Hardware, Software & the Internet of Things
June 23–25, 2015 • San Francisco, CA
 

Solid 2015 Schedule

Use the calendar icon [calendar icon] next to each listing you want to attend. Then use the personal schedule button below to generate your schedule.

Wednesday, June 24

Herbst Pavilion
9:00am Plenary
Room: Herbst Pavilion
Why bio is the new digital Jon Bruner (O'Reilly Media), Joichi Ito (MIT Media Lab)
9:10am Plenary
Room: Herbst Pavilion
Rethinking everyday things Robert Brunner (Ammunition)
9:25am Plenary
Room: Herbst Pavilion
Dematerializing auto manufacturing Kevin Czinger (Divergent Microfactories, Inc.)
9:45am Plenary
Room: Herbst Pavilion
The Machinist and the Artisan Danielle Applestone (Other Machine Co.)
9:55am Plenary
Room: Herbst Pavilion
Making the future – what will makers dream up next? Mark Hatch (TechShop)
10:40am Plenary
Room: Herbst Pavilion
The governance of innovation Yancey Strickler (Kickstarter)
10:55am Plenary
Room: Herbst Pavilion
Killer apps will propel IoT adoption Rob Soderbery (Cisco)
11:05am Plenary
Room: Herbst Pavilion
From ordinary to enchanted: Designing embedded objects David Rose (Ditto | MIT Media Lab)
11:20am Plenary
Room: Herbst Pavilion
Building a fab for synthetic biology Joe Jacobson (MIT Media Lab)
11:35am Plenary
Room: Herbst Pavilion
Primordial - when things wake up Mickey McManus (Autodesk)
11:45am Plenary
Room: Herbst Pavilion
Pop-up Factory David Cranor (Solid), Mengmeng Chen (Seeed), Marcelo Coelho (Marcelo Coelho Studio / Alike), Will Walker (Formlabs)
1:15pm Reality has changed Helen Papagiannis (Augmented Stories Inc.)
2:05pm Moonshots and the physical world Astro Teller (Google)
4:35pm TBC
5:25pm Hardware by the numbers Ben Einstein (Bolt)
Fleet Room (Bldg D)
1:15pm Beyond the hype: Mapping the value of IoT Michael Chui (McKinsey Global Institute)
4:35pm Data analytics for the full IoT lifecycle Caroline Fernandes (Keen IO)
5:25pm Sparking a revolution – monitoring the bulk power system for geomagnetic disturbances Sean Murphy (PingThings), Jerry Schuman (PingThings, Inc.)
Fire House
1:15pm Why can't hardware be more like software? Thomas Kennedy (ReFactory)
4:35pm Getting it here Renee DiResta (Haven)
5:25pm The manufacturing triangle: The key to hardware success Scott Miller (Dragon Innovation, Inc.)
Cowell Theater (Herbst Pavilion)
1:15pm Understanding industrial design: Principles for UX and interaction design Shu Kuen Chang (IDEO), Simon King (CMU Design Center)
2:05pm Semantic listening: Experiments in capturing context, not content Noah Feehan (New York Times R&D Lab)
2:55pm User research for the Internet of Things Kate Benson (af83), Aurélia Lacombe (af83)
4:35pm Zero UI: The end of the screen-based interface Andy Goodman (Cortica)
5:25pm Interacting with a world of connected objects Tom Coates (Thington Inc.)
Southside Theater (Bldg D)
1:15pm HTTP is not enough Matt Biddulph (Hackdiary)
2:05pm ABCs of IoT consortiums Ian Skerrett (Eclipse Foundation)
4:35pm Music, machines and meaning: What art teaches us about robotics and networks Andrew Cavatorta (http://andycavatorta.com/)
5:25pm Thing Theory: Making sense of IoT complexity Sally Applin (I.E.E.E)
Generals Residence
1:15pm Robots doing biology Peter Sand (Modular Science)
2:55pm Assembling custom DNA anytime, anywhere Connor Dickie (Synbiota Inc.), Justin Pahara (Synbiota Inc.)
4:35pm Building a beautiful future: Consumer biotechnology and the power of "Wow!" Keira Havens (Revolution Bioengineering), Nikolai Braun (Revolution Bioengineering)
5:25pm Engineering biology with Antha Sean Ward (Synthace Ltd)
C 210 (Bldg C)
1:15pm Robot swarms for automated construction Justin Werfel (Harvard University, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering)
2:05pm A conversational Internet of Things Nick O'Leary (IBM)
2:55pm Advanced logistics for advanced companies Chris Swearingen (FedEx)
7:30am Coffee Break
Room: Festival Pavilion
10:10am Morning Break sponsored by Divergent Microfactories
Room: Festival Pavilion
12:15pm Lunch sponsored by Intel
Room: Festival Pavilion
3:35pm Afternoon Break
Room: Festival Pavilion
6:15pm Sponsored by American Family Insurance
Room: Festival Pavilion
Demo Pavilion Reception (Sponsored by American Family Insurance)
9:00am-9:10am (10m) Keynote
Why bio is the new digital
Jon Bruner (O'Reilly Media), Joichi Ito (MIT Media Lab)
Solid Program Chairs Jon Bruner, O'Reilly Media, and Joichi Ito, MIT Media Lab, welcome you to the first day of keynotes.
9:10am-9:25am (15m) Keynote
Rethinking everyday things
Robert Brunner (Ammunition)
Robert Brunner, founder of Ammunition, will talk about the unique opportunity designers are faced with to rethink the purpose and design of everyday things through the lens of intelligence and connectivity.
9:25am-9:45am (20m) Sponsored
Dematerializing auto manufacturing
Kevin Czinger (Divergent Microfactories, Inc.)
Kevin Czinger, founder and CEO, Divergent Microfactories, Inc.
9:45am-9:55am (10m) Keynote
The Machinist and the Artisan
Danielle Applestone (Other Machine Co.)
The problems we face are so complex that we have to use everything at our disposal to solve them: data, hardware, software, intuition, robots, empathy. The superheroes of the future are the MacGyvers who use CAD software and robots as readily as bubble gum and paperclips.
9:55am-10:10am (15m) Keynote
Making the future – what will makers dream up next?
Mark Hatch (TechShop)
Fabrication labs like TechShop, the nation’s largest chain of makerspaces, have made it easier for anyone with an idea and a passion to build their dreams. In the last 10 years, makers have been at the forefront of turning big ideas into disruptive innovations. TechShop will discuss the rise of the Maker Movement and what dreams will become realities next.
10:40am-10:55am (15m) Keynote
The governance of innovation
Yancey Strickler (Kickstarter)
Kickstarter projects often go on to incredibly bright stages. GRAMMY and Oscar wins. Acquisitions by Logitech, Samsung, and Facebook. Showcases at MoMA and TED. Trips to outer space. And far beyond.
10:55am-11:05am (10m) Sponsored
Killer apps will propel IoT adoption
Rob Soderbery (Cisco)
As part of his day job, Rob Soderbery, SVP of enterprise products and solutions for Cisco, discusses IOT strategy with business and technology leaders from around the world. In this session, he shares his insights into what it will take to catalyze widespread adoption of IOT and drive a virtuous cycle of adoption, funding, and more development.
11:05am-11:20am (15m) Keynote
From ordinary to enchanted: Designing embedded objects
David Rose (Ditto | MIT Media Lab)
Some believe the future will look like more of the same—more smartphones, phablets, and app stores. David Rose, award-winning entrepreneur and MIT Media Lab scientist, has a different vision.
11:20am-11:35am (15m) Keynote
Building a fab for synthetic biology
Joe Jacobson (MIT Media Lab)
Similar to the way in which we use fabs to build microprocessors and software to program them, the field of synthetic biology offers the prospect of re-programming biological organisms to enable a wide range of new applications, from chemicals to food to pharmaceuticals.
11:35am-11:45am (10m) Sponsored
Primordial - when things wake up
Mickey McManus (Autodesk)
We are fast approaching an era of unprecedented complexity as more and more things, environments, and systems become interconnected. Navigating this world will require coming to terms with three disruptive trends: digital manufacturing, machine learning, and the Internet of Things.
11:45am-12:10pm (25m) Keynote
Pop-up Factory
David Cranor (Solid), Mengmeng Chen (Seeed), Marcelo Coelho (Marcelo Coelho Studio / Alike), Will Walker (Formlabs)
Join us for a blow-by-blow description of how we were able to organize six teams across three countries and two hemispheres in a radically collaborative and radically agile product development process to make Solid's Pop-Up factory demonstration a reality.
1:15pm-1:55pm (40m) Frontiers
Reality has changed
Helen Papagiannis (Augmented Stories Inc.)
How augmented reality, virtual reality, wearable tech, IoT, and machine learning are coming together to create a new digital and physical reality. The boundaries of the digital and physical are blurring. New (augmented) realities are emerging that combine multiple technologies to forever change the way we experience the world.
2:05pm-2:45pm (40m) Frontiers
Moonshots and the physical world
Astro Teller (Google)
Astro Teller, Google[x]
2:55pm-3:35pm (40m) Frontiers
Beyond Hadoop: What the world's devices could tell us and how we might affect social change
Mike Olson (Cloudera)
Earth’s current population is seven billion and will be nine billion by 2050. We consume 1.5 times more resources tha we are capable of producing. As resources become more scarce, the stakes for solving global issues have never been higher. Learn how the data collected from IoT devices is already helping to solve societal problems and what the next wave of social change may look like.
4:35pm-5:15pm (40m)
Session
To be confirmed
5:25pm-6:05pm (40m) Startups
Hardware by the numbers
Ben Einstein (Bolt)
Hardware by the Numbers with Ben Einstein is aimed at painting a rough numerical picture of what starting a scalable hardware business looks like. From team to prototyping, financing, manufacturing, logistics, marketing, retail, and exits, here are some rules of thumb to use when building a physical product business.
1:15pm-1:55pm (40m) Data
Beyond the hype: Mapping the value of IoT
Michael Chui (McKinsey Global Institute)
McKinsey Global Institute partner Michael Chui will present findings from a new, comprehensive research report that analyzes where and how value can be created through IoT. Over 150 use cases were studied in various settings (e.g., human, home, city, factory), mapping the value potential in regions around the globe. We will also describe groundbreaking research on the value of interoperability.
2:05pm-2:45pm (40m) Data
Data rich and attention poor: Intention-based data architecture for intuitive IoT design
Abe Gong (Superconductive Health)
Typical IoT applications must “do what the user expects” based on contextual data, instead of direct commands from users. These constraints mean that IoT designs are only powerful and intuitive to the extent that their data architectures are capable of expressing user intent. Drawing on experience at Jawbone and Metta, this talk shares principles for building intention-based data architectures.
2:55pm-3:35pm (40m) Data
I've got a ton of sensor data...now what? Five approaches to value extraction from Internet of Things data
Cameron Turner (The Data Guild)
The 20-teens will be defined as the years when we gave over control of the world's systems to the machines. Elon Musk has described this as the greatest existential threat to humankind, but we all recognize the tremendous opportunities afforded by this change. In this session, The Data Guild's Cameron Turner will walk through several approaches to getting the most from your IoT data sources.
4:35pm-5:15pm (40m) Data
Data analytics for the full IoT lifecycle
Caroline Fernandes (Keen IO)
IoT data is best collected and analyzed through the full lifecycle–from prototyping and manufacturing through usage and RMA. Adding data analytics to the stack is challenging for IoT companies, who are already spread thin between hardware, firmware, mobile, and web apps. I'll discuss diverse tools and case studies for tracking the IoT lifecycle.
5:25pm-6:05pm (40m) Data
Sparking a revolution – monitoring the bulk power system for geomagnetic disturbances
Sean Murphy (PingThings), Jerry Schuman (PingThings, Inc.)
In 1859, a coronal mass ejection erupted from the sun and, just 17 hours later, hit the earth’s magnetosphere, allowing some telegraphs to transmit messages even after being unplugged. If a geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) of this magnitude occurred today, the US alone would face up to $3 trillion in damages. Fortunately, we now have the data and ability to identify and explain anomalous behavior.
1:15pm-1:55pm (40m) Get It Made
Why can't hardware be more like software?
Thomas Kennedy (ReFactory)
Why is hardware so difficult? We examine what hardware development and manufacturing can learn from software. Hardware development spans several ECAD programs, dozens of suppliers, and complex distribution. Can it ever be as simple as launching a new Rails or Node app?
2:05pm-2:45pm (40m) Get It Made
2D vs. 3D vs. 4D prototyping: The right resolution for the right prototype
Ryan Vinyard (Highway1)
Many hardware projects involve hundreds or even thousands of prototypes, though the public will typically only see one 3D prototype representative of the final product. Each prior prototype should be a test to determine the right final product to build. By using the appropriate prototyping methods at each development stage, companies can be more certain that they end up shipping the best product.
2:55pm-3:35pm (40m) Get It Made
One year to production: Manufacturing a smart device for 100k
Julia Ko (SurePod Corporation)
SurePod is a first gen mini cellphone built in a year for 100k. The entrepreneurs bootstrapped development and contract manufacturing overseas while building a dealer network in parallel. This session highlights methodologies on managing electronics manufacturers and the supply chain in Shenzhen. Get tools and insight into what it’s like working with factories at each stage in the cycle.
4:35pm-5:15pm (40m) Get It Made
Getting it here
Renee DiResta (Haven)
Ninety percent of the world's goods cross the globe on container ships. In the United States, 3.5 million truck drivers deliver $671 billion of freight each year. The logistics ecosystem is massive, and software is transforming it. This talk covers the "APIs for the physical world" that are fundamentally transforming how people move things.
5:25pm-6:05pm (40m) Get It Made
The manufacturing triangle: The key to hardware success
Scott Miller (Dragon Innovation, Inc.)
The foundation of a successful hardware company is built upon many things - a great team, a product with consumer interest and appeal, funding, and so much more. But ultimately none of these things matter without a solid manufacturing plan and a clear understanding of the manufacturing triangle: Cost, quality, and schedule.
1:15pm-1:55pm (40m) Design
Understanding industrial design: Principles for UX and interaction design
Shu Kuen Chang (IDEO), Simon King (CMU Design Center)
As computation and network connectivity extend beyond the screen into products and environments, interaction designers find themselves addressing new UX challenges in the physical world. Although the context is new, much can be learned from long-standing principles of industrial design. This talk will highlight relevant examples and their application to the IoT context.
2:05pm-2:45pm (40m) Design
Semantic listening: Experiments in capturing context, not content
Noah Feehan (New York Times R&D Lab)
I'll introduce the concept of "semantic listening," a sensing strategy that emphasizes context over content. Think "what did we talk about" instead of "what temperature was the room." I'll show the Listening Table, our most recent experiment, and walk through the design decisions and fabrication process, concluding with a peek at a couple projects currently in the works.
2:55pm-3:35pm (40m) Design
User research for the Internet of Things
Kate Benson (af83), Aurélia Lacombe (af83)
How to conduct user research regarding the integration of connected products in users’ daily lives by means of a diary study and employing anthropological methods in order to understand behaviors. Opting for "How" instead of the "Five Whys.
4:35pm-5:15pm (40m) Design
Zero UI: The end of the screen-based interface
Andy Goodman (Cortica)
It's hard to imagine a world not dominated by screens, but that may well be where we are heading. We're entering a new era of “Zero UI” where movements, voice, glances, and thoughts can make systems respond to us. In this talk I will explore the technologies, theories, and future scenarios of Zero UI: what it means to design and build these interfaces; and what it will mean to live alongside them.
5:25pm-6:05pm (40m) Design
Interacting with a world of connected objects
Tom Coates (Thington Inc.)
IoT is on the verge of going mainstream, but as yet we're unprepared for a world with hundreds of millions of objects all around us potentially controllable and broadcasting information 24 hours a day. In this talk, Tom will look a little further out than the object+app model, and review the possible ways we'll use IoT in the future.
1:15pm-1:55pm (40m) Protocols & Platforms
HTTP is not enough
Matt Biddulph (Hackdiary)
Connecting every device on the planet would be impossible without the internet. But are the protocols, technologies, and implementation practices that we used to build the web enough to power this new generation? Drawing on experience from building an Internet of Things software platform, this developer-centric talk will give practical technology advice for implementers.
2:05pm-2:45pm (40m) Protocols & Platforms
ABCs of IoT consortiums
Ian Skerrett (Eclipse Foundation)
In the past two years, a number of industry consortiums have begun focusing on the Internet of Things. However, it is not always clear what the focus of each consortium is and what they are delivering. This presentation will do a survey of the major IoT initiatives and present a scorecard on their openness, availability, and adoption.
2:55pm-3:35pm (40m) Technology
Adafruit.IO: Empowering people to build an Internet of Things they trust
Tony DiCola (Adafruit)
From its beginning ten years ago in Limor “Ladyada” Fried’s dorm room, Adafruit has been dedicated to open hardware that empowers its customers to build great things. This presentation will show how Adafruit applies this principle to the Internet of Things with the new Adafruit.IO service, allowing makers to interact with their creations over the internet.
4:35pm-5:15pm (40m) Frontiers
Music, machines and meaning: What art teaches us about robotics and networks
Andrew Cavatorta (http://andycavatorta.com/)
Our current obsession with technologically mediated experiences has roots that go back four centuries to automata, carillons, and pipe organs. This history informs my work in both technology and art. And this deep context helps illuminate the future directions of robotics, art, and the melding of the virtual and physical.
5:25pm-6:05pm (40m) Frontiers
Thing Theory: Making sense of IoT complexity
Sally Applin (I.E.E.E)
Engineers, developers and designers will bear the brunt of constructing IT relationships within the Solid world, making sense of big data outcomes, and managing relationships between people and technologies. This talk discusses enabling more robust messaging to support IT relationships, through Thing Theory, a way to add socially aware software agents applied in carefully considered contexts.
1:15pm-1:55pm (40m) Bio
Robots doing biology
Peter Sand (Modular Science)
Biology experiments are mainly carried out by human hands. Robotic machines can help with some parts of the process, but they are expensive, hard to use, and do not cover many daily lab activities. This talk will discuss new approaches to lab automation, building on ideas from DIY biology and DIY fabrication.
2:05pm-2:45pm (40m) Bio
Solving intractable problems: How new biotech will reshape our lives
Arvind Gupta (SOSventures)
With biology accelerating faster than Moore's Law, building a biotech startup has become easier than ever. Arvind will discuss how funding and networks of mentors are coming together to create a new tranche of seed funding and how this is shaking the biotech industry to its core, and the long term effects this will have on the types of problems we will solve using biology as a technology.
2:55pm-3:35pm (40m) Bio
Assembling custom DNA anytime, anywhere
Connor Dickie (Synbiota Inc.), Justin Pahara (Synbiota Inc.)
One of the main technologies in a bio-hacker's toolbox is the ability to make custom DNA. This session walks you through the process of designing and building custom plasmids using Synbiota's wetware kits. Synbiota's wetware uses a unique magnetic-bead assembly process that enables anyone to build real DNA, by hand or by robot, in any kitchen, bathroom, basement, or garage.
4:35pm-5:15pm (40m) Bio
Building a beautiful future: Consumer biotechnology and the power of "Wow!"
Keira Havens (Revolution Bioengineering), Nikolai Braun (Revolution Bioengineering)
The conversation around bioengineering alternates between visions of a truly sustainable society in the far future, and unknown dystopian horrors just around the corner. How do we transcend these stereotypes? We make biotechnology beautiful and personal. Beauty captures the imagination in a way that practical and necessary advances can’t – we’re leading the way with color-changing flowers.
5:25pm-6:05pm (40m) Bio
Engineering biology with Antha
Sean Ward (Synthace Ltd)
Antha is a high-level compiled language for describing and executing biological working practices. This allows the rapid composition of biological workflows, built from transferable, interoperable, and reproducible Antha Elements. For the first time, it enables bioengineers to properly engineer biology, by focusing on what experiments they want to run, not just how to run them.
1:15pm-1:55pm (40m) Bio
Robot swarms for automated construction
Justin Werfel (Harvard University, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering)
Social insects like ants and termites build huge, complex structures through the collective actions of millions of independent agents. How could we engineer systems that harness that kind of power? I'll describe how we built and programmed a decentralized system of construction robots that takes a blueprint of a desired final structure as the only input, and provably builds that structure.
2:05pm-2:45pm (40m) Sponsored
A conversational Internet of Things
Nick O'Leary (IBM)
The Internet of Things is not a single choice of technology, approach, or philosophy. Its very existence is the bringing together of multiple platforms, products, and protocols, where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. One of the challenges of IoT is to make it as easy as possible to allow developers to create things, for play or profit, serious or whimsical, professional or hobbyist.
2:55pm-3:35pm (40m) Sponsored
Advanced logistics for advanced companies
Chris Swearingen (FedEx)
MNX, United Airlines, and Kentucky Space discuss how they use sensor-based logistics technology to increase their visibility into global supply chains, and monitor important environmental conditions inside critical packages. The session will be moderated by Chris Swearingen, marketing manager for SenseAware powered by FedEx.
4:35pm-5:15pm (40m) Technology
Safeguarding the IoT: Designing security from the ground up
Hugo Fiennes (Electric Imp)
There have been a lot of scary news stories about Internet of Things security, or lack of it. With connected devices skyrocketing, experts have expressed serious concerns about products falling victim to hackers and compromising the security of entire networks. Hugo Fiennes, CEO of Electric Imp, will explore best practices in IoT security and how businesses can safeguard their connected devices.
5:25pm-6:05pm (40m) Design
Using (big) data to reduce risk while building hardware.
Chris Gammell (Supplyframe)
The primary cause of heartburn for hardware designers is risk: Design flaws, changing schedules, and supply chain unpredictability. Finding accessible parts reduces the risk at the beginning of the design process. By analyzing the component marketplace and balancing that against parameters like price and specifications, engineers can make decisions that result in better products.
7:30am-9:00am (1h 30m)
Break: Coffee Break
10:10am-10:40am (30m)
Break: Morning Break sponsored by Divergent Microfactories
12:15pm-1:15pm (1h)
Break: Lunch sponsored by Intel
3:35pm-4:35pm (1h)
Break: Afternoon Break
6:15pm-7:30pm (1h 15m) Events
Demo Pavilion Reception (Sponsored by American Family Insurance)
Grab a drink, mingle with fellow conference participants, and see the latest technologies and products from leading companies in the Solid space.