Schedule: Design sessions

Data won’t help if we can’t understand it, and if it doesn’t change our behavior. The design track tackles user experience, new interfaces, visualization and examines the role of narrative, context, and interactivity.

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Location: 120-121
Average rating: ****.
(4.05, 20 ratings)
Communicating Data Clearly describes how to draw clear, concise, accurate graphs that are easier to understand than many of the graphs one sees today. The tutorial emphasizes how to avoid common mistakes that produce confusing or even misleading graphs. Graphs for one, two, three, and many variables are covered as well as general principles for creating effective graphs. Read more.
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Location: 120-121
Sebastian Gutierrez (DashingD3js.com)
Average rating: ****.
(4.53, 15 ratings)
D3.js has a very steep learning curve. However, there are three main concepts that, once you get your head around them, will make the climb much easier. Focusing on these three main concepts, we will walk through many examples to teach the fundamental building blocks of D3.js. Read more.
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Location: 115
Jesús Gorriti (Fjord)
Average rating: ***..
(3.17, 6 ratings)
A lot of decisions are made for us based on data – but are we at risk of crossing over into the ‘uncanny valley’ of over-familiar personalisation? Designers need to focus on human elements, rather than allowing tech to lead the way. Jesus Gorriti will discuss SMART, a collaboration with the Harvard Medical School where the pediatric growth chart was reinvented using big data and design thinking. Read more.
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Location: 115
Juliette Melton (New York Times)
Average rating: ***..
(3.67, 12 ratings)
Making meaning and value from data is not only a job for data scientists. Ethnographic researchers, subject matter experts, visual communication designers, and behavioral scientists all play key roles in the data journey. In this talk, we'll explore the data value chain, and share opportunities for how all of us -- whether data scientists or not -- can create and use data for insight and impact. Read more.
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Location: 115
Kim Rees (Periscopic)
Average rating: **...
(2.75, 8 ratings)
We have the unfortunate tendency to fit our problems to the technology at hand. We should be looking for ways to bend technology to our problems...our big problems. Kim will take a long look into the future of data covering the controversial and hopeful areas of privacy, open data, hacking, ETL relief, latent machines, M2M, and mass crowdsourcing. Read more.
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Location: 115
Håkan Jonsson (Sony Mobile Communications)
Average rating: ***..
(3.50, 2 ratings)
Experiences from development of contextual applications, especially on data, design and privacy issues Read more.
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Location: 115
Garrett Grolemund (RStudio)
Average rating: ****.
(4.78, 18 ratings)
The ggvis package makes it easy to create interactive data graphics with R, with a declarative syntax similar to that of ggplot2. Like ggplot2, ggvis uses concepts from the grammar of graphics, but it also adds the ability to create interactive graphics and deliver them over the web. Read more.
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Location: 115
Michael Freeman (University of Washington)
Average rating: ****.
(4.47, 17 ratings)
Complex relationships in big data require involved graphical displays which can be intimidating to users. This talk uses real world examples to identify confusing elements in online visualizations, and articulates a framework for using animation and story-telling to amplify their impact and usability. Tangible and generalizable techniques applicable across fields will be presented. Read more.