4–7 Nov 2019
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Speakers

Hear from innovative programmers, talented leaders, and senior developers who are doing amazing things around software architecture. More speakers will be announced; please check back for updates.

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Matt Auburn is a passionate software developer at Morgan Stanley, where he works as an API developer. Matt currently owns the DevOps and Security API components in his day to day. He’s a Java developer at heart, but he also writes automated tests in Python and has an interest in Go. He enjoys learning new technologies, mentoring, and teaching developers.

Presentations

Building, specifying, and testing APIs with microservices Tutorial

Knowing where to start with an API program is difficult. Most development teams have been building APIs for years, but it's different when the goal is to become an API-centric team or company. James Gough, Nick Ebbitt, and Matthew Auburn bootstrap the basics from building your first API, using OpenAPI specification to describe and version your APIs, and deploying behind a gateway.

Jibby Ayo-Ani is a DevOps engineer II at Welkin, a series-A health tech startup, where she leads the DevOps space to ultimately foster long-term solutions to patients with chronic diseases. She lives to fight the good fight; an experienced Silicon Valley software and DevOps engineer, Jibby has worked across multiple industries addressing social issues in both large and small technology companies as well as for the Marshallese government as a consultant to prevent bad guys from laundering money through off-shore bank accounts. With cloud computing as her core skill set, she’s become a subject matter expert on site reliability and disaster recovery aiming to build out scalable AWS cloud solutions.

Presentations

Approaching a new security model in cloud computing Session

Jibby Ayo-Ani walks you through an approach to the security model of BeyondCorp within a startup. BeyondCorp is an enterprise security model created and improved upon by Google that assigns access controls to individual devices and users rather than networks.

Kenny Baas-Schwegler is a software engineer and consultant focusing on software quality at Xebia. He mentors teams by using practices and techniques from domain-driven design, behavior-driven development, test-driven development, and continuous delivery. He’s an advocate for collaborating in open spaces and using techniques such as event storming, feature mapping, and example mapping to engineer requirements and design of software along with business stakeholders. With these methods, he aims to create a transparent collaborative domain space with constant and instant feedback of the software that is being built. Besides his daily work, he also organizes meetups for Behaviour Driven Development NL and Domain Driven Design NL.

Presentations

Event storming for domain-driven design modeling Tutorial

Creating multiple models for the same problem is one of the more important lessons that domain-driven design teaches you. It's a lot cheaper to quickly iterate over them and throw away less-useful prototypes before you even start coding. Kenny Baas-Schwegler and João RosaIn explore how event storming can support modeling software with domain-driven design model-driven building blocks.

Byron Berrisford is customer-facing, full stack solutions architect at Spotinst representing the solutions team in the UK. Byron has in-depth experience in cloud, virtualization, storage, and datacenter technologies gained from 15 years’ experience in the industry and with work across numerous practices, including native cloud architecture, infrastructure architecture and design, converged systems, enterprise storage and virtualization. His advisory expertise helps customers better adopt and adapt to the technologies that best fit for their business requirements. He’s a geek at heart, passionate about technology and how customers can use emerging and existing technologies to solve their business problems. Byron is a strong proponent and advocate for agile and SRE methodologies in DevOps using automation, orchestration, config management, and CI/CD along with containerization to accelerate business results through technology, firmly believing that removing many of the silos that exist in most IT departments can drive real results that turn IT into a business enabler rather than a cost center. This synergy matches the culture and benefits of Spotinst, driving customers to consume cloud services in the most efficient way.

Presentations

Serverless containers: Nodeless Kubernetes and vertical pod autoscaling Session

Byron Berrisford explains why serverless containers are the future of containers infrastructure. Matching and scaling the right infrastructure to ever-changing microservices deployments is a challenge. Byron explores the evolution of containers auto scaling in Kubernetes, discusses the trade-offs, and introduces a new approach to deploy serverless containers in a "nodeless" cluster.

Birgitta Boeckeler is a technical principal at ThoughtWorks, a global software consultancy, where she spends her time on software delivery teams with coding, architecting, coaching, and consulting. She’s been building software across all layers for more than 15 years, mainly in the space of large custom-developed websites.

Presentations

Cultivating architecture with principles Session

Many organizations strive to establish independent, autonomous development teams. The goal is to achieve speed, scalability, and empowerment—but you have to decide what architecture governance looks like in a decentralized setup. Birgitta Boeckeler explores architecture principles as a way to avoid chaos, providing lessons about using them to walk the line between hard rules and helpful guidance.

Keynote by Birgitta Boeckler Keynote

Keynote by Birgitta Boeckler

Jean Bordelon is a lead architect at Bounteous and owner of Jean Bordelon Gallery. A broadly skilled, multidisciplinary technical leader who drives the delivery of strong business value to his clients, he’s passionate about crafting innovative solutions for complex problems that have real impact for client business. With a deep entrepreneurial background of creating and working with startups and industry leaders, Jean draws on this experience and expertise to see the connection of the business needs and technical possibilities to lead the development of critical business web applications and solutions.

Presentations

Developing great architects: Creating the right environment for growth Session

It's a real challenge to develop great architects on your team when your organization offers limited opportunities to actually perform as an architect. Jean Bordelon examines approaches to give aspiring architects meaningful ways to grow and veteran architects ways to hone their craft as well as lessons learned along the way.

Daniel Bryant is an independent technical consultant and product architect at Datawire, where he specializes in enabling continuous delivery within organizations through the identification of value streams, the creation of build pipelines, and the implementation of effective testing strategies. Daniel’s technical expertise focuses on DevOps tooling, cloud and container platforms, and microservice implementations. He contributes to several open source projects, writes for InfoQ, O’Reilly, and Voxxed, and regularly presents at international conferences, including OSCON, QCon, and JavaOne.

Presentations

API gateways and service meshes: Opening the door to application modernization Session

Daniel Bryant provides an overview of cloud native API gateways and service mesh technologies that are increasingly being used within application modernization programs and microservice-based systems. Join Daniel to learn the benefits and drawbacks of these technologies, how they impact application architecture, and what implementation options are currently available.

Giamir Buoncristiani (he/him) is a senior software developer at ThoughtWorks, an Agile consultant, and a frontend advocate. He leads the internal frontend community at ThoughtWorks and draws inspiration and insights from the real-world experiences of his peers across the world.

Presentations

Evolutionary UI: Change as a first-class element in the modern frontend world Session

Rufus Raghunath and Giamir Buoncristiani apply the principles of evolutionary architecture to UI, first described by Neal Ford, Rebecca Parsons, and Patrick Kua. Neal's a colleague of theirs and has been kind enough to review their content, so they share an authentic look at how frontend engineering can benefit from this progressive approach to architecture.

Paris Buttfield-Addison is a cofounder of Secret Lab, a game development studio based in beautiful Hobart, Australia. Secret Lab builds games and game development tools, including the multi-award-winning ABC Play School iPad games, the BAFTA- and IGF-winning Night in the Woods, the Qantas airlines Joey Playbox games, and the Yarn Spinner narrative game framework. Previously, Paris was a mobile product manager for Meebo (acquired by Google). Paris particularly enjoys game design, statistics, blockchain, machine learning, and human-centered technology research and writes technical books on mobile and game development (more than 20 so far) for O’Reilly and is currently writing Practical AI with Swift and Head First Swift. He holds a degree in medieval history and a PhD in computing. You can find him on Twitter as @parisba.

Presentations

Does architecture matter in a world of "quick hacks"? Architecture versus big data and ML Session

Data science, machine learning, and data manipulation and preparation are all core components of a future, trendy, world of software engineering. Many of these are built with "quick hacks," tiny scripts, or based on pipelines that are cobbled together from multiple components, frameworks, and the like. Mars Geldard and Paris Buttfield-Addison explore if software architecture matters to this world.

How do I game design: Architecting games to expand your thinking Tutorial

Paris Buttfield-Addison, Mars Geldard, and Tim Nugent explore game design without coding or game engines. You’ll get a fresh perspective on architecture, design, and community engagement by understanding how people interact with the fastest-growing form of entertainment in the world: games. A software architect can learn a lot from game design; here you'll learn everything you need to get started.

Maggie Carroll is a senior engineer at Ausley, putting together a system of systems and enabling vendors to play well together. Maggie has been a software architect and enterprise architect for the last six years and has worked in software engineering for the last 30 years. She helped launch two successful startups and has helped with several large real-time systems in the aerospace industry. Maggie loves leaning up processes and has a passion for improving team dynamics to get great results.

Presentations

Beyond the technical: Succeed at leading a software architecture team Session

Software architects and enterprise architects work with a variety of roles; often the deep technical work is performed by other application architects or solutions architects. Maggie Carroll explores developing influence as well as skills and actionable techniques she found useful when creating a new enterprise architecture function and a tool for remaining productive as a leader.

Michael Coté is the director of technical marking on the advocate team at Pivotal. He focuses on how large organizations are getting better at building and delivering software to help their business run better and grow. Previously, he was an industry analyst at RedMonk and 451 Research, worked in corporate strategy and M&A at Dell in software and cloud, and was a programmer for a decade before all that. He does several technology podcasts (such as Software Defined Talk), writes frequently on how large organizations struggle and succeed with agile development and DevOps, blogs at cote.coffee, and is @cote on Twitter.

Presentations

Rethinking enterprise architecture for DevOps, Agile, and cloud native organizations Session

As DevOps marauds through organizations that are becoming more cloud native, the role of enterprise architects (EAs) is changing. EAs helped oversee and govern the software lifecycle, but many of their tasks are now pushed to teams and platforms. Michael Coté provides an overview of this shift and shares advice for EAs.

Zhamak Dehghani is a principal technology consultant at ThoughtWorks, focusing on distributed systems architecture and digital platform strategy in the enterprise. She’s a member of the company’s Technology Advisory Board and contributes to the creation of ThoughtWorks’s Technology Radar.

Presentations

Architecture: The hard parts 2-Day Training

Neal Ford and Zhamak Dehghani highlight solutions and trade-offs to architecture's difficult problems. They explore tools and practices to help you choose proper granularity of components and services, messaging styles in microservices (choreography, orchestration, sagas), and data topics, including microservices caching and data meshes, styles of reuse, and reactive architectures.

Architecture: The hard parts (Day 2) Training Day 2

Neal Ford and Zhamak Dehghani highlight solutions and trade-offs to architecture's difficult problems. They explore tools and practices to help you choose proper granularity of components and services, messaging styles in microservices (choreography, orchestration, sagas), and data topics, including microservices caching and data meshes, styles of reuse, and reactive architectures.

Next data platform architecture: Beyond a monolithic data lake to a distributed data mesh Keynote

Zhamak Dehghani examines her observations and insights from working with many organizations that are busy developing their next-generation centralized data platforms. She explores the failure modes of a centralized paradigm of a data lake or its predecessor, the data warehouse.

Cristina DeLisle is an office and legal administrator and a data protection officer at XWiki SAS. She became interested in software when she began to work at XWiki and CryptPad, open source projects that made her more tech aware, coming from a juridical background. She’s following the GDPR’s evolution, striving to ensure on a daily basis compliance with the applicable data protection rules.

Presentations

OSS shaping the future of data protection compliance Session

The evolution of legal norms has centered on privacy as a core value. Cristina DeLisle analyzes how the provisions of the GDPR are tangential with the OSS ecosystem and how the principles of the GDPR are connected to the OSS world. You'll learn how you can analyze the model of data controller or data processor in the context of the OSS participants and infrastructure providers.

Erik Dörnenburg is a software developer, consultant, and head of technology at ThoughtWorks, where he helps clients with writing custom software. Over the years, Erik has worked with many different technologies and technology platforms, always curious to understand the potential they offer to solve real-world problems. Erik’s career began in the early nineties, and throughout it he has been an advocate of agile values and open source software. Over the past 10 years, he has spoken at many international conferences, contributed to a few books, and maintained several open source projects.

Presentations

Patterns for micro-frontends Session

Architectures based on microservices have spread rapidly. Organizations are drawn to the promises of microservices but fail to carry the architecture through to the frontend, resulting in the dreaded frontend monolith. Erik Dörnenburg explores patterns harvested from practical use that show how to build micro-frontends to realize the benefits of microservices in systems with rich user interfaces.

Avi Douglen is the founder and CEO at Bounce Security, a boutique consultancy specializing in software security, where he spends a lot of time with development teams of all sizes. He helps them integrate security methodologies and products into their development processes, and often provides training on secure coding and other security topics.

AviD is a security architect and developer, with decades of experience building complex systems and implementing security requirements. He has been designing, developing, and testing secure applications for over 20 years, and is obsessed with maximizing value output from security efforts. His research interests include efficient security engineering, usable security, and scaling enterprise security systems.

He is a frequent trainer and speaker at industry conferences, such as OWASP, RSA, BSides, and Infosec, as well as developer conferences such as DevSecCon, PyCon, and DevOpsDays. He has trained hundreds of developers on security, including secure coding, security architecture, threat modeling, and more.

Avi also co-founded the OWASP Threat Modeling project, and is one of the project leaders. He also leads the OWASP Israel chapter, and created the successful AppSec Israel security conference. He volunteers as a high school tech teacher and mentor, and is also a community moderator on https://Security.StackExchange.com/.

Presentations

Secure by design: Value-driven threat modeling Session

Threat modeling is a great method to identify potential security weaknesses, an important part of any secure design. But it's often ignored due to high cost and the time investment of classic approaches. Avi Douglen outlines how to use a lightweight, value-driven approach to embed security into the agile design process. No more top-heavy, big-model-up-front threat modeling that security pros love.

Nick Ebbitt is a software engineer at Morgan Stanley. Software development is Nick’s passion, particularly the processes involved in delivering change. The ability to regularly deliver value in a controlled, automated fashion is central to the way he works. He’s a developer at heart with a strong interest in ops. Quality of software is very important to him, and he looks to use suitable tools and techniques to implement various flavours of tests. Nick believes that testing is a core part of the developers role and should be valued highly. He enjoys the latest technologies and techniques for delivering software.

Presentations

Building, specifying, and testing APIs with microservices Tutorial

Knowing where to start with an API program is difficult. Most development teams have been building APIs for years, but it's different when the goal is to become an API-centric team or company. James Gough, Nick Ebbitt, and Matthew Auburn bootstrap the basics from building your first API, using OpenAPI specification to describe and version your APIs, and deploying behind a gateway.

Paddy Fagan a senior technical staff manager and chief architect for Watson Care Manager at IBM. He’s an expert in the architecture and design of enterprise business applications and has worked across SaaS and on-premises solutions in healthcare and government for over 20 years. He’s also an occasional cyclist and teacher and a dad.

Presentations

Practical experience of continuous architectural refactoring in a SaaS offering Session

Paddy Fagan and Eamonn Moriarty have, over the last three years, overseen the evolution of a SaaS offering (Watson Care Manager). They provide you with an overview of this experience with a particular focus on the continuous architectural refactoring that has been at the core.

Jeff Farber is a principal software engineer at Atlassian, where his main focus is designing and implementation of systems. Over the past 18 months, he’s built a critical permissions service utilized across Atlassian. Jeff has been building software since a young age across various domains. He enjoys guiding software teams and making business-oriented software decisions.

Presentations

Honey, I shrunk the database: Resilience and recoverability in cloud native services Session

Sidney Shek and Jeff Farber explain how to use techniques like event sourcing, CQRS, and CRDTs to mitigate unpredictable failures that stem from humans and increasingly complex architectures in the cloud native world (microservices, anyone?). You'll learn implementation tips and tricks based on their successes (and failures) in building out the Identity platform that underpins Atlassian Cloud.

Jean-Marie Ferdegue is the director of platform engineering at Babylon Health. He’s a modern technology executive with a passion for action who has led the delivery of commercial successes. He’s spoken at conferences (Devoxx in 2018, London CTO, and Microservices Manchester in 2017, as well as various meetups) about DevOps and delivery models. He manages teams of various sizes (from 2 to 150) to deliver digital products and transform organizations.

Presentations

Infrastructure of an AI-centric global healthcare platform Session

The heavily regulated healthcare environment dictates that data stays in country whether the country has a public cloud presence or not. Jean-Marie Ferdegue presents Babylon Health's experience of deploying a customizable microservices architecture in 24 countries in a year. He touches on infrastructure architecture, data regulation (data lineage and security), and more.

Neal Ford is a director, software architect, and meme wrangler at ThoughtWorks, a global IT consultancy that thinks disruptively to deliver technology to address the toughest challenges, all while seeking to revolutionize the IT industry and create positive social change. Neal focuses on designing and building large-scale enterprise applications. He’s an internationally recognized expert on software development and delivery, especially in the intersection of Agile engineering techniques and software architecture. Neal has authored magazine articles, seven books (and counting), and dozens of video presentations and has spoken at hundreds of developers conferences worldwide on the topics of software architecture, continuous delivery, functional programming, and cutting-edge software innovations. Check out his website at Nealford.com. He welcomes feedback and can be reached at nford@thoughtworks.com.

Presentations

Architecture: The hard parts 2-Day Training

Neal Ford and Zhamak Dehghani highlight solutions and trade-offs to architecture's difficult problems. They explore tools and practices to help you choose proper granularity of components and services, messaging styles in microservices (choreography, orchestration, sagas), and data topics, including microservices caching and data meshes, styles of reuse, and reactive architectures.

Architecture: The hard parts (Day 2) Training Day 2

Neal Ford and Zhamak Dehghani highlight solutions and trade-offs to architecture's difficult problems. They explore tools and practices to help you choose proper granularity of components and services, messaging styles in microservices (choreography, orchestration, sagas), and data topics, including microservices caching and data meshes, styles of reuse, and reactive architectures.

Closing remarks Keynote

Program chairs Chris Guzikowski and Neal Ford close the second day of keynotes.

Closing remarks Keynote

Program chairs Chris Guzikowski and Neal Ford close the second day of keynotes.

From the trenches: Patrick Kua Keynote

In this ongoing series, Neal Ford interviews highly regarded industry professions about their career path and their work as an architect. Join in for his discussion with Patrick Kua.

Keynote to come Keynote

Details to come.

Thursday keynotes Keynote

Details to come.

Thursday opening remarks Keynote

Program chairs Chris Guzikowski and Neal Ford open the second day of keynotes.

Wednesday opening remarks Keynote

Program chairs Chris Guzikowski and Neal Ford open the first day of keynotes.

Sérgio Freitas is a lead software engineer at ThousandEyes focused on unearthing performance issues on the internet, the cloud, and the networks the world runs on. He’s a software engineer at heart and two-time CTO with extended experience developing and running large scale systems.

Presentations

Architecting a distributed system to monitor internet performance on a global scale Session

Almost every aspect of our lives depends on a cloud service and the internet is the glue that connects everything. Sergio Freitas explores how to build a distributed system to monitor internet performance, which doesn't come without challenges. Join in to learn which software architecture patterns to apply and how to seamlessly visualize the internet.

Marina Rose Geldard (Mars) is a technologist from Down Under in Tasmania. Entering the world of technology relatively late as a mature-age student, she has found her place in the world: an industry where she can apply her lifelong love of mathematics and optimization. She compulsively volunteers at industry events, dabbles in research, and serves on the executive committee for her state’s branch of the Australian Computer Society (ACS) as well as the AUC. She’s currently writing Practical Artificial Intelligence with Swift for O’Reilly and working on machine learning projects to improve public safety through public CCTV cameras in her hometown of Hobart.

Presentations

Does architecture matter in a world of "quick hacks"? Architecture versus big data and ML Session

Data science, machine learning, and data manipulation and preparation are all core components of a future, trendy, world of software engineering. Many of these are built with "quick hacks," tiny scripts, or based on pipelines that are cobbled together from multiple components, frameworks, and the like. Mars Geldard and Paris Buttfield-Addison explore if software architecture matters to this world.

How do I game design: Architecting games to expand your thinking Tutorial

Paris Buttfield-Addison, Mars Geldard, and Tim Nugent explore game design without coding or game engines. You’ll get a fresh perspective on architecture, design, and community engagement by understanding how people interact with the fastest-growing form of entertainment in the world: games. A software architect can learn a lot from game design; here you'll learn everything you need to get started.

Gernot Starke is a founder of aim42, a cofounder of arc43, a fellow at INNOQ, and a coach and consultant for methodical software architecture and engineering. Gernot has been involved in the design and implementation of medium- and large-size systems for organizations from different business domains, mainly in the areas of finance, insurance, automotive, logistics, and telecommunications, with a focus on legacy system evolution and improvement. He’s written numerous books on software architecture and patterns, regularly publishes technical articles, and shares his experiences on developer conferences. He lives in Cologne, Germany.

Presentations

The rise, the ruin, and the rescue 90-minute session

Gernot Starke examines a (formerly successful) large ecommerce system and its rescue from legacy hell: systematically identifying technical and organizational debt and getting the large system back on track. Gernot explores practical approaches from real live systems, condensed and applicable based on the aim42 architecture improvement method successfully applied to an (anonymized) large system.

Nicola Giacchetta is a software engineer at Nexmo, the Vonage API Platform. His key area of interest is data-centric distributed systems and databases.

Presentations

Extensible autonomous transactions in the world of microservices Session

Divya Nagar and Nicola Giacchetta explore problems organizations face when they start dealing with a lot of microservices and problems that occur due to a big Death Star architecture. They outline the solutions they implemented when facing similar problems to bring transactions in microservices. You'll learn about multiple data patterns and when and how when to use them.

Maria Gomez is the head of technology at ThoughtWorks Spain. Over her 10 years of industry experience, Maria has worked with many different technologies and domains, which has helped her lead teams and advise stakeholders in making the right technology decisions. She’s also a speaker and an advocate for diversity and inclusion in the IT industry.

Presentations

Observability in the era of microservices 2-Day Training

You know the basics of microservices and the pros and cons, but that doesn't mean you can successfully maintain them in production. Microservices can keep your code cleaner and decoupled, but their distributed nature makes them painful to maintain in production. Maria Gomez explores observability as a way to maintain a healthy production environment.

Observability in the era of microservices (Day 2) Training Day 2

You know the basics of microservices and the pros and cons, but that doesn't mean you can successfully maintain them in production. Microservices can keep your code cleaner and decoupled, but their distributed nature makes them painful to maintain in production. Maria Gomez explores observability as a way to maintain a healthy production environment.

James (Jim) Gough is an executive director and developer at Morgan Stanley, where he’s focused on building customer-facing technology. A Java developer and author, Jim first became interested in Java during his degree program at the University of Warwick; after graduating, he became a member of the London Java Community. Community has remained central to Jim’s contributions, which include working on the design and testing of JSR-310 and serving on the Java Community Process Executive Committee for several years. Jim is a regular conference speaker and spent four years teaching Java and C++ around the world.

Presentations

Building, specifying, and testing APIs with microservices Tutorial

Knowing where to start with an API program is difficult. Most development teams have been building APIs for years, but it's different when the goal is to become an API-centric team or company. James Gough, Nick Ebbitt, and Matthew Auburn bootstrap the basics from building your first API, using OpenAPI specification to describe and version your APIs, and deploying behind a gateway.

Chris Guzikowski is the senior content director at O’Reilly Media, where he manages the acquisition and development of content in software architecture and software development. He’s also the cochair of O’Reilly’s Software Architecture Conference. Chris has been working on technical content and technology marketing for more than 30 years. He and his family reside in suburban Boston, MA.

Presentations

Closing remarks Keynote

Program chairs Chris Guzikowski and Neal Ford close the second day of keynotes.

Closing remarks Keynote

Program chairs Chris Guzikowski and Neal Ford close the second day of keynotes.

Keynote to come Keynote

Details to come.

Thursday keynotes Keynote

Details to come.

Thursday opening remarks Keynote

Program chairs Chris Guzikowski and Neal Ford open the second day of keynotes.

Wednesday opening remarks Keynote

Program chairs Chris Guzikowski and Neal Ford open the first day of keynotes.

Andrew Harmel-Law is a technical principal at ThoughtWorks. Having started his tech career as a presales support engineer with Sun Microsystems, Andrew is old enough to have witnessed the dot-com boom and bust first hand. His recent experiences over the last 13 years have been as a consultant. He has a particular interest in setting dev teams up for success, loves teaching and mentoring, and encouraging diversity in tech. Andrew loves learning new things and is always seeking out people he can learn new skills and gain different perspectives from. Having originally studied neural networks the second time they were cool (in the 1990s) he’s also currently using his spare time struggling to remember his high school math and trying to catch up on all the fuss around deep learning. Andrew has left a trail of blogs strewn across the internet, the most recent being at https://andrewharmellaw.github.io/. He also managed to be around at the inception of the Jenkins Job DSL project—his most significant OSS contribution to date.

Presentations

Adopting domain-driven design at scale: Near enemies and how to defeat them Session

Everyone doing large-scale software delivery is using domain-driven design (DDD) these days, because it holds the key to delivering maintainable, evolvable solutions with independent teams. But it can go wrong, and then DDD is blamed. Andrew Harmel-Law and Gayathri Thiyagarajan detail a real project they saw fail. You'll learn the many problems they spotted and how they fixed them.

Michael Hartle is a software architect and engineer at Hartle & Klug Consulting GmbH, a software architecture consultancy in Darmstadt, Germany. He holds a diploma degree in computer science from Darmstadt University of Applied Science and a doctorate degree in computer science from TU Darmstadt. Michael can be reached at mhartle@hartle-klug.com.

Presentations

Dynamic service meshes for microservices using Envoy proxy, Java, and Spring 90-minute session

Join Michael Hartle for a hands-on introduction to service meshes for microservice architectures using Envoy proxy, Java, and Spring. He explores practical applications for their dynamic, programmatic adaptation during runtime.

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer, and trainer. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice, and process. Previously, he has contributed to open and closed source development, has been a columnist for a number of magazines and sites, and has been on far too many committees (it’s been said that “a committee is a cul-de-sac down which ideas are lured and then quietly strangled”). He’s coauthor of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and On Patterns and Pattern Languages and the editor of 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know and the forthcoming 97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know. He lives in Bristol and online.

Presentations

What do you mean? Session

"It's just semantics." Semantics is all about meaning. If there's one thing we struggle with and need to get better at, it's the search for and clarification of meaning. Kevlin Henney explores how the very act of software development is an exercise in meaning—its discovery, its formulation, its communication. Paradigms, processes, and practices are anchored in ways of arriving at meaning.

Rotem Hermon is lead architect for the customer data cloud at SAP. He’s been building and designing backend systems for a long time.

Presentations

Ethical questions in software engineering Session

Software is changing the world, and software developers need to open their eyes to the link between ethics and software. Rotem Hermon outlines some examples of ethical questions involving software and algorithms. You'll explore technology, sense of self, politics, and truth, and you'll try to understand what you can do about it.

Stefan Hofer is a software architect at Workplace Solutions in Hamburg, and he’s bad at drawing stuff. However, he thinks he can build up domain knowledge by drawing domain stories. He hops from one domain to the next, assisting people to figure out how software can help them to get their job done. Stefan studied software engineering in Austria and has a PhD in computer science.

Presentations

Hands-on: Introduction to domain storytelling Tutorial

When you want to apply domain-driven design (DDD), you must first master the domain. In this hands-on examination, Henning Schwentner, Stefan Hofer, and Dorota Kochanowska show you how to build up domain knowledge with domain storytelling. Domain stories help you better understand a domain, identify what is core, segregate bounded contexts, and constitute ubiquitous language.

Gregor Hohpe is an advisor at ArchitectElevator.com, where he advises CTOs and technology leaders in the transformation of their organization and IT infrastructure. Riding the architect elevator from the engine room to the penthouse, he connects corporate strategy with technical implementation by making complex topics engaging and approachable without compromising technical accuracy. Previously, Gregor was a technical director at Google Cloud’s Office of the CTO and a chief architect at Allianz, one of world’s largest insurance companies. Having established accelerated innovation and complexity and cost reduction as architecture goals, he oversaw a global data center consolidation and deployed the first on-premises cloud and software delivery platform. He’s a coauthor of the seminal book Enterprise Integration Patterns, which is widely cited as the reference vocabulary for asynchronous messaging solutions. His book 37 Things One Architect Knows about IT Transformation tells stories from the trenches of IT transformation, while his articles have been featured in Best Software Writing by Joel Spolsky and 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know. He’s an active member of the IEEE Software advisory board.

Presentations

Enterprise architecture: Architecting the enterprise? Session

Architects in the enterprise are often seen as ivory-tower residents far detached from reality. Large-scale IT transformation across hundreds or thousands of applications and processes puts a whole different, and much more exciting, spin on enterprise architecture. Gregor Hohpe takes you on a serious but light-hearted tour of the role of enterprise architects in modern IT organizations.

Living in the first derivative: Architecting for velocity Session

Organizations these days try many things to move faster, from adopting lean and DevOps approaches to moving to the cloud to working weekends. Many organizations realize that increasing velocity is about more than just moving a bit faster. Gregor Hohpe explores the fundamentally different mind-set it takes—one that looks at the first derivative.

The architect elevator 2-Day Training

As the digital economy changes the rules for enterprises, the role of architects also changes. You must connect the penthouse, where the business strategy is set, with the engine room, where the enabling technologies are implemented. Gregor Hohpe explains why making this connection by going from floor to floor won’t work. Architects bypass existing structures by taking the architect elevator.

The architect elevator (Day 2) Training Day 2

As the digital economy changes the rules for enterprises, the role of architects also changes. You must connect the penthouse, where the business strategy is set, with the engine room, where the enabling technologies are implemented. Gregor Hohpe explains why making this connection by going from floor to floor won’t work. Architects bypass existing structures by taking the architect elevator.

Allen Holub is one of the country’s foremost software architects and Agile-transformation consultants. Allen speaks internationally about all things Agile and software architecture and provides in-house training and consulting in those areas. He’s also an expert-level programmer, specializing in Swift, Java, and Web 2.0 applications and microservices. Allen can build highly dynamic websites (along the lines of Gmail) from front to back: both the frontend code—JavaScript, JQuery, Angular, HTML5, and CSS3—that runs in the browser and the backend code—Java, PHP, MySQL, Ruby, Mongo, C++, ZeroMQ, and EC2—that runs either on your server or in the cloud. Allen is widely published. His works include 10 books, hundreds of articles in publications ranging from Dr. Dobb’s Journal to IBM DeveloperWorks, and video classes for Agilitry.com (Agility with Allen), Pluralsight (Swift in Depth, Picturing Architecture, Object-Oriented Design), O’Reilly (Design Patterns in the Real World), and Lynda/LinkedIn.

Presentations

Building evolutionary and incremental architectures 2-Day Training

Join Allen Holub for a hands-on exploration of how to architect systems that easily evolve incrementally over time as requirements emerge. You'll solve a real-world problem under Allen's guidance, learning everything you need to know to go from an idea to an evolutionary implementation architecture.

Building evolutionary and incremental architectures (Day 2) Training Day 2

Join Allen Holub for a hands-on exploration of how to architect systems that easily evolve incrementally over time as requirements emerge. You'll solve a real-world problem under Allen's guidance, learning everything you need to know to go from an idea to an evolutionary implementation architecture.

Choreographing microservices Session

The most effective microservice systems are reactive, choreographed systems. Allen Holub explores what these are and outlines how to design and build them.

Event Storming Session

Learn how to design reactive, event-based systems like microservices using event storming.

Keynote by Allen Holub Keynote

Keynote by Allen Holub

Cheryl Hung is a London-based software engineer, public speaker and tech executive. She is the Director of Ecosystem at the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, the home of Kubernetes, Prometheus and other open source cloud native projects. She founded the largest and most active cloud native meetup globally, Cloud Native London.

Previously, Cheryl was a software engineer at Google London and New York. She holds a Masters degree in Computer Science from the University of Cambridge.

Presentations

Keynote by Cheryl Hung Keynote

Keynote by Cheryl Hung

Viacheslav Inozemtsev is a data engineer at Zalando on its data lake project, building an internal data platform on top of S3, Spark, Presto, and serverless cloud technologies, enabling machine learning and AI for all teams and departments of the company, and solving GDPR in one place. He has 7+ years of data and software engineering experience. He earned a degree in applied mathematics and an MSc degree in computer science mostly on the topics of data processing and analysis.

Presentations

Evolution of a modern cloud-based data lake Session

Building a data lake is a hard task. You have to centralize all the data of the company in one place, it must be easily accessible, and governance has to be done right. And, last but not least, the price has to stay reasonable. All those aspects come up as quite a challenge. But never fear. Viacheslav Inozemtsev outlines the experience of building Zalando's data lake.

Antonio Jimenez is a solutions architect at the Workshop based in Malaga, Spain. He’s passionate about software development. He’s been working in high-performance websites for almost 20 years and has vast experience working with continuous delivery pipeline.

Presentations

How to build an evolutionary architecture Session

Around 2017, Antonio Jimenez and Pedro Martos embarked on an ambitious journey: to redefine one of the company's most mission-critical, most complex products from scratch. Join them as they explore how you can achieve an evolutionary architecture from solid foundations such as microservices architecture within a continuous delivery pipeline.

Ivan Jovanovic is a senior software engineer at NearForm, as well as a team lead, speaker, and mentor. His focus is on building scalable JavaScript applications and experimenting with new languages and frameworks. He’s into functional and reactive programming. Leading teams and mentoring junior developers is his everyday duty. He loves to share knowledge and to write on his tech blog.

Presentations

Micro-frontends: A microservice approach to the modern web Session

Applications are becoming so big and complex and most of the app is living on the client side. It’s hard to maintain those apps, and you’re usually making more bugs than you're fixing. Ivan Jovanovic explores how to fix this problem. Welcome to the era of micro-frontends, a microservice-oriented architecture on the frontend.

Vladik Khononov is chief architect at Naxex. Vladik has nearly 20 years of industry experience at companies large and small in roles ranging from software engineer to chief architect. He maintains an active media career as public speaker and blogger on topics such as microservices and domain-driven design. He also has a keen professional interest in distributed systems, software architecture, and software design in general. In his spare time, Vladik reads lots of books, flies RC aircrafts, helps animals in trouble, and co-organizes the Software Architecture TLV and Domain-Driven Design Israel meetups.

Presentations

7 years of domain-driven design: Tackling complexity in large-scale marketing systems Session

Vladik Khononov explains how he and his team embraced domain-driven design (DDD) at Plexop, a large-scale marketing system that spans over a dozen different business domains. Join in to learn how DDD allowed the team to manage business complexities, see what worked (and what didn't), and discover where they had to adapt the DDD methodology to fit the company's needs.

The dark side of events Session

Events are our industry’s near and dear. All technological conferences are full of talks on event sourcing, event-driven architectures, or event-driven integrations. Vladik Khononov adds another one, but a bit different. Let’s talk about the dark side of this pattern—the cases in which events turn into an anti-pattern, how to identify them, and, of course, how to turn the project around.

Dorota Kochanowska is a software architect at Workplace Solutions, where she consults for a migration process from individual to off-the-shelf software. As a computer scientist, she’s worked in different domains like banking, telecommunication, or managing international IT projects.

Presentations

Hands-on: Introduction to domain storytelling Tutorial

When you want to apply domain-driven design (DDD), you must first master the domain. In this hands-on examination, Henning Schwentner, Stefan Hofer, and Dorota Kochanowska show you how to build up domain knowledge with domain storytelling. Domain stories help you better understand a domain, identify what is core, segregate bounded contexts, and constitute ubiquitous language.

Patrick Kua is the chief scientist at the mobile bank N26, where he’s building the engineering group that will change how retail banking works. Previously, Patrick was the CTO of N26 and a principal technical consultant at ThoughtWorks in London. He’s the author of three books: The Retrospective Handbook, Talking with Tech Leads, and most recently, Building Evolutionary Architectures. Patrick is a frequent conference speaker and blogger. He’s passionate about bringing a balanced focus between people, organizations, and technology.

Presentations

From the trenches: Patrick Kua Keynote

In this ongoing series, Neal Ford interviews highly regarded industry professions about their career path and their work as an architect. Join in for his discussion with Patrick Kua.

Scaling out architectural decision making Session

In the fast-moving startup world, there's often not a lot of time to think about architecture. N26 wanted to ensure that it not only delivered fast but also delivered a quality product. Patrick Kua explores how the company scaled out architectural decision making as it grew very rapidly (in both customers and engineers).

Carola Lilienthal is senior software architect and managing director at Workplace Solutions and loves to design well-structured, long-living software systems. She and her teams have been using domain-driven design (DDD) since 2003 to achieve this goal. DDD and long-livingness of software architectures are the topic of many talks she has given at various conferences. She condensed her experience in the book Sustainable Software Architecture, and has translated the book Domain-Driven Design Distilled by Vaughn Vernon into German.

Presentations

Technical debt hurts: How to recognize and eliminate it 90-minute session

Almost every software system is developed with good intentions but under difficult conditions and technical debt is built step by step. The whole system is woven into a messy big knob and every adjustment becomes an incalculable cost screw. Carola Lilienthal explains how you can organize and further develop your source code to prevent the emergence and increase of technical debt.

Kat Liu is a senior software engineer on the authentication team at N26. She’s worked extensively with distributed systems, sync/async messaging patterns, and authentication standards like OAuth2. Due to the strong DevOps culture at N26, she also has experience with application and machine provisioning, proxy configurations, and multiregion deployment pipelines. When she’s not at work, you can usually find Kat at the local mixed martial arts gym getting her butt kicked in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai, playing guitar, or cooking.

Presentations

On launching a distributed system to global markets Session

N26 has a mission to build the bank the world loves to use. Join Kat Liu on a journey into how N26 designed, managed, and deployed its platform of services into new regions in preparation for bringing its product global.

Diogo Lucas is a senior architect at Atlassian, and he sucks at writing about himself and can’t wait for the day he’ll be famous enough that someone will do it for him. And bring perfect lattes with lovely art on top. Coming to think of it, scratch the writing, just the latte, please. Ahem, but I—nope, he—digresses. Whenever he’s not struggling with the hard work of describing who he is (hm, could he get his mother to do it? Nah, she’d write about that embarrassing story of when he was 9), he does software architecture stuff, which is mostly about drawing lots of arrows and boxes in a whiteboard (bonus points if you put a cloud in or two—they’re all the rage these days), talking to lots of people (sometimes involving coffee, although nobody ever volunteers to bring this poor guy a latte), and coding (yes, you still have to do that as an architect). Oh, he’s also a teacher. If you came here for the catchy words, here’s some of the stuff he’s been involved with: architecture (patterns, integration, event-driven, modernization, arch patterns, and culture), API (strategy, design, and platform), and Agile (DevOps, CI/CD, Kanban, and Agile transformation).

Presentations

When I grow up, I want to be a platform Session

Your organization has grown and now you need to break down product silos and leverage a common platform to move to the next big step. Join Sidney Shek and Diogo Lucas to hear to the ups and downs of a platformization journey, where they address the features you need to platformize and when, how much design is enough for a platform service, how to handle the mass adoption of your service, and more.

Edwin Maldonado is an independent software engineer and a technical architect at Contentful, where he has the chance to review integration and information architectures. He also has experience in the fintech industry, where he spent several years working with ACH (Americas) and SEPA (Europe). Besides the daily work, Edwin loves to talk about software architecture, watch history documentaries, and learn about urban planning.

Presentations

Applying reusability in information architecture Tutorial

Software engineers usually find themselves changing hard-coded content on the presentation layer, changing a paragraph here and there; that’s difficult to maintain and hard to scale. Now imagine you have to support and apply the same changes on a website and other devices. Edwin Maldonado outlines the basics so you can design a reusable information architecture.

Pedro Martos is a technical lead at the Workshop, a tech company based in Malaga, Spain. He’s been developing Java applications for more than eight years. He’s an advocate of best practices and agile culture. He earned his master’s degree in telecommunication engineering from the University of Jaén. In his free time he plays the ukulele and enjoys the occasional book.

Presentations

How to build an evolutionary architecture Session

Around 2017, Antonio Jimenez and Pedro Martos embarked on an ambitious journey: to redefine one of the company's most mission-critical, most complex products from scratch. Join them as they explore how you can achieve an evolutionary architecture from solid foundations such as microservices architecture within a continuous delivery pipeline.

Robin Moffatt is a developer advocate at Confluent, the company founded by the original creators of Apache Kafka, as well as an Oracle Groundbreaker Ambassador and ACE Director Alumnus. His career has always involved data, from the old worlds of COBOL and DB2 through the worlds of Oracle and Hadoop and into the current world with Kafka. His particular interests are analytics, systems architecture, performance testing, and optimization. He blogs at http://cnfl.io/rmoff and http://rmoff.net/ (and previously http://ritt.md/rmoff) and can be found tweeting grumpy geek thoughts as @rmoff. Outside of work, he enjoys drinking good beer and eating fried breakfasts, although generally not at the same time.

Presentations

ETL 2.0: It’s not just for data engineers anymore Session

Robin Moffatt explores the concepts of events, their relevance to software and data engineers, and their ability to unify architectures in a powerful way. Join in to learn why analytics, data integration, and ETL fit naturally into a streaming world. Along the way, Robin leads a hands-on demonstration of these concepts in practice and commentary on the design choices made.

Eamonn Moriarty is a senior technical staff member and chief architect for the health and human services pillar of Watson Health at IBM. In this role, he has technical oversight responsibility for a range of IBM products, including the social program management, Watson Care Manager, and government analytics offerings. Previously, Eamonn was VP of research and development at Curam Software prior to its acquisition by IBM in 2012. Eamonn is coauthor of a technical book on the IBM social program management offering and was an original member of the requirements, design, and development team for this highly successful product; he was also invited by the US federal government to be a member of the Medicaid Information Technology Architecture (MITA) architectural subcommittee. Eamonn is also father to a very energetic 3-year-old.

Presentations

Practical experience of continuous architectural refactoring in a SaaS offering Session

Paddy Fagan and Eamonn Moriarty have, over the last three years, overseen the evolution of a SaaS offering (Watson Care Manager). They provide you with an overview of this experience with a particular focus on the continuous architectural refactoring that has been at the core.

John Mumm is a software architect at Wallaroo Labs based in Netherlands, where he works on an open source high-performance framework for building stateful distributed applications. John holds a PhD in philosophy.

Presentations

A CRDT primer: Why CRDTs are perfect for eventual consistency Session

Conflict-free replicated data types (CRDTs) promise strong eventual consistency for highly available systems without the costs of coordination. John Mumm explains the theory behind state-based CRDTs, which might seem intimidating at first glance, but it's actually built out of familiar elements. And it turns out that this theoretical basis can be useful for implementing CRDTs in practice.

Think local: Reducing coordination and improving performance in your distributed systems Session

Many of the worst problems in distributed systems concern the need for coordination across nodes. But thinking local can help you avoid many of these problems. Drawing on the lessons he’s learned working on Wallaroo, John Mumm outlines strategies for avoiding coordination and relying on local knowledge.

Divya Nagar is a software engineer at Nexmo, the Vonage API Platform, where she works with awesome people who are building a scale-aware layer at Nexmo to create a highly available infrastructure which can scale. Her primary interests are data-centric distributed systems and databases.

Presentations

Extensible autonomous transactions in the world of microservices Session

Divya Nagar and Nicola Giacchetta explore problems organizations face when they start dealing with a lot of microservices and problems that occur due to a big Death Star architecture. They outline the solutions they implemented when facing similar problems to bring transactions in microservices. You'll learn about multiple data patterns and when and how when to use them.

Zdenek “Z” Nemec is the founder of Good API, an independent API consulting company, and the creator of the supermodel.io. Previously, Z authored API Blueprint and pioneered the API design-first approach at Apiary.

Presentations

Autonomous APIs: Navigation in complex landscapes 90-minute session

Ubiquitous APIs and ever-growing distributed systems brought major challenges with complexity and discovery, which can no longer be overcome by hiring more people. We need to architect our systems differently. Enter autonomous APIs. Zdenek Nemec explores the problems with the complexity of forming API landscapes and proposes the autonomy of the components as the solution.

Sam Newman is an independent consultant specializing in helping people ship software fast. Sam has worked extensively with the cloud, continuous delivery, and microservices and is especially preoccupied with understanding how to more easily deploy working software into production. For the last few years, he’s been exploring the capabilities of microservice architectures, and he’s worked with a variety of companies in multiple domains around the world, often with one foot in the developer world and another in the IT operations space. Previously, he spent over a decade at ThoughtWorks and then another year with a startup. Sam speaks frequently at conferences. He’s the author of Building Microservices (O’Reilly). If you’d like to get in touch, please email him.

Presentations

Moving to microservices and beyond 2-Day Training

Sam Newman details framings for microservice architectures that explore the various forces that can drive the design and evolution of microservices, and he leads you through a series of interactive architectural kata exercises to put your newfound knowledge to the test. You'll gain valuable experience with a series of tools you can immediately put into practice in your own projects.

Moving to microservices and beyond (Day 2) Training Day 2

Sam Newman details framings for microservice architectures that explore the various forces that can drive the design and evolution of microservices, and he leads you through a series of interactive architectural kata exercises to put your newfound knowledge to the test. You'll gain valuable experience with a series of tools you can immediately put into practice in your own projects.

Tim Nugent pretends to be a mobile app developer, game designer, tools builder, researcher, and tech author. When he isn’t busy avoiding being found out as a fraud, Tim spends most of his time designing and creating little apps and games he won’t let anyone see. He also spent a disproportionately long time writing his tiny little bio, most of which was taken up trying to stick a witty sci-fi reference in…before he simply gave up. He’s currently writing Practical Artificial Intelligence with Swift for O’Reilly and building a game for a power transmission company about a naughty quoll (a quoll is an Australian animal).

Presentations

How do I game design: Architecting games to expand your thinking Tutorial

Paris Buttfield-Addison, Mars Geldard, and Tim Nugent explore game design without coding or game engines. You’ll get a fresh perspective on architecture, design, and community engagement by understanding how people interact with the fastest-growing form of entertainment in the world: games. A software architect can learn a lot from game design; here you'll learn everything you need to get started.

Pratik Patel is a lead developer advocate at IBM. Pratik has designed and built applications in the retail, healthcare, financial services, and telecom sectors. His specialty is large-scale applications for mission-critical and mobile applications, and he hacks iOS, Android, HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, Rails, and…well, everything except Perl. Pratik is the author of Java Database Programming with JDBC, the first book on enterprise Java. He speaks regularly conferences and participates in several local tech and startup groups. Pratik holds a master’s degree in biomedical engineering from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Presentations

Serverless architecture fundamentals 90-minute session

Moving to serverless allows you to take your application development, deployment, and economics to a new level while delivering software to your customers faster and cheaper. But there are also significant trade-offs to keep in mind. Pratik Patel takes a deep dive into serverless from an architecture point of view.

Paula Paul is a Distinguished Engineer with Slalom Build, where she helps organizations adopt cloud native technology and serves the community as an ABI Syster, diversity speaker, and mentor. Paula entered the workforce as a software engineer at IBM in the early ’80s, where she shipped her first product on magnetic tape. She’s shipped many software products since then, evangelized .NET with Microsoft, held executive positions in technology architecture and operations, and taught people of all ages to code. Paula is passionate about equal opportunities for technical literacy and enjoys (half) joking that Kubernetes reminds her of IBM/370 systems programming.

Presentations

Architecture as code: Objective measures of value in a changing world Session

Architecture standards change in months, not years, and bring new capabilities, but taking advantage of them requires constant monitoring and tight feedback loops. You’ve embraced continuous delivery, but now you need to enable continuous evolution. Cassandra Shum and Paula Paul explore architecture as code as a means to enable continuous evolution.

Jesus Manuel Piñeiro is a software architect at Inditex, a developer, and tech enthusiast with 15 years of experience. Previously, he has mainly worked around the web, basically becoming a full stack developer, but specifically oriented toward ecommerce from hotel booking websites, event ticket sales websites, and the fashion retail industry.

Presentations

Fashion retail at scale: To block or not to block 90-minute session

Jesus Manuel Piñeiro gives you a glimpse into the challenges Inditex overcame in the transition of the ecommerce platform from monolithic to a microservices environment, oriented toward using event-driven nonblocking I/O technologies like Node.js. Jesus highlights the architectural decisions, technology, and tools that allowed the company to leverage the commercial growth in the years to come.

Eltjo R. Poort leads the architecture practice at CGI in The Netherlands. In his 30-year career in the software industry, he has fulfilled many engineering and project management roles. In the 1990s, he oversaw the implementation of the first SMS text messaging systems in the United States. In the last decade, he produced various publications on improving architecting practices, including his PhD thesis in 2012. Eltjo is best known for his work on Risk- and Cost-Driven Architecture, a set of principles and practices for agile solution architecting, for which he received the Linda Northrop Software Architecture Award in 2016 . His solution architecture blog can be found at eltjopoort.nl. In his spare time, Eltjo plays the violin in Symfonieorkest Nijmegen.

Eltjo is a member of IFIP Working Group 2.11 on Software Architecture.

Presentations

Measure your agile architecture maturity 90-minute session

Eltjo Poort is here to help you figure out if you've struck the right balance between architecture and agile working. Eltjo explores how to measure agile architecture maturity and applied the model to help teams get more value out of their architecture function. You might recognize some of the behavior patterns.

Rufus Raghunath (he/him) is a senior software developer at ThoughtWorks, an Agile consultant, and a frontend advocate. He leads the internal frontend community at ThoughtWorks and draws inspiration and insights from the real-world experiences of his peers across the world.

Presentations

Evolutionary UI: Change as a first-class element in the modern frontend world Session

Rufus Raghunath and Giamir Buoncristiani apply the principles of evolutionary architecture to UI, first described by Neal Ford, Rebecca Parsons, and Patrick Kua. Neal's a colleague of theirs and has been kind enough to review their content, so they share an authentic look at how frontend engineering can benefit from this progressive approach to architecture.

Florian Rappl is a solution architect for the IoT and distributed web applications at smapiot. His main interest lies in the creation of innovative architectures that scale in development and usage. Florian also does research on user-interaction models that enhance human-machine interaction. He won several prizes for his work and is a Microsoft MVP in the area of development technologies. He regularly blogs and writes articles for several popular websites in the web development space.

Presentations

Architecture for modular frontend applications Session

The architecture pattern of microservices is found in many modern system landscapes, offering flexibility for the backend services. The frontend is very often realized as a monolith. Florian Rappl and Lothar Schöttner explore microservices and detail an example implementation of a highly modular frontend architecture that mirrors the dynamic of a modern microservices backend.

Mario-Leander Reimer is a principal software architect at QAware, where he’s responsible for several projects concerned with the cloud native evolution of legacy applications, as well as a passionate developer and a #CloudNativeNerd. He’s continuously looking for innovations in software engineering and ways to combine and apply state-of-the-art technology in real-world projects. He’s a regular speaker at national and international conferences and teaches cloud computing and software quality assurance as a part-time lecturer.

Presentations

A hitchhiker's guide to cloud native API gateways Session

Mario-Leander Reimer guides you through cloud native API gateways. Good APIs are the centerpiece of any successful digital product, with proper management of the utmost importance. The API gateway pattern is well established to handle concerns like routing, versioning, rate limiting, access control, or diagnosability in a microservice architecture.

Pini Reznik is the chief technology officer at Container Solutions. He has 15+ years of experience in delivering software in Israel and Netherlands. Starting as a developer and moving through technical, managerial, and consulting positions in configuration management and operations areas, Pini acquired deep understanding of the software delivery processes and is helping organizations around Europe improve the software delivery pipeline by introducing Docker and other cutting-edge technologies.

Presentations

Cloud native survival kit 90-minute session

Pini Reznik shares a story drawn from real-world migration projects that demonstrates a transformation design and reveals related patterns, including failures along the way. By the end, it establishes a full pattern language.

Mark Richards is an experienced, hands-on software architect focused on the architecture, design, and implementation of microservices architectures, service-oriented architectures, and distributed systems in J2EE and other technologies. He’s been involved in the software industry since 1983 and has significant experience and expertise in application, integration, and enterprise architecture. Mark served as the president of the New England Java Users Group from 1999 to 2003. He’s the author of numerous technical books and videos from O’Reilly, including Software Architecture Fundamentals (video), Enterprise Messaging (video), and Java Message Service (book), and he’s a regular conference speaker at the No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) symposium series. Mark has spoken at over 100 conferences and user groups around the world on a variety of enterprise-related technical topics. He holds a master’s degree in computer science as well as numerous architect and developer certifications from IBM, Sun, the Open Group, and BEA.

Presentations

Fundamentals of software architecture 2-Day Training

CNN recently rated software architect the number one job in America. Yet no clear path exists for moving from developer to architect. Mark Richards blends lecture and hands-on real-world group exercises to explore the many aspects of software architecture. You'll learn various integration styles (and when to use them) as well as patterns to fit various business needs and requirements.

Fundamentals of software architecture (Day 2) Training Day 2

CNN recently rated software architect the number one job in America. Yet no clear path exists for moving from developer to architect. Mark Richards blends lecture and hands-on real-world group exercises to explore the many aspects of software architecture. You'll learn various integration styles (and when to use them) as well as patterns to fit various business needs and requirements.

Microservices migration patterns 90-minute session

The path to migrating to microservices from a monolithic or service-oriented architecture is riddled with challenges, pitfalls, canyons, demons, and even fire-breathing dragons. Mark Richards walks you through the migration patterns that allow you to easily fly over this challenging road and ease the pain associated with moving to microservices.

The rise and fall of microservices 90-minute session

Mark Richards examines the the rise and fall of microservices. Over the past five years, microservices has been at the forefront of most books, articles, and company initiatives. While some companies experience success with microservices, most companies experience pain, cost overruns, and failed initiatives while designing and implementing this incredibly complex architecture style.

João Rosa is a software consultant at Xebia, focused on delivering quality software that matters. He believes in the software crafts to provide software in sustainable peace; he is a domain-driven design (DDD), behavior-driven design (BDD), and (test-driven development) TDD practitioner. He can’t live without his CI/CD pipeline. During his career, he always pushed the teams and himself to improve communication, reducing the gap between developers and the business. When not on duty, you can find him traveling with his wife or lying down on the beach reading a book. João is an amateur cook in his remaining time.

Presentations

Event storming for domain-driven design modeling Tutorial

Creating multiple models for the same problem is one of the more important lessons that domain-driven design teaches you. It's a lot cheaper to quickly iterate over them and throw away less-useful prototypes before you even start coding. Kenny Baas-Schwegler and João RosaIn explore how event storming can support modeling software with domain-driven design model-driven building blocks.

Bernd Rücker is a cofounder and developer advocate at Camunda, an open source software company reinventing workflow automation, where he focuses on new workflow automation paradigms that fit into modern architectures around distributed systems, microservices, domain-driven design, event-driven architecture, and reactive systems. Bernd has helped automate highly scalable core workflows at global companies including T-Mobile, Lufthansa, and Zalando and has contributed to various open source workflow engines. He coauthored Real-Life BPMN, a popular book about workflow modeling and automation, writes for various magazines, and regularly speaks at conferences.

Presentations

Complex event flows in distributed systems Session

Event-driven architectures enable nicely decoupled microservices. However, using peer-to-peer event chains to implement complex end-to-end logic crossing service boundaries can accidentally increase coupling. Bernd Rücker shares real-life experiences on how (micro-)services can collaborate and how to balance orchestration and choreography.

Lothar Schöttner is the founder and CEO of smapiot, a German software solutions company. Besides the focus on the products and services of smapiot, he supports clients as solution architect on consulting projects in the areas of the IoT and identity management.

Presentations

Architecture for modular frontend applications Session

The architecture pattern of microservices is found in many modern system landscapes, offering flexibility for the backend services. The frontend is very often realized as a monolith. Florian Rappl and Lothar Schöttner explore microservices and detail an example implementation of a highly modular frontend architecture that mirrors the dynamic of a modern microservices backend.

Jochem Schulenklopper is a Netherlands-based IT architect at Xebia, an international IT consultancy company.

Presentations

How a scientist would improve serverless functions Session

Join us if you're curious about how to reliably improve and refactor serverless applications or how to ensure you've covered all the unexpected edge cases that occur in production. Jochem Schulenklopper and Gero Vermaas demonstrate a scientific approach that enables you to release your refactored serverless applications to production with great confidence.

Releasing improved serverless functions with confidence Tutorial

Jochem Schulenklopper and Gero Vermaas explain and practice an approach that enables you to improve and release serverless functions to production with confidence. You'll make changes in some sample serverless functions running in production, deploy the improved functions to production, and analyze your improvement against the originals.

Henning Schwentner loves coding. He’s a coder, coach, and consultant with Workplace Solutions in Hamburg, Germany. His projects are domain-driven designed, agile, and preferably in Java, which has been his favorite language since version 1.0. But his path is also often crossed by C# and even ABAP. Henning’s interested in the evolution of programming languages, long-living software architectures, and big refactorings. Recently, he translated Domain-Driven Design Distilled into German.

Presentations

Hands-on: Introduction to domain storytelling Tutorial

When you want to apply domain-driven design (DDD), you must first master the domain. In this hands-on examination, Henning Schwentner, Stefan Hofer, and Dorota Kochanowska show you how to build up domain knowledge with domain storytelling. Domain stories help you better understand a domain, identify what is core, segregate bounded contexts, and constitute ubiquitous language.

Sidney Shek is an architect at Atlassian, where he oversees the transformation of identity systems into a massively scalable and flexible platform for users, product developers, and the ecosystem, with over 10 years’ experience in developing and architecting real-time and mission-critical software systems across many industries ranging from financial services to manufacturing. He likes challenging traditional constraints and applying the latest R&D and technologies in elegant yet reliable solutions to real-world problems. He believes that functional programming principles like immutable data, type-safety, and idempotence need to be ingrained in architects and programmers alike.

Presentations

Honey, I shrunk the database: Resilience and recoverability in cloud native services Session

Sidney Shek and Jeff Farber explain how to use techniques like event sourcing, CQRS, and CRDTs to mitigate unpredictable failures that stem from humans and increasingly complex architectures in the cloud native world (microservices, anyone?). You'll learn implementation tips and tricks based on their successes (and failures) in building out the Identity platform that underpins Atlassian Cloud.

When I grow up, I want to be a platform Session

Your organization has grown and now you need to break down product silos and leverage a common platform to move to the next big step. Join Sidney Shek and Diogo Lucas to hear to the ups and downs of a platformization journey, where they address the features you need to platformize and when, how much design is enough for a platform service, how to handle the mass adoption of your service, and more.

Cassie Shum is the technical director and principal consultant for the east portfolio in North America at ThoughtWorks. A software engineer and architect, she’s spent the last nine years focusing on architectures including event-driven systems and microservices, a wide range of technologies with an emphasis on mobile and software delivery excellence, and she’s helped grow delivery practices and technical strategy and support the next generation of technologists. Some of her passions include advocating for women in technology and public speaking. She’s involved in promoting more female speakers in technology.

Presentations

Architecture as code: Objective measures of value in a changing world Session

Architecture standards change in months, not years, and bring new capabilities, but taking advantage of them requires constant monitoring and tight feedback loops. You’ve embraced continuous delivery, but now you need to enable continuous evolution. Cassandra Shum and Paula Paul explore architecture as code as a means to enable continuous evolution.

Brian Sletten is the president of Bosatsu Consulting, where he focuses on web architecture, resource-oriented computing, social networking, the semantic web, data science, 3-D graphics, visualization, scalable systems, security consulting, and other technologies of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. A liberal arts-educated software engineer with a focus on forward-leaning technologies, Brian has worked in many industries, including retail, banking, online games, defense, finance, hospitality, and healthcare. He holds a BS in computer science from the College of William and Mary. Brian is a rabid reader and devoted foodie with excellent taste in music. If pressed, he might tell you about his international pop recording career.

Presentations

Modern machine learning architectures: Data and hardware and platform, oh my Keynote

Brian Sletten takes a deep dive into the intersection of data, models, hardware, language, and architecture as it relates to machine learning systems in particular, but the overall industry in general.

Alex Soto is a software engineer in the Developers Group at Red Hat. He’s passionate about Java World, software automation, and he believes in the open source software model. Alex is the creator of NoSQLUnit project, member of JSR374 (Java API for JSON Processing) Expert Group, the coauthor of Testing Java Microservices, Istio RefCard, and contributor of several open source projects. A Java Champion since 2017 and international speaker, he’s talked about new testing techniques for microservices, continuous delivery in the twenty-first century, and Java.

Presentations

Service mesh patterns Session

There's a lot of talk about Istio and its principles, but Alex Soto goes one step beyond. He just introduces Istio to quickly move on to start covering advanced things like feature graduation, end-to-end security, tap comparison, mirroring traffic, and more.

Laurentiu Spilca is a dedicated development lead and trainer at Endava, where he leads the development of a project in the financial market of European Nordic countries. He has over nine years of experience. Previously, he was a software developer building one of the biggest ERP solutions with worldwide installations. Laurentiu believes it’s important to not only deliver high-quality software but also share knowledge and help others to up-skill, which has driven him to design and teach courses related to Java technologies and deliver presentations and workshops. Outside of work, Laurentiu is passionate about traveling and scuba diving.

Presentations

Navigating in stormy waters: An approach to traffic management with Istio Session

History repeats itself. Some years ago, software engineers started to implement frameworks to ease the development of software applications. Laurentiu Spilca walks you through how microservices are currently delivered and what Istio can do for you in regard to traffic management.

Gayathri Thiyagarajan is a technology lead at Expedia Group. With over 15 years of experience in delivering scalable, autonomous software applications mainly using Java technologies, she has wide experience working in various domains such as travel, public sector, supplier management, logistics, consumer products, and retail industries. She has wide range of experience doing application design and architecture, specializing in distributed systems for big data and applied domain-driven design (DDD), command query responsibility segregation (CQRS), and event sourcing. She’s working on delivering a big data capture platform for Hotels.com using DDD and event sourcing principles. She’s a proficient speaker at conferences such as Devoxx and muCon and an experienced blogger.

Presentations

Adopting domain-driven design at scale: Near enemies and how to defeat them Session

Everyone doing large-scale software delivery is using domain-driven design (DDD) these days, because it holds the key to delivering maintainable, evolvable solutions with independent teams. But it can go wrong, and then DDD is blamed. Andrew Harmel-Law and Gayathri Thiyagarajan detail a real project they saw fail. You'll learn the many problems they spotted and how they fixed them.

Stefan Tilkov is a founder and principal consultant at INNOQ, where he spends his time alternating between advising customers on new technologies and taking the blame from his coworkers for doing so. He’s a frequent speaker at international conferences and the author of numerous articles.

Presentations

“Good enough” architecture Session

Stefan Tilkov takes a look at some of the ways you can determine whether the development efforts you're undertaking suffer from too much or too little focus on architecture. You'll examine a number of real-world examples that are intended to inspire either admiration or terror and try to find some recipes of how you can get more of the former and less of the latter in your own projects.

Pepijn van de Kamp is a consulting software engineering expert at SIG who helps international clients in the financial, utilities, and public domain build and govern high-quality software portfolios. Pepijn specializes in software metrics, architecture analysis, domain-driven design, and automated testing strategies and has a deep understanding of the software quality models applied by international software consultancy firms and tool vendors. His goal is to help the software industry benefit from current software engineering research.

Presentations

Architectural lenses for looking at large-scale software landscapes Session

Pepijn van de Kamp takes you on a journey of software landscapes through different architectural lenses and connects the dots between viewpoints on software portfolio management from the fields of domain-driven design, software evolution, systems thinking, strategy consulting, and risk accounting. Mastery of these techniques will make you an important influencer in your IT organization.

Gero Vermaas is a Netherlands-based IT architect at Xebia, a boutique IT consultancy firm.

Presentations

How a scientist would improve serverless functions Session

Join us if you're curious about how to reliably improve and refactor serverless applications or how to ensure you've covered all the unexpected edge cases that occur in production. Jochem Schulenklopper and Gero Vermaas demonstrate a scientific approach that enables you to release your refactored serverless applications to production with great confidence.

Releasing improved serverless functions with confidence Tutorial

Jochem Schulenklopper and Gero Vermaas explain and practice an approach that enables you to improve and release serverless functions to production with confidence. You'll make changes in some sample serverless functions running in production, deploy the improved functions to production, and analyze your improvement against the originals.

Vaughn Vernon is the founder and chief architect of the vlingo/PLATFORM. A software developer and architect with more than 35 years of experience in a broad range of business domains, Vaughn is a leading expert in domain-driven design (DDD), champion of simplicity and reactive systems. The open source, DDD-friendly, reactive vlingo/PLATFORM is one example of his commitment to balancing the right technology choices with every essential and unique business vision. He consults on and teaches DDD and reactive software development, helping teams and organizations realize the potential of business-driven and reactive systems as they transition from technology-driven legacy web implementation approaches, putting a strong emphasis on embracing simplicity whenever possible. Vaughn is the author of three books: Implementing Domain-Driven Design, Domain-Driven Design Distilled, and Reactive Messaging Patterns with the Actor Model, all published by Addison-Wesley.

Presentations

Reactive domain-driven design: From implicit blocking to explicit concurrency 90-minute session

The paradigm billboard reads, "Object-oriented failed." Vaughn Vernon explores the ways developers have failed at object-oriented compared to the use objects their inventor intended. Reactive domain-driven design (DDD) features explicit, coherent, message sending that employs simple, business-centric, concurrent objects.

Engin Yöyen is a software architect at the eBay Classified Group, where he focuses on building consumer-facing technologies. He has a wealth of software development, design, and architecture experience from his years spent working in digital technology sectors such as telecommunications, education, IoT, and ecommerce. He studied computer science and psychology, as well as business administration. Besides all that he is a father, motorcyclist, and a humble cook.

Presentations

How do we take architectural decisions in eBay Classifieds Group Session

Engin Yöyen explores how to build a distributed system with the collaboration of hundreds of people worldwide with dozens of integrations and millions of users. The eBay Classified Group is building a leading online platform that's adaptable to requirements of marketplaces all around the world. But the company needs to decide how to tackle the complexity to make the right architectural decisions.

Rob Zuber is the chief technology officer of CircleCI, a 20-year veteran of software startups, a four-time founder, and a three-time CTO. Rob has seen CircleCI through its series B and series C and delivered on product innovation at scale. Rob leads a team of 100+ engineers who are distributed around the globe. Previously, Rob was a cofounder and CTO of Distiller, a continuous integration and deployment platform for mobile applications that was acquired by CircleCI; a cofounder of Copious, an online social marketplace; and a cofounder and CTO of Yoohoot, a technology company that enabled local businesses to connect with nearby consumers that was acquired by Appconomy. Rob earned a bachelor’s degree in applied science from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, and lives in Oakland, California, with his wife and two children.

Presentations

How I learned to love the rebuild: How to know when to reinvest in your systems Session

Rob Zuber outlines how to pick your "Goldilocks moment" to update your systems: not too early and not too late. He’ll also share some critical moments at CircleCI and how Docker, Go, Kubernetes, and other tools replaced simpler initial systems to allow CircleCI to hit massive scale.

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