Hardware, Software & the Internet of Things
June 23–25, 2015 • San Francisco, CA

Machine intelligence to free human intelligence: How automation helps you win

Roger Chen (Computable Labs)
5:25pm–6:05pm Thursday, 06/25/2015
Startups
Location: Cowell Theater (Herbst Pavilion)
Average rating: ****.
(4.25, 4 ratings)

Prerequisite Knowledge

Basic understanding of robotics and machine learning is helpful. More important is interest in how these technologies will reshape businesses and industries!

Description

Looking back on our industrial past, we see countless examples of how technology has helped businesses reinvent organizations and processes to become more productive and outcompete. We are now at an inflection point in robotics and machine learning, two technology areas particularly poised to reshape industries like never before. In fact, it’s already happening. Robotic systems are automating warehouses. Machine learning and deep learning are helping firms handle massive and unwieldy datasets by automating analytics and decision-making. In the biotechnology world, companies are leveraging machines and data to build more productive R&D pipelines. Atoms and bits are both being automated en masse. With much more on the way, businesses will have to reinvent themselves once again, but how?

In this talk, we will briefly review the current state of robotics and machine learning and why the timing is right. We will walk through a few case studies of both large companies and startups that have successfully ingrained these technologies into their everyday operations to become more productive and agile. Along the way, we will landscape relevant industries and opportunities and the ambitious startups chasing them.

Photo of Roger Chen

Roger Chen

Computable Labs

Roger is a principal at O’Reilly AlphaTech Ventures (OATV), where he invests in early stage startups bringing enabling technologies to market. He spent his past life as a scientist and engineer, tinkering with photons and electrons at the nanoscale. Roger has a BS from Boston University and a PhD from UC Berkeley, both in electrical engineering.