Engineering the Future of Software
Feb 25–26, 2018: Training
Feb 26–28, 2018: Tutorials & Conference
New York, NY

Speakers

Hear from a wide range of talented software architects, engineers, and senior developers who are doing amazing things in software architecture. New speakers are added regularly. Please check back to see the latest updates to the agenda.

Filter

Search Speakers

An internationally known author and lecturer, Mike Amundsen travels the world consulting and speaking on a wide range of topics, including distributed network architecture, web application development, and other subjects. In his role of director of architecture for the API Academy, Mike heads up the API architecture and design practice in North America. He is responsible for working with companies to provide insight on how to best capitalize on the myriad opportunities APIs present to both consumers and the enterprises themselves. Mike has authored numerous books and papers on programming over the last 15 years, including RESTful Web APIs, a collaboration with Leonard Richardson, and Building Hypermedia APIs with HTML5 and Node, an oft-cited reference on building adaptable web applications. His most recent book, RESTful Web Clients, was released in early 2017 by O’Reilly.

Presentations

Learning RESTful microservices from the ground up Tutorial

A RESTful approach to microservices offers a number of benefits. Mike Amundsen walks you through building adaptable microservices that take advantage of the features of REST, including statelessness, self-description, and using hypermedia to discover and modify application state.

Paul Bakker is a senior software engineer on the edge developer experience team at Netflix, where he primarily works on tools to increase developer productivity within the company. Besides a love for writing code, Paul has a passion for sharing knowledge. He’s the coauthor of Java 9 Modularity and Modular Cloud Apps with OSGi, both from O’Reilly. Paul is also a frequent speaker at conferences about modularity, container technology, and many other topics. He blogs at Paulbakker.io and tweets as @pbakker.

Presentations

Edge PaaS: A Netflix case study about edge service architecture Session

How do feature teams (device teams, UI, etc.) connect efficiently to backend services in a microservices architecture? How do you create an edge API that satisfies teams with vastly different requirements? And how do you operate these mission-critical edge services? Paul Bakker discusses these challenges and offers an overview of Netflix's PaaS built specifically for edge services.

Abby Beck is a senior product designer on the Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) team at Google. While she loves everything about design, her passion lies in systems and simplifying complex user needs. A classically trained designer, Abby has worked in the publishing industry in NYC, retail merchandising, and for Bay Area software companies large (Twitter, Pivotal Labs) and small, working on a wide range of problems for a wide range of users, including social networks, marketing products, dev tools, and hardware usage with guides. She has also taught a UX immersive course at General Assembly. Abby holds a degree from the School of Visual Arts.

Presentations

Design and interactivity without sacrificing speed Session

Web design shouldn’t be hindered by the need for a fast, smoothly loading site. Abby Beck explains how to keep design at the forefront of any web project without sacrificing speed.

Michael Bevilacqua-Linn is a senior software architect at Comcast, where he builds distributed systems that power infrastructure for its next-generation services. Michael has been programming computers ever since he dragged an Apple IIGS that his parents got for opening a bank account into his fifth grade class to explain loops and variables to a bunch of preteenagers. In his spare time, he likes rock climbing and good beer, though not at the same time.

Presentations

Evolving a modern end-to-end data infrastructure at Comcast Session

Michael Bevilacqua-linn shares an architecture for a cloud-based end-to-end data infrastructure that handles everything from the classic analytic use cases to real-time operational analysis to modern machine learning techniques in an elastically scaleable and secure manner.

Marty Brodbeck is chief technology officer at Shutterstock, where he manages the technology organization, partnering with the product and marketing teams to drive development and implementation of products that solve customers’ problems. Marty has over 20 years experience delivering solutions at scale and has a strong track record leading companies through cloud, big data, and product engineering transformations and aligning business strategies with technology solutions to deliver revenue and increase productivity. Previously, he was CTO at companies including Pearson, Pfizer, and Diageo. Marty holds a BA from the University of Richmond and an MS from the Stevens Institute of Technology.

Presentations

Building a component-based 12-factor application Session

In an effort to consolidate and modernize the company’s technology stack, Shutterstock recently embarked on a technology overhaul, which led to organizational and cultural as well as technical change. Marty Brodbeck shares some of the decisions Shutterstock made and the challenges it faced during this huge transformation, along with key principles that drove and guided the shift.

Michelle Brush is engineering director for Cerner Corporation, where she leads teams that develop the platform for ingesting stream and batch data specific to Cerner’s Population Health solutions. A math geek turned computer geek with 15 years of software development experience, Michelle has developed algorithms and data structures for search, compression, and data mining in both embedded and enterprise systems. She is the chapter leader for the Kansas City chapter of Girl Develop It.

Presentations

Math and measurement in the management of architecture Session

Our architectural decisions are both guided and judged by the things we choose to value and measure in our systems. Michelle Brush explains how to assess what aspects of the system different organizations should value and therefore, constantly measure, and shares approaches for measuring for accountability and improvement of those values in an architecture.

Daniel Bryant is an independent technical consultant and the CTO at SpectoLabs, where he specializes in enabling continuous delivery within organizations through the identification of value streams, the creation of build pipelines, and the implementation of effective testing strategies. Daniel’s technical expertise focuses on DevOps tooling, cloud and container platforms, and microservice implementations. He contributes to several open source projects, writes for InfoQ, O’Reilly, and Voxxed, and regularly presents at international conferences, including OSCON, QCon, and JavaOne.

Presentations

Continuous delivery patterns for contemporary architecture Session

It's evident that modern software architecture is evolving toward fully component-based architectures, but there are many challenges to delivering such applications in a continuous, safe, and rapid fashion. Daniel Bryant shares a series of patterns to help you identify and implement solutions for continuous delivery of contemporary service-based architectures.

Reality is overrated: API simulation for microservice testing Tutorial

Testing microservices is challenging. Dividing a system into components naturally creates interservice dependencies, and each service has its own performance and fault-tolerance characteristics that need to be validated during development and the QA process. Daniel Bryant and Andrew Morgan share the theory, techniques, and practices needed to overcome this challenge.

Allard Buijze is the founder and chief technical officer at AxonIQ, a microservices communication platform for building event-driven, distributed applications, where he helps customers reach appropriate future-proof technical decisions. A former software architect within the fields of scalability and performance, he has worked on several projects where performance is often a recurring theme. Allard is convinced that a good domain model is the beginning of contributing to the overall performance of an application and developed the Axon Framework out of this conviction. He regularly gives workshops and trainings on frameworks, best practices, and architecture and is a frequent speaker at conferences, seminars, and meetups.

Presentations

Pragmatic event-driven microservices Session

Most discussions about implementing microservices start by evaluating the technical options and their challenges. However, the real business value is in functionality. Allard Buijze demonstrates how to build evolutionary microservices, starting with a single application that can be scaled out and distributed once the sensible boundaries are known.

John Chapin is a cofounder of Symphonia, a serverless and cloud technology consultancy based in New York City. John has over 15 years of experience in technology leadership and implementation. Previously, he was vice president of engineering at Intent Media. John can be reached at john@symphonia.io.

Presentations

Continuous delivery in an ephemeral world Tutorial

With systems like Travis CI, Circle CI, and CodeBuild, we're never more than a few lines of YAML away from a complete continuous delivery pipeline. However, ephemeral build systems constantly recreate the world from scratch, increasing build time and lengthening the CD feedback loop. John Chapin addresses those challenges and shares a reference pipeline using AWS CodePipeline and CodeBuild.

Mostly serverless Session

Even EC2 has serverless attributes, and you can leverage them to realize the benefits of serverless in your classic enterprise cloud architectures. John Chapin shares the true story of an enterprise IT organization for which a potent combination of “mostly serverless” technology and a DevOps mindset have laid the groundwork for a future serverless transformation.

Joel Crabb is the vice president of architecture and the chief architect at Target, where he has brought a platform mindset to the company’s software engineering teams and created a platform architecture wherein data and business processes are presented through platform APIs that serve the entire enterprise. Joel has over 20 years of experience building large-scale applications, both business and consumer facing. Previously, he was the chief architect at Best Buy, where he replatformed the company’s digital channel into a cloud-based distributed system to support growth from $1.8B to $5.1B in revenue over four years.

Presentations

Enterprise architecting for digital disruption Session

The catchphrase of the year is digital disruption. It's finally clear that digital complacency is a path to nonexistence even in industries that haven’t yet felt the direct impact of the digital era. Joel Crabb explains why retail has been completely disrupted and, in the process, is reinventing enterprise architecture for digital relevancy.

Scott Davis is a principal engineer with ThoughtWorks, where he focuses on the leading-edge, innovative, emerging, and nontraditional aspects of web development, such as serverless web apps, mobile web apps (responsive PWAs), HTML5-based smart TV apps, conversational UIs (like Siri and Alexa), and using web technologies to build IoT solutions. He is also the founder of ThirstyHead.com, a Denver-based training and software development consultancy. Scott has been writing about web development for over 10 years. His books include Getting Started with Grails, Groovy Recipes, GIS for Web Developers, The Google Maps API: Adding Where to Your Web Applications, and JBoss at Work. He is also the author of several popular article series at IBM developerWorks, including Mastering MEAN, Mastering Grails, and Practically Groovy. His videos include Architecture of the MEAN Stack, Responsive Mobile Architecture, and On the Road to Angular 2. Scott is also the cofounder of the Denver HTML5 User Group.

Presentations

Making your mobile web app talk Tutorial

Your web browser doesn't have a cute name like Alexa, Siri, or Cortana, but it can be just as talkative. Scott Davis explains why your smartphone, with its built-in speaker and microphone, is a perfect device for building a browser-based conversational UI.

Monal Daxini is an engineer manager at Netflix, where he is responsible for the stream processing team for business insights. Previously, Monal worked on Netflix’s Cassandra and Dynamite infrastructure and was instrumental in developing the first cloud compute infrastructure for encoding Netflix content. He has over 15 years of experience building distributed systems. He is a frequent speaker about stream processing at conferences.

Presentations

Building stream processing as a service at Netflix Session

Steven Wu and Monal Daxini cover Netflix's polyglot stream-processing-as-a-service (SPaaS) platform and share their experience building and operating the largest SPaaS use case: Netflix's Keystone data pipeline, which processes three trillion events and 12 PB of data every day, feeding various data analytic cases like personalization, fraud detection, and troubleshooting.

Jeremy Deane is chief architect at Foundation Medicine. Jeremy has over 20 years of software engineering experience in leadership positions. His expertise includes enterprise application integration, web application architecture, and software process improvement. He is also an accomplished conference speaker and technical author.

Presentations

Architectural trade-offs Session

There are inherent trade-offs that must be made in any software architecture. Some architectural trade-offs are obvious, such as performance versus security or availability versus consistency, while others are quite subtle such as resiliency versus affordability. Jeremy Deane explores a number of architectural trade-offs and offers strategies for dealing with them.

Duncan DeVore is an engineer at Lightbend (Typesafe) who specializes in the design and implementation of distributed systems using the tenets of the Reactive Manifesto with Scala, Akka, and the Lightbend stack. Duncan believes in responsible design through functional programming with an abundance of test coverage, and he loves to code, present, and help others work through the challenges of distributed computing. Duncan’s specialties include distributed computing, microservice-based architectures, cloud computing, event sourcing, and CQRS. Duncan’s open source projects include journals for Eventsourced and Akka-Persistence based on the theory of event sourcing and CQRS. He is the coauthor of Reactive Application Development.

Presentations

Managing consistency, state, and identity in distributed microservices Session

Duncan DeVore discusses the ins and outs of dealing with modular JVM-based application consistency, distributed state, and identity coherence with techniques such as idempotency, eventual and casual consistency, the CAP theorem, single source of truth, and distributed domain design.

Seth Dobbs is the vice president of engineering at HS2 Solutions, where he directs the development of ecommerce, web, and mobile applications, digital transformations, and other solutions for numerous clients ranging from small startups to companies such as Domino’s Pizza, Zipcar, and HNI. This work includes architecting an ecommerce system that grew to be the fourth largest transactional commerce system on the internet. Seth sets the technology direction at HS2 Solutions and drives the technical skill development by organizing and presenting deep dives into new languages, database platforms, and methodologies. He also has developed several internal architecture training courses that he delivers periodically and blogs occasionally about leadership and technology. Seth was recently named Chicago’s best technology manager for 2016 by Tech in Motion. He began his career as a software engineer at Motorola, where he was first exposed to complex architectures and where he designed and implemented a service-based framework enabling data services to be distributed and recoverable across multiple servers. Seth holds a BS in computer science from Illinois Tech.

Presentations

Shaping and communicating architectural decisions Tutorial

Communication is a critical skill for architects and tech leads, but it involves much more than simply documenting and diagramming. Seth Dobbs explores the illusion of communication and shares a process for effectively communicating your solutions to different stakeholders.

Ben Evans is cofounder and CEO of jClarity, a startup that makes performance tools for development and ops teams. Previously, Ben was chief architect for listed derivatives at Deutsche Bank, performance tested the Google IPO, worked on the initial UK trials of 3G networks with BT, built award-winning websites for some of Hollywood’s biggest hits of the ‘90s, developed some of the UK’s very first true ecommerce websites, and provided technology to help some of the UK’s most vulnerable people. Before joining the tech industry, Ben was a researcher in theoretical physics, working on theories that are now being tested at the LHC. Ben helps to run the London Java Community and represents the user community as a voting member on Java’s governing body, the JCP Executive Committee. He is a Java Champion and JavaOne Rock Star speaker. Ben is author of The Well-Grounded Java Developer and the new edition of Java in a Nutshell and writes regularly for industry publications. He’s also a frequent speaker at technical conferences worldwide. Ben holds a master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Cambridge.

Presentations

Are you really sure you want a blockchain? Session

Confused about what a blockchain is? Think you might have a need for one but are confused by all the hype (and the vendors bearing solutions)? Want to understand how blockchain can be useful to your systems and processes? Join Ben Evans to learn the basic technology underlying the blockchain, explore real use cases, and find out how to avoid antipatterns.

Neal Ford is a director, software architect, and meme wrangler at ThoughtWorks, a global IT consultancy that thinks disruptively to deliver technology to address the toughest challenges, all while seeking to revolutionize the IT industry and create positive social change. Neal focuses on designing and building large-scale enterprise applications. He is an internationally recognized expert on software development and delivery, especially in the intersection of Agile engineering techniques and software architecture. Neal has authored magazine articles, seven books (and counting), and dozens of video presentations and has spoken at hundreds of developers conferences worldwide on the topics of software architecture, continuous delivery, functional programming, cutting-edge software innovations. Check out his website at Nealford.com. He welcomes feedback and can be reached at nford@thoughtworks.com.

Presentations

Building evolutionary architecture 2-Day Training

Neal Ford and Rebecca Parsons offer a new perspective on evolving architecture, making “evolvability” a first-class “-ility” in software projects.

Georgios Gkekas is a big data architect on the international advanced analytics team at ING Bank, where he helps various business units gain insights from their data through ING’s advanced analytics big data environment and is working to extend the architecture of a private cloud advanced analytics offering to serve the global needs of ING. Georgios has 10 years of professional experience in the design, architecture, and development of enterprise software and distributed systems. He has always believed in the incredible value hidden in data, which can be exploited through the use of today’s big data technologies and machine learning techniques. This fascination has guided him throughout his career to build multitransactional and highly scalable backend systems and data products in a variety of sectors, including the space and telecommunications industry.

Presentations

Architecting an advanced analytics platform for machine learning Session

Georgios Gkekas shares ING's advanced analytics journey to promote modern machine and deep learning techniques internally through a central, best-of-breed technical platform tailored for data science activities. The platform offers only the necessary automated tools to replace the tedious, repetitive, and error-prone steps in a typical data science pipeline.

Vinicius Gomes is a software developer at ThoughtWorks. Vinicius is passionate about distributed systems and functional programming. He writes about software development and technology on his blog. Vincius is a strong proponent of microservices architectures and believes in it’s stability and maturity for large scale production systems.

Presentations

Microservices? Serverless is the answer. Session

Serverless architecture is the latest implementation technique for the increasingly popular event-driven system architecture. Karun Japhet and Vinicius Gomes compare the the multiple cross-functional requirements of serverless and microservices implementations of an event-driven system.

Maria Gomez is a market tech principal at ThoughtWorks in Barcelona. Over her more than nine years of industry experience, Maria has worked with many different technologies and domains, which has helped her lead teams and advise stakeholders in making the right technology decisions. She is also a speaker and an advocate for diversity and inclusion in the IT industry.

Presentations

Observable microservices Session

Think of this talk as Microservices 201. You know microservices basics and their pros and cons and have maybe even started putting them in production but haven't spent much time thinking about how to maintain them. Maria Gomez explores the most important operational concerns for maintaining microservices and explains why observability helps you maintain a healthy production environment.

Eben Hewitt is chief architect and vice president of product development at Sabre, a multibillion dollar global software company serving the travel industry. Previously, he was CTO at one of the world’s largest hotel companies and the CIO of O’Reilly Media. He has also been a book series editor. Eben is the author of several technical books published by O’Reilly, including Cassandra: The Definitive Guide and Java SOA Cookbook, and contributed to 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know and a number of other software development books and technical articles. Eben is an award-winning software architect and has been an invited speaker at technology conferences around the world.

Presentations

The architect as strategist Session

Eben Hewitt explains what the world’s top strategy firms can teach us about the intersection of strategic thinking and architecture and outlines a framework, process, and set of tools that will help you create a powerful technology strategy for your organization.

Kevin Hoffman is a lead engineer for the commercial digital innovation catalyst team at Capital One. Kevin started working on .NET back before the first betas and has spent a good portion of his career building just about every type of .NET application, from Windows Phone to ASP.NET and WPF. He’s written over a dozen books on .NET, covering everything from language fundamentals to websites to ecommerce, and spent the last several years working with open source tools and languages and building microservices and cloud-native architectures in Java, Scala, and Go. Kevin has recently written books on microservice development in Go and ASP.NET Core.

Presentations

Designing reactive microservices with ASP.NET Core

Kevin Hoffman explains how to deal with distributed transactions by designing around them with techniques like event sourcing, CQRS, and embracing eventual consistency and walks you through a suite of services built with ASP.NET Core to illustrate these patterns, including consuming and publishing Kafka events, using Entity Framework Core to materialize views in Postgres, and more.

Allen Holub is one of the country’s foremost software architects. Allen speaks internationally about all things Agile and software architecture and provides in-house training and consulting in those areas. He’s also an expert-level programmer, specializing in Swift, Java, and Web 2.0 applications and microservices. Allen can build highly dynamic websites (along the lines of Gmail) from front to back: both the frontend code—JavaScript, JQuery, Angular, HTML5, and CSS3—that runs in the browser and the backend code—Java, PHP, MySQL, Ruby, Mongo, C++, ZeroMQ, and EC2—that runs either on your server or in the cloud. Allen is widely published. His works include 10 books, hundreds of articles in publications ranging from Dr. Dobb’s Journal to IBM developerWorks, and video classes for Pluralsight (Swift in Depth) and O’Reilly (Design Patterns in the Real World).

Presentations

Incremental architecture Session

If you still use large up-front design phases, you'll likely encounter problems with your design as you implement. The solution is to build around a domain-focused metaphor that allows for incremental changes while maintaining coherence throughout. Allen Holub demonstrates how to develop an effective and coherent architecture incrementally as the code evolves.

Karun Japhet is a tech lead, developer, and quality advocate at ThoughtWorks. Over the past nine years, he has worked on realizing value for his clients through the creation of highly scaleable applications and integration of large enterprise applications. Karun believes that if you’re not considering serverless architectures in event-driven systems, you may be doing it wrong.

Presentations

Microservices? Serverless is the answer. Session

Serverless architecture is the latest implementation technique for the increasingly popular event-driven system architecture. Karun Japhet and Vinicius Gomes compare the the multiple cross-functional requirements of serverless and microservices implementations of an event-driven system.

Viktor Klang is the deputy CTO at Lightbend. He’s known as a problem solver, developer, prolific contributor to the Akka project, Akka tech lead emeritus, member of the Reactive Streams Special Interest Group, and contributor to the Scala Standard Library concurrency APIs.

Presentations

Reactivating enterprise integration Session

Viktor Klang offers a new take on enterprise integration patterns that builds on top of the Reactive Streams standard, an orchestration layer where transformations are standalone, composable, and reusable and—most importantly—use asynchronous flow-control (backpressure) to maintain predictable, stable behavior over time.

Robert “r0ml” Lefkowitz is the chief architect for software at Warby Parker. Previously, Robert was a software architect in the insurance, telecommunications, and finance industries. He is also a distinguished engineer of the ACM.

Presentations

Technical debt: A master class Session

Robert Lefkowitz offers a overview of technical debt, explaining how to prevent or reduce it, when to increase it, and how to use refactoring to refinance it.

Boris Lublinsky is a software architect at Lightbend, where he specializes in big data, stream processing, and services.

Presentations

Building streaming applications with Kafka Tutorial

Dean Wampler and Boris Lublinsky walk you through building several streaming microservices applications based on Kafka using Akka Streams and Kafka Streams for data processing. You'll explore the strengths and weaknesses of each tool, helping you choose the best tools for your needs, and contrast them with Spark Streaming and Flink, so you can determine when to choose them instead.

Matt McLarty leads the API Academy for CA Technologies, where he works closely with organizations to design and implement innovative, enterprise-grade API and microservices solutions. An experienced software architect, Matt has worked extensively in the field of integration and real-time transaction processing for software vendors and clients alike. He recently coauthored Microservice Architecture with other members of the API Academy team.

Presentations

API security in a microservice architecture Session

Microservices have taken the software architecture world by storm. Initially driven by a desire for increased delivery velocity and greater scalability, organizations are now recognizing the importance and complexity of securing their microservices. Matt McLarty shares techniques for securing microservice APIs and a practical model you can implement in your organization.

Jon Moore is the chief software architect at Comcast Cable, where he focuses on delivering a core set of scalable, performant, robust software components for the company’s varied software product development groups. Jon specializes in the “art of the possible,” finding ways to coordinate working solutions for complex problems and deliver them on time. He is equally comfortable leading and managing teams and personally writing production-ready code and has a passion for software engineering, continuously learning, and teaching colleagues new ways to deliver working, maintainable software with ever-higher quality and ever-shorter delivery times. His interests include distributed systems, fault tolerance, building healthy and engaging engineering cultures, and Texas Hold’em. Jon holds a PhD in computer and information science from the University of Pennsylvania. He resides in West Philadelphia, although he was neither born nor raised there and does not spend most of his days on playgrounds.

Presentations

Why concurrency management is better than rate limiting Session

Rate limiting is the most common capacity management approach for API gateways, but concurrency management is a fundamentally better concept for a variety of reasons. Jon Moore outlines the basic queuing theory behind concurrency management and shares a new algorithm for keeping misconfigured clients from causing trouble for everyone else.

Andrew Morgan is a consultant at OpenCredo. His interests and experiences include application development in languages such as Java and Go and working with programmable infrastructure tooling (e.g., Terraform). Andrew contributes to a number of open source projects, presents at conferences, and writes for InfoQ.

Presentations

Reality is overrated: API simulation for microservice testing Tutorial

Testing microservices is challenging. Dividing a system into components naturally creates interservice dependencies, and each service has its own performance and fault-tolerance characteristics that need to be validated during development and the QA process. Daniel Bryant and Andrew Morgan share the theory, techniques, and practices needed to overcome this challenge.

JP Morgenthal is CTO of application services at DXC. An internationally renowned thought leader in the areas of IT transformation, modernization, and cloud computing, JP has served in executive roles within major software companies and technology startups. His areas of expertise include strategy, architecture, application development, infrastructure and operations, cloud computing, DevOps, microservices, the IoT, and integration, and he routinely advises C-level executives on the best ways to use technology to derive business value. JP is a published author. His most recent book is Cloud Computing: Assessing the Risks.

Presentations

Strategies for decentralized data management in microservices architectures Session

A big part of microservices architecture is decomposing monolithic applications with tightly coupled data models, but moving to decentralized data management is one of the most challenging aspects of a microservices architecture. JP Morgenthal shares strategies for your redesign efforts and the possible pitfalls and the trade-offs these approaches force architects and engineers to make.

Sonya Natanzon is a solutions architect at Genomic Health, where she is passionate about helping patients by writing software. Sonya has over 15 years of experience in the healthcare industry. She started out as a software developer and as bounced around a number of industries, including finance, semiconductors, and telephony, to name a few, before invariably returning to healthcare.

Presentations

An architect’s survival guide to healthcare Session

Healthcare is a broad and complex field that can overwhelm the most seasoned architect. Sonya Natanzon identifies the guideposts that help you navigate the complexity and focus on the most important aspects of healthcare solutions.

Sam Newman is an independent consultant specializing in helping people ship software fast. Sam has worked extensively with the cloud, continuous delivery, and microservices and is especially preoccupied with understanding how to more easily deploy working software into production. For the last few years, he has been exploring the capabilities of microservice architectures. He has worked with a variety of companies in multiple domains around the world, often with one foot in the developer world and another in the IT operations space. Previously, he spent over a decade at ThoughtWorks and then another year with a startup. Sam speaks frequently at conferences. He is the author of Building Microservices (O’Reilly). If you would like to get in touch, please email him.

Presentations

Moving to microservices and beyond 2-Day Training

Sam Newman shares some framing for microservice architectures that explores the various forces that can drive the design and evolution of microservices before leading you through a series of interactive architectural kata exercises to put your newfound knowledge to the test. You'll gain valuable experience with a series of tools you can immediately put into practice in your own projects.

Rebecca Parsons is CTO at ThoughtWorks. Rebecca has more than 30 years’ experience leading the creation of large-scale distributed, services-based applications and the integration of disparate systems. Previously, she was an assistant professor of computer science at the University of Central Florida, where she taught courses on compilers, program optimization, distributed computation, programming languages, the theory of computation, machine learning, and computational biology, and a director’s postdoctoral fellow at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where her research included work on parallel and distributed computation, genetic algorithms, computational biology, and nonlinear dynamical systems. Rebecca’s interests include parallel and distributed computation, programming languages, domain-specific languages, evolutionary architecture, genetic algorithms, and computational science. She is the coauthor of Domain-Specific Languages, The ThoughtWorks Anthology, and Building Evolutionary Architectures. A strong advocate for diversity in the technology industry who is committed to increasing the number of women in coding and STEM fields, Rebecca has served on the board of CodeChix and acted as an advisor to Women Who Code. A sought-after speaker, she has been a featured presenter at well-known conferences, including Collision Conference, Web Summit, YOW!, the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, and more. She was chairwoman of the Agile Alliance board of directors for four years and has served the organization over a total of six years. Rebecca holds a BS in computer science and economics from Bradley University and both an MS and a PhD in computer science from Rice University.

Presentations

Building evolutionary architecture 2-Day Training

Neal Ford and Rebecca Parsons offer a new perspective on evolving architecture, making “evolvability” a first-class “-ility” in software projects.

Pratik Patel is the CTO of Atlanta-based company TripLingo. Pratik has designed and built applications in the retail, healthcare, financial services, and telecom sectors. His specialty is large-scale applications for mission-critical and mobile applications use, and he hacks iOS, Android, HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, Rails, and. . .well everything except Perl. Pratik is the author of Java Database Programming with JDBC, the first book on enterprise Java. He speaks regularly conferences and participates in several local tech and startup groups. Pratik holds a master’s degree in biomedical engineering from UNC.

Presentations

High-performance JavaScript web app architecture Session

Single-page web apps are becoming increasingly popular, so it's important to understand the low-level and high-level aspects of the browser platform and JavaScript runtimes embedding in them. Pratik Patel dives deep into the performance aspects of JavaScript and the web browser, covering the best practices and techniques you need to tune your apps and tips for framework selection.

Stephen Pember is the CTO of ThirdChannel, a startup in Boston, MA, that crowdsources data from thousands of people through their smartphones and then presents that data through visualization and analytic tools in order to improve the operations of large product companies. In this role, Steve is designing and building a reactive, event-driven platform with a frontend based around Backbone.js. Steve was formally a principal consultant with Cantina, a technology agency specializing in utilizing the forefront in web technologies to construct top-notch experiences. His passion lies in architecting and developing performant, scalable, full stack systems for the web.

Presentations

Event storage in a distributed system Session

Event storage offers many practical benefits to distributed systems providing complete state changes over time, but there are a number of challenges when building an event store mechanism. Stephen Pember explores some of the problems you may encounter and shares real-world patterns for working with event storage.

Christian Posta is chief architect for cloud applications at Red Hat. Christian has spent a great deal of time working with large companies creating and deploying large-scale distributed architectures—many of which are now called microservices based. Christian is the author of Microservices by Example and a committer on the open source projects Apache ActiveMQ, Apache Camel, Fabric8.io, and others. is also a frequent blogger, speaker, and open source enthusiast. Christian enjoys mentoring, training, and leading teams to be successful with distributed systems concepts, microservices, DevOps, and cloud-native application design.

Presentations

The second-hardest part of microservices: Calling your services Session

Christian Posta offers an overview of Envoy Proxy and Istio.io Service Mesh, explaining how they solve application networking problems more elegantly by pushing these concerns down to the infrastructure layer and demonstrating how it all works.

Suudhan Rangarajan is a senior software engineer on the Playback API team at Netflix, where he is responsible for ensuring that customers receive the best possible playback experience every time they click play. Previously, Suudhan worked on the audio/video decoding pipeline for Adobe Flash and Adobe Primetime products, helping partners create a great video streaming client. Suudhan enjoys developing and running large-scale distributed services. Suudhan holds a master’s degree in computer science from the University of Texas at Austin. He tweets as @suudhan.

Presentations

Why Netflix built an evolutionary architecture Session

As Netflix continues its journey beyond 100M members, the company is rearchitecting its critical Playback API service to better serve its business needs for the next three to five years. Suudhan Rangarajan discusses why and how Netflix rebuilt the Playback API service and outlines rigorous framework that you can use to reason about your microservice architecture.

M.-Leander Reimer is a chief technologist for QAware GmbH. A senior Java developer with several years of experience designing complex and large-scale system architectures, he is continuously looking for innovative ways to combine and apply state-of-the-art technology and open source software components in real-world customer projects. As a member of the JCP, he wants to improve Java technology and develop usable technical specifications. He studied computer science at Rosenheim and Staffordshire University.

Presentations

Data services: Processing big data the microservice way Session

Mario-Leander Reimer explores key JEE technologies that can be used to build JEE-powered data services and walks you through implementing the individual data processing tasks of a simplified showcase application. You'll then deploy and orchestrate the individual data services using OpenShift, illustrating the scalability of the overall processing pipeline.

Mark Richards is an experienced, hands-on software architect focused on the architecture, design, and implementation of microservices architectures, service-oriented architectures, and distributed systems in J2EE and other technologies. He has been involved in the software industry since 1983 and has significant experience and expertise in application, integration, and enterprise architecture. Mark served as the president of the New England Java Users Group from 1999 to 2003. He is the author of numerous technical books and videos from O’Reilly, including Software Architecture Fundamentals (video), Enterprise Messaging (video), and Java Message Service (book), and a regular conference speaker at the No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) symposium series. Mark has spoken at over 100 conferences and user groups around the world on a variety of enterprise-related technical topics. He holds a master’s degree in computer science as well as numerous architect and developer certifications from IBM, Sun, the Open Group, and BEA.

Presentations

Fundamentals of software architecture 2-Day Training

CNN recently rated software architect the number one job in America. Yet no clear path exists for moving from developer to architect. Mark Richards blends lecture and hands-on real-world group exercises to explore the many aspects of software architecture. You'll learn various integration styles (and when to use them) as well as patterns to fit various business needs and requirements.

Pramod Sadalage is a director at ThoughtWorks, where he enjoys the rare role of bridging the divide between database professionals and application developers. Pramod is usually sent in to clients with particularly challenging data needs that require new technologies and techniques. In the early ’00s he developed techniques to allow relational databases to be designed in an evolutionary manner based on version-controlled schema migrations. Pramod is the coauthor of Refactoring Databases and NoSQL Distilled and the author of Recipes for Continuous Database Integration, and he often speaks and writes about the insights he and his clients learn.

Presentations

Evolving database architecture Session

Pramod Sadalage shares techniques for evolutionary database design using database refactoring patterns and to enable blue-green deployments, enabling legacy applications to work with fast-changing databases and teams to effectively refactor the database architecture to fulfill the changing needs of the organization.

Jochem Schulenklopper is a Netherlands-based IT architect at Xebia, an international IT consultancy company.

Presentations

How to improve your architectural visualizations Session

Communicating (about) architecture to non-IT and business stakeholders is a valuable skill. After all, many architectural-relevant decisions are made by others, so they need to be informed with clear, honest, intelligible, and helpful information and advice. Jochem Schulenklopper dives into theory and shares practical tips on eight different facets of visually communicating your architecture.

Improving the quality of your application architecture Tutorial

Jochem Schulenklopper and Gero Vermaas offer an overview of TIME, a well-known model for application portfolio management by Gartner, and cover some improvements to the model, including a process for determining business value of applications, a innovative method of measuring IT quality (from an architect's perspective), and tactics for improving the applications in an organization's IT landscape.

Nathaniel T. Schutta is a solution architect focused on making usable applications. A proponent of polyglot programming, Nate has written two books on Ajax and speaks regularly at various worldwide conferences, No Fluff Just Stuff symposia, universities, and Java user groups. In addition to his day job, Nate is an adjunct professor at the University of Minnesota, where he teaches students to embrace dynamic languages. Most recently, Nate coauthored Presentation Patterns with Neal Ford and Matthew McCullough.

Presentations

Thinking architecturally Session

Rich Hickey once said programmers know the benefits of everything and the trade-offs of nothing—an approach that can lead a project down a path of frustrated developers and unhappy customers. Nathaniel Schutta outlines the importance of trade-offs and explains how we can analyze new technologies and effectively capture the inevitable architectural decisions we will make.

James Siddle is principal consultant at his London-based firm Skyhook Consulting, where he describes his role as half product manager, half software engineer, with a sprinkling of data scientist. James blogs on The Variable Tree and contributes to Boing Boing. He also spends a lot of time climbing rocks.

Presentations

Agile product roadmaps for architecture initiatives Session

Software architecture can be beautiful, but business and engineering reality is often inconvenient and messy. James Siddle explains how living product roadmaps help you deal with reality without compromising your architecture vision. You’ll learn Agile roadmapping techniques and how to engage with stakeholders to move toward your architecture goals while avoiding wasteful endeavors.

James Stewart is an independent consultant helping senior leaders embed modern technology and security in their strategies and lead transformational change. Previously, James was a cofounder of the UK Government Digital Service and served as deputy CTO of the UK government, where he was instrumental in the UK government’s use the public cloud, embrace of open source, and changing approach to security, all with the goal of increasing government’s ability to focus on user needs. James speaks regularly around the world on organizational transformation, technology strategy, and cyber security.

Presentations

How to address security as collective systems Tutorial

Architects are often the ones making the decisions about how to build in the right security for systems while making systems usable and delivering them on time. James Stewart shares techniques for considering security of whole systems and explores ways of bringing together cross-disciplinary teams to collectively own secure designs.

Matt Stine is the global CTO for architecture at Pivotal, where he spends much of his time helping customers develop cloud-native application architectures. Matt is a 17-year veteran of the enterprise IT industry, eight of them spent as consulting solutions architect for multiple Fortune 500 companies and the not-for-profit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. He is the author of Migrating to Cloud-Native Application Architectures (O’Reilly) and the host of the Software Architecture Radio podcast. Matt is obsessed with the idea that enterprise IT doesn’t have to suck. He focuses on Lean/Agile software development methodologies, DevOps, architectural principles, patterns, and practices, and programming paradigms in an attempt to find the perfect storm of techniques that will allow corporate IT departments to function like startup companies and create software that delights users while maintaining a high degree of conceptual integrity. Matt has spoken at conferences ranging from JavaOne to OSCON to YOW!, is a seven-year member of the No Fluff Just Stuff tour, and serves as technical editor of NFJS the Magazine. Matt is also the founder and past president of the Memphis Java User Group.

Presentations

Applying cloud architecture patterns 2-Day Training

If you want to implement key design patterns and concepts in enterprise projects, there are clear architectural concepts and patterns that you can use as guideposts on your journey to the cloud. Matt Stine helps you understand six key architecture qualities: modularity, observability, deployability, testablity, disposability, and replaceability.

Sam Stokes is a software engineer who can’t leave well enough alone. He’s compelled to fix broken things, whether they are software systems, engineering processes, or cultures. After watching too many systems catch fire, he’s building better smoke detectors at Honeycomb; in a past life, he cofounded Rapportive and built recommendation systems at LinkedIn.

Presentations

Logs are not human scale: How to build observable systems Session

In the complex world of microservices and distributed systems, we need to understand what our software is doing. Traditional tools, such as logs, read by humans and filtered by crude rules, aren’t powerful enough. Sam Stokes explains that we need new, better tools and why this will also require us to design our systems to give the tools better data.

James Thompson is a staff software engineer at Nav, where he is committed to helping engineering teams become more deliberate in how they build software through developing strong learning cultures, principled engineering practices, and holistic architectural thinking. He has worked with web technologies since 2003. He also loves barbecue.

Presentations

Building a technical coaching program Session

Traditional management approaches tend to focus on narrow measures of performance. Within engineering organizations, this can lead to incentives around the wrong practices and priorities. Coaching models refocus the management of engineers around professional growth in a way that can create a virtuous cycle. James Thompson explains how to build a technical coaching program in your organization.

Gero Vermaas is an IT architect at Xebia, a boutique IT consultancy firm based in the Netherlands.

Presentations

Improving the quality of your application architecture Tutorial

Jochem Schulenklopper and Gero Vermaas offer an overview of TIME, a well-known model for application portfolio management by Gartner, and cover some improvements to the model, including a process for determining business value of applications, a innovative method of measuring IT quality (from an architect's perspective), and tactics for improving the applications in an organization's IT landscape.

Kai Waehner is a technology evangelist at Confluent. Kai’s areas of expertise include big data analytics, machine learning, deep learning, messaging, integration, microservices, the internet of things, stream processing, and the blockchain. He is regular speaker at international conferences such as JavaOne, O’Reilly Software Architecture, and ApacheCon and has written a number of articles for professional journals. Kai also shares his experiences with new technologies on his blog.

Presentations

Apache Kafka + Apache Mesos = Highly scalable streaming microservices Session

Kai Wähner shares a highly scalable, mission-critical infrastructure using Apache Kafka and Apache Mesos: Kafka brokers are used as the distributed messaging backbone; Kafka’s Streams API embeds stream processing into any external application without the need for a dedicated streaming cluster; and Mesos is used as a scalable infrastructure to leverage the benefits of a cloud-native platform.

Dean Wampler is the vice president of fast data engineering at Lightbend, where he leads the creation of the Lightbend Fast Data Platform, a streaming data platform built on the Lightbend Reactive Platform, Kafka, Spark, Flink, and Mesosphere DC/OS. Dean is the author of Programming Scala and Functional Programming for Java Developers and the coauthor of Programming Hive, all from O’Reilly. He is a contributor to several open source projects. He’s also the co-organizer of several conferences around the world and several user groups in Chicago.

Presentations

Building streaming applications with Kafka Tutorial

Dean Wampler and Boris Lublinsky walk you through building several streaming microservices applications based on Kafka using Akka Streams and Kafka Streams for data processing. You'll explore the strengths and weaknesses of each tool, helping you choose the best tools for your needs, and contrast them with Spark Streaming and Flink, so you can determine when to choose them instead.

Heidi Waterhouse is a developer advocate at LaunchDarkly. She works at the intersection of cutting-edge technology, usability, and possible disaster.

Presentations

Y2K and other disappointing disasters: Risk reduction and harm mitigation Session

Heidi Waterhouse explores risk reduction and harm mitigation, helping you understand where you can prevent problems and where you can just make them less bad, and shares available tools to make every disaster a disappointing fizzle.

Steven Wu is a software engineer working on real-time data infrastructure that powers massive data ingestion pipeline and stream processing at Netflix. Steven is passionate about building scalable and operable distributed system. Previously he worked on the cloud platform that builds the foundation of Netflix’s cloud-native microservice architecture. Before Netflix, he worked on Yahoo’s messenger server team, where he was a key contributor in revamping messenger’s backend and supporting multicolo deployment. He also designed and implemented a distributed key-value storage system.

Presentations

Building stream processing as a service at Netflix Session

Steven Wu and Monal Daxini cover Netflix's polyglot stream-processing-as-a-service (SPaaS) platform and share their experience building and operating the largest SPaaS use case: Netflix's Keystone data pipeline, which processes three trillion events and 12 PB of data every day, feeding various data analytic cases like personalization, fraud detection, and troubleshooting.