Engineering the Future of Software
29–31 Oct 2018: Tutorials & Conference
31 Oct–1 Nov 2018: Training
London, UK
 
King's Suite - Balmoral
Add Building a maintainable architecture for software landscapes to your personal schedule
10:45 Building a maintainable architecture for software landscapes Dennis Bijlsma (Software Improvement Group), Haiyun Xu (Software Improvement Group)
Add How to improve your architectural visualizations to your personal schedule
13:15 How to improve your architectural visualizations Jochem Schulenklopper (Xebia)
14:15
Add Event Streaming as a Source of Truth to your personal schedule
15:50 Event Streaming as a Source of Truth Benjamin Stopford (Independent)
King's Suite - Sandringham
Add Choreographing Microservices to your personal schedule
10:45 Choreographing Microservices Allen Holub (Holub Associates)
Add Learning the Three Types of Microservices to your personal schedule
13:15 Learning the Three Types of Microservices Mike Amundsen (API Academy, CA Technologies)
Add Leveraging Containers for Improved Security to your personal schedule
14:15 Leveraging Containers for Improved Security Ashley Ward (Twistlock)
Add Scaling CQRS - in theory, practice and reality to your personal schedule
16:50 Scaling CQRS - in theory, practice and reality Allard Buijze (AxonIQ), Nakul Mishra (Casumo)
Buckingham Room - Palace Suite
Add Serverless Architecture Fundamentals to your personal schedule
10:45 Serverless Architecture Fundamentals Pratik Patel (TripLingo)
Add All The World's A Staging Server to your personal schedule
13:15 All The World's A Staging Server Heidi AT HOME (LaunchDarkly)
Add Adapting Teams to a New Architecture: Whether they know it or not to your personal schedule
14:15 Adapting Teams to a New Architecture: Whether they know it or not Mlungisi Duma (First National Bank)
Add Secure Design and Architecture to your personal schedule
15:50 Secure Design and Architecture Devika Yeragudipati (Bloomberg)
Blenheim Room - Palace Suite
Add Architecting for Data-Driven Reliability to your personal schedule
10:45 Architecting for Data-Driven Reliability Yaniv Aknin (Google Cloud)
13:15
Add Distributed Systems Are a UX Problem to your personal schedule
14:15 Distributed Systems Are a UX Problem Tyler Treat (Real Kinetic)
Add Sundhed.dk's Journey From Monolith to GDPR-Compliant Microservices to your personal schedule
15:50 Sundhed.dk's Journey From Monolith to GDPR-Compliant Microservices Tobias Uldall-Espersen (sundhed.dk), Thomas Krogsgaard Holme (Sundhed.dk)
Add Serverless Microservices at Fender Digital to your personal schedule
16:50 Serverless Microservices at Fender Digital Michael Garski (Fender Digital)
Park Suite (St. James / Regents)
10:45
Add Why happy developers and strong feedback loops create the best products  to your personal schedule
13:15 Why happy developers and strong feedback loops create the best products Yiannis Kanellopoulos (Software Improvement Group), Evelyn van Kelle (Software Improvement Group)
Add Using Continuous Delivery with Machine Learning to Tackle Fraud to your personal schedule
14:15 Using Continuous Delivery with Machine Learning to Tackle Fraud Sarah LeBlanc (ThoughtWorks), Hany Elemary (ThoughtWorks)
Add Tuesday keynotes to your personal schedule
King's Suite
9:00 Tuesday keynotes Mary Treseler (O'Reilly Media), Neal Ford (ThoughtWorks)
Add Architectural Katas to your personal schedule
17:45 Architectural Katas | Room: King's Suite
Add Tuesday Speed Networking to your personal schedule
8:15 Tuesday Speed Networking | Room: King's Suite Foyer
Add Lunch and Tuesday Topic Tables to your personal schedule
12:15 Lunch and Tuesday Topic Tables | Room: Monarch Suite
15:05 Afternoon break | Room: Monarch Suite
10:45-12:15 (1h 30m) Microservices Best Practice, Case Study
Building a maintainable architecture for software landscapes
Dennis Bijlsma (Software Improvement Group), Haiyun Xu (Software Improvement Group)
Modern architectures are more flexible: having many small systems that communicate with each other makes it easier to work on those systems. However, the communication between systems also creates new challenges. How do you determine where and how the current communication lines (both technical and between teams) can be improved? How can you measure this?
13:15-14:05 (50m) Leadership skills Best Practice, Overview
How to improve your architectural visualizations
Jochem Schulenklopper (Xebia)
Communicating (about) architecture to non-IT and business stakeholders is a valuable skill for architects. After all, many architectural-relevant decisions are made by others, so they need to be informed with clear, honest, intelligible and helpful information / advice. This presentation will show theory and many practical tips on eight different facets of visual communication of architecture.
14:15-15:05 (50m) Microservices Best Practice, Case Study
Session
15:50-16:40 (50m) Application architecture, Enterprise architecture, Integration architecture, Microservices, Reactive and its variants Best Practice
Event Streaming as a Source of Truth
Benjamin Stopford (Independent)
One of the most interesting, and provocative patterns to face the software architecture community is the idea of using event streaming as a source of truth. A pattern where replayable logs, like Apache Kafka, provide both communication and storage, splicing the retentive properties of a database into a system designed to share data across teams. Is this pattern really transformative? You decide.
16:50-17:40 (50m) Application architecture Best Practice, Case Study
How DAZN Scales Frontend Applications with Microfrontends
Luca Mezzalira (DAZN)
Microservices provide a way to break up a monolithic architecture into multiple atomic units allowing an independent scalability of a service. They also provide a better way to divide the domains across multiple teams. But what if there is a way to apply the same principles to Frontend applications? And what if we can scale up a project with tens of developers without reducing the throughput?
10:45-12:15 (1h 30m) Application architecture Best Practice, Overview
Choreographing Microservices
Allen Holub (Holub Associates)
Though you can design Microservices to talk to each other synchronously, as if they were making function calls, that's not the best way to do things. Choreographed (asynchronous) systems solve many problems inherent in synchronous (orchestrated) communicatiopn. This talk shows you how to build effective choreographed microservice systems.
13:15-14:05 (50m) Microservices Best Practice, Overview
Learning the Three Types of Microservices
Mike Amundsen (API Academy, CA Technologies)
Microservices is a popular, but vague term. And -- it turns out -- definitions of microservices can vary, depending on what you want them to accomplish and how you want them to communicate with each other. So, just what are the three types of Microservices, what makes them unique, and when do you deploy each of them?
14:15-15:05 (50m) Security Best Practice, Overview
Leveraging Containers for Improved Security
Ashley Ward (Twistlock)
Throughout this session, we’ll break down the security advantages of containers relative to traditional architectures using a real life app as an example.
15:50-16:40 (50m) Application architecture, Cloud native, Distributed systems, Enterprise architecture, Microservices Anti-Pattern, Best Practice
Async in Microservices and Its Three Forms: Understanding the Patterns
Irakli Nadareishvili (Capital One)
With cloud-native and Microservices architecture gaining wide adoption asynchronous programming patterns are becoming increasingly important. We discuss 3 major async forms that are relevant in this space: Event Sourcing, Reactiveness, and Data Streams We define each pattern, explain relevant use-cases, using examples from FinTech context, and discuss differences in implementation
16:50-17:40 (50m) Application architecture, Distributed systems, Microservices, Scale Case Study, Theoretical
Scaling CQRS - in theory, practice and reality
Allard Buijze (AxonIQ), Nakul Mishra (Casumo)
The architectural principle of CQRS makes great promises about the scalability of applications. In this presentation, we will elaborate on these promises and discuss how to bring them into practice. We provide insight in the challenges we faced while scaling from thousands to billions of events, and how we resolved them.
10:45-12:15 (1h 30m) Serverless Overview
Serverless Architecture Fundamentals
Pratik Patel (TripLingo)
Serverless doesn’t mean no servers. It’s a metaphor for a new way of building applications. We will discuss how serverless fits into the world of Microservices, and examine the pyramid of application development and deployment. We’ll put on our architect hat, and also look at Serverless options and how it impact applications architecture.
13:15-14:05 (50m) Devops Best Practice
All The World's A Staging Server
Heidi AT HOME (LaunchDarkly)
I have sad news - staging is a lie and will never be identical to production, because production is unknowable. Trying to replicate it is often prohibitively expensive. But I also have good news - production can contain multitudes, including features you aren’t ready to turn on or activate yet. You can hide in the dark and do integration testing at the same time.
14:15-15:05 (50m) Leadership skills Best Practice, Hands-on
Adapting Teams to a New Architecture: Whether they know it or not
Mlungisi Duma (First National Bank)
Software Development Teams in the Banking Sector in South Africa are made of a number of technical and non-technical experts. The challenge with these teams is trying to lead them to adapt to a new architecture. Reasons are either the audience does not understand the proposed architecture, or they feel they don’t have a sense of control or participation within the proposed solution.
15:50-16:40 (50m) Security
Secure Design and Architecture
Devika Yeragudipati (Bloomberg)
Security breaches and attacks, swiftly followed by patches and policy changes dominate headlines with increasing frequency. How do we, on the development side, work to reduce the probability of our software being exploited?
16:50-17:40 (50m) Enterprise architecture Best Practice, Case Study
Enclave-based Architecture: a blueprint for cloud-native financial institutions
Angelo Agatino Nicolosi (Danske Bank)
At Danske Bank we are implementing ideas and practices as CI/CD, Microservices and DevOps in the extreme conditions of a Financial Enterprise. During this quest for Agility, we are turning decades of legacy into actual competitive advantage, enabling us to define and deliver brand new financial services at the rate and speed of start-ups. We are doing that through the simple concept of an Enclave.
10:45-12:15 (1h 30m) Scale Anti-Pattern, Best Practice
Architecting for Data-Driven Reliability
Yaniv Aknin (Google Cloud)
Architectural choices are often driven by non-functional requirements like reliability and scalability. Unfortunately, it can be deceptively hard to specify the right requirements. Big decisions can be made hoping to hit X nines while failing to ensure the nines measure the right thing. In this talk, we'll review some of Google's lessons in this space, helping you focus on metrics that matter.
13:15-14:05 (50m)
Session
14:15-15:05 (50m) User experience design Anti-Pattern, Best Practice
Distributed Systems Are a UX Problem
Tyler Treat (Real Kinetic)
Distributed systems are not strictly an engineering problem. It’s far too easy to assume a “backend” development concern, but the reality is there are implications at every point in the stack. Often the trade-offs we make lower in the stack in order to buy responsiveness bubble up to the top—so much, in fact, that it rarely doesn’t impact the application in some way.
15:50-16:40 (50m) Application architecture, Microservices, Security Case Study, Hands-on
Sundhed.dk's Journey From Monolith to GDPR-Compliant Microservices
Tobias Uldall-Espersen (sundhed.dk), Thomas Krogsgaard Holme (Sundhed.dk)
The presentation will cover how principles of Microservice Architecture and Privacy by Design were applied to break down a monolithic e-health portal, redesign it and produce a scalable and flexible platform in compliance with the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The work was initiated as a technical project, but has succeeded in delivering significant technical and business value.
16:50-17:40 (50m) Serverless Best Practice, Case Study
Serverless Microservices at Fender Digital
Michael Garski (Fender Digital)
Fender Digital’s service infrastructure is 100% serverless. The promises of serverless include reduced costs and simplified operations, and the challenge lies in how to implement complex applications on a FaaS platform. This session covers the best practices we have established at Fender Digital to optimize function performance and ensure observability.
10:45-12:15 (1h 30m)
Session
13:15-14:05 (50m) Fundamentals Best Practice
Why happy developers and strong feedback loops create the best products
Yiannis Kanellopoulos (Software Improvement Group), Evelyn van Kelle (Software Improvement Group)
If you want to develop high quality products you need happy developers and strong feedback loops. In this talk, we will elaborate on they key factors that determine developer happiness, the crucial relationship between developer happiness and code quality, and how to enhance overall code quality through a blend of interpersonal communication and tool-based analysis.
14:15-15:05 (50m) Application architecture Best Practice, Case Study
Using Continuous Delivery with Machine Learning to Tackle Fraud
Sarah LeBlanc (ThoughtWorks), Hany Elemary (ThoughtWorks)
Credit card fraudsters are always changing their behavior, developing new tactics. For banks, the damage isn’t just financial; their reputations are on the line. So how do banks stay ahead of the crooks? In this session, we will introduce continuous delivery to machine learning with a system that allows for rapid experimentation and deployment of models that catch these fraudsters.
15:50-16:40 (50m) Business solutions, Enterprise architecture, Leadership skills Case Study, Overview
Enterprise Architecture at Mozilla- an astrolabe to guide the future
Michael Van Kleeck (Mozilla)
How can Mozilla evolve our products and capabilities to serve the global, human-driven Internet of the future? We are guided by our mission and supported by the capabilities of our staff and community. In this session, we will dive into how Mozilla uses our version of Enterprise Architecture to wisely explore, evaluate, and pivot to and from future opportunities.
16:50-17:40 (50m) Leadership skills Theoretical
Ethical questions in software engineering
Rotem Hermon (SAP)
We, developers and architects, are a major force influencing software, technology, and the world it creates. If we really want to create a better world, we need to open our eyes to the link between ethics and software. In this session we'll discuss technology, sense of self, politics, truth, and try to understand what we can do about it.
9:00-10:40 (1h 40m)
Tuesday keynotes
Mary Treseler (O'Reilly Media), Neal Ford (ThoughtWorks)
Program Chairs, Mary Treseler and Neal Ford, welcome you to the second day of keynotes.
17:45-19:15 (1h 30m)
Architectural Katas
Software architects have to practice being software architects. Now is your chance. Network and show your skills by joining Architectural Katas—a team exercise where small groups work together on a project that needs development—on Tuesday evening.
8:15-8:45 (30m)
Tuesday Speed Networking
Jumpstart your networking at Software Architecture by coming to Speed Networking before the keynotes begin. Bring your business cards and prepare a minute of patter about yourself, your projects, and your interests.
12:15-13:15 (1h)
Lunch and Tuesday Topic Tables
Join other attendees during lunch at Software Architecture to share ideas, talk about the issues of the day, and maybe solve a few. Not sure which topic to pick? Don’t worry—it's not a long-term commitment. Try two or three and settle on a different topic tomorrow.
15:05-15:50 (45m)
Break: Afternoon break