Training: June 20–21, 2016
Tutorials: June 21, 2016
Keynotes & Sessions: June 22–23, 2016
Santa Clara, CA

Infrastructure reimagined conference sessions

Monday, June 20

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9:00am–5:00pm Monday, June 20-Tuesday June 21
SOLD OUT
Location: Camino Real Room
Michael Hausenblas (Mesosphere)
Average rating: ***..
(3.20, 10 ratings)
The advantages of containerized applications are increasingly recognized. Michael Hausenblas provides a gentle introduction to building and operating containerized applications at scale. The first day focuses on the basics of building app using containers; the second day expands this knowledge, focusing on the operations (monitoring, upgrades, etc.) of these apps. Read more.

Tuesday, June 21

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9:00am–10:30am Tuesday, 06/21/2016
Location: Ballroom CD Level: Intermediate
Avleen Vig (Etsy)
Average rating: ****.
(4.88, 17 ratings)
Deploying and scaling ELK is often a trial by fire. Avleen Vig presents the lessons Etsy learned over the last three years working with ELK and scaling it from tens of millions to over five billion log lines per day. Avleen covers sizing your cluster, monitoring and extracting metrics from it, and patterns for effectively scaling it up as your logs grow. Read more.
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9:00am–10:30am Tuesday, 06/21/2016
Location: Ballroom GH Level: Intermediate
Timothy Gross (Joyent)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 10 ratings)
Microservice architectures manage the complexity of the development process, and application containers help manage the dependencies and deployment of those microservices. But deploying and connecting services together is a challenge because it forces developers to design for operationalization. Timothy Gross explores autopiloting applications as a powerful design pattern to solve this problem. Read more.
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11:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 06/21/2016
Location: Ballroom CD Level: Intermediate
Sam Newman (Independent)
Average rating: ****.
(4.92, 13 ratings)
Microservices offer many options for securing your systems. Done right, microservices can increase the security of your vital data and processes. Done wrong, and they can increase the surface area of attack. Sam Newman explores the importance of defense in depth, discussing the many different ways in which you can secure your fine-grained, distributed architectures. Read more.
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11:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 06/21/2016
Location: Ballroom GH Level: Intermediate
Seth Vargo (HashiCorp)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 12 ratings)
Seth Vargo offers a comprehensive, engineer­-led overview of two of HashiCorp's tools: ­Terraform and Atlas. Read more.
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1:30pm–3:00pm Tuesday, 06/21/2016
Location: Ballroom CD Level: Intermediate
Gianluca Borello (Sysdig)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 7 ratings)
Gianluca Borello explores the state of the art for visibility, monitoring, and troubleshooting for microservices and containers—including live demonstrations of popular tools and methods and the pros and cons of each—with special emphasis on sysdig, an open source system visibility tool. Read more.
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3:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, 06/21/2016
Location: Ballroom GH Level: Intermediate
Dave Nielsen (Intel)
Average rating: **...
(2.38, 8 ratings)
Redis is a critical part of scalable web architecture, whether for consumer-facing apps or as an operational database for microservices, and Redis is the most common NoSQL database deployed in containers. Dave Nielsen walks attendees through Redis and compares the steps to deploy Redis in various container frameworks, including Kubernetes, Docker Swarm, Amazon ECS, and Cloud Foundry. Read more.

Wednesday, June 22

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11:20am–12:00pm Wednesday, 06/22/2016
Location: Ballroom AB Level: Intermediate
Bryan Cantrill (Joyent)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 6 ratings)
2015 was a huge year for containers. A multitude of vendors rushed into the scene, leaving businesses scratching their heads about how to adopt this new technology. Will all this activity be a barrier to adoption as organizations wait out the hype? Bryan Cantrill explains why the “wait it out’ mentality won’t last long, why interoperability is key, and what’s next. Read more.
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1:15pm–1:55pm Wednesday, 06/22/2016
Location: Ballroom AB Level: Intermediate
Casey West (Pivotal)
Average rating: ****.
(4.43, 7 ratings)
Platforms: either you have one, or you’re building one. Drawing on observations made over the years, Casey West explores in detail six high-level characteristics common to operationally mature production environments and demonstrates these capabilities in an interactive, live exposition. Read more.
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2:10pm–2:50pm Wednesday, 06/22/2016
Location: Ballroom AB Level: Beginner
Jeremy Edberg (MinOps)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 4 ratings)
Granularity has gotten smaller over the years, going from machines to instances to containers, but the smallest unit of granularity is the function. With AWS Lambda, Parse, App Engine, etc., the rise of the serverless production environment is upon us. Jeremy Edberg explains how CloudNative manages the conglomeration of functions built across the organization. Read more.
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3:40pm–4:20pm Wednesday, 06/22/2016
Location: Ballroom AB Level: Beginner
Karl Isenberg (Mesosphere)
Average rating: ****.
(4.62, 8 ratings)
The orchestration space is fast moving and full of competing products, platforms, and frameworks. How do you choose the right one for your requirements? Karl Isenberg explores the features of several container orchestrators, breaking down the feature sets and characteristics into categories and scoring multiple solutions—including Kubernetes, Marathon, and Docker Swarm—against each other. Read more.
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4:35pm–5:15pm Wednesday, 06/22/2016
Location: Ballroom AB Level: Intermediate
Gareth Rushgrove (Puppet Labs)
Average rating: ****.
(4.40, 5 ratings)
The meme "Google infrastructure for everyone else" has emerged alongside Kubernetes and other recent releases by Google. Gareth Rushgrove explores whether Google's approach to infrastructure will be how all organizations run software in the future and why that's an interesting question to ask for anyone running systems today. Read more.

Thursday, June 23

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9:40am–10:00am Thursday, 06/23/2016
Location: Mission City Ballroom Level: Intermediate
Charity Majors (Honeycomb)
Average rating: ****.
(4.85, 13 ratings)
Charity Majors discusses making better choices with software. Whether you're selecting a new polyglot persistence layer, launching a startup from scratch, or modernizing a mature environment, there have never been more opportunities for chaos. Charity explains when you should use boring technology, when to take a flyer on the bleeding edge, and best practices for making solid technical decisions. Read more.
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10:10am–10:25am Thursday, 06/23/2016
Location: Mission City Ballroom Level: Non-technical
Average rating: ***..
(3.25, 8 ratings)
There's a software culture revolution inside the government. User-centric design, lean, and agile are first citizens, but the increased velocity in development and testing requires a change in the way the government does deployment, security, and compliance. Diego Lapiduz shows how the cloud.gov team is building tools to achieve faster deployments and continuous compliance in a secure environment. Read more.
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11:20am–12:00pm Thursday, 06/23/2016
Location: Ballroom AB Level: Beginner
Ritesh Maheshwari (LinkedIn), Yang Yang (LinkedIn)
Average rating: ****.
(4.43, 7 ratings)
For the past year, LinkedIn has been running and iteratively improving Luminol, its anomaly detection system for real user monitoring data. Ritesh Maheshwari and Yang Yang offer an overview of Luminol, focusing on how to build a low-cost end-to-end system that can leverage any algorithm, and explain lessons learned and best practices that will be useful to any engineering or operations team. Read more.
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1:15pm–1:55pm Thursday, 06/23/2016
Location: Ballroom AB Level: Intermediate
Betsy Nichols (Netuitive, Inc)
Average rating: ****.
(4.80, 5 ratings)
Effective monitoring for today’s agile environments is both science and art. (Analytics can provide the “science” while experts and business context can provide the “art.”) There is no perfect solution, but a framework for integrating these varied information sources as collaborators can drive continuous improvement. Elizabeth Nichols highlights (anonymized) examples from real environments. Read more.
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2:10pm–2:50pm Thursday, 06/23/2016
Location: Ballroom AB Level: Beginner
Michelle Carrizosa (SOASTA), Iris Lieuw (SOASTA)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 1 rating)
Michelle Carrizosa and Iris Lieuw demonstrate how to prioritize improvements across your ecommerce site by identifying which of your pages are the most important to optimize and then looking at resource timing data to determine what affects those pages the most. Read more.
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3:40pm–4:20pm Thursday, 06/23/2016
Location: Ballroom AB Level: Intermediate
Andre Vachon (Microsoft)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 3 ratings)
Execution graphs enable the capabilities of a debugger and profiler on top of log and tracing data emitted by a multiple services. Andre Vachon explains that although distributed tracing tools work well when a common tracing library is used across all components, execution graphs provide a more general schema to extract and save data from heterogeneous, loosely coupled distributed systems. Read more.
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4:35pm–5:15pm Thursday, 06/23/2016
Location: Ballroom AB Level: Intermediate
Dieter Plaetinck (raintank)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 3 ratings)
Alerting on your stack is the key to happy customers and a healthy business. Dieter Plaetinck explains what's wrong with the oft-touted complicated alerting methods and explores how to get the in-depth coverage and address complicated alerting needs using simple techniques, with a focus on the workflow using an alerting IDE. Read more.