Engineering the Future of Software
April 2–3, 2017: Training
April 3–5, 2017: Tutorials & Conference
New York, NY

Speakers

New speakers are added regularly. Please check back to see the latest updates to the agenda.

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Alasdair Allan is a scientist, author, hacker, tinkerer, and journalist who has recently been spending a lot of time thinking about the Internet of Things, which he thinks is broken. He is the author of a number of books and sometimes also stands in front of cameras. You can often find him at conferences talking about interesting things or deploying sensors to measure them. A couple of years ago, he rolled out a mesh network of five hundred sensor motes covering the entirety of Moscone West during Google I/O. He’s still recovering. A few years before that, he caused a privacy scandal by uncovering that your iPhone was recording your location all the time, which caused several class-action lawsuits and a US Senate hearing. Some years on, he still isn’t sure what to think about that.

Alasdair sporadically writes blog posts about things that interest him or, more frequently, provides commentary in 140 characters or less. He is a contributing editor for Make magazine and a contributor to O’Reilly Radar. Alasdair is a former academic. As part of his work, he built a distributed peer-to-peer network of telescopes that, acting autonomously, reactively scheduled observations of time-critical events. Notable successes included contributing to the detection of what was—at the time—the most distant object yet discovered, a gamma-ray burster at a redshift of 8.2.

Presentations

The little things of horror Session

A review of the internet of things finds poor architectural choices, poor decisions, and poorly secured things. In the rush to connect devices to the internet, we have built devices with sloppy privacy and sloppy security. It can't continue. Alasdair Allan explains why our mistakes must inform future architectures before the internet of things becomes a threat to the internet itself.

Michael Barker is the head of software for Asia/Pacific at LMAX Exchange. Michael coded his way across the entire stack but has mostly focused on the infrastructure layers, specifically reliable messaging, remoting, data storage/journalling, high availability, and making all of the above as fast as possible. Michael currently maintains the LMAX Disruptor open source project and has made a smattering of OSS contributions elsewhere. In his spare time, he’s a burger connoisseur and an Formula 1 fan.

Presentations

The evolving architecture of a low-latency financial exchange Session

Michael Barker explores how the architecture for LMAX Exchange's FX trading platform has evolved in the face of significant business change and a ten-fold reduction in latency and increase in throughput.

Aaron Bedra is Chief Security Officer at Eligible and the creator of Repsheet, an open source threat intelligence toolkit. Aaron is the coauthor of Programming Clojure, 2nd Edition and a frequent open source contributor.

Presentations

It starts and ends with you Keynote

As Architects, security starts and ends with you. As designers of systems it is your responsibility to ensure that security is built in. Join Aaron as he walks through the security skills you need to bring to the table as a system designer and Architect. He will identify the common gaps and misconceptions, and provide resources to help you improve your security architecture knowledge.

Michelle Brush is a math geek turned computer geek with 15 years of software development experience. Michelle has developed algorithms and data structures for search, compression, and data mining in embedded as well as enterprise systems. In her current role as an engineering director for Cerner Corporation, Michelle leads teams that develop the platform for ingesting stream and batch data specific to Cerner’s Population Health solutions. She is also the chapter leader for the Kansas City chapter of Girl Develop It and one of the conference organizers for Midwest.io.

Presentations

Migrating an architecture across batches and streams Session

Realizing you want a new architecture is easy, but convincing your leadership is difficult, and actually doing it is by far the hardest part. Michelle Brush shares a case study of migrating from batches to streams, covering the often overlooked impact to operations, support, and team dynamics and providing advice on how to minimize the impact.

John Chapin is a cofounder of Symphonia, a serverless and cloud technology consultancy based in New York City. John has over 15 years of experience in technology leadership and implementation. Previously, he was vice president of engineering at Intent Media. John can be reached at john@symphonia.io.

Presentations

Designing serverless applications with AWS Lambda and Java Session

John Chapin explores AWS Lambda in depth, covering the Lambda execution environment, Lambda’s Java runtime characteristics and best practices for Java-based Lambdas, and techniques for effectively using services like Cloudwatch, DynamoDB, and Kinesis with Lambdas.

Meet the Experts With Mike Roberts and John Chapin Meet the Experts

The latest buzzword is "serverless"—the idea of replacing your server applications with. . .well, what, exactly? Mike and John offer a great overview of what serverless means, why it’s important, and how to get started.

Wes Chow is currently serving out his term as CTO of Chartbeat. Previously, Wes spent eight years building technical infrastructure for high-frequency trading shops before staring into his dark soul and realizing he needed to move into the startup light. S7 Labs sprang into being, and Wes led teams that built Storybox, a Seedcamp NY finalist, and Songza Radio, subsumed by Google Music. Wes holds a BS in electrical engineering and computer science from UC Berkeley.

Presentations

Fear of and uncertainty about open source Session

How does a small engineering team decide which technologies to use? Or whether to be open source or not? To be self-hosted or in the cloud? Wes Chow discusses the choices Chartbeat has made, how they’ve succeeded and failed, and the framework by which the company makes decisions and argues for transparency and empathy from free and proprietary technologists to ease the pain.

Scott Davis is a Principal Engineer with ThoughtWorks, where he focuses on the leading-edge, innovative, emerging, and nontraditional aspects of web development, such as serverless web apps, mobile web apps (Responsive PWAs), HTML5-based smart TV apps, conversational UIs (like Siri and Alexa), and using web technologies to build IoT solutions.

Scott is the founder of ThirstyHead.com, a Denver-based training and software development consultancy. Scott is also the cofounder of the Denver HTML5 User Group.

Scott has been writing about web development for over 10 years. His books include Getting Started with Grails, Groovy Recipes, GIS for Web Developers, The Google Maps API: Adding Where to Your Web Applications, and JBoss at Work. Scott is also the author of several popular article series at IBM developerWorks, including Mastering MEAN, Mastering Grails, and Practically Groovy. His videos include Architecture of the MEAN Stack, Responsive Mobile Architecture, and On the Road to Angular 2.

Presentations

Mean architecture 2.0 Tutorial

In this half-day tutorial, Scott Davis (author/presenter of O'Reilly videos Architecture of the MEAN Stack, Mobile Web Architecture, and On the Road to Angular 2) explores several common web architectures for MEAN apps and the corresponding production-ready libraries and frameworks that will help you implement them.

Meet the Experts With Scott Davis Meet the Experts

Curious about how MEAN architecture can help solve your web development problems? Join Scott to discuss common web architectures for MEAN apps, libraries, frameworks, and any other MEAN question you can think of.

Jeremy Deane is a senior solutions architect at Liberty Mutual. Jeremy has over 20 years of software engineering experience in leadership positions. His expertise includes enterprise application integration, web application architecture, and software process improvement. In addition, he is an accomplished conference speaker and technical author.

Presentations

Architectural resiliency Session

Regardless of the techniques used to make an enterprise solution highly available (HA), failure at some point is inevitable. Resiliency is how fast a system reacts and then recovers to such failures. Jeremy Deane covers a number of techniques and patterns for addressing architectural resiliency, including intelligent agents, tolerant reader, and circuit breaker.

Duncan DeVore is an engineer at Lightbend (Typesafe) who specializes in the design and implementation of distributed systems using the tenets of the Reactive Manifesto with Scala, Akka, and the Lightbend stack. Duncan believes in responsible design through functional programming with an abundance of test coverage, and he loves to code, present, and help others work through the challenges of distributed computing. Duncan’s specialties include distributed computing, microservice-based architectures, cloud computing, event sourcing, and CQRS. Duncan’s open source projects include journals for Eventsourced and Akka-Persistence based on the theory of event sourcing and CQRS. He is the coauthor of Reactive Application Development.

Presentations

Meet the Experts With Duncan DeVore and Henrik Engstrom Meet the Experts

Have questions about reactive microservice design? Chat with Duncan and Henrik about working with and testing actors, managing system behavior and horizontal distribution, or any other question you have about creating responsive, elastic, resilient, and message-driven systems.

Reactive microservice design Session

Reactive microservice design is the future of application design. Drawing on his deep understanding of distributed systems and reactive programming, Duncan DeVore shares the know-how for building apps that are responsive, resilient, and elastic in the face of failure and extreme load.

Seth Dobbs is currently the vice president of engineering at HS2 Solutions, where he directs the development of ecommerce, web, and mobile applications, digital transformations, and other solutions for numerous clients ranging from small startups to companies such as Domino’s Pizza, Zipcar, and HNI. This work includes architecting an ecommerce system that grew to be the fourth largest transactional commerce system on the internet. Seth sets the technology direction at HS2 Solutions and drives the technical skill development by organizing and presenting deep dives into new languages, database platforms, and methodologies. He also has developed several internal architecture training courses that he delivers periodically and blogs occasionally about leadership and technology. Seth was recently named Chicago’s best technology manager for 2016 by Tech in Motion. He began his career as a software engineer at Motorola, where he was first exposed to complex architectures and where he designed and implemented a service-based framework enabling data services to be distributed and recoverable across multiple servers. Seth has also worked as a developer in over a dozen programming languages and as an architect at several corporations in the Chicago area and has run his own consulting business. Seth holds a BS in computer science from Illinois Tech.

Presentations

Designing for consumption Session

Modern web and mobile applications have read/write ratios that are far different than when many of the underlying technologies and architectural patterns were first developed. Seth Dobbs demonstrates architecting data partitioning and flow control to enable our highly consumption-oriented world.

Henrik Engström is a senior developer at Lightbend. Henrik has vast experience in various types of programming and great domain knowledge within the finance, retail, and e-gaming industries. Previously, he worked as a consultant. Apart from his major interest, programming languages, he is also an avid Arsenal supporter, a black belt in Shotokan Karate, and a hobby wine connoisseur. Henrik has presented at various well-known conferences such as JavaOne (rock star 2016), OSCON, JFokus, Scala eXchange, 33 Degrees. He holds an MSc in computer science from the Royal Institute of Technology.

Presentations

Building a reactive system with Akka Tutorial

Akka, the distributed systems toolkit, has been pushing the envelope of distributed and reactive systems for many years now. Konrad Malawski and Henrik Engström walk you through writing services using state-of-the-art technology like Akka Cluster and Streams and expose them as microservices using Akka HTTP, Play, or Lagom.

Meet the Experts With Duncan DeVore and Henrik Engstrom Meet the Experts

Have questions about reactive microservice design? Chat with Duncan and Henrik about working with and testing actors, managing system behavior and horizontal distribution, or any other question you have about creating responsive, elastic, resilient, and message-driven systems.

Monitoring reactive microservices Session

Reactive applications are the next major evolution of the internet. However, this method of architecting systems introduces some new issues (for instance, with monitoring). Henrik Engstrom explores the traditional monitoring approach and outlines different ways to monitor asynchronous applications before offering an overview of the Lightbend monitoring tool for reactive applications.

Neal Ford is a software architect and meme wrangler at ThoughtWorks, a global IT consultancy with an exclusive focus on end-to-end software development and delivery. Neal focuses on designing and building large-scale enterprise applications and is the designer and developer of applications, instructional materials, magazine articles, courseware, and video presentations as well as the author and/or editor of six books spanning a variety of technologies, including, most recently, The Productive Programmer. He is also an internationally acclaimed speaker, having delivered more than 600 talks at over 100 developer conferences worldwide. Check out his website at Nealford.com. He welcomes feedback and can be reached at nford@thoughtworks.com.

Presentations

Closing remarks Keynote

Program chairs Neal Ford and Brian Foster close the first day of keynotes.

Closing remarks Keynote

Program chairs Brian Foster and Neal Ford close out the last day of keynotes.

Tuesday opening remarks Keynote

Program chairs Brian Foster and Neal Ford open the first day of keynotes.

Wednesday opening remarks

Program chairs Brian Foster and Neal Ford open the first day of keynotes.

Brian Foster is an editor at O’Reilly Media focusing on Java and enterprise technologies. Brian has been working in technical publishing for over five years, acquiring content in business, statistical computing, open source programming, and financial engineering as well as several other computer-related topics.

Presentations

Closing remarks Keynote

Program chairs Neal Ford and Brian Foster close the first day of keynotes.

Closing remarks Keynote

Program chairs Brian Foster and Neal Ford close out the last day of keynotes.

Tuesday opening remarks Keynote

Program chairs Brian Foster and Neal Ford open the first day of keynotes.

Wednesday opening remarks

Program chairs Brian Foster and Neal Ford open the first day of keynotes.

Thomas Gamble is a technical principal at ThoughtWorks. Tom has worked in a variety of development and management roles. He’s currently enjoying contributing to open source and helping teams to deliver quality software more efficiently (while having fun).

Presentations

Design and implementation patterns for reviving relational monoliths Session

Hari Ramamurthy and Thomas Gamble share design ideas and technical implementation approaches that can boost the performance and improve maintainability of your monolithic applications. Delve into how to split read-write traffic load, leverage in-memory caches, break up transaction boundaries, mitigate issues with the CAP theorem, and use reactive patterns to improve your application.

Product Manager, Mesosphere. He’s focused on solving problems for developers and operators building and running modern distributed apps on a platform that scales and is drop dead simple. He’s a former software engineer with 10+ years of Product Management experience. His most recent product management roles have been at LinkedIn, HPE, Founder of his own eCommerce startup. When he’s not helping teams build great products, he’s conquering the hills of the bay area on his bike. Feel free to connect with him: LinkedIn, @GehaniNeil.

Presentations

Advanced continuous delivery strategies for containerized applications using DC/OS Session

Container orchestration systems make continuous delivery straightforward, but often simple application update strategies (for example, rolling deploys) are naive when it comes to updating complex applications that serve many users and run on thousands of machines. Neil Gehani outlines advanced deployment strategies that can be adopted to update production applications with low risk and at scale.

Tudor Gîrba is a software environmentalist and the founder of feenk gmbh, a consulting and coaching company. Tudor leads the work on the Moose platform for software and data analysis and founded the Glamorous Toolkit project for rethinking the IDE. He believes that software assessment must be recognized as a critical software engineering activity, and he authored the humane assessment method to help teams to rethink the way they manage large software systems and datasets. Tudor also argues that storytelling should be prominent in software development. He is a board member of the Pharo live programming environment. In 2014, he won the prestigious Dahl-Nygaard Junior Prize for his work on the modeling and visualization of evolution and interplay of large numbers of objects. Tudor holds a PhD from the University of Bern.

Presentations

Steering Agile architecture Tutorial

"Emerge your architecture" goes the Agile mantra. That’s great. Developers get empowered, and fluffy papers make room for real code structure. But how do you ensure the cohesiveness of the result? Tudor Girba explains why architecture cannot be controlled (because it is a commons) and introduces an Agile yet systematic approach for how it can be steered.

Having crafted professional software on the LAMP stack since 2003, Georgiana Gligor is living proof that geek girls are an asset to any team. She loves coding large-scale applications and mentoring teammates to better their craftsmanship. Georgiana has experience in every aspect of the life-cycle of software development and is hungry for more.

Presentations

Smart, scalable content distribution Session

Distributing website content in a microservices-driven architecture is not a trivial task, and it requires solving complex problems stemming from the large number of servers involved and the variety of edge cases that need to be solved. Georgiana Gligor shares a solution to content snapshotting, distribution, and caching in a silo-based architecture involving tens of machines.

Vinicius Gomes is a software developer at ThoughtWorks. Vinicius is passionate about distributed systems and functional programming. He writes about software development and technology on his blog.

Presentations

When microservices met event sourcing Session

Forget about URIs and synchronous HTTP calls. Vinicius Gomes explains how the combination of microservices and event sourcing helped his team successfully build and evolve a banking services platform. You'll learn details of this architectural style in comparison to the traditional HTTP/REST approach, its benefits and challenges, and the first steps on the practical implementation.

María Gómez is a tech lead and lead consultant at ThoughtWorks. Over her more than eight years of industry experience, María has worked with many different technologies and domains, which has helped her lead teams and advise stakeholders in making the right technology decisions. She has talked about architecture at various conferences in the USA and South America, including SACON 2016, OSCON 2016, Agile Uruguay, and SOALATAM Peru.

Presentations

CQRS and event sourcing: A DevOps perspective Session

Many organizations are moving toward a distributed system architecture like command query responsibility segregation (CQRS) and event sourcing. Maria Gomez and Stacey Watro discuss the challenges of deploying and supporting these systems in production and explore different strategies to mitigate these challenges, such as building resilient systems and monitoring.

Meet the Experts With Maria Gomez Meet the Experts

Stop by and chat with Maria about supporting CQRS and event sourcing systems in production and learn from her experience.

David Grizzanti is a principal software engineer at Comcast, where he oversees the development of multitenant software platforms that support tens of millions of customers across North America. David has more than 10 years of software experience. Prior to joining Comcast, he participated in three IaaS platform builds in his time at Sungard Availability Services. His general areas of interests include software architecture, DevOps/QA, and engineering leadership.

Presentations

From VMs to containers: A DevOps journey Session

David Grizzanti explains how Comcast moved large-scale, multi-data-center services from an architecture deployed on virtual machines supported by separate development and operations teams to one based on containers with Apache Mesos operated by a single DevOps team, sharing how Comcast overcame multiple challenges—some that were anticipated and many that were not.

Mark Heckler is a Pivotal principal technologist and developer advocate, conference speaker, published author, and Java Champion focusing upon developing quality production software at velocity for the internet of things and the cloud. Mark has worked with key players in the manufacturing, retail, medical, scientific, telecom, and financial industries as well as various public sector organizations to develop and deliver critical capabilities on time and on budget. He is an open source contributor and author/curator of a developer-focused blog and an occasionally interesting Twitter account. Mark lives with his very understanding wife in St. Louis.

Presentations

This stuff is cool, but how can I get my company to do it Session

We go to conferences and get excited about things that could revolutionize our development and change our organization. Then, we go home—and hit the wall. If you've ever said, "This stuff is cool, but how can I get my company to do it?" this is the session for you. Mark Heckler, an experienced software developer (who also happens to have an MBA), explains how to make your case to leadership.

Allen Holub is one of the country’s foremost software architects. Allen speaks internationally about all things Agile and software architecture and provides in-house training and consulting in those areas. He’s also an expert-level programmer, specializing in Swift, Java, and Web 2.0 applications and microservices. Allen can build highly dynamic websites (along the lines of Gmail) from front to back: both the frontend code—JavaScript, JQuery, Angular, HTML5, and CSS3—that runs in the browser and the backend code—Java, PHP, MySQL, Ruby, Mongo, C++, ZeroMQ, and EC2—that runs either on your server or in the cloud. Allen is widely published. His works include 10 books, hundreds of articles in publications ranging from Dr. Dobb’s Journal to IBM developerWorks, and video classes for Pluralsight (Swift in Depth_) and O’Reilly (_Design Patterns in the Real World).

Presentations

Architecture under stress 2-Day Training

Allen Holub leads a hands-on training covering the entire system design process, starting with planning strategies and "user stories" and ending with a full implementation architecture.

Lightweight messaging and interservice communication with ZeroMQ Session

Lightweight messaging is an essential part of every microservice implementation, forming the basic interservice communication backbone. Allen Holub introduces messaging in general, how to use it within a microservice system, and how to implement using ZeroMQ—the most effective of the lightweight messaging libraries.

Training: Architecture under stress Training Day 2

Allen Holub leads a hands-on training covering the entire system design process, starting with planning strategies and "user stories" and ending with a full implementation architecture.

Hans-Jürgen Jacobs is an IT architect at Xebia, an international IT consultancy company based in the Netherlands, where he works with IT organizations to improve their architecting and software delivery capabilities.

Presentations

Communicating architecture to business stakeholders Tutorial

Jochem Schulenklopper and Hans-Jürgen Jacobs demonstrate how to (visually) communicate architecture to non-IT stakeholders, sharing relevant theories, techniques, and examples for creating architecture visualizations that are attractive, informative, and easier to understand. You'll then apply your newly gained knowledge in an interactive, small-group workshop with a prepared case.

I’m a developer at ThoughtWorks. I tend to focus on work in the cloud and continuous delivery space, more recently focusing on the use of microservice architectures. I love helping people build better systems. I love presenting ideas, meeting people and learning new things, and I find conferences a great way to help that. I’ve also written a few articles and done some talks along the way.

Presentations

Confident releasing with continuous testing in microservices Tutorial

Sina Jahan walks you through bootstrapping a set of related services, explores the challenges with testing finer-grained systems, and shares some solutions, enabling you to release with more confidence.

Karun Japhet is a tech lead, developer, and quality advocate at ThoughtWorks. Over the past seven years, he has worked on realizing value for his clients through the creation of highly scaleable applications and integration of large enterprise applications.

Presentations

Bridging the gap: Event sourcing and system integration Session

Karun Japhet tells a tale of bridging the technological divide between modern event-sourced systems and more traditional architectures from the last few decades, exploring how a resilient, modern, event-sourced, CQRS-based, domain-driven designed platform can be built with eventual consistency guarantees when third parties provide no guarantees of reasonable service.

Jessica Kerr is a lead engineer at Atomist, where she writes Scala to operate TypeScript to create code that modifies code. She’s known for her enthusiasm and insight about functional programming, microservices, and trade-offs in languages. Jessica speaks at conferences internationally, podcasts at Greaterthancode.com, and tweets as @jessitron about the technical and social realities of software. She has two daughters and a home office in St. Louis, Missouri.

Presentations

Meet the Experts With Jessica Kerr Meet the Experts

Come talk with Jessica about the people writing the code that runs your code—infrastructure engineers.

The architects below Keynote

These days one of the hardest problems in software is software. Code to run our code, code to change our code, code to see into what our code is doing—all determining how our components run and talk to each other. Jessica Kerr explores those powerful architects below that we call infrastructure engineers.

Dmytri Kleiner is a veteran Developer/Analyst with extensive experience with diverse technologies and platforms, both as a hands-on coder and in a management/leadership role. IT generalist with significant operations experience, Dmytri is currently one of the Solution Architects working at Contentful.

Presentations

CMS as Code Session

in the "Cloud Age", systems are deployed using cloud services. Many of these services provide friendly UIs where users can configure environments. Unfortunately, as the number of services that teams operate grows, it becomes unmanageable to maintain each one by pointing and clicking through the UI. When is come to managing content "CMS as Code" is an approach to deal with this issue.

Bridget Kromhout is a Principal Technologist for Cloud Foundry at Pivotal. Her CS degree emphasis was in theory, but she now deals with the concrete (if ‘cloud’ can be considered tangible). After 15 years as an operations engineer, she traded being on call for being on a plane. A frequent speaker and program committee member for tech conferences, she leads the devopsdays organization globally and the devops community at home in Minneapolis. She podcasts with Arrested DevOps, blogs at Bridgetkromhout.com, and is active in a Twitterverse near you.

Presentations

Computers are easy; people are hard Keynote

Bridget Kromhout compares the architectural patterns of modern distributed systems with the communication patterns of successful teams, explaining how to apply the principles and practices of a DevOps culture to ensure we build systems designed for humans.

Daniel Krook is a New York area Software Engineer, Distinguished IT Specialist, Master Inventor, and Member of the IBM Academy of Technology. He works with customers and the community to create first of a kind cloud solutions based on the OpenStack, Cloud Foundry, Docker, and OpenWhisk open source projects. Most recently he has been building bots and IoT solutions backed by serverless, event-driven cloud architectures.

Presentations

Serverless architectures on an open source platform (sponsored by IBM Bluemix) Keynote

Serverless architectures on an open source platform

Robert “r0ml” Lefkowitz is the chief architect for software at Warby Parker. Prior to Warby Parker, Robert was a software architect in the insurance, telecommunications, and finance industries. He is also a distinguished engineer of the ACM.

Presentations

Man in the middle Session

Many web frameworks consist of an application server that performs "business logic" and connects to a database. By design, they connect to the database with full access rights, defeating most database-enforced security. Robert Lefkowitz explains how using a two-tier architecture with modern databases enhances information security.

Pete LePage is a developer advocate at Google working on the Chrome Web Store team and the Open Web platform. Pete has been designing websites since his early days in high school, evolving from overlapping blink, marquee, and font tags on GeoCities to properly styled CSS and managed hosted websites. Pete works with the web developer community to build awesome new web applications using Open Web technologies like HTML5 and CSS3. He can often be found traveling the world with his friends, seeing both exotic and ordinary sites, or in a black and white dark room printing something he shot with a film camera. He has studied and taught at the prestigious Photographic Center Northwest in Seattle, where he completed his thesis in fine art photography.

Presentations

AMP + progressive web apps: Start fast, stay engaged Session

Progressive web apps (PWAs)—a technology allows sites to deliver rich experiences without worrying about networks—are the future of the mobile experience. Pete LePage explains how to use PWAs, along with accelerated mobile pages (AMP), to deliver fast initial loading and reliable second-visit performance, as well as advanced features like offline reading and richer UI treatment for your audience.

Steven A. Lowe is a consultant, software developer, inventor, entrepreneur, musician, and lover of puns. He ran an innovative custom software development company for nearly a decade before joining ThoughtWorks as an object mechanic (principal consultant developer). He admits to being the author of From Burnout to Bonfire and a willing participant in the band Noise in the Basement but neither confirms nor denies being the science-fiction author Steven Ayel. Steven is also writing the forthcoming_Head-First Domain-Driven Design_ from O’Reilly.

Presentations

Three rules for domain-driven design Session

Domain-driven design (DDD) helps focus and guide software development efforts, but learning DDD can be a daunting task. Steven Lowe shares three simple philosophical rules that guide understanding and application of DDD—capture the domain model, embed it in the code, and protect it from corruption—and explains how these rules guide DDD at all scales.

Sander Mak crafts scalable software at Luminis Technologies. With almost a decade of experience on the JVM platform, Sander specializes in modular Java and JavaScript development. Data analysis and machine learning are part of his ever growing list of interests. Sander loves sharing knowledge, particularly through his blog at Branchandbound.net. He speaks regularly at international developer conferences on topics including Java, alternative JVM languages, and related technologies. Sander is currently writing Java 9 Modularity for O’Reilly, with an expected release in summer 2017.

Presentations

Meet the Experts With Sander Mak Meet the Experts

Trying to decide whether to use microservices? Consider modules instead. Join Sander to discuss the joys of modularity and learn how Java 9 makes this process easier.

Modules or microservices? Session

Microservices offer advantages but also come with associated costs. Modularizing applications without going the full microservices route is a viable alternative that is often overlooked. Sander Mak helps you ask the right questions in order to make good decisions for the right reasons.

Konrad Malawski is a senior developer at Lightbend working on Akka, a distributed systems toolkit for the JVM. He is currently responsible for the Akka HTTP module, has contributed large parts of Akka Persistence, and remains active in the core modules of Akka as well. Konrad is a leading contributor to the current Reactive Streams TCK and maintains various other open source projects. He has founded and helps run multiple user groups, including the international GeeCON conference (and its multiple Polish and Czech editions). When he’s not coding, Konrad spreads the joy of computer science by organizing a white paper reading club, where people of all skill levels are invited to discuss and debate actual computer science topics and papers. He was named a JavaOne RockStar in 2015 and published the “Why Reactive?” O’Reilly report in 2016.

Presentations

Building a reactive system with Akka Tutorial

Akka, the distributed systems toolkit, has been pushing the envelope of distributed and reactive systems for many years now. Konrad Malawski and Henrik Engström walk you through writing services using state-of-the-art technology like Akka Cluster and Streams and expose them as microservices using Akka HTTP, Play, or Lagom.

Meet the Experts With Konrad Malawski Meet the Experts

Join Konrad to discuss reactive principles and get advice on where reactive architecture makes sense in your organization. You can also talk with Konrad about building reactive systems with Akka.

Aviran Mordo is the head of engineering at Wix. In his 20+ years in the software industry, Aviran has held a number of engineering roles and leading positions, from designing and building the US national Electronic Records Archives prototype to building large search engine infrastructures. Aviran has vast knowledge of internet technologies, software development, continuous delivery. He is a technology blogger as well as a dev-centric culture advocate.

Presentations

Scaling to 100 million users Session

In few years, Wix grew from a small startup with traditional system architecture (based on a monolithic server) to a company that serves 100 million users. Aviran Mordo explains how Wix evolved from a monolithic system to microservices, using some interesting patterns like CQRS to build a blazing-fast, highly scalable, and highly available system.

Ken Mugrage has 25 years of experience in the IT industry, spending the last 7 at ThoughtWorks. During his entire career, Ken has focused on using technology to increase business effectiveness, as opposed to using the ‘latest cool thing’. Ken has been focused on Continuous Delivery and DevOps for most of the past decade, working with organizations all over the world, ranging from startups to Fortune 50 companies. He now uses this experience to teach others how to get better at building, testing and deploying software.

Presentations

It’s Not Continuous Delivery If You Can’t Deploy Right Now. Session

I hear people say all the time that they're practicing continuous delivery. This declaration is often followed by something like, "I can let the security team know anytime", or "I just have to run the performance tests". If you can't push your software to production right now, you're not done with your continuous delivery journey.

What we’re learning about burnout and how a DevOps culture can help Session

One of the most overlooked advantages of converting to a DevOps culture can be the reduction of stress. This could be due to “sharing the load” as a whole team, the feeling of joint ownership in solving a business problem, or many other things.

Ryan Murray is the founder and director of the ThoughtWorks Digital Platform Strategy group. As a principal consultant with ThoughtWorks, Ryan has driven the multiyear platform architecture vision for a major US retailer and provides strategy and hands-on implementation support to a number of other clients in designing and implementing enterprise architectures, platforms, and applications. Ryan is a software technology professional and systems architect with more than 17 years of industry experience and has worked as both consultant and employee in the US, Europe, and the MENA region. Previously, Ryan worked as the director of engineering for several companies, including element^n, a enterprise and web application consulting and delivery firm, Apstrata.com, a mobile, cloud-based MBaaS solution, and the Net Planet, s.p.a., an innovative search technology startup in Milan, Italy. Ryan has also served as a software architect for large distributed systems and a technical architect and technical consultant to a number of European and international firms, including Siemens (Germany, Italy), Humanis (France), Spazio ZeroUno (Italy), and Omnitel-Vodafone (Italy). Ryan holds a degree in molecular biology, genetics, and public policy from Duke University.

Presentations

Architectures for enabling serendipity Session

Strategic enablement of foundational architecture in your platform can help your product and IT teams discover new ways to create value from your organizational assets. We'll present value-driven approaches to building these necessary capabilities into the platform, paths to follow, and traps to avoid.

After working for over a decade at ThoughtWorks, and then spending a year with a startup, Sam Newman is now an independent consultant specialising in helping people ship software fast. Sam has worked extensively with the cloud, continuous delivery, microservices, and is especially preoccupied with understanding how to more easily deploy working software into production.

He has worked with a variety of companies in multiple domains around the world, often with one foot in the developer world and another in the IT-operations space. For the last few years, he has been exploring the capabilities of microservice architectures. Sam speaks frequently at conferences and is the author of Building Microservices (O’Reilly).If you would like to get in touch, please email him.

Presentations

Meet the Experts With Sam Newman Meet the Experts

Sam is a great resource for learning about microservice architectures. Come by to get advice on building, deploying, and managing microservices in your own projects.

Moving to microservices and beyond 2-Day Training

Sam Newman shares some framing for microservice architectures that explore the various forces that can drive the design and evolution of microservices before leading you through a series of interactive architectural kata exercises to put your newfound knowledge to the test. You'll gain valuable experience with a series of tools you can immediately put into practice in your own projects.

Training: Moving to microservices and beyond Training Day 2

Sam Newman shares some framing for microservice architectures that explore the various forces that can drive the design and evolution of microservices before leading you through a series of interactive architectural kata exercises to put your newfound knowledge to the test. You'll gain valuable experience with a series of tools you can immediately put into practice in your own projects.

Nancy Nunes is a software systems leader, architect, mentor, and engineer with extensive experience developing high-performance distributed software systems for the defense, surgical robotics, and commercial markets. Nancy embraces a work smart philosophy, persistently exploring how to build a lot with a little.

Presentations

Meet the Experts With Nancy Nunes Meet the Experts

If you want to ensure scalability in your architecture, Nancy is a great resource. She explains how to combine software components to form separate optimized executables for different deployments.

Scaling architecture through flexible deployment Tutorial

Nancy Nunes demonstrates how to construct versatile software components that can be deployed on multiple platforms without performance hits normally associated with generalized behavior. You’ll leave with understanding and an operational example of how to package software components to make them adaptable to running in a single processor or distributed processing system.

Tomasz Nurkiewicz is a senior software engineer at Allegro. Tomasz has spent half of his life programming (for the last decade professionally in Java land). He loves backend, tolerates JavaScript, is passionate about alternative JVM languages, is disappointed with the quality of software written these days (so often by himself!), and hates long methods and hidden side effects. Tomasz is interested in charting, data analysis and reporting and believes that computers were invented so that developers could automate boring and repetitive tasks. He is involved in open source and used to be very active on StackOverflow. Tomasz is an author, trainer, conference speaker, technical reviewer, and runner and has been recognized as _DZone_’s most valuable blogger. He claims that code not tested automatically is not a feature but just a rumor.

Presentations

Asynchronous by default, synchronous when necessary Session

In distributed systems, synchronous communication (RPC-style) is tempting but can quickly get out of hand. Suddenly you need to think about retrying, fallbacks, circuit breakers, failover, and latency. Tomasz Nurkiewicz explains how all of this can be avoided by preferring asynchronous communication between services, pub-sub patterns, and event sourcing.

Michael Nygard is an architect at Cognitect, the company behind Clojure, ClojureScript, Pedestal, and Datomic. Michael has been a professional programmer and architect for over 15 years. In that time, he has delivered systems to the US government, the military, banking, finance, agriculture, and retail industries, and his work has spanned domains as diverse as B2B exchanges, retail commerce sites, travel and leisure sites, an information brokerage, and applications for the military and intelligence communities. Along the way, Michael has shared his painfully won experience by mentoring, writing, and speaking. Michael contributed to the O’Reilly book 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know and authored the best seller Release It! Design and Deploy Production-Ready Software.

Presentations

Architecture without an end state 2-Day Training

Michael Nygard demonstrates how to design and architect systems that admit change—bending and flexing through time. Using a blend of information architecture, technical architecture, and some process change, Michael walks you through examples of rigid systems to show how to transform them into more maneuverable architecture.

Training: Architecture without an end state Training Day 2

Michael Nygard demonstrates how to design and architect systems that admit change—bending and flexing through time. Using a blend of information architecture, technical architecture, and some process change, Michael walks you through examples of rigid systems to show how to transform them into more maneuverable architecture.

Sandeep Parikh is the head of solutions architecture, Americas East, for Google Cloud Platform, where he leads a team of solutions architects that develop solutions and architectural patterns for deploying onto Google Cloud Platform. His focus areas are container deployments and large-scale data infrastructure. Sandeep’s formal background is in software engineering. He has worked for several companies big and small over the last 13 years, including MongoDB, Ravel, 21CT, Affinegy, and Apple. He has developed reference architectures for running NoSQL database deployments and big data analytical pipelines as well as software systems to analyze social networks, document similarity, and text sentiment. Sandeep holds a BS in computer engineering from the University of Michigan and an MS in computer engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.

Presentations

Hybrid cloud deployment patterns using Kubernetes Session

Hybrid and multicloud deployments are critical approaches for bridging the gap between legacy and modern architectures. Sandeep Parikh discusses common patterns for creating scalable cross-environment deployments using Kubernetes and explores best practices and repeatable patterns for leveraging Kubernetes as a consistent abstraction layer across multiple environments.

A graduate of the Georgia Institute of Technology, Christopher Phillips has over seven years of distributed application development experience across multiple industries. Currently, he works as the backend technical lead across all projects at Stanley Black and Decker’s Digital Accelerator in Atlanta, which focuses on cloud-based solutions for SBD’s forays into the IoT and application spaces.

Presentations

Serverless architecture on AWS: Our experiences Session

Stanley Black and Decker's Digital Accelerator has spent the last year migrating existing applications, and creating new ones, using serverless architecture on AWS. Christopher Phillips explores the pros and cons of going serverless, as well as the tools and patterns you need and the caveats learned along the way.

Jeff Poole is a principal software engineer at Vivint Smart Home, where he works on the backend platform that powers the smart home and security aspects of Vivint’s products. Previously, he held a diverse collection of roles and responsibilities, including as a technical lead in re-architecting a multi-data-center-hosted VoIP platform and as a principal engineer designing networking hardware for defense applications. Jeff has an affinity for jumping into production issues wherever he works, possibly due to his background working in a local emergency department and ambulance service.

Presentations

Considerations for multi-data-center applications Session

Most applications should at least consider running in multiple data centers for reasons from end-user latency to being able to meet the modern expectation for 24/7 uptime. Jeff Poole outlines the considerations when moving to multiple data centers and the trade-offs for different approaches.

Christian Posta is a principal middleware specialist and architect at Red Hat. Christian is well known for being an author, frequent blogger, speaker, and open source enthusiast. He is the author of Microservices by Example (O’Reilly, 2016) and a committer on the open source projects Apache ActiveMQ, Apache Camel, Fabric8.io, and others. Christian has spent a great deal of time working with large companies creating and deploying large-scale distributed architectures—many of which are now called microservices based. He enjoys mentoring, training, and leading teams to be successful with distributed systems concepts, microservices, DevOps, and cloud-native application design.

Presentations

Meet the Experts With Christian Posta Meet the Experts

Are you a Java developer interested in microservices? Or maybe you’re already working with microservices but need help with a complicated system? Come talk with Christian about building microservices, microservices technologies, and techniques for running microservices at scale.

The hardest part of microservices: Your data Session

With a microservices architecture, we optimize for speed by developing independent, autonomous services with their own change cadence with minimal dependency coupling. An overlooked dependency, which happens to be the most important, is data consistency. Christian Posta explains how a balance of domain-driven design, transactions, and CAP theorem can guide us in a microservices world.

Steve is a Dad, Son, Partner, and Developer Evangelist with OpenShift. He goes around and talks about cool technology that sometimes involves Red Hat Technology. He can teach you about Java, Python, PostgreSQL MongoDB, some JavaScript, Docker, and Kubernetes. He has deep subject area expertise in GIS/Spatial, Statistics, and Ecology. He has spoken at over 75 conferences and done over 50 workshops including Monktoberfest, MongoNY, JavaOne, FOSS4G, CiscoLive, Fluent, DevNation, Where2.0, and OSCON. Before OpenShift, Steve was a developer evangelist for LinkedIn, deCarta, and ESRI. Steve has a Ph.D. in Ecology. He likes building interesting applications and helping developers create great solutions. He can be bribed with offers of bird watching or fly fishing trips!

Presentations

Daily Development With Docker, Kubernetes, and OpenShift Session

For us developers, there has been a lot of change in the infrastructure where our apps will run. After some basic concepts around containers and running them in production we go full on ALL DEMO, ALL THE TIME! Automated builds, deployments, and advanced scenarios. Come and see how the future of development is evolving!

Lyndsay Prewer is an Agile delivery consultant with over 20 years’ experience helping developers, teams, and organizations improve their software delivery. Lyndsay is currently consulting with Equal Experts for a variety of public and private sector clients (including HMRC and M&S).

Presentations

Smoothing the continuous delivery path: A tale of two teams Session

Continuous delivery is gaining recognition as a best practice, yet adopting and iteratively improving it is challenging. Lyndsay Prewer shares various best practices for doing continuous delivery well, drawn from his experiences working with two very different organizations—one with a .Net monolith architecture, the other with a microservice architecture of over 300 Scala microservices.

Hari Ramamurthy is an enterprise architect at The Home Depot with hands-on technical expertise and deep functional knowledge related to omnichannel retailing and third-party logistics operations. Hari has designed and implemented solutions specializing in distributed order management, warehouse management systems, call centers, store order management applications, in-store location tracking, and marketing solutions. He’s led over 10 complex implementations for name-brand Fortune 500 companies across multiple geographies. Hari specializes in designing scalable systems that leverage emerging technologies and performance tuning applications. He’s an Open Group-certified Distinguished IT Specialist.

Presentations

Design and implementation patterns for reviving relational monoliths Session

Hari Ramamurthy and Thomas Gamble share design ideas and technical implementation approaches that can boost the performance and improve maintainability of your monolithic applications. Delve into how to split read-write traffic load, leverage in-memory caches, break up transaction boundaries, mitigate issues with the CAP theorem, and use reactive patterns to improve your application.

Mark Richards is an experienced, hands-on software architect focused on the architecture, design, and implementation of microservices architectures, service-oriented architectures, and distributed systems in J2EE and other technologies. He has been involved in the software industry since 1983 and has significant experience and expertise in application, integration, and enterprise architecture. Mark served as the president of the New England Java Users Group from 1999 to 2003. He is the author of numerous technical books and videos from O’Reilly, including Software Architecture Fundamentals (video), Enterprise Messaging (video), and Java Message Service (book), and a regular conference speaker at the No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) symposium series. Mark has spoken at over 100 conferences and user groups around the world on a variety of enterprise-related technical topics. He holds a master’s degree in computer science as well as numerous architect and developer certifications from IBM, Sun, the Open Group, and BEA.

Presentations

Fundamentals of software architecture 2-Day Training

Mark Richards blends lecture and hands-on real-world group exercises to leverage many of the topics found in his Software Architecture Fundamentals videos from O’Reilly and explore the many aspects of software architecture.

Meet the Experts With Mark Richards Meet the Experts

Stop by and chat with Mark about the 10 most common microservice anti-patterns and pitfalls—and learn the difference between an anti-pattern and a pitfall. (Hint: a pitfall is a bad idea from the start.)

The evolution and future of software architecture Keynote

Mark Richards discusses the evolution of software architecture and shows how the systems we've built so far won’t live up to current social, economic, and technology demands.

Training: Fundamentals of software architecture Training Day 2

Mark Richards blends lecture and hands-on real-world group exercises to leverage many of the topics found in his Software Architecture Fundamentals videos from O’Reilly and explore the many aspects of software architecture.

Based in in New York City, Mike Roberts is an engineering leader and cofounder of Symphonia, a serverless and cloud technology consultancy. Mike is a long-time proponent of Agile and DevOps values and is excited by the role that cloud technologies have played in enabling such values for many high-functioning software teams. He sees serverless as the next technological evolution of cloud systems and as such is optimistic about their ability to help teams be awesome. Mike can be reached at mike@symphonia.io.

Presentations

An introduction to serverless Keynote

The latest buzzword is "serverless"—the idea of replacing your server applications with. . .well, what, exactly? Mike Roberts introduces the concepts behind serverless architectures to answer this question.

Meet the Experts With Mike Roberts and John Chapin Meet the Experts

The latest buzzword is "serverless"—the idea of replacing your server applications with. . .well, what, exactly? Mike and John offer a great overview of what serverless means, why it’s important, and how to get started.

Serverless architectures: What, why, why not, and where next? Session

Mike Roberts expands on the ideas from his Introduction to Serverless keynote to give a cautiously optimistic description of the state of the art of the serverless world, concluding with how it’s expected to develop over the coming months and years.

Rafael Schloming is the CTO of datawire.io, a coauthor of the Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP) specification, and primary architect of the open source Apache Qpid Proton project. Previously, Rafael was a principal software engineer at Red Hat, working on messaging technologies.

Presentations

Microservices are topologies of business logic Session

Topologies are the basic abstraction of distributed systems. Historically, changing topologies required re-architecture. Today, microservices enable any engineer to dynamically change topologies of business logic. Rafael Schloming explores the power of topologies and common topological patterns and demonstrates how a microservices architecture lets us dynamically create and update topologies.

Theo founded Circonus in 2010, and continues to be its principal architect. After earning undergraduate and graduate degrees from Johns Hopkins University in computer science, he went on to research resource allocation techniques in distributed systems during four years of post-graduate work. In 1997, Theo founded OmniTI, which has established itself as the go-to source for organizations facing today’s most challenging scalability, performance and security problems. He was also the principal architect of the Momentum MTA, which is now the flagship product of Message Systems, Inc. Born from Theo’s vision and technical wisdom, this innovation is transforming the email software spectrum.

A widely respected industry thought leader, Theo is the author of Scalable Internet Architectures (Sams) and a frequent speaker at worldwide IT conferences. Theo is a member of the IEEE and a senior member of the ACM. He serves on the editorial board of the ACM’s Queue Magazine.

Theo resides in Maryland with his wife and three daughters. When speaking about his work, he remarks, “I like tackling hard problems and playing with big toys [computing equipment]”.

Presentations

Applying SRE techniques to micro service design Session

The domain of the SRE has evolved tremendously over the last several years and one thing that is central is the construction and operations of resiliency in services. In this talk we'll explore specific techniques learned from the world of SRE to build faster, safer, and better microservice architectures.

Jochem Schulenklopper is an IT architect from the Netherlands working at Xebia, an international IT consultancy company.

Presentations

Communicating architecture to business stakeholders Tutorial

Jochem Schulenklopper and Hans-Jürgen Jacobs demonstrate how to (visually) communicate architecture to non-IT stakeholders, sharing relevant theories, techniques, and examples for creating architecture visualizations that are attractive, informative, and easier to understand. You'll then apply your newly gained knowledge in an interactive, small-group workshop with a prepared case.

Nathaniel T. Schutta is a solution architect focused on making usable applications. A proponent of polyglot programming, Nate has written two books on Ajax and speaks regularly at various worldwide conferences, No Fluff Just Stuff symposia, universities, and Java user groups. In addition to his day job, Nate is an adjunct professor at the University of Minnesota, where he teaches students to embrace dynamic languages. Most recently, Nate coauthored Presentation Patterns with Neal Ford and Matthew McCullough.

Presentations

Architecting for the "-ilities" Session

Developers focus on functional requirements, but once you step into the architect role, your world is increasingly inhabited by the "-ilities"—the nonfunctional or quality attributes of a software system. But which "-ilities" matter and which don't? Nathaniel Schutta explores approaches to architectural problems and explains how to best document the inevitable decisions we arrive at.

Jeff Smith builds large-scale artificial intelligence systems and the teams behind them and currently works on the team behind Amy, the artificial intelligence who schedules meetings at x.ai. For the past decade, he has been working on data science applications at various startups in New York, San Francisco, and Hong Kong. Jeff is a frequent speaker, blogger, and the author of Reactive Machine Learning Systems, an upcoming book on how to build real-world machine-learning systems using Scala, Akka, and Spark.

Presentations

Reactive for machine-learning teams Session

Machine-learning systems can be designed to be just as reactive as the most bulletproof web or mobile app. It takes a system-level understanding of your machine-learning system and a team-level commitment to continual evolution. But you can succeed. Jeffrey Smith shows you how.

Daniel Somerfield is a system architect and consultant at ThoughtWorks, where he works with customers building systems that serve their business needs and are fast, flexible, and secure. Daniel has been in the software business for over 15 years, during which time he has been a full stack coder, team lead, and application security trainer. Daniel leads the team that builds materials for the ThoughtWorks Digital Platform Strategy Group and is the major contributor to product direction and opinion for issues related to security and identity.

Presentations

Architectures for enabling serendipity Session

Strategic enablement of foundational architecture in your platform can help your product and IT teams discover new ways to create value from your organizational assets. We'll present value-driven approaches to building these necessary capabilities into the platform, paths to follow, and traps to avoid.

With over 25 years of experience, Dion Stewart coaches, teaches, and develops software. He works with individual teams adopting Agile practices and large organizations doing multiteam product discovery and delivery for complex products and platforms and helps leadership groupswith strategy, planning, and delivery of product portfolios. At other times you’ll find him working in the trenches, pairing with developers on test-driven development and continuous delivery. Prior to becoming a full-time coach, Dion worked as an application architect and Smalltalk developer, where he was first exposed to test-driven development, pair programming, and other Agile practices in the late 1990s. He holds a master’s degree in software engineering and undergraduate degrees in music and English literature. His work as a professional software developer is also influenced by his study of Zen philosophy and Tai Chi.

Presentations

Story mapping evolved: How to tie architecture to user experience design using annotated journeys Session

Dion Stewart offers an overview of user story mapping—a technique for improving product delivery by keeping development focused on users—using annotating user journeys, which help architects design elegant systems by ensuring the needs of the user experience are met and using the user experience to inform architectural decisions.

Matt Stine is a 17-year veteran of the enterprise IT industry, with 8 of those years spent as a consulting solutions architect for multiple Fortune 500 companies, as well as the not-for-profit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Matt is currently the product owner for Spring at Pivotal and spends much of his time driving an active feedback loop between the Spring R&D organization and customers developing cloud-native application architectures. He is the author of Migrating to Cloud-Native Application Architectures from O’Reilly and the host of the Software Architecture Radio podcast. Matt is obsessed with the idea that enterprise IT doesn’t have to suck. He focuses on Lean/Agile software development methodologies, DevOps, architectural principles/patterns/practices, and programming paradigms, in an attempt to find the perfect storm of techniques that will allow corporate IT departments to not only function like startup companies but also create software that delights users while maintaining a high degree of conceptual integrity. Matt has spoken at conferences ranging from JavaOne to OSCON to YOW!, is a seven-year member of the No Fluff Just Stuff tour, and serves as technical editor of NFJS the Magazine. Matt is also the founder and past president of the Memphis Java User Group.

Presentations

An architect's guide to evaluating cloud services: 10 things to consider Session

The verdict is in: the cloud is NOT a fad. As a software architect, you will soon be called upon to evaluate various cloud services and determine their suitability for your company's use (If you haven't been already). Matt Stine outlines 10 key criteria that you can use to evaluate any cloud service.

Cloud-native architecture patterns Tutorial

As a software architect, confronting the cloud can feel quite daunting, especially when facing the onslaught of provider choices and technology hype. Fortunately there is a way forward. There are clear architectural concepts and patterns that you can use as guideposts on your journey to the cloud. Matt Stine shows you the way.

Give me that old-time pattern language Keynote

What is a microservice? What do you mean when you say service discovery? How does a circuit breaker work? These questions (and many more like them) are rapidly circulating within our industry, and we're struggling to answer them well. You'll rediscover the value of pattern languages as Matt Stine explains how they can help us make sense of the ongoing paradigm shift in software architecture.

Meet the Experts With Matt Stine Meet the Experts

Join Matt to talk about anything related to cloud-native architecture, from the unique characteristics of cloud infrastructure and its trade-offs to evaluating a cloud service. You can also pick Matt’s brain about the value of pattern languages.

Ben Stopford is an engineer and architect working on the Apache Kafka Core Team at Confluent (the company behind Apache Kafka). A specialist in data, both from a technology and an organizational perspective, Ben previously spent five years leading data integration at a large investment bank, using a central streaming database. His earlier career spanned a variety of projects at Thoughtworks and UK-based enterprise companies. He writes at Benstopford.com.

Presentations

The data dichotomy: Rethinking data and services with streams Session

Ben Stopford looks at two forces that sit in opposition: data systems (which focus on exposing data) and services (which focus on encapsulating it). How should we balance these two? Streaming has a solution.

Adam Tornhill is a programmer who combines degrees in engineering and psychology. He’s the founder and CTO of Empear, where he designs tools for software analysis. He’s also the author of Your Code as a Crime Scene, has written the popular Lisp for the Web tutorial, and self-published a book on patterns in C. Adam’s other interests include modern history, music, and martial arts.

Presentations

Software (r)evolution: A crystal ball to prioritize technical debt Session

Adam Tornhill introduces novel techniques to uncover both problematic code and the social dimension of the teams that build your software. This combination lets you prioritize the parts of your system that benefit the most from improvements, detect organizational issues, and make practical decisions guided by data.

Kai Wähner is a technology evangelist at TIBCO. Kai’s main area of expertise lies within the fields of big data, analytics, machine learning, integration, SOA, microservices, BPM, the cloud, Java EE, and enterprise architecture management. He is regular speaker at international IT conferences, such as JavaOne, O’Reilly Software Architecture, and ApacheCon, writes articles for professional journals, and shares his experiences with new technologies on his blog.

Presentations

10 lessons learned from building cloud-native middleware microservices Session

Kai Wähner shares 10 lessons learned from building cloud-native microservices in the middleware world, including the concepts behind cloud native, choosing the right cloud platform, and when not to build microservices at all, and shows how to apply these lessons to real-world projects by leveraging Docker, CloudFoundry, and Kubernetes to realize cloud-native middleware microservices.

Dean Wampler is the architect for fast data products at Lightbend, where he specializes in scalable, distributed big data and streaming systems using tools like Spark, Mesos, Akka, Cassandra, and Kafka (the SMACK stack). Dean is the author of Programming Scala and Functional Programming for Java Developers and the coauthor of Programming Hive, all from O’Reilly Media. He is a contributor to several open source projects and the co-organizer of several conferences around the world and several user groups in Chicago. Dean can be found on Twitter as @deanwampler.

Presentations

Stream all the things! Session

"Stream" is a buzzword for several things that share the idea of timely handling of neverending data. Big data architectures are evolving to be stream oriented. Microservice architectures are inherently message driven. Dean Wampler defines "stream" based on characteristics for such systems, using specific tools as examples, and argues that big data and microservices architectures are converging.

Stacey Watro is a software consultant developer at global IT consultancy ThoughtWorks. At heart, Stacey is a math nerd who enjoys problem solving and challenging herself to expand her knowledge. While at ThoughtWorks, she has been given the opportunity to grow as a developer by working with different technologies and awesome technologists. Stacey holds a master’s degree in computational mathematics from Clemson University.

Presentations

CQRS and event sourcing: A DevOps perspective Session

Many organizations are moving toward a distributed system architecture like command query responsibility segregation (CQRS) and event sourcing. Maria Gomez and Stacey Watro discuss the challenges of deploying and supporting these systems in production and explore different strategies to mitigate these challenges, such as building resilient systems and monitoring.

Bulama Yusuf is an enthusiastic application developer with over six years’ experience building applications. Currently, his core interests are cloud computing and mobile application development. Bulama has built and deployed several cloud-connected mobile applications, including an application that lets users engrave their signatures at places they visit and an application that monitors and reports the electricity status of a given location. Bulama has entered and won several mobile application building contests such the Google Android Challenge for Sub-Saharan Africa and the Samsung Mobile Application Development Challenge. He has also led several web development teams that built customized solutions for specific clients.

Bulama has a keen interest in understanding how systems work and building them. He recently picked up a new hobby programming microcontrollers and hopes to build useful things. With certifications including the Sun Certified Web Component Developer, Sun Certified Java Programmer, and Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist, Bulama has a wide exposure to several technologies and has held numerous training sessions within and outside Nigeria. He is the current coordinator for the Google Developer Group and Java User’s Group in Abuja and is also an enterprise application developer and solution architect on the Sun Java Platform.

Presentations

Leading software development teams Session

Software architecture and architects focus on engineering, business, and the user—the developer experience is usually an afterthought, which impacts the quality of the system being built. Bulama Yusuf discusses the importance of the developer experience and why it is important that the people who are going to build the system be taken into consideration right from the start.