Build resilient systems at scale
October 12–14, 2015 • New York, NY

devops conference sessions

3:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 10/12/2015
Jeremy Edberg (MinOps)
Slides:   1-PDF 
A system is only as reliable as its weakest link, and the only way to find those links is to constantly break your systems. Your backup isn't useful unless you test restoration, and your system isn't reliable unless you break it on purpose. Hear all the latest in availability testing, describing not only what, but why, and how, success rates, and how we gain resilience by breaking things.
4:35pm–5:15pm Wednesday, 10/14/2015
Aaron Weaver (Cengage), Matt Tesauro (Pearson plc)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
Are you currently running at AppSec program? Nobody said it was going to be easy working on the inside of AppSec. AppSec programs fall into an odd middle ground; highly technical interactions with the Dev and Ops teams, yet a practical business focus is required as you go up the org chart.
1:15pm–1:55pm Wednesday, 10/14/2015
Daniel Lockhart (Verizon Digital Media Services)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
Introducing a deployment process can be difficult in the best of circumstances; introducing one at an established company, with many entrenched developers and over 10,000 servers, is an even bigger challenge. This talk will share the experience of bringing DevOps deployment practices to Verizon Digital Media Services.
3:40pm–4:20pm Wednesday, 10/14/2015
Thorvald Natvig (Medallia, Inc.)
Slides:   1-PDF 
What’s the difference between a server, a switch and a SAN? We asked ourselves this question and realized the distinction stemmed from outdated assumptions. By blurring the lines — running networking on our servers and applications on our switches — we pushed the frontier of infrastructure performance, decreased complexity and costs, and increased our availability. All on white-box Linux hardware.
12:00pm–12:30pm Monday, 10/12/2015
Matthew Campbell (Digital Ocean)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Many of us are familiar with Netflix's Chaos monkey, where they randomly kill the process of their servers. On our financial instant messenger, we needed to simulate server failures and network disconnects/splits. We developed a strong method of doing integration tests locally with VMs and Docker to simulate these conditions.
11:20am–12:00pm Wednesday, 10/14/2015
Dan McKinley (Stripe)
Slides:   external link
How do you choose the technology to run your business? You should use the best tools for the job, of course. But the precise definitions of the words "best" and "job" are tricky. This talk gives these terms shape, and introduces a framework for thinking about new technology rigorously, holistically, and systematically.
4:35pm–5:15pm Tuesday, 10/13/2015
Aly Fulton (Travis CI)
Despite being comfortable working with distributed systems, the idea of a remote, distributed team seems to make some companies uneasy. This talk aims to change that, by examining the advantages of remote teams for both companies and employees, as well as discussing remote-friendly DevOps strategies.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 10/12/2015
John Willis (Docker)
A comprehensive overview of Docker. We will cover all the basics of the product. By the end of this session you should be able to install Docker, run Docker containers, and build images. If time permits we will also cover Docker Machine, Compose, and Swarm.
11:00am–12:30pm Monday, 10/12/2015
Philip Tellis (Akamai), Nic Jansma (Akamai)
Slides:   external link
Investigating performance problems often requires more than one tool to nail down the problem. In fact, using the wrong tools can often point you completely in the wrong direction. In this talk, we will walk through a real situation we recently dealt with to identify the cause of a performance problem using RUM, Synthetic, and packet captures.
1:30pm–3:00pm Monday, 10/12/2015
Radu Gheorghe (Sematext Group), Rafał Kuć (Sematext Group)
Slides:   external link
The ELK stack (Elasticsearch, Logstash, Kibana) is all the rage now when it comes to centralizing logs. This talk will cover all the basics, and will quickly change to production-tips mode: we'll show you how to tune and scale both Elasticsearch and its indexing pipeline for handling huge loads with minimal overhead.
2:10pm–2:50pm Wednesday, 10/14/2015
Brandon Philips (CoreOS, Inc)
The architectural patterns of large-scale infrastructure are changing. The last decade we sped up server acquisition by putting software and APIs in control of the base infrastructure. This decade we will make our infrastructure better at running our applications easily, securely, and consistently.
3:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 10/12/2015
Chris Hawley (Blackrock 3 Partners), Ron Vidal (Blackrock 3 Partners), Rob Schnepp (Blackrock 3 Partners)
The Incident Management System (IMS) has been battle tested by the American fire service for over 40 years across fires, rescues, hazardous materials incidents, and every other type of emergency. Learn how we’ve adapted IMS for IT, and get an early look at content from our forthcoming book from O’Reilly Media: "Incident Management for IT Operations."
4:35pm–5:15pm Wednesday, 10/14/2015
Philip Tellis (Akamai), Nic Jansma (Akamai)
Slides:   1-PDF 
It’s hard to tell when a new component of an SPA was requested as a result of an intentional user action or something else. Add on the various ways of building SPAs, ranging from raw XHR to Angular, Backbone, and sometimes all of the above, and you have an interesting problem in traffic analysis. Find out how boomerang measures the performance of SPAs in a way that works for real websites.
1:30pm–3:00pm Monday, 10/12/2015
Tammy Everts (SpeedCurve), Cliff Crocker (Akamai)
Slides:   external link
There’s no one-size-fits-all approach to metrics. In this session, we’ll walk through various metrics that answer performance questions from multiple perspectives — from designer and DevOps to CRO and CEO. You’ll walk away with a better understanding of your options, as well as a clear understanding of how to choose the right metric for the right audience.
3:40pm–4:20pm Wednesday, 10/14/2015
Patrick Debois (Small Town Heroes)
Slides:   external link
In the mobile world, continuous delivery is rare. A lot has to do with the emerging/changing toolset in the mobile world. In this presentation, I want to give: * An overview of the current available toolset to automate almost everything in the delivery process * How to get valuable feedback from production back to the developers * How this relates to DevOps and a better feedback cycle
11:20am–12:00pm Tuesday, 10/13/2015
James Turnbull (Glitch)
Building a modern monitoring environment is more than just using the latest awesome tools, collecting all the data, displaying numerous graphs, and knowing when things go wrong. A modern monitoring environment is more than tools and infrastructure. It's a service. A service you provide to your whole team: developers, operations, security, and the business.
2:00pm–2:30pm Monday, 10/12/2015
Nathan Duthoit (Wave Accounting Inc.)
PCI is critical if you wish to process payments for customers. Sadly, compliance can be especially onerous to achieve while retaining agile, lean teams with DevOps mindsets. In this session we will examine how a small team was able to leverage AWS, automation, infrastructure as code, and SaaS platforms to achieve PCI compliance on time, on budget, and without discarding our DevOps culture.
11:20am–12:00pm Tuesday, 10/13/2015
Jan Schaumann (The Internet)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This is a discussion of the ethical obligations in Internet Operations, where a binding code of ethics or even a definition of various professions has been missing. We will review the concept of a professionally defined code of ethics, and consider the impact software and infrastructure engineers have in a world where software and internet applications are increasingly dominating our lives.
2:10pm–2:50pm Tuesday, 10/13/2015
Baron Schwartz (VividCortex)
Slides:   1-PDF 
If you're monitoring a lot of data in an event stream (as VividCortex does query traffic monitoring, for example), sampling the stream usefully can be a hard problem. There are all sorts of edge cases and bad consequences. This talk explains how a sketch - a probabilistic data structure - turned out to be the answer for us.
4:35pm–5:15pm Tuesday, 10/13/2015
Puneet Khanduri (Sn126), Arun Kejariwal (Independent)
The service oriented architecture (SOA) at Twitter comprises of hundreds of services. Each service pushes out code at velocity. In light of this, we developed a statistically robust approach to detect both functional and performance regressions. This is critical in order to minimize impact on the end-user experience. In this talk we shall walk through the challenges and how we addressed them.
4:35pm–5:15pm Wednesday, 10/14/2015
Bridget Kromhout (Microsoft), Peter Shannon (DramaFever)
At DramaFever, the largest streaming video site for international content, we operate a next-generation internet TV platform using Docker, Chef, Packer, and more to manage the AWS instances serving our main Django application and Go microservices. We’ll detail how we build and scale our infrastructure to serve more than 20 million viewers.
2:10pm–2:50pm Wednesday, 10/14/2015
Jamesha Fisher (GitHub)
Slides:   external link
Security is as essential to the DevOps process as any other team involved; however, much of the time they're an afterthought. In my talk, I explain why it's more important than ever that they're included at the DevOps collaborative table, and show this by walking through the process of securing a popular configuration management tool, Chef Server.
4:25pm–4:55pm Monday, 10/12/2015
Tapabrata Pal (Capital One), Ty Sbano (Capital One)
DevOps has arrived at large enterprises, but security often gets left in the dust. It is always challenging to embed security in the delivery pipeline for a large regulated enterprise like Capital One. In this session, we will review the tools, automation, collaboration between organizations, and feedback mechanisms that Capital One has implemented to enable secured continuous delivery.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 10/12/2015
Björn Rabenstein (Grafana Labs), Julius Volz (SoundCloud)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Prometheus is a popular open-source monitoring system and time series database written in Go. It features a multi-dimensional data model, a flexible query language, and integrates aspects all the way from client-side instrumentation to alerting. Participants in this tutorial will instrument a toy service and set up all critical components of the Prometheus ecosystem.
9:40am–10:05am Monday, 10/12/2015
After Agile/Scrum as our development methodology, we made the transition to DevOps, with joint responsibility for production together with a representative of the business. The next step is to transform our entire organisation into tribes, squads, and chapter leads. Business and IT are now very close to each other. How will they cooperate?
11:00am–12:30pm Monday, 10/12/2015
Mike Rembetsy (Bloomberg), Patrick McDonnell (Etsy)
Slides:   1-PDF 
How can your organization scale management without sacrificing the culture you have worked hard to build? Grow your own managers! This talk will focus on the steps Etsy has taken to overcome the pitfalls that lie in the path of transitioning from individual contributor to manager, and how to encourage those who want to become managers for the right reasons.
3:40pm–4:20pm Tuesday, 10/13/2015
J. Paul Reed (Release Engineering Approaches), Jim Kimball (HedgeServ Corporation)
Service level agreements are the bedrock upon which many relationships in our industry are based. But are they serving us well? In this talk, we'll deconstruct SLAs, examine how they incentivize precisely the opposite behaviors we actually want while operating complex socio-technical systems, and explore what might replace this ubiquitous clause of every business contract.
11:20am–12:00pm Wednesday, 10/14/2015
Pete Cheslock (Threat Stack)
Computers are hard, and security is even harder. Let's discuss the role of security in this new *aaS landscape. We'll talk about things to do when you have a dedicated InfoSec team, tools you can use when you don't, and how you can strengthen your security posture while maintaining your ability to move quickly and deliver value to your customers.
1:15pm–1:55pm Wednesday, 10/14/2015
Joseph Lynch (Yelp), Josh Snyder (Yelp)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Yelp’s move to a service oriented architecture has required us to change the way we think about datastores. With the ability to rapidly provision application services, we have also found ourselves supporting many datastores with varying SLAs. This talk will discuss the technical and cultural elements we dealt with as we empowered developers to choose from a menu of datastores.

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