Engineering the Future of Software
April 10–11, 2016: Training
April 11–13, 2016: Conference
New York, NY

O'Reilly Software Architecture Speakers

New speakers are added regularly. Please check back to see the latest updates to the agenda.

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Mike Amundsen is an internationally known author and speaker who travels the world discussing network architecture, web development, and the intersection of technology and society. He works with companies large and small to help them capitalize on the opportunities provided by APIs, microservices, and digital transformation. He’s authored numerous books and papers. He contributed to the O’Reilly book Continuous API Management (2018). His RESTful Web Clients was published by O’Reilly in February 2017, and he coauthored Microservice Architecture (June 2016). His latest book, Design and Build Great APIs, (Pragmatic Publishing) is scheduled for release in late 2019.

Presentations

12 patterns for hypermedia service architecture Session

Mike Amundsen offers 12 patterns and practices for building APIs that can safely evolve over time and client applications that can adapt to those changes without relying on explicit versioning systems or repeated redeployment.

Chad Arimura is the CEO and cofounder of Iron.io. Chad is an expert developer and cloud architect with over 10 years’ experience leading technology teams in high-growth startups. He combines his development and engineering expertise with his product marketing and sales experience to drive the Iron.io team to build the world’s best cloud infrastructure services.

Presentations

Best practices for implementing serverless architecture Session

As applications move toward microservices and modern architectural design patterns, the concept of “serverless” computing often comes up. Chad Arimura explores serverless computing, explaining how it differs from microservices, and discusses best practices and tools to address the challenges of service-driven architectures head-on while deploying in a serverless environment.

Based in Australia, Clarence Bakirtzidis is the DevOps chapter lead at Elabor8, where his focus includes helping organizations migrate to cloud and container platforms, adopt continuous delivery, and embrace a DevOps culture. Clarence has over 17 years of experience in software development across a variety of industries, including telecommunications, finance, and healthcare and has worked for both product-oriented and consulting organizations.

Presentations

Building microservices with Docker 2-Day Training

In this 2-day hands-on workshop, Sam Newman covers both the theory and the practice of microservices. Learn what microservices are all about, then build them yourself.

Building microservices with Docker (Day 2) Training Day 2

In this 2-day hands-on workshop, Sam Newman covers both the theory and the practice of microservices. Learn what microservices are all about, then build them yourself.

Mark Bates is the founder and chief architect of the consulting company Meta42 Labs, based in Boston, MA. Mark spends his days focusing on new application development and consulting for his clients. At night he writes books, raises kids, and occasionally starts a band and tries to “make it.” Mark is the author of three books, Distributed Programming with Ruby (2009), Programming in CoffeeScript (2012), and Conquering the Command Line (2014). Mark also ran the weekly Golang screencast site, Metacasts.tv, acquired by O’Reilly in 2015.

Presentations

Butterfly in reverse: From SOA to monolith Session

Mark Bates discusses how he started building an application “correctly”—using Go, Angular, and SOA—and ended up with the classic monolith architecture you hear people warning against. Mark explains why Go, SOA, and Angular were the wrong choices for this app and why the monolith was the right answer.

David Boloker is CTO of IBM’s Emerging Internet Technology group and also holds the title of distinguished engineer. David is also responsible for forming IBM’s technical strategy around the emerging areas of mobile identity and gaining insights from big data. In this role, he leads an globally distributed IBM team researching new areas in software design and development. Previously, he was responsible for the commercialization of the Watson machine. David and his team took the system that played Jeopardy and created a multipurpose machine that can analyze information and provide solutions across the industry from healthcare to finance to retail.

Throughout David’s extensive career at IBM, he has held the role of CTO for Java technology, and he’s worked at IBM’s esteemed Thomas J. Watson Research Center as well as the Cambridge Scientific Center doing research in the area of remote distribution and control of hardware and software systems and secure Internet gateways. David has also developed an Internet-based data exploration tool to support development and testing of hypotheses regarding complex genetic and environmental relationships in the development of chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) in collaboration with COPDGene investigators in the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Center for Advanced Medical Imaging and COPDGene.

Presentations

Connect and control IoT devices in minutes Session

The world of the IoT is exploding with respect to sensors, and speech and analytics are providing a powerful new user experience. David Boloker and Mark VanderWiele explain how to put everything together in a clear and simple way using the power of the cloud, microservices, and real-time analytics.

Jonas Bonér is founder and CTO of Lightbend, inventor of the Akka project, coauthor of the Reactive Manifesto, and a Java Champion. Learn more at Jonas’s website, Jonasboner.com.

Presentations

Blah blah. . .microservices. . .blah blah Keynote

Everyone is talking about microservices, but there is more confusion than ever about what the promise of microservices really means and how to deliver on it. Jonas Bonér explores microservices from first principles, distilling their essence and putting them in their true context: distributed systems.

Michelle Brush is engineering director for Cerner Corporation, where she leads teams that develop the platform for ingesting stream and batch data specific to Cerner’s Population Health solutions. A math geek turned computer geek with 15 years of software development experience, Michelle has developed algorithms and data structures for search, compression, and data mining in both embedded and enterprise systems. She is the chapter leader for the Kansas City chapter of Girl Develop It.

Presentations

Let's not rewrite it all Session

Every engineer dreams at some point of rewriting a legacy system. Rewrites introduce bugs, duplicate effort, and delays. Architectural evolution or incremental rewrites can be an alternative, but only if done properly. Michelle Brush explores good and bad patterns for evolving architectures, offering a framework for deciding what approach to take.

Matthew Campbell is a microservices scalability expert at DigitalOcean, where he builds the future of cloud services. Matthew is a founder of Errplane and Langfight. In the past, he worked at Thomson Reuters, Bloomberg, Gucci, and Cartoon Network. Matthew recently presented at GothamGO, Velocity NYC, and GopherCon India and is the author of Microservices in Go, published by O’Reilly. He blogs at Kanwisher.com.

Presentations

Cloud in your cloud: How we build DigitalOcean Session

How is the cloud built? Matthew Campbell explores how DigitalOcean writes microservices that run the cloud at scale for tens of thousands of customers across 10 data centers.

A proven DevOps visionary and leader, Chip Childers is vice president of technology at the Cloud Foundry Foundation. Previously, Chip was vice president of product strategy at CumuLogic and spent more than 15 years in engineering leadership positions within the service provider industry, including work at SunGard Availability Services and Qwest Solutions. Chip has served on the board of directors for the Distributed Management Task Force and is a member of the Apache Software Foundation.

Presentations

Going cloud native: It takes a platform Keynote

Becoming cloud native means changing how we think about, develop, and deploy applications. This shift impacts the structure of organizations, as teams align to common business outcomes. Chip Childers explains why a successful cloud native approach requires a platform. Chip explores what it means to be truly cloud native, what it takes to get there, and how a platform can make it all work.

Wes Chow is the director of engineering in advanced analytics at Cortico and a researcher at the MIT Media Lab. He’s an advisor to Chartbeat, where he was CTO for more time than healthy. Previously, he built early infrastructure for high-frequency trading shops and led the team that created Songza Radio, which was acquired and merged into Google Music.

Presentations

Consistent hashing, shuffle sharding, and copysets: Practical tools for controlling failure Session

Sharding is our go-to tool for handling failures and load balancing, and yet we software engineers rarely think about the quirks of what seems like a largely solved problem or consider the possibility that we can improve on its basic application. Wes Chow reviews some work—both old and recent—on controlling failures and adverse distributional effects.

Adrian Cockcroft is vice president of cloud architecture strategy at Amazon Web Services, where he focuses on the needs of cloud native and all-in customers and leads the AWS open source community development program. Adrian has had a long career working at the leading edge of technology and is fascinated by what happens next. Previously he was a developer in the UK; worked at Sun Microsystems; was a founding member of eBay Research Labs; directed a team working on personalizing algorithms, served as a cloud architect, helped teams scale and migrate to AWS, and led the open source program at Netflix; and promoted new ideas around DevOps, microservices, the cloud, and containers at Battery Ventures. He’s also written four books, including Sun Performance and Tuning from Prentice Hall. Adrian holds a degree in applied physics from City, University of London.

Presentations

Microservices: What's missing. . . Session

Many people have now figured out how to get started with microservices, and there are frameworks available for most common languages and platforms. Adrian Cockcroft explores some key aspects of successful large-scale microservice deployments that tend to be skipped and explains how this can lead to common problems in the transition.

Thomas Cozzolino is a director of architecture for the Salesforce App Cloud, focusing on the success of Salesforce customers, architects, and developers. With over 30 years of experience in industry and consulting, Thomas has successfully designed and deployed large-scale solutions based on next-generation cloud, social, and mobile architectures across a range of industries. A pioneer in Internet, web, and mobile strategies, he is a published author and speaker with over 50 journal articles, book chapters, and industry interviews.

Presentations

From static to future-proof: Enterprise architectures in the age of the customer Keynote

Thomas Cozzolino highlights the growing importance of the developer experience, API-first thinking, common data models, and enterprise ecosystems.

Scott Davis is a Web Architect and Developer Advocate with ThoughtWorks, where he focuses on the leading-edge, innovative, emerging, and nontraditional aspects of web development, such as serverless web apps, mobile web apps (responsive PWAs), HTML5-based smart TV apps, conversational UIs (like Siri and Alexa), and using web technologies to build IoT solutions. He is also the founder of ThirstyHead.com, a Denver-based training and software development consultancy. Scott has been writing about web development for over 10 years. His books include Getting Started with Grails, Groovy Recipes, GIS for Web Developers, The Google Maps API: Adding Where to Your Web Applications, and JBoss at Work. He is also the author of several popular article series at IBM developerWorks, including Mastering MEAN, Mastering Grails, and Practically Groovy. His videos include Architecture of the MEAN Stack, Responsive Mobile Architecture, and On the Road to Angular 2. Scott is also the cofounder of the Denver HTML5 User Group.

Presentations

MEAN architecture 2-Day Training

Modern 21st-century web development is a story of what David Weinberger calls "small pieces, loosely joined." Join Scott Davis for a 2-day hands-on, lab-driven exploration of the MEAN (MongoDB, Express, AngularJS, Node.js) stack. The best way to learn about each highly cohesive, loosely coupled piece of the MEAN stack is to see it in action.

MEAN architecture (Day 2) Training Day 2

Modern 21st-century web development is a story of what David Weinberger calls "small pieces, loosely joined." Join Scott Davis for a 2-day hands-on, lab-driven exploration of the MEAN (MongoDB, Express, AngularJS, Node.js) stack. The best way to learn about each highly cohesive, loosely coupled piece of the MEAN stack is to see it in action.

MEAN Architecture 2.0 Session

Details to come.

Thierry Delprat joined Nuxeo in 2005 as chief technology officer. As CTO, Thierry guides the architectural development of the Nuxeo Platform, including the adoption of Java as the platform for innovation. 
Prior to joining Nuxeo, Thierry worked for over seven years at Unilog, holding progressively senior positions across different branches of the consulting company. He was also a technical architect at Cryo-Networks (infrastructure for online games) and has participated in a number of startups. 
Thierry graduated from the Ecole Centrale de Nantes and holds a master’s degree in telecommunications.

Presentations

Beyond multitenancy: Introducing a new container-based application factory Session

Although it's a classical approach, multitenancy at the application level comes with limitations in terms of processing isolation, efficient hardware utilization, and advanced per-tenant configuration. Thierry Delprat demonstrates Nuxeo's new container-based approach—powered by dynamic Docker containers, CoreOS, Fleet, and Gogeta—that avoids common issues with traditional multitenancy.

Kristoffer Dyrkorn works at the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation. He has been a developer, solution architect and project manager on various large IT projects for 20 years. Kristoffer specializes in pragmatic architectures and performance/scalability and has been a speaker at several developer and usability conferences in Norway, Europe, and the US.

Presentations

Road traffic analysis and agile architectures Session

Kristoffer Dyrkorn outlines an infrastructure that reduces the steep cost of road construction and maintenance. The system provides high-quality and near real-time information by integrating an unusual combination of sensors, devices, protocols, and software. Kristoffer discusses architectural challenges met and choices and mistakes made while trying to keep the architecture receptive to change.

Markus Eisele is a developer advocate at Lightbend. While focused for many years on middleware, today, he’s concentrating on enterprise-grade Java and on education about the latest trends in building enterprise systems in a Reactive way with Java. Markus has also been looking into containers and microservices architectures more deeply. He is a Java Champion, former Java EE Expert Group member, a Java community leader of the German Oracle user group (DOAG), founder of JavaLand, reputed speaker at Java conferences around the world, and a very well-known figure in the enterprise Java world—maybe you’ve seen him at conferences and Java user group meetups, read his blog posts, or follow him on social media. Markus wrote a book about modern Java EE design patterns for O’Reilly and is excited to continue to demonstrate how microservices architectures can integrate and complement existing platforms, as well as how to successfully build resilient applications with Java.

Presentations

Integration architecture with Java EE and Spring Tutorial

Results matter. Choosing a technology stack shouldn't be an either/or discussion. Thankfully, when it comes to the industry's two largest enterprise application platforms—Java EE and Spring—architects can cherry pick and integrate with ease. Markus Eisele and Joshua Long explain how architects and developers can benefit from the best of both technologies and embrace cloud-ready JVM architectures.

Scott Feinberg is an architect at the New York Times, where he builds the API systems that allow teams to build, deploy, and use APIs as easily and securely as possible. For the past few years, Scott has been focused on designing systems to maximize developer productivity. If Scott isn’t thinking about APIs, he is likely in a plane traveling to some new far-flung location.

Presentations

Enhancing society with APIs at the New York Times Session

To fulfill its core mission, the New York Times requires hundreds of APIs to create, collect, and distribute high-quality news and information. Scott Feinberg explores the evolution and practices of how the New York Times handles APIs internally and externally.

Neal Ford is a director, software architect, and meme wrangler at ThoughtWorks, a global IT consultancy that thinks disruptively to deliver technology to address the toughest challenges, all while seeking to revolutionize the IT industry and create positive social change. Neal focuses on designing and building large-scale enterprise applications. He’s an internationally recognized expert on software development and delivery, especially in the intersection of Agile engineering techniques and software architecture. Neal has authored magazine articles, seven books (and counting), and dozens of video presentations and has spoken at hundreds of developers conferences worldwide on the topics of software architecture, continuous delivery, functional programming, and cutting-edge software innovations. Check out his website at Nealford.com. He welcomes feedback and can be reached at nford@thoughtworks.com.

Presentations

Tuesday opening welcome Keynote

Program chairs Neal Ford and Rachel Roumeliotis open the first day of keynotes.

Wednesday opening welcome Keynote

Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis and Neal Ford open the second day of keynotes.

Sasha Goldshtein is the CTO of Sela Group, a Microsoft C# MVP and Azure MRS, a Pluralsight author, and an international consultant and trainer. Sasha’s consulting work revolves mainly around distributed architecture, production debugging, and mobile application development. Sasha is the author of Introducing Windows 7 for Developers (Microsoft Press) and Pro .NET Performance (Apress). He is also a prolific blogger and the author of numerous training courses, including .NET Debugging, .NET Performance, Android Application Development, and Modern C++.

Presentations

Modern backends for mobile apps Session

Backend concerns for mobile apps include data storage, efficient queries, push notifications, and user authentication. Sasha Goldshtein discusses cloud backend providers that take away the burden of managing servers and infrastructure for your mobile apps.

Maria Gomez is Engineering Director at BCG Digital Ventures in Berlin. Over her 10 years of industry experience, Maria has worked with many different technologies and domains, which has helped her lead teams and advise stakeholders in making the right technology decisions. She’s also a speaker and an advocate for diversity and inclusion in the IT industry.

Presentations

Microservices tutorial Tutorial

In a hands-on workshop, Cassandra Shum and María Gómez explore microservices and demonstrate how to deploy service-oriented software using the popular DevOps tool Docker. Participants will learn a continuous delivery approach focused on building, testing, and deploying independent microservices to production continuously and autonomously.

Christopher Grant is a customer engineer at Google, where he focuses on enabling change, innovation, and speed of delivery for customers on Google Cloud Platform. Christopher has 20 years’ experience in the industry working with a variety of languages and technologies, including microservices, Docker, Python, Go, DevOps, Agile, and other assorted buzzwords.

Presentations

Evolving toward microservices: How HomeDepot.com made the transition Keynote

Architectural theory often takes a back seat to feature delivery; teams can deliver on a project as significant as migrating from a monolithic architecture to microservices while continuing to release new functionally. Christopher Grant offers some lessons learned as HomeDepot.com transitioned from monolith to microservices.

As president and founder of Gist Labs, a management consulting company located in Austin, TX, John Heintz consults with executives, managers, and teams in numerous industries, including ecommerce, SaaS/hosting, and game studios. John is recognized for his unique ability to blend technical leadership and intuitive organizational management to solve critical business problems. He combines his deep technical skills, mastery of agile/lean methods, and insightful leadership to create and implement strategic, innovative solutions. John is also a recognized speaker, published author, and international trainer. He is a senior consultant with Cutter Consortium’s Agile Project & Product Management Practice as well as an Innovation Games trained facilitator.

John’s technical and organizational management skills have helped companies worldwide. John uses the agile methods he adopted in 1999 to guide his work and has helped many clients, including teams in India, adopt agile tools, such as scrum and kanban. John has practiced RESTful service-oriented architectures since 2004. He also provides technology due diligence and tech debt monetization services for VC and M&A investors. Weaving technology and organizational management together, John successfully delivers vital, useful solutions for his clients. You can reach John via his website.

Presentations

Death to anemic roadmaps: Let’s build roadmaps that actually help us work together Tutorial

If you have a roadmap that no one uses, it may be an anemic roadmap. An anemic roadmap is just a list of features that goes on as far as the eye can see. This is harmful to your organization. John Heintz explains how to build truly useful roadmaps that actually help us define goals and work jointly by weaving together marketing, product, architecture, and more.

Bradley Holt leads a team of developer advocates at IBM who are democratizing data and AI through open source technologies. His team’s work includes helping developers integrate open source deep learning models into their applications, ensuring trustworthiness and transparency from AI systems, promoting open standards for the deployment and operationalization of AI systems, and enabling better collaboration between developers, data scientists, and data engineers.

Presentations

Domain-driven data Session

The many types of databases and data analysis tools available today offer developers tremendous options. Should you use a relational database? How about a key-value store? Maybe a document database? Or is a graph database the right fit for your project? Applying principles from domain-driven design, Bradley Holt helps you choose and apply the right data layer for your application’s model.

Allen Holub is one of the country’s foremost software architects and Agile-transformation consultants. Allen speaks internationally about all things Agile and software architecture and provides in-house training and consulting in those areas. He’s also an expert-level programmer, specializing in Swift, Java, and Web 2.0 applications and microservices. Allen can build highly dynamic websites (along the lines of Gmail) from front to back: both the frontend code—JavaScript, JQuery, Angular, HTML5, and CSS3—that runs in the browser and the backend code—Java, PHP, MySQL, Ruby, Mongo, C++, ZeroMQ, and EC2—that runs either on your server or in the cloud. Allen is widely published. His works include 10 books, hundreds of articles in publications ranging from Dr. Dobb’s Journal to IBM DeveloperWorks, and video classes for Agilitry.com (Agility with Allen), Pluralsight (Swift in Depth, Picturing Architecture, Object-Oriented Design), O’Reilly (Design Patterns in the Real World), and Lynda/LinkedIn.

Presentations

Designing for volatility 2-Day Training

Allen Holub offers a 2-day hands-on deep dive into how to design and architect code in a world where requirements change as you’re working. Allen provides incredible learning experiences through interactive and grouped hands-on exercises, during which you’ll design and develop an architecture to solve a real-world problem.

Designing for volatility (Day 2) Training Day 2

Allen Holub offers a 2-day hands-on deep dive into how to design and architect code in a world where requirements change as you’re working. Allen provides incredible learning experiences through interactive and grouped hands-on exercises, during which you’ll design and develop an architecture to solve a real-world problem.

Robert Hurlbut is an independent software security consultant, architect, developer, and trainer at Robert Hurlbut Consulting Services. Robert is a Microsoft MVP for Developer Security and holds the (ISC)2 CSSLP certification. Robert has over 20 years of industry experience in secure coding, software architecture, and software development and has served at times as a project manager, chief architect, and director of software development for several clients. Robert blogs at Roberthurlbut.com and shares links and other information on Twitter at @RobertHurlbut.

Presentations

How to make threat modeling work for you Session

Threat modeling helps us think about what could go wrong and how to prevent it, but often when building software, we can't figure out how to connect threat models to real-world development and priorities—or we skip threat modeling altogether. Robert Hurlbut offers practical strategies for threat modeling for secure software design and explains how to apply risk management to deal with the threats.

Born in Serbia and currently living in Amsterdam, Marin Jankovski is the maintainer of Omnibus GitLab and was the company’s first hire. Marin has been building complex systems for years and is usually the first person to solve the problem when pagers are beeping. With the support of his two cats, he has helped to release a new version of GitLab every month since 2011.

Presentations

Shipping a Ruby on Rails stack to thousands of companies every month Session

Marin Jankovski explains how GitLab launches a scalable Ruby on Rails stack every month (on the 22nd) without disrupting thousands of customers.

Janelle Klein is a NFJS tour speaker, author of Idea Flow: How to Measure the PAIN in Software Development, and founder of Open Mastery, an industry collaborative learning network focused on mastering the art of software development with a data-driven feedback loop. Janelle founded Open Mastery to rally the industry in working and learning together to break down the wall of ignorance between managers and developers that drives software projects into the ground. Janelle has also worked with New Iron for the last 10 years as a developer, consultant, and, now, CTO. Her development background is specialized in data-intensive analytic systems from financial core processors to factory automation, supply chain optimization, and statistical process control (SPC). Janelle’s consulting work focuses on continuous delivery infrastructure, database automation, test automation strategies, and helping companies identify and solve their biggest problems.

Presentations

Let's make the pain visible Keynote

We've been trying to explain the pain of technical debt for generations, but we've never been able to measure it. What if we could measure the effects of learning curves, collaboration pain, and problems building up in the code? Janelle Klein outlines the Idea Flow Learning Framework, a strategy for measuring the friction in developer experience that introduces a whole new world of possibilities.

Stop getting crushed by business pressure

This session is replacing John Feminella's, _Too Many Cooks_ talk.

Jay Kreps is the cofounder and CEO of Confluent, a company focused on Apache Kafka. Previously, Jay was one of the primary architects for LinkedIn, where he focused on data infrastructure and data-driven products. He was among the original authors of a number of open source projects in the scalable data systems space, including Voldemort (a key-value store), Azkaban, Kafka (a distributed messaging system), and Samza (a stream processing system).

Presentations

Apache Kafka and the stream data platform Session

Companies are increasingly transitioning from batch data movement and processing to continuous streams of data processed in real time. Jay Kreps introduces Apache Kafka, the system at the center of many of these stream-centric architectures, and describes the real-world experience he gained designing, building, and deploying it as a central platform for streaming data.

Sam Lambert is the director of systems at GitHub. An experienced engineer, Sam focuses on growing the technical organization responsible for GitHub’s core services. He is passionate about technical leadership and building high-performing engineering teams. Sam has spent his two years at GitHub applying his experience to positively impact the availability and performance of its technologies while also advocating for simplicity and pragmatism within the engineering community.

Presentations

Leading simplicity Session

It is important for leaders to guide their teams toward pragmatic technical choices and avoid complexity. Much of building software is about picking your challenges. By making sensible technical choices, you can move fast without compromising stability. Sam Lambert describes how GitHub is building a world-leading, cutting-edge platform on top of stable, proven technologies.

Josh Long is the Spring developer advocate at Pivotal.

Presentations

Integration architecture with Java EE and Spring Tutorial

Results matter. Choosing a technology stack shouldn't be an either/or discussion. Thankfully, when it comes to the industry's two largest enterprise application platforms—Java EE and Spring—architects can cherry pick and integrate with ease. Markus Eisele and Joshua Long explain how architects and developers can benefit from the best of both technologies and embrace cloud-ready JVM architectures.

Juval Löwy is the founder of IDesign and a master software architect specializing in system and project design. Juval has mentored hundreds of architects across the globe, sharing his insights, techniques, and breakthroughs in architecture, project design, development process, and technology. Juval is Microsoft’s regional director for Silicon Valley and participated in the Microsoft internal strategic design reviews for C#, WCF, and related technologies.

Juval is a frequent speaker at major international software development conferences. Microsoft recognized Juval as a software legend—one of the world’s top experts and industry leaders. Juval has published numerous articles, covering almost every aspect of modern software development and architecture, as well as several best-selling books. His latest is the fourth edition of Programming WCF Services (O’Reilly 2015).

Presentations

Zen of architecture Tutorial

In this dense tutorial, Juval Löwy explains his approach to large system analysis and design: using volatility to decompose a system into its comprising services. Juval contrasts this approach with the most common mistake made in architecture—using functionality to identify services—and outlines universal design principles, explained with examples from software and nonsoftware systems alike.

Ruth Malan is an architecture consultant at Bredemeyer Consulting, which she cofounded with Dana Bredemeyer in the late 1990s. Together, they have worked with and influenced thousands of software, systems, and enterprise architects around the world. Previously, Ruth was part of the Software Initiative at Hewlett-Packard and created a consulting and training practice in software architecture, focused on HP product teams. Ruth was awarded the Linda Northrop Software Architecture Award in 2017 for her contributions to software architecture.

Presentations

The architect's clue bucket Session

Ruth Malan explores the playful idea of a clue bucket (so that we can reach in and get a clue when we need one). Ruth considers sources of design inspiration—along with a collection of design guides, principles, tips, and heuristics—which she contextualizes by outlining the kinds of challenges the architect addresses.

Ted Malaska is a director of enterprise architecture at Capital One. Previously, he was the director of engineering in the Global Insight Department at Blizzard; principal solutions architect at Cloudera, helping clients find success with the Hadoop ecosystem; and a lead architect at the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). He has contributed code to Apache Flume, Apache Avro, Apache Yarn, Apache HDFS, Apache Spark, Apache Sqoop, and many more. Ted is a coauthor of Hadoop Application Architectures, a frequent speaker at many conferences, and a frequent blogger on data architectures.

Presentations

What I learned about architecture from running marathons Keynote

What do running and architecture have in common? Ted Malaska explains how long hours of training, blisters, and shin splints relate to life-changing lessons in software architecture.

Patrick McFadin is the vice president of developer relations at DataStax, where he leads a team devoted to making users of DataStax products successful. Previously, he was chief evangelist for Apache Cassandra and a consultant for DataStax, where he helped build some of the largest and exciting deployments in production; a chief architect at Hobsons; and an Oracle DBA and developer for over 15 years.

Presentations

Building better distributed data pipelines Session

Injecting and analyzing large quantities of data can be equal parts science and art. Understanding the components and how they fit can make or break your plans; understanding how they don't fit will save your sanity. Patrick McFadin explains the basics of how to build more efficient data pipelines, using Apache Kafka to organize, Apache Cassandra to store, and Apache Spark to analyze.

Tyler McMullen is CTO of Fastly, where he is responsible for the system architecture and leads the company’s technology vision. As part of the founding team, Tyler built the first versions of Fastly’s instant purging system, API, and real-time analytics. Previously, Tyler worked on text analysis and recommendations at Scribd. A self-described technology curmudgeon, Tyler has experience in everything from web design to kernel development and loathes all of it. Especially distributed systems.

Presentations

It probably works: Deploying probabilistic algorithms on a large scale Session

Probabilistic algorithms are an awesome and underused tool for engineers building very large-scale systems. Making calculations or consistency guarantees "with high probability" instead of "exactly" is surprisingly reliable and often easier to scale. Tyler McMullen presents three straightforward probabilistic algorithms that have seen successful deployments at massive scale.

Brent Miller is a designer and developer who is currently a senior software engineer at New Relic. After leaving grad school, Brent worked stints at Intel, where he worked on their website, and Reed College, where he helped them move to using Rails. Brent lives in Portland in the sunny and always dry Pacific Northwest with his wife and two kittens. In his spare time, he trains in Aikido, cooks a lot, eats too much, takes photos, and goes hiking to look at wildflowers.

Presentations

A biological and human approach to architecture: How New Relic builds to scale Session

Software architecture is usually seen as a technical challenge (18 million requests per minute), but the real problems are human problems (33 teams). New Relic tackles both aspects by taking lessons from biology to build a resilient architecture that will grow with the company. Brent Miller shares New Relic's approach and explores the costs and benefits of using this kind of strategy.

Jon Moore is the chief software architect at Comcast Cable, where he focuses on delivering a core set of scalable, performant, robust software components for the company’s varied software product development groups. Jon specializes in the “art of the possible,” finding ways to coordinate working solutions for complex problems and deliver them on time. He is equally comfortable leading and managing teams and personally writing production-ready code and has a passion for software engineering, continuously learning, and teaching colleagues new ways to deliver working, maintainable software with ever-higher quality and ever-shorter delivery times. His interests include distributed systems, fault tolerance, building healthy and engaging engineering cultures, and Texas Hold’em. Jon holds a PhD in computer and information science from the University of Pennsylvania. He resides in West Philadelphia, although he was neither born nor raised there and does not spend most of his days on playgrounds.

Presentations

How to have your causality and wall clocks too Session

Jon Moore describes evolving research into distributed monotonic clocks, which can reflect causality like Lamport clocks while retaining a component that stays close to the wall-clock time that is meaningful to human operators, allowing application timestamps to come out in the right order even without perfect clock synchronization.

Jake Moshenko is the product manager for the Quay container registry at CoreOS, a Linux distribution with containers as a first-class citizen and software-distribution channel. Formerly at Google, Amazon, and Boeing, Jake has been building robust distributed systems for over 10 years.

Presentations

Containers and microservices: New ways to deploy and manage applications at scale Session

Organizations are beginning to adopt microservices in an attempt to streamline product delivery and increase developer agility. But this new style of application architecture requires a shift in thinking about how we approach building out the underlying infrastructure. Jake Moshenko explores the container microservices landscape and explains how CoreOS and Quay fit into the development lifecycle.

Ted Neward is a big geek.

Presentations

Architectural Katas Tutorial

The Architectural Katas are proven exercises designed to maximize the architectural effort, minimize the unnecessary overhead, and complete all the critical elements that any architectural exercise should include. Ted Neward leads a hands-on workshop where you'll answer an RFP, cook up an architecture, and present it for review. It's the quickest way to experiment without risking your job.

Sam Newman is an independent consultant specializing in helping people ship software fast. Sam has worked extensively with the cloud, continuous delivery, and microservices and is especially preoccupied with understanding how to more easily deploy working software into production. For the last few years, he’s been exploring the capabilities of microservice architectures, and he’s worked with a variety of companies in multiple domains around the world, often with one foot in the developer world and another in the IT operations space. Previously, he spent over a decade at ThoughtWorks and then another year with a startup. Sam speaks frequently at conferences. He’s the author of Building Microservices (O’Reilly). If you’d like to get in touch, please email him.

Presentations

AppSec and microservices Session

Microservices are all the rage, but unfortunately so are security breaches. Sam Newman explains what you can do to have one without the other, exploring the many different ways in which you can secure your fine-grained, distributed architectures.

Building microservices with Docker 2-Day Training

In this 2-day hands-on workshop, Sam Newman covers both the theory and the practice of microservices. Learn what microservices are all about, then build them yourself.

Building microservices with Docker (Day 2) Training Day 2

In this 2-day hands-on workshop, Sam Newman covers both the theory and the practice of microservices. Learn what microservices are all about, then build them yourself.

Stewart Nickolas is an IBM distinguished engineer working in the IBM Emerging Internet Technologies organization, where he has led several projects focused on new and evolving technologies that represent future business opportunities. As a distinguished engineer, Stew is involved at all levels of development from strategy and investment to product planning and development. Most recently, Stew has led efforts driving IBM adoption of IBM BlueMix (its platform as a service), big data analytics, IBM Watson productization, and collaborative development environments.

Presentations

Conversational commerce Keynote

The face of applications is changing, evolving into a continuous information experience where the interaction model is immersive, experiential, and multimodal. Stewart Nickolas discusses the set of architectural challenges this new interaction paradigm brings, from microservice-based conversations to service integration to deep learning systems that support conversational commerce.

Conversational commerce Session

Architectures are under relentless pressure to evolve—and do so quickly. We are seeing the emergence of a conversational stye of user interface beyond simple command and control of applications. Stewart Nickolas discusses this new interaction paradigm and the set of architectural challenges it brings, from modeling conversations to deep learning systems that support conversational commerce.

Michael Nygard is an architect at Cognitect, the company behind Clojure, ClojureScript, Pedestal, and Datomic. Michael has been a professional programmer and architect for over 15 years. In that time, he has delivered systems to the US government, the military, and the banking, finance, agriculture, and retail industries, and his work has spanned domains as diverse as B2B exchanges, retail commerce sites, travel and leisure sites, an information brokerage, and applications for the military and intelligence communities. Along the way, Michael has shared his painfully won experience by mentoring, writing, and speaking. Michael contributed to the O’Reilly book 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know and authored the best seller Release It! Design and Deploy Production-Ready Software.

Presentations

Architecture without an end state Session

Architecture styles come and go. The hot tech from three years ago is today's "legacy." Michael Nygard explains that we need to flex and change, incorporating new styles into old—or else end up rebuilding the same system over and over in new languages.

Maneuverable architecture Session

At company-wide scale, what we want isn't agile development: we want maneuverability. The company should be able to gain, shed, or redirect momentum rapidly. Maneuverability has everything to do with how we allocate knowledge and responsibility among systems. Michael Nygard explores systems that can be recombined in novel ways to tackle changing business challenges.

Rebecca Parsons is CTO at ThoughtWorks. Rebecca has more than 30 years’ experience leading the creation of large-scale distributed, services-based applications and the integration of disparate systems. Previously, she was an assistant professor of computer science at the University of Central Florida, where she taught courses on compilers, program optimization, distributed computation, programming languages, the theory of computation, machine learning, and computational biology, and a director’s postdoctoral fellow at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where her research included work on parallel and distributed computation, genetic algorithms, computational biology, and nonlinear dynamical systems. Rebecca’s interests include parallel and distributed computation, programming languages, domain-specific languages, evolutionary architecture, genetic algorithms, and computational science. She is the coauthor of Domain-Specific Languages, The ThoughtWorks Anthology, and Building Evolutionary Architectures. A strong advocate for diversity in the technology industry who is committed to increasing the number of women in coding and STEM fields, Rebecca has served on the board of CodeChix and acted as an advisor to Women Who Code. A sought-after speaker, she has been a featured presenter at well-known conferences, including Collision Conference, Web Summit, YOW!, the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, and more. She was chairwoman of the Agile Alliance board of directors for four years and has served the organization over a total of six years. Rebecca holds a BS in computer science and economics from Bradley University and both an MS and a PhD in computer science from Rice University.

Presentations

The evolution of evolutionary architecture Keynote

Evolutionary architecture—also known as just-in-time architecture—is not as horrifying to developers and software architects as it once was. Rebecca Parsons explains how evolutionary architecture techniques and capabilities have evolved and explores how to apply evolutionary architecture in your work. If you’ve shunned evolutionary architecture in the past, it could be worth another look.

Russell Pavlicek has spent over two decades evangelizing open source. Since his introduction to Linux in 1995, he has relentlessly promoted the concept of open source to anyone who would listen. He spent the last three years with Citrix as the evangelist and user community organizer for the Xen Project, with a recent focus on unikernels. Russell also has many years of experience employing open source software in solutions for clients. Russell has published over 200 pieces, including columns for Infoworld and Processor magazines as well as a book. He has spoken over 100 times at open source conferences, including multiple times at OSCON, and is a former panelist on the weekly Linux Show webcast. He is currently looking for a new business opportunity.

Presentations

The bare-metal hypervisor as a platform for innovation Session

Some workloads work better on a hypervisor hosted within an existing operating system, while others work better on a hypervisor run directly on bare metal with no operating system host. Russell Pavlicek explores a growing breed of solutions that specifically leverage the architecture of a bare-metal hypervisor to address new concepts.

Unikernel-powered transient microservices: Changing the face of software architecture 90-minute session

For years, software architects have worked with the idea that services are necessarily persistent: they must start and sit idle until they are needed. But lightweight, powerful microservices built on unikernels now allow services to appear precisely when needed and disappear when the need passes. Russell Pavlicek reviews unikernels and explains how they will change software architecture.

Steve Pember is a principal engineer and team lead at Toast—a creator of systems and point of sale devices for managing restaurants. Previously, he was a director of engineering, a CTO, and a principal consultant, all the while pushing for and building reactive, event-driven, microservices-based platforms. Steve is obsessed with highly scalable distributed systems, software architecture, and alternative data storage techniques like event sourcing, and he loves telling the world about them.

Presentations

A year with event sourcing and CQRS Session

Stephen Pember offers an introduction to command-query responsibility segregation (CQRS) and event sourcing (ES), techniques that help when working with complex systems with high user demand. Steve explores the individual techniques, discusses their usefulness, and outlines what ThirdChannel has learned after using ES and CQRS for the past year.

An introduction to reactive applications, Reactive Streams, and options for the JVM Session

Stephen Pember offers an overview of reactive applications and Reactive Streams. Steve explores the individual concepts and examines a sampling of libraries and frameworks available on the JVM for reactive applications. Demo applications and sample apps round out Steve's talk, giving attendees an idea of where to begin with the reactive ecosystem.

Mark Richards is an experienced hands-on software architect involved in the architecture, design, and implementation of microservices architectures, service-oriented architectures, and distributed systems. He’s been in the software industry since 1983 and has significant experience and expertise in application, integration, and enterprise architecture. Mark’s the founder of Developertoarchitect.com, a website devoted to helping developers in the journey to software architect. He’s the author of numerous O’Reilly technical books and videos, including several books on microservices, the Software Architecture Fundamentals video series, Enterprise Messaging video series, Java Message Service, second edition, and a contributing author to 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know. Mark has a master’s degree in computer science and numerous architect and developer certifications from IBM, Sun Microsystems, The Open Group, and Oracle. He’s spoken at hundreds of conferences and user groups around the world on a variety of enterprise-related technical topics.

Presentations

Fundamentals of software architecture 2-Day Training

Being a software architect involves more than just drawing boxes and lines. It requires thinking like an architect, being a leader, and understanding the elements, patterns, and styles necessary to create effective software architectures. In a 2-day training course blending lecture and hands-on real-world group exercises, Mark Richards explores the many aspects of software architecture.

Fundamentals of software architecture (Day 2) Training Day 2

Being a software architect involves more than just drawing boxes and lines. It requires thinking like an architect, being a leader, and understanding the elements, patterns, and styles necessary to create effective software architectures. In a 2-day training course blending lecture and hands-on real-world group exercises, Mark Richards explores the many aspects of software architecture.

David Rogers is head of technology at the UK Ministry of Justice Digital. David has worked across the UK government as part of the Government Digital Service and now leads a team of technical architects in the Ministry of Justice who deliver new digital services for the UK justice system as part of multidisciplinary agile teams.

Presentations

The microservice state: The inevitable challenges of a more connected government Session

Are microservices a compelling alternative to the monolithic systems so prevalent in government? If indeed they are, what problems will widespread adoption present? David Rogers explores these questions, with a particular focus on the criminal justice system.

Rachel Roumeliotis is a strategic content director at O’Reilly, where she leads an editorial team that covers a wide variety of programming topics ranging from full stack to open source in the enterprise to emerging programming languages. Rachel is a programming chair of OSCON and O’Reilly’s Software Architecture Conference. She has been working in technical publishing for 10 years, acquiring content in many areas including mobile programming, UX, computer security, and AI.

Presentations

Tuesday opening welcome Keynote

Program chairs Neal Ford and Rachel Roumeliotis open the first day of keynotes.

Wednesday opening welcome Keynote

Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis and Neal Ford open the second day of keynotes.

Kiru Samapathy is a senior consultant at ThoughtWorks with over nine years of technology consulting experience. Kiru has helped clients achieve tangible business outcomes through implementation of best practices in DevOps, such as automated testing, continuous integration, infrastructure as service, and containerization. Her core expertise includes microservices, continuous delivery, and the cloud. Kiru also has a keen interest in functional programming languages and the ways these languages can solve complex problems with simpler solutions.

Presentations

Building microservices with Docker 2-Day Training

In this 2-day hands-on workshop, Sam Newman covers both the theory and the practice of microservices. Learn what microservices are all about, then build them yourself.

Building microservices with Docker (Day 2) Training Day 2

In this 2-day hands-on workshop, Sam Newman covers both the theory and the practice of microservices. Learn what microservices are all about, then build them yourself.

Nathaniel T. Schutta is a software architect focused on cloud computing and building usable applications. In addition to his day job, he’s an adjunct professor at the University of Minnesota, where he teaches students to embrace dynamic languages. A proponent of polyglot programming, Nate has written multiple books, including Presentation Patterns, with Neal Ford and Matthew McCullough, written to rid the world of bad presentations. He’s also appeared in various videos and is a seasoned speaker, regularly presenting at conferences worldwide, No Fluff Just Stuff symposia, meetups, universities, and user groups.

Presentations

Modeling for architects Tutorial

Nathaniel Schutta discusses a basic set of architectural diagrams. Drawing on a case study, Nathaniel walks attendees through constructing a set of diagrams that will effectively communicate their designs. In addition, Nathaniel covers stakeholders—explaining who might benefit from each type of diagram—and explores how to constructively review an architectural model.

Yulia Sheynkman is a professional executive coach who brings a unique blend of corporate strategy expertise, cognitive science research, and coaching skills. Yulia is currently a faculty associate with the Exetor Group and principal with SATYA Coaching Partners and has held leadership positions in large financial services and professional services organizations for 15 years. Prior to her corporate career, Yulia was a researcher at Princeton University, working in the laboratory of Anne Treisman and Daniel Kahneman (winner of the 2002 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences) on issues of human memory and perception. Yulia’s cognitive science research on early conceptual development received an Honorable Mention from the National Science Foundation.

Presentations

Awesome postmortems Tutorial

Failure is inevitable. Success is unpredictable. Both are tremendous learning opportunities. A postmortem, conducted in an skillful way, is one of the best ways to learn from both failures and successes. Dave Zwieback and Yulia Sheynkman explain how postmortems can help identify and address areas of fragility within systems and organizations and make both more resilient.

Cassie Shum is the technical director and principal consultant for the east portfolio in North America at ThoughtWorks. A software engineer and architect, she’s spent the last nine years focusing on architectures including event-driven systems and microservices, a wide range of technologies with an emphasis on mobile and software delivery excellence, and she’s helped grow delivery practices and technical strategy and support the next generation of technologists. Some of her passions include advocating for women in technology and public speaking. She’s involved in promoting more female speakers in technology.

Presentations

Microservices tutorial Tutorial

In a hands-on workshop, Cassandra Shum and María Gómez explore microservices and demonstrate how to deploy service-oriented software using the popular DevOps tool Docker. Participants will learn a continuous delivery approach focused on building, testing, and deploying independent microservices to production continuously and autonomously.

Alex Silva is a chief data architect at Pluralsight, where he leads the development of the company’s data infrastructure and services. He’s been instrumental in establishing Pluralsight’s data initiative by architecting a platform to capture valuable insights on real-time video analytics while integrating several data sources within the business. He’s built a reputation as a passionate and pragmatic data evangelist. Previously, Alex was a principal data engineer at Rackspace, leading a team of developers building its data initiative, while establishing its big data platform by helping architect a solution to drive actionable insight on consumer behavior and product-usage trends and designing analytical models, APIs, and frameworks to deliver fanatical support, including a computational linguistics library to analyze and classify support chat logs; a principle software engineer at ESPN Emerging Technologies, where he architected and developed a distributed application to help basketball operators collect play-by-play records; and several senior-level engineering positions at Walt Disney World Internet Group, Pentaho, OutStart, and Travelatro.com. He’s Sun Certified as an enterprise architect for the J2EE platform and is a web component developer and a Java 2 programmer. He earned his bachelor’s degree in molecular biology and an MBA from the University of Central Florida in Orlando. When Alex is not programming, you’ll probably catch him with an athletic bag on his shoulders. He’s a little bit of a sports junkie, particularly a CrossFit addict, who’s been known to create an epidemic of fitness recovery, smoking cessation, and weight loss around him.

Presentations

Designing a reactive data platform: Challenges, patterns, and antipatterns Session

Extracting value from data goes beyond robust ingestion pipelines and flexible storage. A solid data architecture addresses the needs of analysts and engineers by providing a simple, self-service ecosystem capable of handling any workload. Alex Silva discusses how the platform team at Pluralsight has been conquering these challenges by designing a platform using distributed, reactive services.

Frederic Simon’s 20 years of development experience as a programmer, architect, and consultant covers the Java evolution from day one. Fred is best known as the cofounder and chief architect of JFrog—the creator of the Artifactory Binary Repository and Bintray and winner of the JavaOne Duke’s Choice Award from 2011 to 2013. A strong open source software advocate, Fred promotes the OSS culture within JFrog by providing open source projects like SpringSource and Gradle with complimentary cloud-based Artifactory hosting. Before founding JFrog in 2008, Fred founded AlphaCSP France—one of the leading software companies in Europe, with five branches worldwide—where he was the company’s global CTO.

In addition to his role promoting ALM local and cloud-based tools for developers, Fred is hacking around Artifactory, creating plugins for CI servers (like Jenkins and Bamboo) and build tools (like Maven and Gradle), and working on new features for the core Java language, a Java port of the popular sky-rendering Stellarium project, and other neat stuff. Fred blogs at Blogs.jfrog.org and Freddy33.blogspot.com and tweets as @freddy33.

Presentations

From ACID to CAP and back again: Making S3 reliable Session

Artifactory’s use of hybrid storage has clear benefits, but what are the drawbacks? Fred Simon describes Artifactory’s journey to find harmony between ACID and CAP. Fred reviews the challenges in building a reliable and atomic system on top of eventually consistent storage and explains how Artifactory solved them for both standalone and clustered architectures.

Brian Sletten is the president of Bosatsu Consulting, where he focuses on web architecture, resource-oriented computing, social networking, the semantic web, data science, 3D graphics, visualization, scalable systems, security consulting, and other technologies of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. A liberal arts–educated software engineer with a focus on forward-leaning technologies, Brian has worked in many industries, including retail, banking, online games, defense, finance, hospitality, and healthcare. He holds a BS in computer science from the College of William and Mary. Brian is a rabid reader and devoted foodie with excellent taste in music. If pressed, he might tell you about his international pop recording career.

Presentations

Information as architecture, architecture as information Session

Brian Sletten explores the intersection of design, architecture, and development, with the Web's resource-oriented abstractions serving as both information and architecture. Brian explains how this ties into the Web's organization, its software, the people using it, its requirements, and its security.

James Stewart is an independent consultant helping senior leaders embed modern technology and security in their strategies and lead transformational change. Previously, James was a cofounder of the UK Government Digital Service and served as deputy CTO of the UK government, where he was instrumental in the UK government’s use the public cloud, embrace of open source, and changing approach to security, all with the goal of increasing government’s ability to focus on user needs. James speaks regularly around the world on organizational transformation, technology strategy, and cybersecurity.

Presentations

The architect as coach Session

As every organization becomes a software organization, senior leaders with no technology background regularly have to make technology decisions. To help their teams succeed, architects must learn to coach those leaders in how to deliver and operate high-quality services. James Stewart covers a range of techniques that help develop understanding and capability among senior leadership.

Will it scale? This is the guiding question for Pantheon CTO David Strauss, whose all-for-one-and-one-for-all improvements to web infrastructure have made the largest content sites in the world more scalable and secure, while saving developers thousands of hours in manual updates.

If you’ve ever deployed an enterprise website, chances are you’ve benefited from one of the tools he’s developed. After co-founding Four Kitchens, a successful web development shop, David found himself gravitating away from custom client work and toward infrastructure solutions. Large clients like Creative Commons, Internet Archive, The Economist, and Wikimedia had already benefited from his scalability and database optimization work.

Now he wanted to use this expertise to improve websites for everyone. When the opportunity to build an all-in-one website platform came along, he knew he needed to be a part of it. In addition to his role as Pantheon CTO, David also co-maintains the systemd/udev layer that runs on most of the world’s Linux systems, serves on the Advisory Board for the Drupal Association, contributes to the infrastructure and security teams at Drupal.org, and leads the development of Pressflow.

Presentations

Don’t build “Death Star” security: Maintaining agility and security in distributed and microservice architectures Session

“Death Star” security describes a system that relies entirely on an outermost security layer and fails catastrophically when breached. David Strauss explores security methods strong enough to cross the public Internet, flexible enough to allow new services without altering existing systems, and robust enough to avoid single points of failure.

Josh Street is the technology strategist and chief architect for AmWINS Group, working to build the architecture practice and discipline within the firm. Josh is a regular author and speaker in the areas of enterprise architecture, service-oriented architectures, Java technology, and integration methodology.

Presentations

How to modernize legacy web applications Session

Most firms have older web applications using legacy approaches; attempting to upgrade to a more modern standard is a unique challenge that means thinking about a wide array of radically different approaches. Josh Street explains how to modernize legacy web applications and walks attendees through some specific solutions for the challenges that can arise in these legacy systems.

Prasanna Swaminathan is the director of developer relations at MediaMath. In addition to teaching people how to pronounce his name, Prasanna leads a team that works with clients across the globe to open MediaMath’s API and build on its platform. Prior to joining MediaMath, he worked on power relay firmware systems, though he likes to think that prior to joining MediaMath, the matter/antimatter ratio was even. Prasanna holds a BA in physics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Presentations

Building a status dashboard with a server-free architecture Session

Thanks to the evolution of cloud-based architectures, we can see a future in which applications are defined by their behavior and not by a collection of servers to keep track of, allowing them to be more flexible and scalable. Prasanna Swaminathan explains how you can make your applications server free and demonstrates a sample app to get you started.

Stefan Toth is a software architect and the CEO at embarc Software Consulting GmbH, based in Hamburg, Germany. Stefan’s focus lies in the conception and design of medium- to large-scale software solutions, the evaluation of software architectures, and the connection of these disciplines to agile practices. He is a regular speaker at technical conferences and a published author.

Presentations

Reverse evaluating Netflix's architecture Session

Netflix is built on modern, efficient, and robust architectural concepts. Should you follow Netflix's lead and refactor your systems into microservices, split up big databases, and use polyglot approaches? Stefan Toth discusses an inverse architecture evaluation that embarc Software Consulting GmbH conducted to find the answers.

Mark VanderWiele is an IBM distinguished engineer working on emerging cloud technologies. Mark was chief architect for some of the first clouds in IBM and over the last several years has been performing research and development on cloud technology, focusing on how to build more efficient data centers and shorten development cycles. He has helped hundreds of customers transition to the cloud, and he uses each experience to refine future offerings. Mark is currently working on the PaaS layer with IBM’s BlueMix to radically simplify cloud application development and deployment.

Presentations

Connect and control IoT devices in minutes Session

The world of the IoT is exploding with respect to sensors, and speech and analytics are providing a powerful new user experience. David Boloker and Mark VanderWiele explain how to put everything together in a clear and simple way using the power of the cloud, microservices, and real-time analytics.

Bulama Yusuf is the founder and chief software architect at Intellectual Apps. An enthusiastic application developer with over six years’ experience building applications, Bulama has built and deployed several cloud-connected mobile applications, including an application that lets users engrave their signatures at places they visit and an application that monitors and reports the electricity status of a given location. Bulama has entered and won several mobile application building contests, including the Google Android Challenge for Sub-Saharan Africa and the Samsung Mobile Application Development Challenge. He has also led several web development teams that built customized solutions for specific clients. Bulama’s core interests are cloud computing and mobile application development, and he has a keen interest in understanding how systems work and building them. He recently picked up a new hobby: programming microcontrollers. Bulama holds a number of certifications, including the Sun Certified Web Component Developer, Sun Certified Java Programmer, and Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist, and he has experience with a wide range of technologies. He has led numerous training sessions within and outside Nigeria and is the current coordinator for the Google developer group and Java user group in Abuja.

Presentations

How we built an election report-casting app for the 2015 Nigeria general elections (with little experience building mobile apps, using agile scrum methods for the first time) Session

Bulama Yusuf explains how he and his team introduced agile methodologies to build a mobile app with a cloud-based backend at an organization that previously used the waterfall method of software development (and had never built a mobile app before). Bulama outlines the challenges the team faced and the lessons they learned along the way.

Dave Zwieback has been working with large-scale mission-critical infrastructure and teams for almost two decades. Dave is the VP of engineering at Next Big Sound (acquired by Pandora Media, Inc.) and CTO of Lotus Outreach. He has previously worked with the adaptive learning startup Knewton, the quantitative investment management firm D.E. Shaw & Co., and the financial services behemoth Morgan Stanley. He also ran an infrastructure architecture consultancy for seven years. Dave is the author of Beyond Blame: Learning from Failure and Success from O’Reilly Media. He blogs at Mindweather.com.

Presentations

Awesome postmortems Tutorial

Failure is inevitable. Success is unpredictable. Both are tremendous learning opportunities. A postmortem, conducted in an skillful way, is one of the best ways to learn from both failures and successes. Dave Zwieback and Yulia Sheynkman explain how postmortems can help identify and address areas of fragility within systems and organizations and make both more resilient.