4–7 Nov 2019

Schedule: Hands-on sessions

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9:0012:30 Tuesday, 5 November 2019
Location: Hall A1
Kenny Baas-Schwegler (Xebia), João Rosa (Xebia)
Creating multiple models for the same problem is one of the more important lessons that domain-driven design teaches you. It's a lot cheaper to quickly iterate over them and throw away less-useful prototypes before you even start coding. Kenny Baas-Schwegler and João RosaIn explore how event storming can support modeling software with domain-driven design model-driven building blocks. Read more.
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9:0012:30 Tuesday, 5 November 2019
Location: Hall A7
Edwin Maldonado (Contentful)
Software engineers usually find themselves changing hard-coded content on the presentation layer, changing a paragraph here and there; that’s difficult to maintain and hard to scale. Now imagine you have to support and apply the same changes on a website and other devices. Edwin Maldonado outlines the basics so you can design a reusable information architecture. Read more.
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9:0012:30 Tuesday, 5 November 2019
Location: Hall A2
James Gough (Morgan Stanley), Nick Ebbitt (Morgan Stanley), Matthew Auburn (Morgan Stanley)
Knowing where to start with an API program is difficult. Most development teams have been building APIs for years, but it's different when the goal is to become an API-centric team or company. James Gough, Nick Ebbitt, and Matthew Auburn bootstrap the basics from building your first API, using OpenAPI specification to describe and version your APIs, and deploying behind a gateway. Read more.
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13:3017:00 Tuesday, 5 November 2019
Location: Hall A2
Jochem Schulenklopper and Gero Vermaas explain and practice an approach that enables you to improve and release serverless functions to production with confidence. You'll make changes in some sample serverless functions running in production, deploy the improved functions to production, and analyze your improvement against the originals. Read more.
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13:3017:00 Tuesday, 5 November 2019
Location: Hall A1
Stefan Hofer (Workplace Solutions), dorota kochanowska (Workplace Solutions)
When you want to apply domain-driven design (DDD), you must first master the domain. In this hands-on examination, Stefan Hofer, and Dorota Kochanowska show you how to build up domain knowledge with domain storytelling. Domain stories help you better understand a domain, identify what is core, segregate bounded contexts, and constitute ubiquitous language. Read more.
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13:3017:00 Tuesday, 5 November 2019
Location: Hall A7
Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab), Mars Geldard (University of Tasmania), Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
Paris Buttfield-Addison, Mars Geldard, and Tim Nugent explore game design without coding or game engines. You’ll get a fresh perspective on architecture, design, and community engagement by understanding how people interact with the fastest-growing form of entertainment in the world: games. A software architect can learn a lot from game design; here you'll learn everything you need to get started. Read more.
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15:5516:40 Wednesday, 6 November 2019
Location: M6/M7
Mario-Leander Reimer guides you through cloud native API gateways. Good APIs are the centerpiece of any successful digital product, with proper management of the utmost importance. The API gateway pattern is well established to handle concerns like routing, versioning, rate limiting, access control, or diagnosability in a microservice architecture. Read more.
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15:5516:40 Wednesday, 6 November 2019
Location: Hall A2
Erik Dörnenburg (ThoughtWorks)
Architectures based on microservices have spread rapidly. Organizations are drawn to the promises of microservices but fail to carry the architecture through to the frontend, resulting in the dreaded frontend monolith. Erik Dörnenburg explores patterns harvested from practical use that show how to build micro-frontends to realize the benefits of microservices in systems with rich user interfaces. Read more.
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16:5017:35 Wednesday, 6 November 2019
Location: Hall A2
Florian Rappl (smapiot), Lothar Schöttner (smapiot)
The architecture pattern of microservices is found in many modern system landscapes, offering flexibility for the backend services. The frontend is very often realized as a monolith. Florian Rappl and Lothar Schöttner explore microservices and detail an example implementation of a highly modular frontend architecture that mirrors the dynamic of a modern microservices backend. Read more.
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9:0010:30 Thursday, 7 November 2019
Location: Hall A5
Vaughn Vernon (Kalele & vlingo)
The paradigm billboard reads, "Object-oriented failed." Vaughn Vernon explores the ways developers have failed at object-oriented compared to the use objects their inventor intended. Reactive domain-driven design (DDD) features explicit, coherent, message sending that employs simple, business-centric, concurrent objects. Read more.
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9:0010:30 Thursday, 7 November 2019
Location: M8
Michael Hartle (Hartle & Klug Consulting GmbH)
Join Michael Hartle for a hands-on introduction to service meshes for microservice architectures using Envoy proxy, Java, and Spring. He explores practical applications for their dynamic, programmatic adaptation during runtime. Read more.
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16:5017:35 Thursday, 7 November 2019
Location: Hall A2
Laurentiu Spilca (Endava)
History repeats itself. Some years ago, software engineers started to implement frameworks to ease the development of software applications. Laurentiu Spilca walks you through how microservices are currently delivered and what Istio can do for you in regard to traffic management. Read more.
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16:5017:35 Thursday, 7 November 2019
Location: Hall A5
Rene Weiss (embarc Software Consulting GmbH)
Evolutionary Architectures? Fitness Functions? How can those approaches help the ongoing development of software systems? This talk shows practical applications of fitness functions beyond theoretical ideas and shows hands on examples of tools to craft fitness functions and use them in CI/CD pipelines as well as ideas on how to do safe experiments in production environments. Read more.

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