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  • NAVTEQ
  • Veriplace
  • AT&T Interactive
  • DigitalGlobe
  • Google
  • Yahoo! Inc.
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  • Digital Map Products
  • Microsoft Research (MSR)
  • Pitney Bowes Business Insight
  • NAVTEQ

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Scaling GIS Data in Nonrelational Data Stores

General
Location: Ballroom III Level: Novice
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 3 ratings)

As the amount of GIS data we need to keep track of increases, the amount of devices accessing it increases, and the amount of GIS writes increase, we’re finding that, much like real-time web applications, normal RDBMS’s are not well suited to scaling. This talk covers why GIS data is hard to scale in a normal RDBMS, what nonrelational stores exist out there, and some basic examples of how to do spatial queries within a nonrelational store.

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Photo of Mike Malone

Mike Malone

SimpleGeo

Mike Malone is lead architect at SimpleGeo, where he works on building and integrating scalable systems that power the company’s location platform. Since joining SimpleGeo, Mike has been working to ensure operational continuity in the face of rapid growth, partial system failures, and traffic bursts. Before joining SimpleGeo, Mike helped build the microblogging web site Pownce, where he learned a lot about the technical and social difficulties of scaling an online community. After Pownce’s acquisition by Six Apart in 2008, Mike worked on the TypePad platform team, where he gained a great deal of experience building RESTful web services. In his spare time Mike enjoys tinkering with new technologies. When he’s not on the computer, you can probably find him hanging out with his girlfriend, Katie, and their friends at a good bar.