Engineering the Future of Software
16–18 October 2017: Conference & Tutorials
18–19 October 2017: Training
London, UK

Speakers

Hear from a wide range of talented software architects, engineers, and senior developers who are doing amazing things in software architecture. New speakers are added regularly. Please check back to see the latest updates to the agenda.

Filter

Search Speakers

Asanka Abeysinghe is vice president of solutions architecture at WSO2, where he spearheads the company’s customer-facing technical tasks and oversees the solution architecture and technical sales functions. He also provides consulting to key WSO2 customer and evangelizing digital transformation. Asanka has over 20 years of industry experience, which includes implementing projects ranging from desktop and web applications to highly scalable distributed systems and SOAs in the financial domain, mobile platforms, and business integration solutions. His areas of specialization include application architecture, development using Java technologies, and C/C++ on Linux and Windows platforms. He is a committer for the Apache Software Foundation.

Presentations

Iterative architecture: Your path to on-time delivery Session

Think big, act small. It’s easy to develop a vision, but there are often many architecture barriers along the path to achieving it. Asanka Abeysinghe explores iterative architecture—introducing iterative architectural changes to support business and technical requirements—and shares real-world examples.

Based in Australia, Clarence Bakirtzidis is the DevOps chapter lead at Elabor8, where his focus includes helping organizations migrate to cloud and container platforms, adopt continuous delivery, and embrace a DevOps culture. Clarence has over 17 years of experience in software development across a variety of industries, including telecommunications, finance, and healthcare and has worked for both product-oriented and consulting organizations.

Presentations

Docker in production: Your journey starts here. Tutorial

Whether you are migrating existing applications or starting afresh with microservices, Clarence Bakirtzidis helps you get started on your journey to Docker-based production environments, focusing on an infrastructure-as-code approach via scripting and automation from the command-line interface.

Nikhil Barthwal is a senior software engineer on the internal tools and productivity team at ecommerce startup Jet.com (recently acquired by Walmart), where he leads several projects related to static analysis and build and deployment systems. Previously, Nikhil worked at Oracle and Microsoft. He is involved with local meetups in New York City, where he gives introductory talks on programming in F#. Nikhil holds a master’s degree in distributed systems and a bachelor’s in electrical engineering.

Presentations

Implementing an event-driven microservices architecture in a functional language Session

Web services are typically stateless entities that need to operate at scale. Nikhil Barthwal explains how Jet.com implemented event-driven microservices architecture using a functional language, demonstrating how the functional paradigm captures the behavior of this service architecture very naturally and offers several benefits, such as scalability, productivity, and correctness.

Simon Brown is an independent consultant specializing in software architecture. Simon is the author of Software Architecture for Developers, a developer-friendly guide to software architecture, technical leadership, and the balance with agility. He is also the creator of the C4 software architecture model.

Presentations

Software architecture for developers Session

In a talk aimed at software developers who want to learn more about software architecture, technical leadership, and the balance with agility, Simon Brown offers an overview of software architecture on modern software projects.

Visualize, document, and explore your software architecture Session

It seems like many software teams have lost the ability to communicate what it is they are building, so it's no surprise that these same teams often lack technical leadership, direction, and consistency. Simon Brown shares approaches and tools for visualizing, documenting, and exploring your software architecture.

Michelle Brush is engineering director for Cerner Corporation, where she leads teams that develop the platform for ingesting stream and batch data specific to Cerner’s Population Health solutions. A math geek turned computer geek with 15 years of software development experience, Michelle has developed algorithms and data structures for search, compression, and data mining in both embedded and enterprise systems. She is the chapter leader for the Kansas City chapter of Girl Develop It and one of the conference organizers for Midwest.io.

Presentations

Adventures in accidental human architecture Session

Are you vigilantly keeping watch on your system in anticipation of altering some setting or system state? When parts of your system fail, do you perform manual cleanup? If so, humans have been injected into your architecture. Michelle Brush explores the factors that lead to systems that run on human intervention and shares best practices for detecting and removing humans from the machine.

The death of Cannot Reproduce Keynote

Software practitioners believe if you can’t reproduce a bug, you can’t know if you’ve fixed it, but sometimes it's just not possible. Issue tracking systems have a special resolution type for this situation—Cannot Reproduce. Michelle Brush highlights principles and practices that deliver reproducibility in systems, arguing that we are getting closer and closer to the death of Cannot Reproduce.

Daniel Bryant is an independent technical consultant and the CTO at SpectoLabs, where he specializes in enabling continuous delivery within organizations through the identification of value streams, the creation of build pipelines, and the implementation of effective testing strategies. Daniel’s technical expertise focuses on DevOps tooling, cloud and container platforms, and microservice implementations. He contributes to several open source projects, writes for InfoQ, O’Reilly, and Voxxed, and regularly presents at international conferences, including OSCON, QCon, and JavaOne.

Presentations

Continuous delivery patterns for contemporary architecture Session

It's evident that modern software architecture is evolving toward fully component-based architectures, but there are many challenges to delivering such applications in a continuous, safe, and rapid fashion. Daniel Bryant shares a series of patterns to help you identify and implement solutions for continuous delivery of contemporary service-based architectures.

Reality is overrated: API simulation for microservice testing Tutorial

Testing microservices is challenging. Dividing a system into components naturally creates interservice dependencies, and each service has its own performance and fault-tolerance characteristics that need to be validated during development and the QA process. Daniel Bryant and Andrew Morgan share the theory, techniques, and practices needed to overcome this challenge.

Allard Buijze is the founder and chief technical officer at AxonIQ, a microservices communication platform for building event-driven, distributed applications, where he helps customers reach appropriate future-proof technical decisions. A former software architect within the fields of scalability and performance, he has worked on several projects where performance is often a recurring theme. Allard is convinced that a good domain model is the beginning of contributing to the overall performance of an application and developed the Axon Framework out of this conviction. He regularly gives workshops and trainings on frameworks, best practices, and architecture and is a frequent speaker at conferences, seminars, and meetups.

Presentations

Pragmatic event-driven microservices Session

Most discussions about implementing microservices start by evaluating the technical options and their challenges. However, the real business value is in functionality. Allard Buijze demonstrates how to build evolutionary microservices, starting with a single application that can be scaled out and distributed once the sensible boundaries are known.

Joel Crabb is the vice president of architecture and the chief architect at Target, where he has brought a platform mindset to the company’s software engineering teams and created a platform architecture wherein data and business processes are presented through platform APIs that serve the entire enterprise. Joel has over 20 years of experience building large-scale applications, both business and consumer facing. Previously, he was the chief architect at Best Buy, where he replatformed the company’s digital channel into a cloud-based distributed system to support growth from $1.8B to $5.1B in revenue over four years.

Presentations

Platform architecture for omnichannel retail Session

The retail landscape for brick and mortar companies transitioning to digital is incredibly complex. Saddled with extensive legacy systems that impinge rapid development capabilities, retailers need an architecture that melds the new with the old. Joel Crabb shares a platform architecture for retailers to compete in this new world.

Yan Cui is a senior server developer at Space Ape Games. A polyglot software architect with over 10 years of development experience, primarily in building scalable backend systems with AWS, Yan has worked for some of the UK’s largest names in gaming and ecommerce. He is a regular speaker at user groups and conferences and keeps an active blog at Theburningmonk.com. Yan is a coauthor of F# Deep Dives.

Presentations

Serverless in production: An experience report Session

AWS Lambda has changed the way we deploy and run software, but the serverless paradigm has created new challenges to old problems around testing, CI/CD, and ops. Yan Cui shares solutions to these challenges, drawing on his experience running Lambda in production.

Scott Davis is a principal engineer with ThoughtWorks, where he focuses on the leading-edge, innovative, emerging, and nontraditional aspects of web development, such as serverless web apps, mobile web apps (responsive PWAs), HTML5-based smart TV apps, conversational UIs (like Siri and Alexa), and using web technologies to build IoT solutions. He is also the founder of ThirstyHead.com, a Denver-based training and software development consultancy. Scott has been writing about web development for over 10 years. His books include Getting Started with Grails, Groovy Recipes, GIS for Web Developers, The Google Maps API: Adding Where to Your Web Applications, and JBoss at Work. He is also the author of several popular article series at IBM developerWorks, including Mastering MEAN, Mastering Grails, and Practically Groovy. His videos include Architecture of the MEAN Stack, Responsive Mobile Architecture, and On the Road to Angular 2. Scott is also the cofounder of the Denver HTML5 User Group.

Presentations

Practical examples of serverless architecture Session

What does a networked app look like without the server? Scott Davis explores a spectrum of environments, from platforms as a service (PaaS) to container hosting, and walks you down the evolutionary trail from microservices and backends as a service (BaaS) to canonical, truly serverless solutions like OpenWhisk and AWS Lambda—e.g., functions as a service (FaaS).

Clément Delafargue is CTO at Clever Cloud, where he works on IT automation and continuous delivery. A functional programmer by trade, Clément loves discussing FP, distributed systems, and cloud architecture.

Presentations

Acknowledging boundaries Session

Get consistency back in your μServices architecture. Clément Delafargue explains why the best way to reduce complexity in a μServices architecture is to embrace boundaries. Join in to learn how to do it with the help of proper design and a good type system.

Rob Dickinson is a systems architect and software engineer on Intel’s NVML development team as well as the technical lead for pmemkv, a key-value datastore optimized for persistent memory. Previously, Rob led development of end-user monitoring products at Quest Software and Dell Software but won’t admit to how many startups it took to get there. Rob has never met a programming language he didn’t like. He lives with his wife, three kids, and snowboard collection in Boulder, Colorado.

Presentations

Planning ahead for persistent memory Session

The persistent memory revolution is almost here, but many of us architects can't clearly picture where persistent memory fits into our applications. The hard truth is that persistent memory isn't quite like memory or storage; it's a new tier with new capabilities and tradeoffs. Rob Dickinson dispels some of the myths about persistent memory so you can better plan your own research.

Draško Draskovic is an electronics engineer with over 15 years of professional experience working for Fortune 500 companies and startups including Texas Instruments, Philips, Sequans Communications and Alcatel-Lucent, focusing on embedded systems, semiconductors, and telecommunication technologies. Draško earned his reputation in the open source community by contributing to projects dealing with low-level kernel programming and Linux device drivers like the OpenWrt platform, the OpenOCD JTAG debugger, the U-Boot bootloader, the CodeZero L4 hypervisor, the Linux kernel, and the NuttX RTOS. He is an expert in software and hardware networking technology, distributed networks, wireless communication, smart devices, microcontrollers, sensor networks, gateways, mobile telecommunications, radio frequency technology, and the interconnection of networked embedded devices with higher-level applications using web technologies. Draško holds an MSc in electrical engineering from Belgrade University.

Presentations

Architecturing and securing IoT platforms with microservices Session

IoT device management and multiprotocol messaging platforms demand specific architectural decisions and high-concurrency approaches due to the massive number of expected devices. Drasko Draskovic and Janko Isidorovic share an architecture, implementation, and testing procedures needed to create an industry-grade IoT platform based on microservices and Docker containers.

Murat Erder is the Chief Technology Officer for the Chief Adminstrative Office at Deutsche Bank. Before that he was a director in the Chief Data Office focusing on Data Engineering. Previous responsibilities included leading the Integration Services Group at Deutsche Bank. Prior to joining Deutsche Bank in 2009, Murat had a career as management consultant, software architect and developer.

Murat is the co-author of "Continuous Architecture: Sustainable Architecture in an Agile and Cloud-Centric World’

Presentations

Continuous data-centric architecture Session

In the last five years, data has again risen to prominence, with chief data officers, data science, and analytics on the business side and microservices and NoSQL databases on the technology side. But how should software architects approach data in this age of Agile, big data, and the cloud? Murat Erder looks into key trends and architectural considerations.

Ben Evans is cofounder and CEO of jClarity, a startup that makes performance tools for development and ops teams. Previously, Ben was chief architect for listed derivatives at Deutsche Bank, performance tested the Google IPO, worked on the initial UK trials of 3G networks with BT, built award-winning websites for some of Hollywood’s biggest hits of the ‘90s, developed some of the UK’s very first true ecommerce websites, and provided technology to help some of the UK’s most vulnerable people. Before joining the tech industry, Ben was a researcher in theoretical physics, working on theories that are now being tested at the LHC. Ben helps to run the London Java Community and represents the user community as a voting member on Java’s governing body, the JCP Executive Committee. He is a Java Champion and JavaOne Rock Star speaker. Ben is author of The Well-Grounded Java Developer and the new edition of Java in a Nutshell and writes regularly for industry publications. He’s also a frequent speaker at technical conferences worldwide. Ben holds a master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Cambridge.

Presentations

Thinking about thinking about architecture Session

The cognitive processes that an architect undertakes when creating a new design are often overlooked. Ben Evans explores some of the best known cognitive biases and other effects that are relevant to architectural design and related tasks.

Rick Fast is a distinguished software engineer at Expedia. Previously, Rick was an engineer at CDK Global/Cobalt in Portland, an industry leader in automotive retail software, and served as lead engineer at Nokia HERE (formerly Navteq), a provider of digital map data.

Presentations

Building next-gen edge architecture at Expedia Session

As Expedia refactors its backend services into a finer-grained microservice architecture, frontend applications have begun to be split into smaller applications serving a small number of pages or content on the website. Rick Fast details how Expedia is creating an extremely configurable, self-service edge architecture for routing between frontend applications and managing bot traffic.

Neal Ford is a director, software architect, and meme wrangler at ThoughtWorks, a global IT consultancy that thinks disruptively to deliver technology to address the toughest challenges, all while seeking to revolutionize the IT industry and create positive social change. Neal focuses on designing and building large-scale enterprise applications. He is an internationally recognized expert on software development and delivery, especially in the intersection of Agile engineering techniques and software architecture. Neal has authored magazine articles, seven books (and counting), and dozens of video presentations and has spoken at hundreds of developers conferences worldwide on the topics of software architecture, continuous delivery, functional programming, cutting-edge software innovations. Check out his website at Nealford.com. He welcomes feedback and can be reached at nford@thoughtworks.com.

Presentations

Evolutionary architectures Session

An evolutionary architecture supports incremental, guided change as a first principle across multiple dimensions. Neal Ford describes how to build architectures that safely evolve over time, adding evolvability as a standard "-ility" on software projects.

Monday opening welcome Keynote

Brian Foster and Neal Ford welcome you to the first day of the Software Architecture Conference.

Tuesday opening welcome Keynote

Brian Foster and Neal Ford welcome you to the second day of the Software Architecture Conference.

Brian Foster is an editor at O’Reilly Media focusing on Java and enterprise technologies. Brian has been working in technical publishing for over five years, acquiring content in business, statistical computing, open source programming, and financial engineering as well as several other computer-related topics.

Presentations

Monday opening welcome Keynote

Brian Foster and Neal Ford welcome you to the first day of the Software Architecture Conference.

Tuesday opening welcome Keynote

Brian Foster and Neal Ford welcome you to the second day of the Software Architecture Conference.

Uwe Friedrichsen is CTO of codecentric AG, where he focuses on resilience, scalability, and the IT of (the day after) tomorrow. Uwe has traveled the IT world for many years and is always in search of innovative ideas and concepts. Often, you can find him sharing ideas at conferences or in his many articles, blog posts, and tweets.

Presentations

Resilient software design in a nutshell Tutorial

Uwe Friedrichsen walks you through the foundations of resilient software design: what it is, why we need it, how to start, and where the biggest pitfalls lie, with a focus on design challenges and useful resilience patterns.

Georgiana Gligor is chief Tekkie officer at Tekkie Consulting. Georgiana is living proof that geek girls are an asset to any team. She has crafted professional software on the LAMP stack since 2003 and loves coding large-scale applications and mentoring teammates to better their craftsmanship. Georgiana has experience in every aspect of the software development lifecycle and is hungry for more.

Presentations

Smart, scalable content distribution Session

Distributing website content in a microservices-driven architecture is not a trivial task, and it requires solving complex problems stemming from the large number of servers involved and the variety of edge cases that need to be solved. Georgiana Gligor shares a solution to content snapshotting, distribution, and caching in a silo-based architecture involving tens of machines.

Maria Gomez is a market tech principal at ThoughtWorks in Barcelona. Over her more than nine years of industry experience, Maria has worked with many different technologies and domains, which has helped her lead teams and advise stakeholders in making the right technology decisions. She is also a speaker and an advocate for diversity and inclusion in the IT industry.

Presentations

CQRS and event sourcing: A DevOps perspective Session

As more organizations move toward distributed system architectures like CQRS and event sourcing, it’s important to discuss the challenges of deploying and supporting these systems in production. Stacey Watro and Maria Gomez explore strategies and pitfalls for supporting CQRS and event sources systems in production, covering how to build resilient systems, approach monitoring, and more.

Meet the Experts with Maria Gomez Meet The Experts

Maria has experience with microservices and event-driven architectures. Join her to get advice on how to evaluate if they are suitable for you and how to deploy and operationalize them or share your experiences.

Michael Hausenblas is a developer advocate for Go, OpenShift, and Kubernetes at Red Hat, where he helps app ops engineers build and operate distributed services. Michael shares his experience with distributed systems and large-scale data processing through demos, blog posts, and public speaking engagements and contributes to open source software such as OpenShift and Kubernetes. Previously, Michael was a developer advocate at Mesosphere, chief data engineer at MapR Technologies, and a research fellow at the National University of Ireland, Galway, where he researched large-scale data integration and the internet of things and gained experience in advocacy and standardization (World Wide Web Consortium, IETF). In his free time, Michael contributes to open source software (mainly using Go), blogs, and hangs out on Twitter too much.

Presentations

Cloud-native design patterns in practice (sponsored by Red Hat OpenShift) Session

Cloud-native applications—containerized apps that run in a cluster, whether in the public cloud or in a hybrid cloud setup—are going mainstream. Michael Hausenblas offers an overview of the CNCF stack, where cloud native goes beyond 12-factor apps, and walks you through the design and implementation process for a concrete app, using Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Istio.

Kevin Hoffman is a lead engineer for the commercial digital innovation catalyst team at Capital One. Kevin started working on .NET back before the first betas and has spent a good portion of his career building just about every type of .NET application, from Windows Phone to ASP.NET and WPF. He’s written over a dozen books on .NET, covering everything from language fundamentals to websites to ecommerce, and spent the last several years working with open source tools and languages and building microservices and cloud-native architectures in Java, Scala, and Go. Kevin has recently written books on microservice development in Go and ASP.NET Core.

Presentations

Building microservices with ASP.NET Core Session

Microsoft finally has a truly open source, cross-platform development framework that is ideal for building cloud-native microservices: ASP.NET Core. Kevin Hoffman explains how to use ASP.NET Core to build immutable releases with Docker, address real-world concerns like configuration, security, and data access, and implement continuous integration and continuous delivery in the cloud.

Emma Jane Hogbin Westby leads the operations team for shared digital services at the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). She is the author of O’Reilly’s Git for Teams and two books on web development.

Presentations

Humane teams at home and around the world Session

Software development is a social activity that favors direct human contact, yet 21st century life can often get in the way, forcing us to reconsider our communication patterns. Daniel Young and Emma Jane Hogbin Westby explore how to build and maintain happy productive teams, regardless of geography.

Meet the Experts with Emma Jane Hogbin Westby Meet The Experts

Come talk with Emma about the importance of the human element in software development, communication patterns and anti-patterns of distributed and collocated teams, and strategies to build and maintain happy productive teams.

Janko Isidorovic is COO of Mainflux. Previously, Janko was an ERP specialist at NELT, southern Europe’s biggest logistic and distribution company, an IT specialist for warehouse operations, and an application and systems engineer. He worked on SAP’s BC implementation team, where he was responsible for SAP landscape design and conceptual design of the business processes and design of interfaces for the MM module. Janko also has significant experience as a project manager; he worked on the GO4YU project, a joint venture between NELT and Telekom Srbija that aimed to provide a mobile, VoIP, and live TV and video on demand streaming platform for Serbian expats in the US and Canada. In 1994, Janko won the First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics, an international competition for high school students organized by the European Physics Society. He holds an MSc in electrical engineering from Belgrade University.

Presentations

Architecturing and securing IoT platforms with microservices Session

IoT device management and multiprotocol messaging platforms demand specific architectural decisions and high-concurrency approaches due to the massive number of expected devices. Drasko Draskovic and Janko Isidorovic share an architecture, implementation, and testing procedures needed to create an industry-grade IoT platform based on microservices and Docker containers.

Karun Japhet is a tech lead, developer, and quality advocate at ThoughtWorks. Over the past nine years, he has worked on realizing value for his clients through the creation of highly scaleable applications and integration of large enterprise applications. Karun believes that if you’re not considering serverless architectures in event-driven systems, you may be doing it wrong.

Presentations

Scaling traditional integration in an event-driven architecture Session

Karun Japhet tells the tale of how one company bridged the technological divide between modern event-driven systems and traditional architectures, building a resilient platform with eventual consistency guarantees even when third parties provided no guarantees of reasonable service.

Yiannis Kanellopoulos is the practice leader for Greece at the Software Improvement Group (SIG), where he specializes in helping international organizations manage risks and costs related to the procurement, development, and maintenance of their software systems. Yiannis is also a founding member of Orange Grove Patras, a business incubator sponsored by the Dutch Embassy in Greece to promote entrepreneurship and counter youth unemployment. He holds a PhD in computer science from the University of Manchester.

Presentations

We cannot engineer the future of software without happy developers. (sponsored by SIG) Keynote

Software is the DNA of modern society. However, most organizations don't seem to care about the people who are fundamentally responsible for implementing their digital vision: software developers. Yiannis Kanellopoulos explores several deficiencies SIG found in its current approach to making developers excel and realizing prophesied potential. So how can you help? One word: empowerment.

Don first heard the siren call of the machine emanating from a TRS-80 sometime in the early ’80s. His first caretaker was a venerable PDP-7 hidden in a remote coastal outpost. A veteran programmer of a wide variety of projects ranging from high-performance servers delicately handcrafted in C to creaky old desktop applications written in dead frameworks to squeaky-clean mobile applications written using the latest cool tools, Don has a strong interest in nurturing new apprentices into strong journeymen and creating software that astonishes at every level and withstands inspection long after the show has finished. Writing something that seems to work from a superficial inspection is simply not good enough. From initial idea to finished product, each object and function should be a work of art.

Presentations

Superheroes and con artists: Abusing fictional tropes for better teams Session

Hiring and maintaining a software team is a challenging proposition. Programmers are among the toughest craftspeople to manage and assess. To gain a fresh perspective (and relieve the boredom), Don Kelly turns to the pulp fiction of his adolescence for inspiration, explaining how he maps teams from fictional universes into the software teams he would like to build.

Kasey Klipsch is a principal engineer at MediaMath, where he works on backend infrastructure. Kasey is passionate about the craft of software creation, mentorship and developer hiring. Previously, he built software in a wide variety of industries, including quantitative finance, high-frequency trading, and online education. He holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science from Indiana University.

Presentations

Unlocking the mysteries of distributed microservice authorization Session

In a monolith, authorization is easy. In a microservices world, you have to make hard choices about your data model and the abstractions on top of which authorization rules are built. Wilfried Schobeiri and Kasey Klipsch share an approach to implementing distributed authorization in a microservices context, covering fallacies, common pitfalls, and best practices along the way.

Jakub Korab is principal consultant at Ameliant, where he specializes in open source messaging and integration. Jakub’s experience ranges from architecture to development to troubleshooting, and he has worked for over 100 clients worldwide across a range of industries, including investment banking, law enforcement, gaming, aviation, logistics, utilities, and space exploration. Jakub is the author of Understanding Message Brokers and Apache Camel Developer’s Cookbook.

Presentations

The dark art of flow Session

Your system has worked fine for months, but one day it receives more load than expected and seizes up. Web service requests start being rejected, message brokers stop accepting and handing out messages, and everything grinds to a halt. Jakub Korab explains how to diagnose these issues, understand why they happen, and respond to ensure that your data keeps flowing in torrential conditions.

Patrick Kua is the CTO of mobile bank N26, where he is building the engineering group that will change how retail banking works. Previously, Patrick was a principal technical consultant at ThoughtWorks in London. He is the author of three books: The Retrospective Handbook, Talking with Tech Leads, and most recently, Building Evolutionary Architectures. Patrick is a frequent conference speaker and blogger. He is passionate about bringing a balanced focus between people, organizations, and technology.

Presentations

The travel guide to a software system Session

Imagine that tomorrow you started work on a new software system. What would you need to know to be productive? What information would help you orient yourself, make better decisions, and know that you're heading in the right direction? Patrick Kua uses the analogy of the travel guide to help you decide what to document in your software systems.

James Lewis is a principal consultant at ThoughtWorks, where he has worked for nearly a decade. James is primarily interested in building distributed systems using web technologies and has been a keen observer (and participant) in the resurgence of interest in SOA. You can often find him being a loudmouth at conferences, usually on some aspect of building microservices. He’s also been known to offer opinions on lean software engineering, domain-driven design, organizational design, and innovation. . .and Welsh rugby.

Presentations

Thinking about platforms Keynote

Drawing on his experience advising clients on platform adoption, James Lewis explores the benefits that platforms can bring, the organizational limitations that make platform adoption attractive, how we currently overcome these limitations, and the paradigm shift in thinking needed to get the most out of them.

Fei Li is a software architect and research scientist at Siemens AG in Austria, where he designs and develops prototypes in the fields of edge computing, industrial automation, and manufacturing management, working closely with various production teams to transfer practical knowledge into production. Fei has more than 10 years of experience designing and developing large-scale distributed software. He has authored more than 30 publications on the subjects of service-oriented computing, the internet of things, and smart city solutions.

Presentations

Application scaling over the edge: Microservice architecture in industrial applications Session

Driven by the need for data analytics in Industry 4.0, edge computing is gaining momentum to bring intelligence to the devices at the network’s edge. Fei Li offers insights on a microservice-based architecture that keeps analytics applications on edge devices while dynamically utilizing resources on the cloud to achieve resilience and scalability in critical industrial applications.

Phil Lombardi is a senior platform engineer at Datawire, where he is building the cloud services for Datawire.io’s resilient microservices framework. Phil has extensive experience building and operating distributed systems and continuous delivery pipelines in both the internet of things and web services spaces.

Presentations

Developing resilient microservices with Kubernetes and Envoy Tutorial

Microservices are an increasingly popular approach to building cloud-native applications, and dozens of new technologies that streamline microservices development, such as Docker, Kubernetes, and Envoy, have been released over the past few years. Phil Lombardi and Rafael Schloming walk you through actually using these technologies to develop, deploy, and run microservices.

Jan Machacek is CTO at Cake Solutions, where he helps companies achieve exceptional growth and success through the use of modern computing technologies—specifically large-scale machine learning and big data systems, particularly those that interact with the IoT, wearables, mobile, and modern web applications. Jan is a passionate technologist with hands-on experience delivering large-scale systems, with a focus on those that bring together the data science and mathematics with modern engineering practices. He regularly contributes to open source projects and speaks at technical conferences.

Presentations

Practical resilience Session

Jan Machacek explores the architecture and design decisions needed to build resilient systems, offering a step-by-step guide that you can apply to your current system to discover its critical areas and see what happens in those critical areas when the inevitable faults start to pile in. Along the way, Jan demonstrates different types of failures and how to deal with them.

Nils Magnus is a system architect and journalist. He has a 15+-year track record in open source security architecture, engineering, and cloud infrastructure. He believes in scalable, sustainable software solutions and cooperative, Agile development. In his role as a board member at LinuxTag Association and the German Unix Users Group, Nils organizes conferences and workshops on these topics. He works for Open Telekom Cloud, the simple, affordable, and secure IaaS framework. Nils lives in Munich and Berlin.

Presentations

Container zen: 12 steps to enlightenment Session

Nils Magnus outlines the 12 stages of self-awareness that lead to ultimate container enlightenment. It's a long and winding road: while usual suspects like system engineers, developers, and system designers understand container virtualization fairly well, its architectural pattern remains a different cup of tea, and orchestration frameworks and auxiliary tools make it hard to see to the bottom.

Eleanor McHugh is the director of Innovative Identity Solutions. Ellie trained as a physicist but for the last 12 years has specialized in developing real-time software systems for aviation control, broadcast transmission, and network infrastructure. In recent years, her research work has taken her into the wacky world of next-generation internet technologies, with an emphasis on DNS provisioning, semantic networking, and the web as a middleware platform. Ellie is a vociferous evangelist for the Ruby way and a well-known, if often elusive, member of the London Ruby community.

Presentations

Don't ask, don't tell: The virtues of privacy by design Session

After years of personal data breaches and mishandled payment data, lawmakers are waking up to the importance of online privacy. Eleanor McHugh explains why, to comply with new laws, we need to put privacy at the heart of our design processes. But how do we do this when design itself is often seen as the enemy?

Luca Mezzalira is a chief architect at DAZN. In his 14-year career, Luca has worked on cutting-edge projects for mobile (iOS, Android, and Blackberry), desktop, web, TVs, set-top boxes, and embedded devices. Luca believes the best way to learn any programming language is by mastering its models, so he’s spent a lot of time studying topics like object-oriented programming, functional programming, and reactive programming. As a result, he’s able to swap easily between different programming languages, apply best practices, and drive any team to success. Luca is a Google Developer Expert on web technologies and manager of the London JavaScript community.

Presentations

Frontend reactive architectures Session

Reactive programming is quickly becoming one of the hottest topics in frontend development. Luca Mezzalira offers an overview of available reactive architectures for frontend ecosystems and evaluates libraries and frameworks, such as Cycle.js, MobX, and SAM, that you can use to make your current architecture reactive.

Andrew Morgan is a consultant at OpenCredo. His interests and experiences include application development in languages such as Java and Go and working with programmable infrastructure tooling (e.g., Terraform). Andrew contributes to a number of open source projects, presents at conferences, and writes for InfoQ.

Presentations

Reality is overrated: API simulation for microservice testing Tutorial

Testing microservices is challenging. Dividing a system into components naturally creates interservice dependencies, and each service has its own performance and fault-tolerance characteristics that need to be validated during development and the QA process. Daniel Bryant and Andrew Morgan share the theory, techniques, and practices needed to overcome this challenge.

Bryan Moyles is a software engineer at Google with plenty of experience in the beautiful ups of what works and the downs of what doesn’t. Bryan leads a local meetup group to share what he’s learned along his journey and learn some clever bits of wisdom himself from those in the community. Bryan enjoys spending Sunday sessions at his local Starbucks coding and researching, and when he can, he visits his family all over the world. He recently won the FTC’s Humanity Strikes Back competition after developing RoboKiller, an algorithm that could detect and destroy robocalls.

Presentations

Practical Kubernetes Session

Kubernetes is an open source scheduling system that manages your containers. Admittedly, some of the concepts are difficult to understand. Bryan Moyles covers the bare minimum you need to know to get a basic web service up and running and shares best practices for managing canary deployments, managing configuration files, leveraging the internal DNS provided by Kubernetes services, and more.

Ann Mwangi is a software developer at ThoughtWorks. Previously, she worked in QA and was a consultant for projects across a number of continents. Ann contributes to open source projects and serves as a mentor with groups like Rails Girls, coaching and working with young people interested in IT. She is intrigued by the complexity of life, people, and how teams effectively work together. Ann hates being stagnant in life and thus keeps seeking for opportunities to grow both as a person and employee.

Presentations

Architecting for the cloud Session

Architects are increasingly becoming convinced that the cloud is the way to scale. The most important consideration after deciding on a cloud migration is the architectural design of the proposed infrastructure. Ann Mwangi shares considerations when deciding on and designing a cloud architecture for a business and highlights common pitfalls that teams fall into during this process.

Matthias Naab is a software architect, consultant, and researcher for Fraunhofer IESE, where he is responsible for the area of architecture for information systems and works with customers from many industries to build innovative products and modernize legacy systems. Matthias regularly speaks at scientific and industrial conferences and teaches software architecture in the Fraunhofer Academy. Previously, he was a developer in the logistics domain. Matthias holds a master’s degree and PhD in computer science from the Technical University of Kaiserslautern.

Presentations

How do software architects find the way to user experience? With Google Maps Session

A successful software system requires both a strong software architecture and a great user experience (UX). However, UX is surprisingly often neglected by software architects. Using Google Maps as an example, Matthias Naab and Marcus Trapp explore the architectural decisions behind excellent UX and the relationship between UX designers and software architects.

Neha Narkhede is the cofounder and CTO at Confluent, a company backing the popular Apache Kafka messaging system. Previously, Neha led streams infrastructure at LinkedIn, where she was responsible for LinkedIn’s petabyte-scale streaming infrastructure built on top of Apache Kafka and Apache Samza. Neha specializes in building and scaling large distributed systems and is one of the initial authors of Apache Kafka. A distributed systems engineer by training, Neha works with data scientists, analysts, and business professionals to move the needle on results.

Presentations

Meet the Experts Neha Narkhede Meet The Experts

Neha will answer questions about using Apache Kafka for streaming and why Kafka has become the central nervous system for modern digital businesses.

The rise of the streaming platform Keynote

Streaming platforms have emerged as a popular, new trend, but what exactly is a streaming platform? With Apache Kafka at the core, streaming platforms offer an entirely new perspective on managing the flow of data. Neha Narkhede shares examples of Kafka in action and explains why streaming platforms have become the central nervous system for modern digital businesses.

Max Neunhöffer is senior software developer and architect at ArangoDB. Previously, Max was an academic mathematician at the University of St. Andrews, where he worked on the development and implementation of new algorithms in computer algebra, mainly for the open source system GAP. During this time, he juggled with mathematical big data like group orbits containing trillions of points. He studied mathematics in Heidelberg and holds a PhD from the RWTH Aachen University, where he also finished his habilitation.

Presentations

The computer science behind a modern distributed data store Session

What we see in the modern data store world is a race between different approaches to achieve distributed and resilient storage. The IoT, genomics, and applications for any other field also raise the demand for a stateful layer. Max Neunhöffer walks you through the components and the inner workings of modern open source databases like ArangoDB, Cassandra, Cockroach, and RethinkDB.

Sam Newman is an independent consultant specializing in helping people ship software fast. Sam has worked extensively with the cloud, continuous delivery, and microservices and is especially preoccupied with understanding how to more easily deploy working software into production. For the last few years, he has been exploring the capabilities of microservice architectures. He has worked with a variety of companies in multiple domains around the world, often with one foot in the developer world and another in the IT operations space. Previously, he spent over a decade at ThoughtWorks and then another year with a startup. Sam speaks frequently at conferences. He is the author of Building Microservices (O’Reilly). If you would like to get in touch, please email him.

Presentations

Meet the Experts with Sam Newman Meet The Experts

Stop by and chat with Sam about the forces that drive the design and evolution of microservices, how to plan and manage a migration from a monolith to the microservice architecture, or any other burning microservices question you may have.

Moving to microservices and beyond 2-Day Training

Sam Newman shares some framing for microservice architectures that explores the various forces that can drive the design and evolution of microservices before leading you through a series of interactive architectural kata exercises to put your newfound knowledge to the test. You'll gain valuable experience with a series of tools you can immediately put into practice in your own projects.

Stewart Norriss is the principal architect at the Datashed, where he works on real-time and on-demand data projects for some of the largest companies in the UK, particularly designing and implementing cloud-hosted solutions allowing businesses to leverage their data when and where they need it. Stewart frequently works with technologies such as Node.js, Docker, Kafka and Akka, activity feeds, Redis, MySQL, Percona, Informix, and Couchbase. Previously, he was a principal architect at one of the UK’s biggest gaming and gambling companies, where he worked on account, core technologies, and finance areas, including the company’s next-generation real-time platform, and worked with with industry-leading web caching and WAN optimization technology such as Riverbed and Cisco WasS, as well as NoSQL DB, Mongo, and Hadoop. His goal is to make IT as useful and as easy as possible for everyone. Stewart is interested in the communication and convergence side of IT, which gives companies the chance to engage a wider user base and build applications and hardware that people actually want and can contribute to. Only by doing so will IT be fully embraced and become part of normal business and social interaction.

Presentations

Architecture at scale Session

Stewart Norriss worked in the gaming and betting industry on a platform that coped with 30+ million events a day and took 115+ million payment events a year. Stewart offers an overview of the architecture built to meet this general demand while also dealing with singular massive-scale events.

Dan North uses his deep technical and organizational knowledge to help senior executives and their product teams deliver quickly and successfully. Dan draws on his more than 25 years of experience in IT to find simple, pragmatic solutions to business and technical problems, often using Lean and Agile techniques. Dan is the originator of behavior-driven development (BDD) and deliberate discovery. A frequent keynote speaker at technology conferences worldwide, Dan has published feature articles in numerous software and business publications and contributed to The RSpec Book: Behaviour Driven Development with RSpec, Cucumber, and Friends and 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts. He occasionally blogs.

Presentations

How to break the rules Keynote

Societies work because we follow the rules, but what if those same rules are holding us back? The problem may be because we are failing to change our habits. Dan North introduces some uncomfortable truths from Eliyahu Goldratt, author of The Goal, a cornerstone of modern management theory, that help us recognize and challenge this behavior and unlock the true value from our technology.

Michael Nygard is an architect at Cognitect, the company behind Clojure, ClojureScript, Pedestal, and Datomic. Michael has been a professional programmer and architect for over 15 years. In that time, he has delivered systems to the US government, the military, and the banking, finance, agriculture, and retail industries, and his work has spanned domains as diverse as B2B exchanges, retail commerce sites, travel and leisure sites, an information brokerage, and applications for the military and intelligence communities. Along the way, Michael has shared his painfully won experience by mentoring, writing, and speaking. Michael contributed to the O’Reilly book 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know and authored the best seller Release It! Design and Deploy Production-Ready Software.

Presentations

Architecture without an end state 2-Day Training

Michael Nygard demonstrates how to design and architect systems that admit change—bending and flexing through time. Using a blend of information architecture, technical architecture, and some process change, Michael walks you through examples of rigid systems to show how to transform them into more maneuverable architecture.

Meet the Experts with Michael Nygard Meet The Experts

Michael is here to talk with you about designing systems for production, cloud-native architecture, microservices, and DevOps.

Pratik Patel is the CTO of Atlanta-based company TripLingo. Pratik has designed and built applications in the retail, healthcare, financial services, and telecom sectors. His specialty is large-scale applications for mission-critical and mobile applications use, and he hacks iOS, Android, HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, Rails, and. . .well everything except Perl. Pratik is the author of Java Database Programming with JDBC, the first book on enterprise Java. He speaks regularly conferences and participates in several local tech and startup groups. Pratik holds a master’s degree in biomedical engineering from UNC.

Presentations

High-performance JavaScript web app architecture Session

Single-page web apps are becoming increasingly popular, so it's important to understand the low-level and high-level aspects of the browser platform and JavaScript runtimes embedding in them. Pratik Patel dives deep into the performance aspects of JavaScript and the web browser, covering the best practices and techniques you need to tune your apps and tips for framework selection.

Stepan Pushkarev is CTO at hydrosphere.io, where he is responsible for product vision, sales strategy, and architecture and is still heavily involved in development. A technology entrepreneur, Stepan has cofounded two product startups so far. Previously, he spent 13 years in the software industry as a consulting engineer, architect, and CTO.

Presentations

Apache Spark and machine learning on microservices Session

Hadoop-based data platforms that power ETL jobs and machine learning pipelines are great examples of monolithic architectures that could be redesigned with microservices. Stepan Pushkarev walks you through building and deploying data processing, reporting services, training, and prediction pipelines as decoupled microservices connected with the rest of the enterprise architecture.

Shiva Rao is a software engineering manager at Intel, where he is responsible for delivering Intel’s cutting-edge data center FPGA acceleration software stack and design tools. Previously, Shiva worked at Altera Corporation and was a founding researcher at the Altera Virtualization Lab (AVL), where he invented a prototype live migration solution for FPGA-based accelerators, resulting in several filed patents. Shiva holds an MS in computer engineering and computer science from Northwestern University. His graduate work focused on dynamic voltage and frequency scaling in virtualized environments.

Presentations

Unleash the power of FPGA acceleration in the data center (sponsored by Intel)

Shiva Rao explains how to deploy and leverage FPGAs to accelerate specific data center workloads to optimize performance and lower power consumption and offers an overview of an acceleration stack for enabling applications running on Intel Xeon processors to leverage FPGA acceleration across the ecosystem of Intel FPGA-based acceleration platforms.

Mark Richards is an experienced, hands-on software architect focused on the architecture, design, and implementation of microservices architectures, service-oriented architectures, and distributed systems in J2EE and other technologies. He has been involved in the software industry since 1983 and has significant experience and expertise in application, integration, and enterprise architecture. Mark served as the president of the New England Java Users Group from 1999 to 2003. He is the author of numerous technical books and videos from O’Reilly, including Software Architecture Fundamentals (video), Enterprise Messaging (video), and Java Message Service (book), and a regular conference speaker at the No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) symposium series. Mark has spoken at over 100 conferences and user groups around the world on a variety of enterprise-related technical topics. He holds a master’s degree in computer science as well as numerous architect and developer certifications from IBM, Sun, the Open Group, and BEA.

Presentations

Fundamentals of software architecture 2-Day Training

CNN recently rated software architect the number one job in America. Yet no clear path exists for moving from developer to architect. Mark Richards blends lecture and hands-on real-world group exercises to explore the many aspects of software architecture. You'll learn various integration styles (and when to use them) as well as patterns to fit various business needs and requirements.

Meet the Experts with Mark Richards Meet The Experts

Come talk with Mark about the architecture, design, and implementation of microservices architectures, service-oriented architectures, and distributed systems in J2EE and other technologies.

The move toward modularity Keynote

We must rethink how we approach the design and architecture of software for the future. Architectural modularity will be a cornerstone of these software applications. Mark Richards explores the history of architectural modularity, discusses current architecture patterns that support modularity, and explains why architectural modularity is so important (and necessary).

Mike Roberts is an engineering leader and cofounder of Symphonia, a serverless and cloud technology consultancy. Mike is a longtime proponent of Agile and DevOps values and is excited by the role that cloud technologies have played in enabling such values for many high-functioning software teams. He sees serverless architectures as the next technological evolution of cloud systems and is optimistic about their ability to help teams be awesome. Mike can be reached at mike@symphonia.io.

Presentations

Real-world serverless architecture and engineering with AWS Tutorial

Mike Roberts discusses the benefits, trade-offs, concepts, and patterns of serverless architecture and then demonstrates building a serverless application using AWS technology with API Gateway and Lambda.

Serverless architectures: What, why, why not, and where next? Session

Mike Roberts offers a thorough overview of serverless, covering benefits and limitations along with examples and case studies to help you understand whether serverless is a good fit for your team and needs. Along the way, Mike also discusses the key elements of serverless that will have to advance as the technology evolves.

Bernd Rücker is a technology evangelist and cofounder at Camunda. Bernd started developing Java more than 15 years ago, when the world was still three-tiered and using ACID transactions. Previously, he was a consultant, coaching clients on their software projects and helping them implement business logic centered around long running flows. Bernd is excited about how flows will be implemented in next-generation architectures.

Presentations

Complex event flows in distributed systems Session

In distributed systems, some business transactions and end-to-end processes stretch across the boundaries of individual services. While event-driven choreography leads to nicely decoupled systems, complex event chains can cause headaches. Bernd Rücker and Martin Schimak explain why transforming certain events into commands is beneficial and how to avoid losing sight of larger-scale flows.

Martin Schimak is a software developer at Plexiti. In his 15+-year career, Martin has helped implement complex business processes at a number of companies, including energy trading at E.ON, wind tunnel organization at BMW, and contract management for Telefónica. He has made manifold open source contributions on GitHub. Martin has a soft spot for readable APIs and testable specs, and as a curious domain “decoder," he is on a first-name basis with domain-driven design, BPMN, DMN, and CMMN. He is an editorial member of the well-read German software magazine OBJEKTspektrum and writes about topics such as Agile, microservices, and the particularly exciting field of long-running behavior. In his spare time, Martin organizes several meetups in his hometown of Vienna, Austria.

Presentations

Complex event flows in distributed systems Session

In distributed systems, some business transactions and end-to-end processes stretch across the boundaries of individual services. While event-driven choreography leads to nicely decoupled systems, complex event chains can cause headaches. Bernd Rücker and Martin Schimak explain why transforming certain events into commands is beneficial and how to avoid losing sight of larger-scale flows.

Rafael Schloming is the CTO of Datawire. Rafael is a coauthor of the Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP) specification and the primary architect of the open source Apache Qpid Proton project. Previously, he was a principal software engineer at Red Hat, where he worked on messaging technologies.

Presentations

Developing resilient microservices with Kubernetes and Envoy Tutorial

Microservices are an increasingly popular approach to building cloud-native applications, and dozens of new technologies that streamline microservices development, such as Docker, Kubernetes, and Envoy, have been released over the past few years. Phil Lombardi and Rafael Schloming walk you through actually using these technologies to develop, deploy, and run microservices.

Wilfried Schobeiri is the CTO at MediaMath, where he leads development of MediaMath’s digital marketing platform, which powers the operations of thousands of marketers. A software architect with experience in distributed systems, behavioral analytics, and data science, Wil is a lifetime technologist and entrepreneur. He launched his first tech startup in high school out of his parent’s basement. He is obsessed with building great teams, great engineering cultures, and great technology. Previously, he led development at a number of startups, including gaming ad platform Tap.Me (acquired by MediaMath).

Presentations

Unlocking the mysteries of distributed microservice authorization Session

In a monolith, authorization is easy. In a microservices world, you have to make hard choices about your data model and the abstractions on top of which authorization rules are built. Wilfried Schobeiri and Kasey Klipsch share an approach to implementing distributed authorization in a microservices context, covering fallacies, common pitfalls, and best practices along the way.

Nathaniel T. Schutta is a solution architect focused on making usable applications. A proponent of polyglot programming, Nate has written two books on Ajax and speaks regularly at various worldwide conferences, No Fluff Just Stuff symposia, universities, and Java user groups. In addition to his day job, Nate is an adjunct professor at the University of Minnesota, where he teaches students to embrace dynamic languages. Most recently, Nate coauthored Presentation Patterns with Neal Ford and Matthew McCullough.

Presentations

Architect as storyteller Keynote

Nathaniel Schutta explains why an architect's job is to be a storyteller. Architects are essentially the Rosetta Stone of an organization, providing translation services (or, as some would call it, the "elevator" between the executive suite and the development floors). The challenge lies in not only crafting a compelling message but doing so for wildly disparate audiences.

Thomas Sigdestad is cofounder and CTO of Enonic AS. Thomas is passionate about the web, application architecture, scalability, and reducing complexity in digital projects. He lives in Norway with his wife and two children.

Presentations

Episode PWA: Return of the web (sponsored by Enonic) Session

Thomas Sigdestad leads a Star Wars-themed talk about progressive web apps (PWAs) and how they are changing the future of application development. Thomas also discusses the death of REST and why new backend technologies such as GraphQL and GRPC are better suited to fuel the needs of tomorrow's clients

Brian Sletten is the president of Bosatsu Consulting, where he focuses on web architecture, resource-oriented computing, social networking, the semantic web, data science, 3D graphics, visualization, scalable systems, security consulting, and other technologies of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. A liberal arts-educated software engineer with a focus on forward-leaning technologies, Brian has worked in many industries, including retail, banking, online games, defense, finance, hospitality, and healthcare. He holds a BS in computer science from the College of William and Mary. Brian is a rabid reader and devoted foodie with excellent taste in music. If pressed, he might tell you about his international pop recording career.

Presentations

Scaling and operationalizing machine learning solutions Session

Building successful machine learning implementations is only partially about the models and their predictive capabilities. Most toolkits and frameworks will hold your hand through a training phase, but operationalizing the results is up to you. Brian Sletten walks you through the necessary architecture and best practices for sustained, iterative production machine learning systems.

Bhavana Srinivas is a solutions architect at PubNub, where she works with real-time applications and infrastructure, all day, every day, and helps customer by suggesting design patterns and best practices and guiding them in building customized scalable real-time solutions over the PubNub infrastructure. Previously, Bhavana was a developer evangelist. She speaks at conferences and meetups and conducts workshops for developers building real-time applications for mobile, the web, and the IoT.

Presentations

Choosing the right stack for real-time applications (sponsored by PubNub) Session

As software continues to evolve from a request/response architecture to an always-on data stream architecture, a lot has to change. Bhavana Srinivas explores new software architectures that make it easy for companies to deliver applications that rely on streaming data and real-time messaging.

Ben Stopford is an engineer and architect on the Apache Kafka core team at Confluent (the company behind Apache Kafka). A specialist in data, both from a technology and an organizational perspective, Ben previously spent five years leading data integration at a large investment bank, using a central streaming database. His earlier career spanned a variety of projects at Thoughtworks and UK-based enterprise companies. He writes at Benstopford.com.

Presentations

Rethinking microservices with stateful streams Session

Ben Stopford looks at two forces that sit in opposition: data systems (which focus on exposing data) and services (which focus on encapsulating it). How should we balance these two? Streaming offers a solution.

Zsolt Sz. Sztupák is a senior software engineer on the platform engineering team at Gamesys, where he helps the company automate its processes. Zsolt started his professional career as an infrastructure engineer who spent most of his days laying CAT-6 cables. While he eventually ventured further into more development-oriented positions, he always remained aware that development doesn’t actually end when you finish coding. He enjoys working on security architecture while looking into new technologies like Kubernetes. Zsolt has given a number of talks on the development stack and DevOps in general.

Presentations

The road taken Session

A few years ago, Gamesys began to modernize its platform. Moving to a containerized microservice architecture was a big part of this journey. While the road taken was long and bumpy, the team was able to fulfill most of its promises. Zsolt Sztupák shares Gamesys's experience, pinpointing various design decisions that both helped and hindered the team in achieving what they wanted.

James Thompson is a staff software engineer at Nav, where he is committed to helping engineering teams become more deliberate in how they build software through developing strong learning cultures, principled engineering practices, and holistic architectural thinking. He has worked with web technologies since 2003. He also loves barbecue.

Presentations

Beyond accidental architecture Session

In many cases, existing architectures represent an accident of circumstances. James Thompson explains why you should move beyond the accidental and introduce intentional architectural thinking to your team, outlining the benefits of deliberate software architecture, from helping newer engineers understand why certain boundaries exist to enabling senior engineers to improve their skills and more.

Bounded contexts for legacy code Session

Monolithic applications often resist the introduction of clearer architectural boundaries. Drawing on a real-world project as an example, James Thompson explains how to implement bounded contexts into such applications in conjunction with normal feature development and maintenance.

Meet the Experts with James Thompson Meet The Experts

James answers your questions on developing strong learning cultures, principled engineering practices, and holistic architectural thinking. He might also talk about barbecue.

Marcus Trapp is software engineer and department head for user experience and requirements engineering (UXR) at Fraunhofer IESE, where he supports companies in the areas of user experience for business applications, creativity and innovation workshops, requirements engineering, interaction design, and user interface prototyping. His motto is “Software is no end in itself; it always supports or enables business.” Since software is the most important driver of innovation for (almost) every business domain, software should not only be of high quality but also contribute to a great user experience. Marcus is an enthusiastic speaker on the topics of innovation and (user) experience.

Presentations

How do software architects find the way to user experience? With Google Maps Session

A successful software system requires both a strong software architecture and a great user experience (UX). However, UX is surprisingly often neglected by software architects. Using Google Maps as an example, Matthias Naab and Marcus Trapp explore the architectural decisions behind excellent UX and the relationship between UX designers and software architects.

Nick Tune is a principal engineer at Salesforce. Nick is passionate about delighting users, creating business impact, and crafting quality software and places an equal focus on improving both the delivery capabilities and the alignment of an organization. He specializes in transformation projects. Over his career, he has worked with a number of organizations in both the public and private sector to achieve continuous delivery. Nick is the coauthor of Patterns, Principles, and Practices of Domain-Driven Design and blogs at Ntcoding.co.uk.

Presentations

Great technical architects must be great organization architects Session

Aligning organizational and technical boundaries will be the most important responsibility of future architects. Nick Tune explains why we must learn to codesign and coevolve teams and technical architectures to take the next big step to reduce lead times and build learning organizations.

Pepijn van de Kamp is a consulting software engineering expert who helps international clients in the financial, utilities, and public domain build and govern high-quality software portfolios. Pepijn specializes in software metrics, architecture analysis, domain-driven design, and automated testing strategies and has a deep understanding of the software quality models applied by international software consultancy firms and tool vendors. His goal is to help the software industry benefit from current software engineering research.

Presentations

Balancing sociotechnical complexity in software architectures Session

When discussing architecture, things like microservices and the Reactive Manifesto come to mind. However, the culmination and success of technical choices is strongly determined by social context. Evelyn van Kelle and Pepijin van de Kamp explore the interplay of technical issues and the social aspects of working on a team, such as communication and shared understanding of assumptions and choices.

Building maintainable software architectures (sponsored by SIG) Tutorial

Pepijin van de Kamp shares a simple, fact-based method of building software systems and their architecture, covering some frequently encountered architectural styles and ways to identify architectural bottlenecks in your implementations.

Evelyn van Kelle is content lead at the Software Improvement Group, where she focuses on the interplay between technical issues and social factors. During her MSc study at Tilburg University, Evelyn was delighted to discover that the world of IT becomes exponentially stronger with sound communication. Her curiosity and predilection for data drive her to design content that is both meaningful and packed with solutions for technology leaders around the world.

Presentations

Balancing sociotechnical complexity in software architectures Session

When discussing architecture, things like microservices and the Reactive Manifesto come to mind. However, the culmination and success of technical choices is strongly determined by social context. Evelyn van Kelle and Pepijin van de Kamp explore the interplay of technical issues and the social aspects of working on a team, such as communication and shared understanding of assumptions and choices.

Meet the Experts with Evelyn van Kelle Meet The Experts

Evelyn is here to talk with you about the interplay between technical and social factors when building maintainable software architecture. She strongly believes that the success of technical choices is strongly determined by their social context. Join her to get advice on best practices and how to balance social and technical factors.

Stacey Watro is a software developer at Stride Consulting. At heart, Stacey is a math nerd who enjoys problem solving and challenging herself to expand her knowledge. Throughout her career, she has been given the opportunity to grow as a developer by working with different technologies and awesome technologists. Stacey holds a master’s degree in computational mathematics from Clemson University.

Presentations

CQRS and event sourcing: A DevOps perspective Session

As more organizations move toward distributed system architectures like CQRS and event sourcing, it’s important to discuss the challenges of deploying and supporting these systems in production. Stacey Watro and Maria Gomez explore strategies and pitfalls for supporting CQRS and event sources systems in production, covering how to build resilient systems, approach monitoring, and more.

Philip Winder is a multidisciplinary architect working toward the research and development of cutting-edge technology. Phil has significant experience in machine learning and electronics, but most recently, he has been developing cloud-based full stack microservice systems for a range of clients. His company, Winder Research, has recently released a range of developer- and business-focused data science training courses. Phil holds a PhD and master’s degree in electronics, with a focus on embedded signal processing, from the University of Hull in the UK. He lives in the north of the UK with his wife and two young children.

Presentations

Research-driven development: Improve the software you love while staying productive Session

Philip Winder argues that modern developers are in fact researchers. To that end, Philip explores shares practical tips to make people better researchers and therefore better developers.

Eoin Woods is the CTO at European IT services company Endava, as well as an author, a conference speaker, and an active member of the London software engineering community. Eoin’s main technical interests are software architecture, distributed systems, and computer security.

Presentations

Meet the Experts with Eoin Woods Meet The Experts

Eoin’s main technical interests are software architecture, distributed systems, and computer security. Stop by to chat about any of these topics.

Practical security principles for the working architect Session

As our world becomes digital, the systems we build must be secure by design. The security community has developed a well-understood set of principles used to build secure systems, but they are rarely explained outside that community. Eoin Woods walks you through these fundamental principles and demonstrates how to apply them to mainstream systems.

Martin Woodward is the principal program manager for DevOps in Microsoft, where he focuses on Visual Studio Team Services and Team Foundation Server. Previously, Martin was executive director of the .NET Foundation, helping drive Microsoft’s move to open source, and was responsible for the Java, Linux, and Mac tooling in the Developer Division, where he helped introduce Git into Microsoft.

Presentations

What we learned moving 65,000 Microsofties to DevOps on the public cloud Session

Martin Woodward tells the full story of transforming Microsoft’s internal engineering systems from a collection of disparate in-house tools built up over decades to One Engineering System with a globally distributed 24×7×365 service on the public cloud, utilizing modern techniques and industry-recognized open source technologies.

Dan Young is CEO and cofounder of small, London-based software consultancy EngineerBetter, which places an emphasis on XP values and practices, including pair programming on colocated teams. Dan’s 15-year career has been a multidisciplinary journey through web ops, large-scale carrier networking, and product management leadership. He is driven by a strong desire to reduce friction and find more effective ways of working in large organizations.

Presentations

Humane teams at home and around the world Session

Software development is a social activity that favors direct human contact, yet 21st century life can often get in the way, forcing us to reconsider our communication patterns. Daniel Young and Emma Jane Hogbin Westby explore how to build and maintain happy productive teams, regardless of geography.

Bulama Yusuf is the founder and chief software architect at Intellectual Apps. An enthusiastic application developer with over six years’ experience building applications, Bulama has built and deployed several cloud-connected mobile applications, including an application that lets users engrave their signatures at places they visit and an application that monitors and reports the electricity status of a given location. Bulama has entered and won several mobile application building contests, including the Google Android Challenge for Sub-Saharan Africa and the Samsung Mobile Application Development Challenge. He has also led several web development teams that built customized solutions for specific clients. Bulama’s core interests are cloud computing and mobile application development, and he has a keen interest in understanding how systems work and building them. He recently picked up a new hobby: programming microcontrollers. Bulama holds a number of certifications, including the Sun Certified Web Component Developer, Sun Certified Java Programmer, and Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist, and he has experience with a wide range of technologies. He has led numerous training sessions within and outside Nigeria and is the current coordinator for the Google Developer Group and Java User’s Group in Abuja.

Presentations

How to use the Backend for Frontend (BFF) pattern in your mobile application architecture Session

Today, many solutions employ a mobile-first approach. In addition to handling mobile clients, there is a need to cater to web clients, sensors, and devices, but these clients have different needs and consume data in different ways. Bulama Yusuf explains how to use the Backend for Frontend (BFF) pattern to develop an API for a system that has various clients.