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Ari Gesher

Ari Gesher
Director, Software Engineering, Kairos Aerospace

Website | @alephbass

Ari Gesher is the founding director of software engineering at Kairos Aerospace, a startup building and operating the next-generation of airborne and spaceborne sensors for monitoring oil and gas infrastructure. Ari also serves as consulting architect for Jupiter, a company productizing high-quality datasets that describe the long-term effects of climate change. Previously, he was a very early engineer at Palantir Technologies and later served as Palantir’s engineering ambassador to the tech community at large; before Palantir, he was the maintainer of the SourceForge.net open source archive. Ari is the coauthor of The Architecture of Privacy, which explains how to responsibly hold data about people while preserving their privacy to the greatest extent possible. Ari is a frequent speaker on various topics, including the need for modern, high-leverage engineers to work on substantive problems, human-computer symbiosis as system design aesthetic, the limits of automated decision making, and privacy architectures for a world where everything is recorded.

Sessions

Ari Gesher (Kairos Aerospace)
Average rating: ***..
(3.25, 4 ratings)
Statistical methods tends to fail when there is someone on the other side of a problem actively evading detection. Here we look at three systems successfully used to fight adaptive adversaries engaged in fraud and cyber attacks. Using a combination of big data techniques and interactive human analysis, these systems are protecting commercial banks, pharmaceutical companies, and governments. Read more.
Moderated by:
Jim Stogdill (O'Reilly Media, Inc.)
Panelists:
Brian Behlendorf (The Hyperledger Project at the Linux Foundation), Adrian Cockcroft (AWS), Ari Gesher (Kairos Aerospace), Kimberly Stedman (Freelance)
The always-popular Great Debate series returns to Strata. In this Oxford-style debate, two opposing teams take opposing positions. We poll the audience, and the teams try to sway opinions. It’ll be a fast-paced, sometimes irreverent look at some of the core challenges of putting data to work. Read more.