Presented By O'Reilly and Cloudera
Make Data Work
March 13–14, 2017: Training
March 14–16, 2017: Tutorials & Conference
San Jose, CA

Big data as a force for good

Craig Hibbeler (MasterCard Advisors), David Goodman (Nethope), Mike Olson (Cloudera), Laura Eisenhardt (iKnow Solutions), Steven Totman (Cloudera)
11:50am12:30pm Thursday, March 16, 2017
Law, ethics, governance
Location: LL21 B Level: Non-technical
Secondary topics:  Data for good

Who is this presentation for?

  • Anyone with an interested in using data for good and addressing the unique challenges humanitarian organizations and not-for-profits face in the big data world

What you'll learn

  • Understand the role of big data and analytics in delivering humanitarian aid
  • Explore the current state of big data and analytics adoption within the humanitarian community
  • Discover the unique challenges aid organizations face with data protection, privacy, and informed consent
  • Learn the complexities of data sharing between humanitarian organizations and funding entities
  • Understand the consequences of security incidents and data leaks
  • Explore work underway to better protect the data and livelihood of the most at-risk populations in the world

Description

Humanitarian aid organizations are increasingly using technology to streamline operations, reduce costs, and improve program effectiveness. Where programs were previously delivered by volunteers collecting enrollment information with paper and pen, they are now enabled by mobile devices and cloud-connected reporting platforms. The flexibility provided by these digital tools allows programs to collect traditional program data more quickly and get additional enrollee data with relative ease. Today, more reporting and better program monitoring and evaluation are within reach for cash-strapped and resource-constrained humanitarian organizations.

Many complex challenges are front-and-center for the humanitarian community with this big data revolution. All participants in the humanitarian value chain—aid recipients, NGOs, donors, and governments—must grapple with the complicated issues of data protection, informed consent, privacy, and data sharing in ways previously unimagined. Left unmet, these challenges jeopardize the reputation and effectiveness of a humanitarian mission and expose program participants to tremendous harm. Careful consideration must be given and thoughtful approaches developed in order to serve and protect the most vulnerable communities in the world.

In a panel moderated by Steve Totman, Mike Olson (cofounder of Cloudera and board member at Datakind), Laura Eisenhardt (from Cognizant and founder of Digital Conscience), Craig Hibbeler (senior managing consultant at MasterCard Advisors), and David Goodman (NetHope’s CIO in residence) discuss real-world projects using big data as a force for good to address problems ranging from Zika to child trafficking. If you’re interested in how big data can benefit humankind, join in to learn how to get involved.

Topics include:

  • The role of big data and analytics in delivering humanitarian aid
  • The current state of big data and analytics adoption within the humanitarian community
  • The unique challenges aid organizations face with data protection, privacy, and informed consent
  • The complexities of data sharing between humanitarian organizations and funding entities
  • The consequences of security incidents and data leaks
  • Work underway to better protect the data and livelihood of the most at-risk populations in the world
Photo of Craig Hibbeler

Craig Hibbeler

MasterCard Advisors

Craig Hibbeler is principal for big data and security within MasterCard Advisors’ Enterprise Information Management consultancy practice. In his role, Craig leverages practical hands-on experience and broad industry and platform knowledge to develop, execute, secure, and drive results with customers’ big data platforms and initiatives.

Photo of David Goodman

David Goodman

Nethope

David Goodman is CIO in residence at NetHope, where he focuses on bringing both technical and thought leadership to bear on the implementation of NetHope’s strategic plan. Toward that end, he works on developing strategies to bolster NetHope’s relationship with the technology sector and works with the NetHope leadership team to ensure NetHope activities are properly orientated toward its key constituents, CIOs, and technology leaders in the global development sector. Previously, David served as the CIO of the International Rescue Committee, where he had global responsibility for all technology-related activities and oversaw teams focused on infrastructure, application development, user services, and project management.

Photo of Mike Olson

Mike Olson

Cloudera

Mike Olson cofounded Cloudera in 2008 and served as its CEO until 2013, when he took on his current role of chief strategy officer. As CSO, Mike is responsible for Cloudera’s product strategy, open source leadership, engineering alignment, and direct engagement with customers. Previously, Mike was CEO of Sleepycat Software, makers of Berkeley DB, the open source embedded database engine, and he spent two years at Oracle Corporation as vice president for embedded technologies after Oracle’s acquisition of Sleepycat. Prior to joining Sleepycat, Mike held technical and business positions at database vendors Britton Lee, Illustra Information Technologies, and Informix Software. Mike holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley.

Photo of Laura Eisenhardt

Laura Eisenhardt

iKnow Solutions

Laura Eisenhardt is EVP at iKnow Solutions Europe and the founder of DigitalConscience.org, a CSR platform designed to create opportunities for technical resources (specifically expats) to give back to communities with their unique skills while making a huge impact locally. Laura has led massive programs for the World Health Organization across Africa, collecting big data in over 165 languages, and specializes in data quality and consistency. Laura is also COO for the American Institute of Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery (AIMHS.org), a nonprofit designed to educate the public and heart surgeons worldwide on how to do open heart surgery without splitting open the chest. Why? People that have complex heart surgery in a minimally invasive procedure return to work in two weeks versus 9–12 months, which has a substantial impact on society, family finances, depression, and cost for all.

Photo of Steven Totman

Steven Totman

Cloudera

Steven Totman is Cloudera’s big data subject-matter expert, helping companies monetize their big data assets using Cloudera’s Enterprise Data Hub. Steve works with over 180 customers worldwide and helps across verticals in architectures around data management tools, data models, and ethical data usage. Previously, Steve ran strategy for a mainframe-to-Hadoop company and drove product strategy at IBM for DataStage and Information Server after joining with the Ascential acquisition. He architected IBM’s Infosphere product suite and led the design and creation of governance and metadata products like Business Glossary and Metadata Workbench. Steve holds several patents in data integration and governance- and metadata-related designs. Although he is based in NYC, Steve is happiest onsite with customers wherever they may be in the world.