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About Velocity
Web Operations & Performance Conference

Audience

Experience Velocity | Who Should Attend | What People Are Saying About Velocity | Program Chairs

Most companies with outward-facing dynamic websites face the same challenges: pages must load quickly, infrastructure must scale efficiently, and sites and services must be reliable, without burning out the team or breaking the budget. Velocity is the best place on the planet for web ops and performance professionals like you to learn from your peers, exchange ideas with experts, and share best practices and lessons learned.

Five reasons to come to Velocity:

Patrick Meenan at Velocity New York 2013 Velocity Conference
  1. Operations: At Velocity, you'll learn what's important to monitor and when, understand which metrics make a difference, and see how some of the world's largest sites deal with config management, failover, downtime, best practices, and other key issues in the operations side of the Web. If you're producing software, you'll learn the secrets of deploying rapidly without any disruption to your customers.
  2. Web Performance: If you measure your success in milliseconds, you'll find your time well spent as you immerse yourself in the latest tools, technologies, and expert advice on getting your site to perform at warp speed.
  3. Mobile Performance: As mobile takes center stage with consumers, user expectations have skyrocketed. At Velocity, you won't just get the tools you need to make the mobile web faster, you'll learn how to measure, analyze, and improve mobile performance, learn how UX/UI play a key role in performance, and improve operations and deployment so your apps are never unavailable or out of date.
  4. Culture: Are you ready to fully embrace a culture of performance and operations in your organization? To stay resilient, manage complex systems of both the technical and human varieties, in the face of near-impossible odds? Future-proof the health of your organization with essential skills from Velocity's Culture track.
  5. The Big Picture: After three days of super-intense focus on web ops and performance, spent among some of the best minds in the field, you'll find that Velocity has changed the way you approach your work—for the better. From the keynotes and sessions to the exhibit hall and networking opportunities, every aspect of Velocity is designed to make you better at what you do.

Experience Velocity

Velocity Conference New York 2013
  • Four in-depth tracks covering the key aspects of web performance, operations, mobile performance, and Velocity culture
  • Inspirational keynote presentations that bring clarity to thorny issues and new perspectives on the state of the art
  • Over 1,000 developers, engineers, managers, sys admins, programmers, and experts under one roof
  • An Exhibit Hall featuring dozens of the latest tools and products
  • Fun evening events, Birds of a Feather sessions, and plenty of networking opportunities

Who Should Attend

  • Developers, engineers, and managers from companies of all sizes
  • Technical executives looking out for the bottom line
  • CTOs and CIOs seeking to streamline operations
  • Technology evangelists and entrepreneurs pushing enterprise boundaries
  • Researchers and academics
  • Companies and professionals engaged in the mobile development and performance ecosystem

What People Are Saying About Velocity

"O'Reilly's Velocity conference is the only generalized Web ops and performance conference out there. We really like it; you can go to various other conferences and have 10-20% of the content useful to you as a Web Admin, or you can go here and have most of it be relevant!" —Web Admin Blog

"Velocity conference: development for the speed of light. For a performance nerd, this year's Velocity conference had to be Mecca. There was an abundance of great sessions, covering a wide variety of performance and operations topics." —Tom Hughes-Croucher, Yahoo! Developer Network Blog

"Velocity is the best conf for web engineers I've been to so far. Solid talks and invaluable info. Worth every penny!" —Ismail Elshareef, via Twitter

"I can say without hyperbole that this was the best conference I've attended. The presentations were from people doing real large-scale web development and included a fair amount of real data and some of their solutions to hard problems." —robcee

"...an eye opener in terms of improving and maintaining performance on very large web sites." —Mike Brunt, Musings from a ColdFusion Aficionado

"Velocity is the conference I always wanted. Instead of focusing on one particular product or technology, it focuses on the true problem of keeping websites fast and available, which a lot of us have to deal with" —Peter Zaitsev, CEO Percona Inc., co-author of High Performance MySQL

The Velocity conference is the best ops focused event I've been to, the content was highly technical and not just teaser." —Ezra Zygmuntowicz, Engine Yard

"Performance is one of the difficult frontiers that web developers must push against. Velocity is a good forum for exchanging sightings and explorations." —Douglas Crockford, Yahoo!, Author of JavaScript: The Good Parts

"Velocity is the conference where people talk about how to get things done in the real world - if you want to know how the best in the world handle their Operations, Velocity is the place to learn." —Adam Jacob, Opscode

"With a great line up of speakers, this conference is a gathering of hundreds of web ops and performance professionals that get together to share their ideas and expertise. Without a doubt, this is one of my favourite conferences… I thoroughly recommend attending this conference!" —Dean Hume, Coding Tips & Tricks

Program Chairs

John Allspaw

John Allspaw

John has worked in systems operations for over fourteen years in biotech, government and online media. He started out tuning parallel clusters running vehicle crash simulations for the U.S. government, and then moved on to the Internet in 1997. He built the backing infrastructures at Salon, InfoWorld, Friendster, and Flickr. He is now VP of Tech Operations at Etsy, and is the author of The Art of Capacity Planning published by O'Reilly.

Courtney Nash

Courtney Nash

Courtney manages all Velocity-related content for O'Reilly Media. An erstwhile academic neuroscientist, she is still fascinated by the brain and how people learn just about anything. She's been known to teach people how to salsa dance, conduct psychology experiments, or even get air on a mountain bike. When not working on books, Courtney can be found biking, hiking, skiing, and photographing the Cascade mountains near her home in Bellingham, Washington.

Steve Souders

Steve Souders

Steve is Chief Performance Officer at Fastly developing web performance services. He previously served as Google's Head Performance Engineer and Chief Performance Yahoo!. Prior to that Steve worked at General Magic, WhoWhere?, and Lycos, and co-founded Helix Systems and CoolSync. Steve is the author of High Performance Web Sites and Even Faster Web Sites. He is the creator of many performance tools and services including YSlow, the HTTP Archive, Cuzillion, Jdrop, ControlJS, and Browserscope. He serves as co-chair of Velocity, the web performance and operations conference from O'Reilly, and is co-founder of the Firebug Working Group. He taught CS193H: High Performance Web Sites at Stanford.

 

Committee Members

Camille FournierCamille Fournier is currently the Director of Infrastructure Engineering and Lead Architect at Rent the Runway. Previously a Vice President at Goldman Sachs. Apache ZooKeeper committer and PMC member.

 

Lyza Danger GardnerLyza Danger Gardner is a dev. She has built, broken and hacked web things since 1996. Curiously, Lyza was actually born and raised in Portland, Ore. Since co-founding Cloud Four, a Portland-based mobile web agency, in 2007, Lyza has voyaged further into the deep, untrammeled reaches of Device Land, exploring the foibles and chaos of mobile browsers and the mobile web. She has an odd set of anachronistic hobbies and it has been said she takes a fair number of photographs. She owns a four-letter .com domain. I bet you can guess what it is and go visit her there. Lyza and co-founder Jason Grigsby are the authors of Head First Mobile Web (O'Reilly).

 

Mark ImbriacoMark Imbriaco has spent the last 17 years working for companies like Bank of America, America Online, Heroku, 37signals, and a number of smaller startups doing operations, system architecture, and software development. He currently works for LivingSocial.

 

Tim KadlecTim Kadlec is an independent developer, consultant and trainer living in a tiny town in the north woods of Wisconsin. He is the author of Implementing Responsive Design: Building sites for an anywhere, everywhere web (New Riders, 2012) and was a contributing author for the Web Performance Daybook Volume 2 (O'Reilly, 2012). He writes sporadically at timkadlec.com and you can find him sharing his thoughts in a briefer format on Twitter at @tkadlec.

 

Jonathan KleinJonathan Klein Jonathan is a software engineer at Etsy that focuses on solving web performance and scalability challenges. Prior to working at Etsy he spent almost four years at Wayfair, where he led the team that converted the primary tech stack to PHP/Lighttpd/FreeBSD. He started and organizes the Boston Web Performance Meetup Group, and he contributes to a few open source projects, including the HTTPArchive and CSSLint. Jonathan blogs regularly at jonathanklein.net and can be found on Twitter at @jonathanklein.

 

Alex LinesAlex Lines loves a good scalability crisis and solves architecture and performance problems. He previously worked at betaworks with companies including digg, chartbeat, and bitly.

 

Patrick MeenanPatrick Meenan has been working on web performance in one form or another for the last 12 years and is currently working at Google to make the web faster. He created the popular open-source WebPagetest web performance measurement tool, runs the free instance of it at www.webpagetest.org and can frequently be found in the forums helping site owners understand and improve their website performance. He also helped found the WPO foundation which is a non-profit organization focused on Web Performance Optimization.

 

Ade OshineyeAde Oshineye is a Staff Developer Advocate in Google's London office and works on the Google+ project. Over the last decade he's worked on trading systems for a variety of investment banks as well as on Google's advertising and mobile search systems. He's also the co-author of Apprenticeship Patterns, a book that teaches you how to learn to be a great programmer. He's particularly interested in Developer Experience, distributed systems and the future of online news.

 

Guy PodjarnyGuy Podjarny, or Guypo, is a Chief Product Architect at Akamai. Guy works on Automated Front-End Optimization, and was the co-founder and CTO of Blaze.io, later acquired by Akamai. Guy has been in the web application field for over a decade, moving from Web Application Security to Web Application Performance, but keeping his focus on deep analysis of web pages. Guy is also a self admitted efficiency fanatic, looking to extract the most out of everything, from a packed suitcase to a complex web 2.0 app.

 

Andrew ShaferAndrew Shafer co-founded Reductive Labs and worked to help organizations build better systems with better tools. He brings with him a background in high performance computing, computational science, embedded Linux development, web frameworks and Agile methods. Andrew really likes to help teams navigate the technology Renaissance triple point between people, process and tools. He is interested in conversation about almost anything. His two sons and wife think he is pretty cool. He is definitely a villager (linkedin.com/in/andrewclayshafer).

 

Stoyan StefanovStoyan Stefanov (phpied.com, @stoyanstefanov) is a Facebook engineer. Previously at Yahoo! he was the creator of the smush.it online image optimization tool and architect of YSlow 2.0. performance tool. Book author (JavaScript Patterns, Object-Oriented JavaScript), contributor (Even Faster Web Sites, High-Performance JavaScript) and speaker (Velocity, JSConf, Fronteers, Ajax Experience).

 

Nicole SullivanNicole Sullivan is an evangelist, front-end performance consultant, CSS Ninja, and author. She started the Object-Oriented CSS open source project, which answers the question: how do you scale CSS for millions of visitors or thousands of pages? She also consulted with the W3C for their beta redesign, and is the co-creator of Smush.it, an image optimization service in the cloud. She is passionate about CSS, web standards, and scalable front-end architecture for large commercial websites. She co-authored Even Faster Websites and blogs at stubbornella.org.

 

Mandi WallsMandi Walls has been administering Linux systems of various sizes and scopes for more than 10 years. After a number of years running large web sites for AOL, she recently joined Admeld in New York City.

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