• ESRI
  • NAVTEQ
  • Veriplace
  • AT&T Interactive
  • DigitalGlobe
  • Google
  • Yahoo! Inc.
  • ZoomAtlas
  • Digital Map Products
  • Microsoft Research (MSR)
  • Pitney Bowes Business Insight
  • NAVTEQ

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the conference, contact Yvonne Romaine at yromaine@oreilly.com

Media Partner Opportunities

For media partnerships, contact mediapartners@ oreilly.com or download the Media & Promotional Partner Brochure (PDF)

Press and Media

For media-related inquiries, contact Maureen Jennings at maureen@oreilly.com

Where 2.0 Newsletter

To stay abreast of conference news and to receive email notification when registration opens, please sign up for the Where 2.0 Conference newsletter (login required)

Where 2.0 Ideas

Have an idea for Where to share? where-idea@oreilly.com

Contact Us

View a complete list of Where 2.0 contacts

Handling Real-time Geostreams

General
Location: Ballroom IV Level: Novice
1 Presentation File:
Handling Real-time Geostreams Presentation [PDF]
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 4 ratings)

Twitter has launched a Geotagging API – we really wanted to enable users to not only talk about “What’s happening?” but also “What’s happening right here?” For a while now, we’ve been watching as users have been trying to geo-tag their tweets through a variety of methods, all of which involve a link to a map service embedded in their Tweet. This talk will delve into how Twitter handles their geocontent including tool suggestions.

As a platform, we’ve tried to make it easier for our users by making location be omnipresent through our platform, and an inherent (but optional) part of a tweet. We’re making the platform be not just about time, but also about place.

Photo of Raffi Krikorian

Raffi Krikorian

Uber Advanced Technologies Center

Raffi Krikorian is Engineering Lead at Uber’s Advanced Technologies Center in Pittsburgh, PA. He spends most of his time thinking about off-the-wall ways to change computing, transportation, and the world.

Until August 2014, he was Twitter’s VP of Engineering in charge of the Platform – the core infrastructure of Twitter. During his tenure, Platform Engineering was primarily responsible for the scalability, efficiency, reliability, and performance of Twitter, as well as the developer productivity of all software engineers at Twitter. He lead the Twitter’s transition from a Ruby on Rails web site, to a JVM-powered services oriented architecture which currently serves about 250 million monthly active users who send about 500 million tweets daily. He also created and used to chair Twitter’s Architecture Group, the team of senior software engineers in charge of Twitter’s overall technology portfolio as well as ensuring that software got written to the same consistent standards across its entire global development team.