Presented By O'Reilly and Cloudera
Make Data Work
Sept 29–Oct 1, 2015 • New York, NY

Being a small, global, 3000-person company

Martin Fowler (ThoughtWorks), Rachel Laycock (ThoughtWorks)
1:30pm–2:30pm Tuesday, 09/29/2015
Cultivate
Location: Hall B
Slides:   1-FILE 

ThoughtWorks has developed into a 3000-person worldwide company, yet still has much of the pragmatic, informal culture from a decade ago when it was a tenth of the size. We’ll explore how we’ve managed to do this, and how we try to influence our clients – who are usually much more corporate and hierarchical.

Photo of Martin Fowler

Martin Fowler

ThoughtWorks

Martin Fowler is an author, speaker, consultant, and self-described loud-mouthed pundit on the topic of software development. He works for ThoughtWorks, a software delivery company, where he has the exceedingly inappropriate title of chief scientist. Martin has written half-a-dozen books on software development, including Refactoring and Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture. He writes regularly about software development on Martinfowler.com. Martin’s main interest is to understand how to design software systems to maximize the productivity of development teams, which includes both the patterns of good software design and the processes that support software design. He has become a big fan of Agile approaches and the resulting focus on evolutionary software design. Martin doesn’t come up with original ideas but does a pretty good job of recognizing and packaging the ideas of others—or, as Brian Foote puts it, he’s “an intellectual jackal with good taste in carrion.”

Photo of Rachel Laycock

Rachel Laycock

ThoughtWorks

Rachel Laycock is a market technical principal at ThoughtWorks in New York, where she has played the role of coach, trainer, technical lead, architect, and developer, coaching teams on Agile and continuous delivery technical practices. She is now a member of the Technical Advisory Board to the CTO, which regularly produces the ThoughtWorks Technology Radar. Rachel has over 10 years of experience in systems development and has worked on a wide range of technologies and the integration of many disparate systems. She is fascinated by problem solving and has discovered that people problems are often more difficult to solve than software ones.