March 16–17, 2015: Training
March 17–19, 2015: Conference
Boston, MA

Dev2architect Sessions

Recommendations for the Accidental Architect

Whether you have the official title or not, you're probably playing the role of architect in your job already. You're what we call the "accidental architect" and you're stepping into the role more and more, whether you realize it or not.

We've designed a track specifically for software engineers, developers, and other accidental architects. These sessions provide a solid foundation in the skills and training you need to further develop your role and become an even greater asset to your organization.

3:30pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 03/18/2015
David Elsberry (Ventana Medical Systems), Michael Montgomery (IDesign)
In this firsthand case study, explore the value of decomposing service-oriented systems based on the inherent volatility in their domain, not by features, function, or model. You will learn the basics of volatility-based decomposition and see through a real-world example how this novel approach to software design makes your system more flexible and resilient to change.
1:15pm–2:45pm Thursday, 03/19/2015
Slides:   external link
Data science makes businesses more responsive and offers possibilities for new products, yet companies only access a fraction of the value in their data. Software architecture helps. We share design decisions and a reactive programming framework that allow flexibility in deploying machine learning and data science in real-world business scenarios, where change and iterative progress is constant.
1:15pm–2:45pm Wednesday, 03/18/2015
Brian Mitchell (Cigna / Drexel University)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
This presentation will focus on a case study highlighting the evolution of the architectures Cigna put in place for bringing new customer facing applications to the marketplace. Specific focus of the talk will be on the modernization of our SOA approach, and some of the innovative work we are doing with reactive architectures, embracing polyglot languages and persistence, and microservices.
3:30pm–5:00pm Thursday, 03/19/2015
Russell Pavlicek (Looking for an opportunity)
The current generation of cloud is concerned with orchestration: how to make machines do what we want. The next generation will focus on payloads: how to make VMs small, fast, secure, and portable. While Docker has made strides in this direction, unikernels go even farther, yielding tiny, secure VMs which could support a density of thousands of VMs per server.
5:05pm–6:00pm Wednesday, 03/18/2015
Edward Fagin (edX)
The classic data warehouse pipeline is obsolete. As demand for realtime analytics and continuous deployment increases, batch-driven warehouses are cited as barriers to progress. Stream-oriented architectures are emerging as a viable alternative. We will present a case study of how MediaMath, a digital marketing technology platform, embraced stream processing and transformed its pace of innovation.
5:05pm–6:35pm Thursday, 03/19/2015
Paul Downey (GDS)
Slides:   external link
Many modern services and databases are optimised for short response times, high throughput, high availability, or even high confidentiality. But what should you do if your users need a system of record with very high level of integrity?
5:05pm–6:00pm Wednesday, 03/18/2015
Marc Siegel (TIM Group), Brian Roberts (TIM Group)
Slides:   1-PDF 
We've used Event Sourcing to re-architect our Investible Stock Universe service, replacing REST/CRUD with task-specific read projections. In this talk, we discuss differences between these architectures for this type of use case, and impacts on availability, determinism, auditability, performance, and correctness. No prior knowledge of financial market data or Event Sourcing necessary.
10:45am–12:15pm Thursday, 03/19/2015
Michael Brunton-Spall (Government Digital Service)
Slides:   1-PDF 
As we move towards architectures designed to cope with changing requirements, and eternal services that go live and iterate, how can we manage change in a secure way? How can we possibly build secure systems in this environment
1:15pm–2:45pm Thursday, 03/19/2015
David  Sklar  (David Sklar, Inc.)
Slides:   1-PDF 
When you're starting your career, the code you write is often the sole focus of your job. But as you grow from engineer to architect, you need to play nice with others. This talk helps you become a more effective architect by giving you tools and techniques for having successful, productive conversations with designers, business people, product managers, and all those non-coders in your meetings.
5:05pm–6:00pm Wednesday, 03/18/2015
Ben Evans (jClarity)
Examples of software patterns and antipatterns inspired by similar structures in public transport systems.
3:30pm–5:00pm Thursday, 03/19/2015
Ben Hindman (Mesosphere)
Web-scale organizations like Google, Twitter and Airbnb run their datacenters much differently than the rest of the industry. In this presentation, Ben Hindman - co-creator of Apache Mesos (http://mesos.apache.org/) will explain the emerging APIs for “programming against the datacenter,” and highlight new developments in resource abstractions that are making this all possible.
3:30pm–5:00pm Thursday, 03/19/2015
Slides:   1-PDF 
Effective design is fast design. Inspired by design thinking and UX design practices, Rapid Software Architecture Exploration is a set of structured, lightweight architecture-centric design, discovery, and description practices built for speed and effectiveness. In this session we'll discuss the context of rapid exploration and try out four methods you'll be able to use with your team back home.
1:15pm–2:45pm Thursday, 03/19/2015
Ian Buchanan (Atlassian), Tim Pettersen (Atlassian)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Far too many architects are mired in technical details of APIs and wondering why developers aren't using what they have built. What does it take to attract other developers to build upon a platform? Learn from the benefits and pitfalls Atlassian has experienced in building beyond the APIs to create a valuable developer ecosystem that has paid out over $40M to partner vendors.
10:45am–12:15pm Wednesday, 03/18/2015
Stephen Pember (ThirdChannel)
Slides:   external link
Event Sourcing provides an alternative data storage pattern where one stores the historical record of the interactions with a data entity rather than the current state. This affects storage and data processing, but has great potential for analytics and usability. This talk presents Event Sourcing, describes how to get started with the technique, and identifies potential pain points.
3:30pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 03/18/2015
Simon Brown (Independent Consultant)
Software architecture and coding are often seen as mutually exclusive disciplines, despite us referring to higher level abstractions when we talk about our software. Take a look at the codebase though. Can you clearly see these abstractions or does the code reflect some other structure? If so, why is there no clear mapping between the architecture and the code?
5:05pm–6:35pm Thursday, 03/19/2015
Ghica van Emde Boas (Bronstee.com)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Sounds familiar? A group of young cowboys enthusiastically start a large programming project with minimal knowledge about coding, architecture, and development methods. This talk will be about a truly remarkable piece of unstructured and unmaintainable code, intended as a core application for a large school. I will explain why we decided not to redevelop code and what we did to refactor it.
3:30pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 03/18/2015
Mark  Richards  (Independent)
Slides:   1-PDF 
In this session I will focus on the some of the more important soft skills of architecture, including working with architecture teams, leadership skills, leveraging checklists, negotiation skills, and facilitation skills. By the end of this session you will learn the necessary soft skill techniques to become a great architect - one that is well respected by your team as well as your peers.
5:05pm–6:35pm Thursday, 03/19/2015
Sean Leach (Fastly)
Slides:   1-PDF 
As an overwhelming number of applications are created or move to the cloud, web application vulnerabilities are skyrocketing. This talk will dive into the latest web attack vectors and how you can protect your web applications and API’s. Some example areas that will be touched on are DDOS, XSS, CSP, SQL injection, HSTS and PKI.
10:45am–12:15pm Thursday, 03/19/2015
Dave McLoughlin (Rogue Wave Software )
This workshop explores the best ways to track all the open source software coming into your organization and programs. We’ll focus on techniques that help you secure and deploy open source software. We’ll use real life examples, so come prepared to discuss your own open source architecture needs.