Engineering the Future of Software
April 10–11, 2016: Training
April 11–13, 2016: Conference
New York, NY

12 patterns for hypermedia service architecture

Mike Amundsen (API Academy, CA Technologies)
1:15pm–2:05pm Tuesday, 04/12/2016
Microservices, pros and cons
Location: Regent Parlor Level: Advanced
Average rating: ****.
(4.80, 5 ratings)

Prerequisite knowledge

Attendees should be familiar with microservices, REST, HTTP, and distributed software architecture.

Description

The speed of feature release for web and mobile apps continues to increase, but it can grow costly and time consuming to constantly rebuild and redeploy client applications—especially through app stores, where updates can take more than a week to appear. What if you could add new features to an existing client without repeatedly installing new versions of the application? What would the code look like? What changes are needed to create a client that can adapt to changes in the service API? How much change is reasonably possible when both the client and API are able to evolve over time?

Mike Amundsen offers 12 patterns and practices for building APIs that can safely evolve over time and client applications that can adapt to those changes without relying on explicit versioning systems or repeated redeployment. Whether you are responsible for building web frontends or APIs to serve those apps, Mike helps you identify key principles to increase the adaptability and evolvability of your web implementations.

OFFICE HOURS
Mike will take part in Office Hours on Tuesday, April 12 at 12:15 PM in the Mercury Complex. Come by and meet him!

Photo of Mike Amundsen

Mike Amundsen

API Academy, CA Technologies

An internationally known author and lecturer, Mike Amundsen travels the world consulting and speaking on a wide range of topics, including distributed network architecture, web application development, and other subjects. In his role of director of architecture for the API Academy, Mike heads up the API architecture and design practice in North America. He is responsible for working with companies to provide insight on how to best capitalize on the myriad opportunities APIs present to both consumers and the enterprises themselves. Mike has authored numerous books and papers on programming over the last 15 years, including RESTful Web APIs, a collaboration with Leonard Richardson, and Building Hypermedia APIs with HTML5 and Node, an oft-cited reference on building adaptable web applications. His most recent book, RESTful Web Clients, was released in early 2017 by O’Reilly.