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Tim O'Reilly

Tim O'Reilly
Founder and CEO, O'Reilly Media, Inc.

Website | @timoreilly

Tim has a history of convening conversations that reshape the industry. In 1998, he organized the meeting where the term “open source software” was agreed on, and helped the business world understand its importance. In 2004, with the Web 2.0 Summit, he defined how “Web 2.0” represented not only the resurgence of the web after the dot com bust, but a new model for the computer industry, based on big data, collective intelligence, and the internet as a platform. In 2009, with his “Gov 2.0 Summit,” he framed a conversation about the modernization of government technology that has shaped policy and spawned initiatives at the Federal, State, and local level, and around the world. He has now turned his attention to implications of the on-demand economy and other technologies that are transforming the nature of work and the future shape of the business world. He is the founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media and a partner at O’Reilly AlphaTech Ventures (OATV). He is also a founder and board member at Maker Media, which spun out of O’Reilly Media in 2012, and a board member at Code for America, PeerJ, Civis Analytics, and PopVox.

Sessions

Grand Ballroom
Tim O'Reilly (O'Reilly Media, Inc.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.70, 30 ratings)
The failure of healthcare.gov was a textbook DevOps (or rather, lack of DevOps) case study. But it's part of a wider pattern that reminds us that people should be at the heart of everything we build. In fact, getting the "people" part right is the key both to DevOps and great user experience design. Read more.
Office Hours
Table 2 (Sponsor Pavilion)
Tim O'Reilly (O'Reilly Media, Inc.), Mikey Dickerson (Federal Government | United States Digital Services Team)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 2 ratings)
Join Tim and Mikey for a special Office Hours discussion. They’ll answer your questions on IT in government—particularly the new US Digital Services Playbook, Healthcare.gov, and other government projects you can become involved with. They’ll tell you how you can apply these lessons learned to your current work. Read more.