Engineering the Future of Software
Feb 25–26, 2018: Training
Feb 26–28, 2018: Tutorials & Conference
New York, NY

Architectural trade-offs

Jeremy Deane (Foundation Medicine)
10:45am–12:15pm Tuesday, February 27, 2018
Application architecture, Enterprise architecture
Location: Grand Ballroom West Level: Intermediate
Secondary topics:  Overview

Who is this presentation for?

  • Technical leads and software architects

Prerequisite knowledge

  • Experience with architecture design

What you'll learn

  • Explore a number of architectural trade-offs and learn how to deal with them using lightweight techniques

Description

The role of a technical lead or software architect is to design software that realizes the vision of the stakeholders. However, as the design evolves, conflicting requirements emerge that impact the candidate architecture. Resolving these conflicts often involves architectural trade-offs, such as granularity versus maintainability. In addition, with time-to-market pressures and having to do more with less, adopting a bloated architectural framework like TOGAF or using a time-consuming process like ATAM is not an option. Thus, it is essential to have a deep understanding of architectural trade-offs and know when to use lightweight resolution techniques. Jeremy Deane explores a number of architectural trade-offs and offers strategies for dealing with them.

Photo of Jeremy Deane

Jeremy Deane

Foundation Medicine

Jeremy Deane is chief architect at Foundation Medicine. Jeremy has over 20 years of software engineering experience in leadership positions. His expertise includes enterprise application integration, web application architecture, and software process improvement. He is also an accomplished conference speaker and technical author.

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