Engineering the Future of Software
18-19 October 2016: Training
19-21 October 2016: Tutorials & Conference
London, UK

Schedule: Fundamentals sessions

9:00–17:00 Tuesday & Wednesday, 18-19 October
Location: Hilton Meeting Room 3-4
Mark Richards (Independent)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 6 ratings)
Being a software architect involves more than just drawing boxes and lines. It requires thinking like an architect, being a leader, and understanding the elements, patterns, and styles necessary to create effective software architectures. In a 2-day training course blending lecture and hands-on real-world group exercises, Mark Richards explores the many aspects of software architecture. Read more.
13:30–17:00 Wednesday, 19/10/2016
Location: Park Suite (St. James/Regents) Level: Intermediate
Tudor Girba (feenk.com)
Average rating: ****.
(4.29, 7 ratings)
"Emerge your architecture" goes the Agile mantra. That’s great. Developers get empowered, and fluffy papers make room for real code structure. But how do you ensure the cohesiveness of the result? Tudor Girba explains why architecture cannot be controlled (because it is a commons) and introduces an Agile yet systematic approach for how it can be steered. Read more.
10:45–12:15 Thursday, 20/10/2016
Location: Balmoral Level: Intermediate
Simon Brown (Independent Consultant)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 6 ratings)
Drawing on his experience of working with software development teams across the globe, Simon Brown explores the visual communication of software architecture, covering what's commonplace today, the importance of creating a shared vocabulary, diagram notation, the value of creating a model, and how to use tooling and static analysis techniques to automate diagram generation. Read more.
10:45–12:15 Thursday, 20/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Patrick Kua (N26)
Average rating: ****.
(4.23, 13 ratings)
How do you build systems that not only last but can easily be changed over time? Architectural choices made now may solve today's problems but may also constrain how you make changes to solve future, unknown problems. Patrick Kua demonstrates how architects can get the best of both worlds, solving today's problems and enabling future change through evolutionary architecture. Read more.
13:15–14:05 Thursday, 20/10/2016
Location: Windsor Suite Level: Intermediate
Thomas Gamble (ThoughtWorks), Hari Ramamurthy (The Home Depot)
Average rating: *....
(1.80, 5 ratings)
Everyone is familiar with microservice buzzwords, but the fundamentals of design are just as important and relevant as ever. Thomas Gamble and Hari Ramamurthy cover the recommended patterns associated with implementing or migrating to microservices and align them with the well-documented and familiar design patterns from the Gang of Four. Read more.
14:15–15:05 Thursday, 20/10/2016
Location: Balmoral Level: Intermediate
Simon Brown (Independent Consultant)
Average rating: ****.
(4.86, 7 ratings)
If you can’t build a well-structured monolith, what makes you think microservices is the answer? Simon Brown explains why we should put more thought into how we structure our code. Read more.
14:15–15:05 Thursday, 20/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Intermediate
Eoin Woods (Endava)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 4 ratings)
Architects have to balance providing clear guidance for important decisions with the need to let people get on and build their aspects of the system without interference. Eoin Woods explores how architecture principles can help achieve this by making constraints and priorities clear without being unnecessarily prescriptive about how they are to be implemented. Read more.
15:50–16:40 Thursday, 20/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Dave King (Exaptive)
Average rating: ***..
(3.83, 6 ratings)
Every developer relishes the prospect that his or her code could have a life of its own, of it getting used by someone else or producing delightful but unexpected results. But getting one use case right so often seems to necessitate letting all others go. Dave King unpacks this abstraction problem, argues its importance in an open source ethos, and describes the exciting way to beat it. Read more.
15:50–16:40 Thursday, 20/10/2016
Location: Park Suite (St. James/Regents) Level: Beginner
Rob Allen (Nineteen Feet Limited)
Average rating: ****.
(4.25, 8 ratings)
What makes a good API? Rob Allen outlines five of the more important architectural features that you should consider when designing and building your API. These are the features that ensure that your API plays well with HTTP and, more importantly, make your API a delight to maintain and work with. Read more.
16:50–17:40 Thursday, 20/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Intermediate
peter campbell (Kainos)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 2 ratings)
Architects love to debate technologies, patterns, and best practices, but are there any universals that architects believe in? Are microservices, reactive architectures, and Agile universally relevant? Peter Campbell shares his architecture beliefs and explains why openness about beliefs helps us all make better architecture choices for technology, design, and behavior. Read more.
16:50–17:40 Thursday, 20/10/2016
Location: Park Suite (St. James/Regents) Level: Intermediate
Marcel Weiher (Microsoft, metaobject)
Average rating: **...
(2.20, 5 ratings)
REST is the architectural style of the Web and probably the most successful distributed architecture in history. Marcel Weiher explains how, with slight modifications, it is also highly useful for nondistributed applications and simple, high-performance storage architectures on both client and server. Read more.
10:45–12:15 Friday, 21/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Daniel Grund (evosoft GmbH)
Average rating: **...
(2.50, 4 ratings)
Doing software architecture in an Agile environment imposes several requirements and challenges on the architect, the process of creating and managing the software architecture, and the chosen architectural styles. Drawing on his real-world experience, Daniel Grund shares best practices regarding team collaboration, development process setup, and how to adopt to constant change. Read more.
10:45–12:15 Friday, 21/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Intermediate
Eoin Woods (Endava), Simon Brown (Independent Consultant)
Average rating: ****.
(4.14, 7 ratings)
The word "modeling" brings back memories of analysis paralysis for many software developers, and countless software teams have just decided to stop doing it. In extreme cases, this has led to systems that are the stereotypical “big ball of mud." Eoin Woods and Simon Brown share some practical advice on how how a little well-chosen modeling can help avoid chaos. Read more.
10:45–12:15 Friday, 21/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room Level: Intermediate
Murat Erder (Deutsche Bank)
Average rating: ***..
(3.33, 6 ratings)
As the pace of innovation increases, IT departments are leveraging Agile, continuous delivery, and DevOps to deliver systems more rapidly. But is architecture still relevant in this new world? Murat Erder shares an approach called Continuous Architecture based on six principles. Additional topics addressed are the role of the architect, psychometric tests and enterprise concerns. Read more.
13:15–14:05 Friday, 21/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Beginner
Patrick Kua (N26)
Average rating: ****.
(4.83, 6 ratings)
Being a successful architect requires more than just a good understanding of architecture. Patrick Kua explores the breadth of skills and experience an architect should focus on and outlines the balance of traits that makes a well-rounded architect. Read more.
15:50–16:40 Friday, 21/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room Level: Non-technical
Chris Bailey (IBM)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 2 ratings)
The availability of on-demand, utility computing via the cloud introduces a new world of flexibility but also an entirely new charging model for applications. Chris Bailey explains how this new economics of the cloud is driving changes in the way applications are architected, developed, and deployed. Read more.
16:50–17:40 Friday, 21/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Beginner
Rob Allen (Nineteen Feet Limited)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 3 ratings)
We all know that the M in MVC stands for model, but what does that actually mean? Domain-driven design helps us map our software to the business requirements of our clients, but it can be quite hard to understand. Rob Allen explores the fundamentals of domain-driven design and explains how to apply them to your application. Read more.