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Make Data Work
Oct 15–17, 2014 • New York, NY

Office Hour with Brian Granger (Cal Poly San Luis Obispo) and Fernando Perez (University of California at Berkeley)

Brian Granger (Cal Poly San Luis Obispo), Fernando Perez (UC Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
10:30am–11:00am Friday, 10/17/2014
Office Hour
Location: Table C

Stop by and check in with two of the co-founders of the Jupyter Project (and the new multiuser Jupyter Notebook server). Brian and Fernando can tell you about:

  • Using IPython/Jupyter notebook for telling data and code driven stories
  • Using the Notebook with languages other than Python (such as R and Julia)
  • How to integration the Notebook and Google Drive
Photo of Brian Granger

Brian Granger

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

Brian Granger is an Assistant Professor of Physics at Cal Poly State
University in San Luis Obispo, CA. He has a background in theoretical
atomic, molecular and optical physics, with a Ph.D from the University of Colorado. His current research interests include quantum computing, parallel and distributed computing and interactive computing environments for scientific and technical computing. He is a core developer of the IPython project and co-founder of Project Jupyter and is an active contributor to a number of other open source projects focused on scientific computing in Python. He is @ellisonbg on Twitter and GitHub.

Photo of Fernando Perez

Fernando Perez

UC Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Fernando PĂ©rez is a staff scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a founding investigator of the Berkeley Institute for Data Science at UC Berkeley, created in 2013. His research focuses on creating tools for modern computational research and data science across domain disciplines, with an emphasis on high-level languages, interactive and literate computing, and reproducible research. He created IPython while a graduate student in 2001 and continues to lead its evolution into Project Jupyter, now as a collaborative effort with a talented team that does all the hard work. Fernando regularly lectures about scientific computing and data science and is a member of the Python Software Foundation, a founding member of NumFOCUS, and a National Academy of Science Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow. He is also the recipient of the 2012 Award for the Advancement of Free Software from the Free Software Foundation. Fernando holds a PhD in particle physics from the University of Colorado at Boulder, which he followed with postdoctoral research in applied mathematics and developing numerical algorithms.