Engineering the Future of Software
April 2–3, 2017: Training
April 3–5, 2017: Tutorials & Conference
New York, NY

Scale

A scalable architecture is an architecture that can scale up to meet increased work loads. Scaling vertically (scaling up) means adding resources to a single machine, while increasing the number of available machines is called horizontal scaling (scaling out). Distributed systems are much more complex to manage than centralized ones, which is why horizontal scaling is more challenging than scaling vertically. What kind of bottlenecks do we need to consider when scaling our architecture? How do we know when it’s best to scale out compared to scaling up? How do we manage the impact of scale on our databases and the overall performance of our systems?

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1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, April 3, 2017
Location: Nassau East/West
Level: Intermediate
Nancy Nunes (Architects Who Code)
Nancy Nunes demonstrates how to construct versatile software components that can be deployed on multiple platforms without performance hits normally associated with generalized behavior. You’ll leave with understanding and an operational example of how to package software components to make them adaptable to running in a single processor or distributed processing system. Read more.
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4:50pm–5:40pm Tuesday, April 4, 2017
Location: Sutton North/Center
Level: Intermediate
Jeff Poole (Vivint Smart Home)
Most applications should at least consider running in multiple data centers for reasons from end-user latency to being able to meet the modern expectation for 24/7 uptime. Jeff Poole outlines the considerations when moving to multiple data centers and the trade-offs for different approaches. Read more.
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4:50pm–5:40pm Tuesday, April 4, 2017
Location: Sutton South/Regent Parlor
Level: Intermediate
Aviran Mordo (Wix.com)
In few years, Wix grew from a small startup with traditional system architecture (based on a monolithic server) to a company that serves 100 million users. Aviran Mordo explains how Wix evolved from a monolithic system to microservices, using some interesting patterns like CQRS to build a blazing-fast, highly scalable, and highly available system. Read more.