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Looking Into Google Goggles

Mobile
Location: Ballroom IV Level: Novice
Average rating: **...
(2.83, 6 ratings)

Google Goggles is visual search for a mobile phone. Once you take a picture it is processed in Google’s datacenters and compared to other images in their index. The app takes advantage of your location, advances in computer vision and your constant mobile connection. This talk will dive into how they made it happen and what the computer is actually “seeing”.

In a nutshell, Goggles lets users search for objects using images rather than words. Simply take a picture with your phone’s camera, and if we recognize the item, Goggles returns relevant search results. Right now Goggles identifies landmarks, works of art, and products (among other things), and in all cases its ability to “see further” is rooted in powerful computing, pervasive connectivity, and the cloud:

  • We first send the user’s image to Google’s datacenters
  • We then create signatures of objects in the image using computer vision algorithms
  • We then compare signatures against all other known items in our image recognition databases; and
  • We then figure out how many matches exist; and
  • We then return one or more search results, based on available meta data and ranking signals; and
  • We do all of this in just a few seconds
Photo of Lior Ron

Lior Ron

Google, Inc.

Lior Ron is the lead Group Product Manager for Google Places. He has spent the last 12 years innovating in the geo industry where he was the CTO of the Israeli Intelligence mapping and search efforts, product manager at Yahoo, founder of a geo search startup and in the last 4 years part of the Google geo leadership team. He holds an MBA from Stanford GSB, BSc and MS from the Technion – the Israeli institute for technology.

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Comments

Pablo Abend
08/04/2010 5:47am PDT

Was this session recorded and is it available online anywhere?