Engineering the Future of Software
18-19 October 2016: Training
19-21 October 2016: Tutorials & Conference
London, UK

Software Architecture Speakers

New speakers are added regularly. Please check back to see the latest updates to the agenda.

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Marcus Ahnve is a solution architect, educator, and Agile change leader currently working at Valtech. Marcus has over 20 years’ experience programming and delivering software applications, mostly for the Web and based on open source technologies. Marcus got involved with eXtreme Programming in 2001 and has since supported individuals and organizations in using Agile methodologies.

Presentations

Modular UI design for a microservices world Session

Microservices are widely adopted to ensure modularity, but so far they have mainly been a solution for the backend of applications. Marcus Ahnve and Visar Ulaj describe an approach for designing and implementing a frontend that matches the flexibility of the backend.

Rob Allen runs Nineteen Feet, a company focused on web development, training, and consultancy. Rob has been involved in software architecture and development for a number of years. He started out writing C++ applications; he now concentrates on web-based applications and writes code in PHP, Swift, and other interesting languages. Rob contributes to open source projects such as Swift and the Slim Framework. He is the author of Zend Framework in Action (Manning). Rob holds a master’s degree in electronic engineering from the University of Birmingham in the UK.

Presentations

Designing the M in MVC Session

We all know that the M in MVC stands for model, but what does that actually mean? Domain-driven design helps us map our software to the business requirements of our clients, but it can be quite hard to understand. Rob Allen explores the fundamentals of domain-driven design and explains how to apply them to your application.

Five features of a good API architecture Session

What makes a good API? Rob Allen outlines five of the more important architectural features that you should consider when designing and building your API. These are the features that ensure that your API plays well with HTTP and, more importantly, make your API a delight to maintain and work with.

Chris Bailey is an architect on the Runtime Technologies team at IBM, where he leads teams contributing to the open source communities for Java, Node.js, and Swift. Chris’s current focus areas are in performance, concurrency, monitoring, and diagnostics. He is also a recognized author and speaker in these areas.

Presentations

The new economics of the cloud Session

The availability of on-demand, utility computing via the cloud introduces a new world of flexibility but also an entirely new charging model for applications. Chris Bailey explains how this new economics of the cloud is driving changes in the way applications are architected, developed, and deployed.

Luigi Bennardis is an IT architect in charge of configuration management executive functions in Poste Italiane, where he develops and implements large-scale open source and commercial ALM solutions, continuous integration, automated workflow systems, IT change management, and change control on Unix and Windows environments. Previously, he spent 10 years at Banksiel SpA (now Almaviva SpA) as a production manager, focusing on the delivery of large-scale security and mission-critical IT systems for national and international banks, including Banca d’Italia, Poste Italiane, Intesa Sanpaolo, Unicredit, and UBS. He also worked as an OOP developer and an IT architect on Java and Microsoft technologies at at the Italian National Statistical Institute (ISTAT) and Sistemi Informativi SpA (an IBM company). Luigi is a Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer (MCSD) on Microsoft .NET. He is the author of 15 articles on Mokabyte, the first Italian web journal about Java technology, and was a speaker at the 2015 Codemotion conference held in Rome. Luigi holds a master’s degree in statistics and economical sciences from the University of Rome, La Sapienza.

Presentations

The full life-cycle of a microservice: How to realize a fault-tolerant and reliable architecture and deliver it as a Docker container or in a cloud environment Session

Luigi Bennardis explains how to realize and containerize in a Docker image a "database per service" REST microservice, using Spring Cloud to simplify the complexity of Eureka service registry and Ribbon client-side load balancing. Luigi then demonstrates how to orchestrate delivery with PaaS cloud environments, such as GitHub, Jenkins/Openshift, DockerHub, and Pivotal Cloud Foundry.

Tim Berglund is a teacher, author, and technology leader with Confluent, where he serves as the senior director of developer experience. Tim can frequently be found at speaking at conferences internationally and in the United States. He is the copresenter of various O’Reilly training videos on topics ranging from Git to distributed systems and is the author of Gradle Beyond the Basics. He tweets as @tlberglund, blogs very occasionally at Timberglund.com, and is the cohost of the DevRel Radio Podcast. He lives in Littleton, Colorado, with the wife of his youth and and their youngest child, the other two having mostly grown up.

Presentations

Four distributed systems reference architectures 90-minute session

Tim Berglund explores four ready-to-use examples of how to architect a distributed data-processing system using open source tools, including criteria for how to select each one. Each reference architecture is based on a successful real-world production system.

Simon Brown is an independent consultant specializing in software architecture. Simon is the author of Software Architecture for Developers, a developer-friendly guide to software architecture, technical leadership, and the balance with agility. He is also the creator of the C4 software architecture model.

Presentations

Models, sketches, and everything in between 90-minute session

The word "modeling" brings back memories of analysis paralysis for many software developers, and countless software teams have just decided to stop doing it. In extreme cases, this has led to systems that are the stereotypical “big ball of mud." Eoin Woods and Simon Brown share some practical advice on how how a little well-chosen modeling can help avoid chaos.

Modular monoliths Session

If you can’t build a well-structured monolith, what makes you think microservices is the answer? Simon Brown explains why we should put more thought into how we structure our code.

The art of visualizing software architecture 90-minute session

Drawing on his experience of working with software development teams across the globe, Simon Brown explores the visual communication of software architecture, covering what's commonplace today, the importance of creating a shared vocabulary, diagram notation, the value of creating a model, and how to use tooling and static analysis techniques to automate diagram generation.

Daniel Bryant is an independent technical consultant and the CTO at SpectoLabs, where he specializes in enabling continuous delivery within organizations through the identification of value streams, the creation of build pipelines, and the implementation of effective testing strategies. Daniel’s technical expertise focuses on DevOps tooling, cloud and container platforms, and microservice implementations. He contributes to several open source projects, writes for InfoQ, O’Reilly, and Voxxed, and regularly presents at international conferences, including OSCON, QCon, and JavaOne.

Presentations

A practical guide for continuous delivery with containers Session

The large (unicorn) companies have been talking about deploying containerized applications for some time, but the processes, techniques, and technologies involved are not always clear when looking in from the outside. Daniel Bryant demonstrates how to create a scalable build pipeline that takes a series of Java applications, containerizes them, and deploys them onto Docker Swarm.

Dirkjan Bussink is the engineering manager for GitHub Enterprise. He has a background mostly in Ruby and systems development and likes debugging complex problems for fun.

Presentations

Scaling down Session

GitHub.com is a large, distributed system with many components. Dirkjan Bussink explains how GitHub turns this into something that it can ship in a single virtual machine to its GitHub Enterprise customers.

Peter Campbell is currently CTO for digital at Kainos and, for the past three years, has been working with UK government on its digital transformation, which has given him experience building some of the most exciting new digital services in the UK government. Peter has worked at Kainos for a large part of his career. Previously, Peter was CTO for Kainos Evolve, where he initiated the move to a mobile-first strategy that led to the creation of Evolve for iPad. He joined Kainos as a graduate developer and was introduced to the world of C programming. Peter continues to apply his experience as a practicing architect and shares his thoughts on Medium.

Presentations

Architecture as belief Session

Architects love to debate technologies, patterns, and best practices, but are there any universals that architects believe in? Are microservices, reactive architectures, and Agile universally relevant? Peter Campbell shares his architecture beliefs and explains why openness about beliefs helps us all make better architecture choices for technology, design, and behavior.

Vincenzo Chianese is an Italian full stack developer with a particular love for frontend development, API design, and its consumption. Currently, Vincenzo works at Apiary, helping people to design better APIs.

Presentations

Scaling your API development workflow: Five simple things you can do today Session

It was all fun and games when you had a single API. Now you’re drowning in tens (hundreds?) of services. How do you keep them consistent, usable, and error free? Distilling lessons learned building APIs, Vincenzo Chianese shares five simple things you can do today to retain your sanity and ship great product—and make your team 10x more productive.

Wes Chow is currently serving out his term as CTO of Chartbeat. Previously, Wes spent eight years building technical infrastructure for high-frequency trading shops before staring into his dark soul and realizing he needed to move into the startup light. S7 Labs sprang into being, and Wes led teams that built Storybox, a Seedcamp NY finalist, and Songza Radio, subsumed by Google Music. Wes holds a BS in electrical engineering and computer science from UC Berkeley.

Presentations

Consistent hashing, shuffle sharding, and copysets: Practical tools for controlling failure Session

Want to scale? Shard it! If only it were that simple. There are more gotchas than you might expect, like possibly taking down your entire system and guaranteeing failure. Wes Chow covers the math of engineering better failure scenarios and real-world applications.

Duncan DeVore is an engineer at Lightbend (Typesafe) who specializes in the design and implementation of distributed systems using the tenets of the Reactive Manifesto with Scala, Akka, and the Lightbend stack. Duncan believes in responsible design through functional programming with an abundance of test coverage, and he loves to code, present, and help others work through the challenges of distributed computing. Duncan’s specialties include distributed computing, microservice-based architectures, cloud computing, event sourcing, and CQRS. Duncan’s open source projects include journals for Eventsourced and Akka-Persistence based on the theory of event sourcing and CQRS. He is the coauthor of Reactive Application Development.

Presentations

Blah blah. . .microservices. . .blah blah Session

Jonas Bonér leads a deep dive into the essence of microservices and explains how to use them to exploit reality. Jonas explores microservices from first principles, distilling their essence and putting them in their true context: distributed systems.

Reactive system design Training

Are you building distributed apps? If so, you need those apps to be responsive, resilient, and elastic in the face of both failure and extreme load. Duncan DeVore explores the tenets of reactive programming before walking you through practical exercises that lead to a fully functional reactive application.

Training: Reactive system design Training Day 2

Are you building distributed apps? If so, you need those apps to be responsive, resilient, and elastic in the face of both failure and extreme load. Duncan DeVore explores the tenets of reactive programming before walking you through practical exercises that lead to a fully functional reactive application.

Joe Drumgoole is director of developer advocacy EMEA at MongoDB, where he helps developers to understand and utilize MongoDB in order to unleash the power of software and data for innovators everywhere. Joe is a software entrepreneur with over 25 years experience with successful product delivery at Digital Equipment Corporation, Nomura, Oracle Corporation, CR2, and Cape Clear Software. He is a regular speaker at technical conferences and has provided mentoring and advice to many startups over the past 10 years.

Presentations

Event sourcing: The best ubiquitous pattern you've never heard of Session

Event sourcing is a deceptively radical idea which forms the basis of global finance. Rather than persisting an object in its current state, event sourcing instead writes an immutable log of deltas (domain events) to the database from which application state is derived. Joe Drumgoole examines event sourcing and CQRS implemented with MongoDB.

Kristoffer Dyrkorn is a scientist at BEKK Consulting, a leading Norwegian business and technology consulting firm. For the last 15 years, Kristoffer has worked as a developer, project manager, and solution architect on large IT projects in Norway. Always hands-on, he has used a great variety of technologies and solved quite a few mysterious problems. Kristoffer specializes in pragmatic architectures and scalability and has spoken about usability and architecture at several conferences in Norway, Europe, and the US.

Presentations

Road traffic analysis and Agile architectures Session

Kristoffer Dyrkorn outlines an infrastructure that reduces the cost of road construction and maintenance. The system provides high-quality and near real-time information by integrating an unusual combination of sensors, devices, protocols, and software. Kristoffer discusses the architectural challenges encountered and choices and mistakes made trying to keep the architecture receptive to change.

Murat Erder is the Chief Technology Officer for the Chief Adminstrative Office at Deutsche Bank. Before that he was a director in the Chief Data Office focusing on Data Engineering. Previous responsibilities included leading the Integration Services Group at Deutsche Bank. Prior to joining Deutsche Bank in 2009, Murat had a career as management consultant, software architect and developer.

Murat is the co-author of "Continuous Architecture: Sustainable Architecture in an Agile and Cloud-Centric World’

Presentations

Continuous architecture: Sustainable architecture in an Agile and cloud-centric world 90-minute session

As the pace of innovation increases, IT departments are leveraging Agile, continuous delivery, and DevOps to deliver systems more rapidly. But is architecture still relevant in this new world? Murat Erder shares an approach called Continuous Architecture based on six principles. Additional topics addressed are the role of the architect, psychometric tests and enterprise concerns.

John Feminella is an advocate for curiosity in all people and about all things. John serves as the advisory platform architect at Pivotal, where his daily goal is to transform how the world builds software. He’s also the author of several published research papers on software architecture and the cofounder of analytics startup UpHex. John lives in Charlottesville, VA, with his partner. He likes milkshakes, meta-jokes, and referring to himself in the third person in speaker bios.

Presentations

Microservices are hard: A guide for optimists Session

Microservices are a much-vaunted architectural strategy for decomposing applications; there's a lot of value to be had when they're done right. But if they work so well, why do they often seem tough to pull off? John Feminella explores lessons learned from organizations that tried to implement microservices architectures and extracts a mental model for what works and what doesn't.

Neal Ford is a director, software architect, and meme wrangler at ThoughtWorks, a global IT consultancy that thinks disruptively to deliver technology to address the toughest challenges, all while seeking to revolutionize the IT industry and create positive social change. Neal focuses on designing and building large-scale enterprise applications. He is an internationally recognized expert on software development and delivery, especially in the intersection of Agile engineering techniques and software architecture. Neal has authored magazine articles, seven books (and counting), and dozens of video presentations and has spoken at hundreds of developers conferences worldwide on the topics of software architecture, continuous delivery, functional programming, cutting-edge software innovations. Check out his website at Nealford.com. He welcomes feedback and can be reached at nford@thoughtworks.com.

Presentations

Closing remarks Keynote

Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis and Neal Ford close the first day of keynotes.

Closing remarks Keynote

Program chairs Neal Ford and Rachel Roumeliotis close the last day of keynotes.

Friday opening remarks Keynote

Program chairs Neal Ford and Rachel Roumeliotis open the second day of keynotes.

Thursday opening remarks Keynote

Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis and Neal Ford open the first day of keynotes.

Thomas Gamble is a technical principal at ThoughtWorks. Tom has worked in a variety of development and management roles. He’s currently enjoying contributing to open source and helping teams to deliver quality software more efficiently (while having fun).

Presentations

Study the past if you would define the future: How Gang of Four patterns are more relevant than ever with microservice architecture Session

Everyone is familiar with microservice buzzwords, but the fundamentals of design are just as important and relevant as ever. Thomas Gamble and Hari Ramamurthy cover the recommended patterns associated with implementing or migrating to microservices and align them with the well-documented and familiar design patterns from the Gang of Four.

Tudor Gîrba is a software environmentalist and the founder of feenk gmbh, a consulting and coaching company. Tudor leads the work on the Moose platform for software and data analysis and founded the Glamorous Toolkit project for rethinking the IDE. He believes that software assessment must be recognized as a critical software engineering activity, and he authored the humane assessment method to help teams to rethink the way they manage large software systems and datasets. Tudor also argues that storytelling should be prominent in software development. He is a board member of the Pharo live programming environment. In 2014, he won the prestigious Dahl-Nygaard Junior Prize for his work on the modeling and visualization of evolution and interplay of large numbers of objects. Tudor holds a PhD from the University of Bern.

Presentations

Steering Agile architecture Tutorial

"Emerge your architecture" goes the Agile mantra. That’s great. Developers get empowered, and fluffy papers make room for real code structure. But how do you ensure the cohesiveness of the result? Tudor Girba explains why architecture cannot be controlled (because it is a commons) and introduces an Agile yet systematic approach for how it can be steered.

Storytelling in a technical world 90-minute session

Our technical world is governed by facts, and too often this makes us forget that the goal of our job is to produce value, not fulfill specifications. So how do you keep track of value? Tell a story. Better yet, make your system tell that story. Tudor Gîrba explains the importance of storytelling in a technical context and how this skill can significantly impact the shape of the system.

Sasha Goldshtein is the CTO of Sela Group, a Microsoft C# MVP and Azure MRS, a Pluralsight author, and an international consultant and trainer. Sasha’s consulting work revolves mainly around distributed architecture, production debugging, and mobile application development. Sasha is the author of Introducing Windows 7 for Developers (Microsoft Press) and Pro .NET Performance (Apress). He is also a prolific blogger and the author of numerous training courses, including .NET Debugging, .NET Performance, Android Application Development, and Modern C++.

Presentations

Pen testing 101 Session

There are many kinds of attackers potentially looking at your system, from script kiddies with no particular target to dedicated criminals that are specifically trying to exploit your organization. Sasha Goldshtein offers an overview of the fundamentals you need for hacking your own system to secure it from external attacks.

Daniel Grund is a software architect and coach/trainer for junior architects at evosoft GmbH, a subsidiary of Siemens. Daniel is a certified Microsoft enterprise application developer and software architect. Previously, he worked as a consultant on small, colocated teams and for large, distributed projects for several companies, where he was responsible for software development and software architecture and gained experience in traditional approaches to development as well as mixed and pure Agile setups.

Presentations

Architects in an Agile world 90-minute session

Doing software architecture in an Agile environment imposes several requirements and challenges on the architect, the process of creating and managing the software architecture, and the chosen architectural styles. Drawing on his real-world experience, Daniel Grund shares best practices regarding team collaboration, development process setup, and how to adopt to constant change.

Adron Hall is a principal engineer and systems architect consultant. Adron runs the gamut of dev stacks from Ruby on Rails, Golang, Node.js and .NET, but a favorite of his these days is Go combined with a growing admiration for the chaos of JavaScript. As a software architect, engineer, code monkey, or coder (depending on your preference of wording), Adron is fluent in test-driven and behavior-driven development and passionate about DevOps. In his free time, he is involved with hackathons, user groups, and other tech community events.

Presentations

Building immutably to continuous delivery with minimal inputs Tutorial

Adron Hall demonstrates how to build a continuously delivered pipeline using Node.js (however the lessons are easily transferable to Ruby, Rails, Java, Scala, .NET, etc.). Adron walks you through the steps from inception to deployed application (with a domain pointed appropriately and all), which can then be developed against to continue the intent of the developer.

Moving enterprise practices and development to open source Session

Moving software development in the enterprise into open source has huge benefits but also comes with huge hurdles to overcome. Adron Hall explores the trials and efforts undertaken to move much of the code at Home Depot to open source practices and models. Getting there is still in process, but the advantages have already begun.

Ben Hall is the founder of Ocelot Uproar, a company focused on building products loved by users. Ben has worked as a system administrator, tester, and software developer and launched several companies. He still finds the time to publish books and speak at conferences. Ben enjoys looking for the next challenges to solve, usually over an occasional beer. Ben recently launched Katacoda, an online learning environment for developers that helps break down the barriers to learning new technologies such as Docker and containers.

Presentations

Understanding Docker security and performance Tutorial

Docker offers many advantages, simplifying both development and production environments. But there is still uncertainty around the security and performance of containers. In a hands-on tutorial, Ben Hall shares his experiences and investigates the security and performance of containers.

Rob Harrop is CEO at Skipjaq, where he leads a team working on the cutting edge of machine-driven performance optimization. When he’s not thinking about how best to tune the myriad workloads encountered by Skipjaq customers, he’s thinking hard about how to pass the optimization burden on to machines that learn. Rob is well known as a cofounder of SpringSource, the software company behind the wildly successful Spring Framework. At SpringSource, he was a core contributor to the Spring Framework and led the team that built dm Server (now Eclipse Virgo). Prior to SpringSource, Rob was (at the age of 19) cofounder and CTO at Cake Solutions, a boutique consultancy in Manchester, UK. A respected author, speaker, and teacher, Rob writes and talks frequently about large-scale systems, cloud architecture, and functional programming. His published works include the highly popular Spring Framework reference Pro Spring.

Presentations

Am I only streaming? Thinking reactive Keynote

The reactive model is an evolution of the CSP and actor models that switches the focus to data flows and transformations on those data flows. Rob Harrop explores how to exploit this architectural similarity and how to use the concepts of CSP, actors, and reactive as powerful tools for reasoning about your system.

Rob Harrop is CEO at Skipjaq, where he leads a team working on the cutting edge of machine-driven performance optimization. When he’s not thinking about how best to tune the myriad workloads encountered by Skipjaq customers, he’s thinking hard about how to pass the optimization burden on to machines that learn. Rob is well known as a cofounder of SpringSource, the software company behind the wildly successful Spring Framework. At SpringSource, he was a core contributor to the Spring Framework and led the team that built dm Server (now Eclipse Virgo). Prior to SpringSource, Rob was (at the age of 19) cofounder and CTO at Cake Solutions, a boutique consultancy in Manchester, UK. A respected author, speaker, and teacher, Rob writes and talks frequently about large-scale systems, cloud architecture, and functional programming. His published works include the highly popular Spring Framework reference Pro Spring.

Presentations

Optimizing for microservices Session

Optimizing microservices means optimizing distributed systems. We can't ignore latency, reliability, and bandwidth just because we've wrapped our distributed systems up in fancy terminology. Rob Harrop explains how to extend optimizations from single-service to multiservice architectures with ease.

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer, and trainer interested in patterns, programming, practice, and process. Kevlin has been a columnist for various magazines and websites and was an associate editor of IEEE Software. He is coauthor of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and On Patterns and Pattern Languages, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series. He is also editor of 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know.

Presentations

The architecture of uncertainty Keynote

Much project management thinking is based on the elimination of uncertainty, and advice on software architecture and guidance for future-proofing code often revolves around adding complexity to embrace uncertainty. Kevlin Henney explains how uncertainty, lack of knowledge, and options can be used to drive both a system's architecture and its development schedule.

Rotem Hermon is vice president of architecture at Gigya. He has been building and designing backend systems for a long time.

Presentations

Actors, evolved Session

Rotem Hermon introduces the concept of “virtual actors”—a new abstraction on top of the actor model that is designed to be cloud native and aims to accelerate the development of distributed applications. Rotem covers the classic actor model, why virtual actors make distributed application programming a lot simpler, and which open source implementations are available for .NET and Java.

Kevin Hoffman is a lead engineer for the commercial digital innovation catalyst team at Capital One. Kevin started working on .NET back before the first betas and has spent a good portion of his career building just about every type of .NET application, from Windows Phone to ASP.NET and WPF. He’s written over a dozen books on .NET, covering everything from language fundamentals to websites to ecommerce, and spent the last several years working with open source tools and languages and building microservices and cloud-native architectures in Java, Scala, and Go. Kevin has recently written books on microservice development in Go and ASP.NET Core.

Presentations

Building microservices with ASP.NET Core Session

Kevin Hoffman and Chris Umbel explain how to build microservices with the new cross-platform, open source ASP.NET Core. You'll learn to build cloud-native services that scale horizontally and can handle massive throughput and use tools like Wercker and Docker for continuous integration and continuous delivery in the cloud.

Emma Jane Hogbin Westby leads the operations team for shared digital services at the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). She is the author of O’Reilly’s Git for Teams and two books on web development.

Presentations

Starting an ops team Session

The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) supports humanitarian efforts around the world. Emma Jane Hogbin Westby explains how it turned those lessons inward to coordinate its shared-services platform.

Allen Holub is one of the country’s foremost software architects. Allen speaks internationally about all things Agile and software architecture and provides in-house training and consulting in those areas. He’s also an expert-level programmer, specializing in Swift, Java, and Web 2.0 applications and microservices. Allen can build highly dynamic websites (along the lines of Gmail) from front to back: both the frontend code—JavaScript, JQuery, Angular, HTML5, and CSS3—that runs in the browser and the backend code—Java, PHP, MySQL, Ruby, Mongo, C++, ZeroMQ, and EC2—that runs either on your server or in the cloud. Allen is widely published. His works include 10 books, hundreds of articles in publications ranging from Dr. Dobb’s Journal to IBM developerWorks, and video classes for Pluralsight (Swift in Depth) and O’Reilly (Design Patterns in the Real World).

Presentations

Designing for volatility Training

You can implement an Agile process perfectly, but if you don't have an architecture that handles the stress of changing requirements, you will fail. Traditional, monolithic n-tier systems, including service-oriented architectures, just don't cut it. Allen Holub offers a two-day hands-on deep dive into designing and architecting systems that are robust in the face of change.

Lightweight messaging and interservice communication with ZeroMQ 90-minute session

Messaging systems are at the core of effective microservice systems, forming the basic interservice communication backbone. Allen Holub introduces messaging in general and provides a practical introduction to ZeroMQ—the best of the lightweight messaging libraries.

Hans-Jürgen Jacobs is an IT architect at Xebia, an international IT consultancy company based in the Netherlands, where he works with IT organizations to improve their architecting and software delivery capabilities.

Presentations

How to make them get it: On communicating architecture to business stakeholders Tutorial

Jochem Schulenklopper and Hans-Jürgen Jacobs present relevant theories, techniques, and examples for creating architecture visualizations that are attractive, informative, and easier to understand for nontechnical audiences before walking you through applying them, using to a prepared case, in an interactive small group workshop.

Caroline Jarrett is a forms specialist. She helps organizations make their forms easier to fill in and cut the costs of business processes that include forms. Caroline has been a project manager in recovery since 1994.

Presentations

Interfaces include people Session

Interfaces have always been areas of peril in software development. Caroline Jarrett challenges teams to include interfaces with people, and maybe even with paper, in their notions of where development begins and ends. If you deliver software that has to be used by real people, Caroline will help you distinguish between software that is “deployed” and actually “delivered.”

Asko Kauppi is an agility coach at Zalando, where he helps pump up a site that promises radical agility and full team autonomy to its developers. Asko has four years’ experience in Scala, 20 years’ with C++, and a few years’ with assembly and electronics. In his free time, Asko enjoys kayaking and hiking in the wilderness. He’s worried about the loss of biodiversity caused by our civilization’s demand for efficiency and monocultures.

Presentations

Data-first at Zalando Session

Asko Kauppi shares what a prototype project discovered about the benefits of truly embracing data streaming and the value of seeing it from the “outside in” (the customer-facing application’s point of view). Using a live demo, Asko covers techniques such as data as code, killing configuration, and providing the minimum appropriate dataset to a subscriber.

David King has been involved in high-tech entrepreneurship since the early 1990s. He has over 15 years’ experience in all aspects of software development, from system architecture to large-scale database design to the psychology of user interfaces and management of Agile development teams. Dave helped to pioneer paperless manufacturing information systems in the electronics industry, then focused on designing extensible software systems for ad hoc visualization and analysis of large-scale multidimensional datasets. In 2011, Dave saw the need for a more modular and cross-disciplinary approach to data science and founded Exaptive, Inc. in order to pursue ways that technology and community can be combined to facilitate innovation. In 2015, his company was named as one of five Cool New Vendors in the life sciences by Gartner and an Innovator of Year by the Journal Record and in 2016 was selected by the Bloor Group as one of the top 10 companies and technologies to watch. Dave holds a BS from MIT in electrical engineering and computer science.

Presentations

Making code take flight: Finding the right abstractions Session

Every developer relishes the prospect that his or her code could have a life of its own, of it getting used by someone else or producing delightful but unexpected results. But getting one use case right so often seems to necessitate letting all others go. Dave King unpacks this abstraction problem, argues its importance in an open source ethos, and describes the exciting way to beat it.

Jakub Korab is a independent consultant specializing in open source messaging and integration, working exclusively with a suite of tools from the Apache Software Foundation, of which Apache ActiveMQ and Kafka are corner stones. His experience ranges from architecture to troubleshooting systems and spans a broad range of industries including investment banking, law enforcement, logistics, and space exploration. Jakub is also a coauthor of the Apache Camel Developer’s Cookbook.

Presentations

The myth of the magical messaging fabric 90-minute session

“Messages will be processed once and only once, and in order.” Such statements show a deep misunderstanding of messaging, a technology that is at the core of so many of the systems we build. Jakub Korab outlines the rationale and mechanics of ActiveMQ and Kafka, explains how their guarantees and constraints impact your designs, and explores how to reason about similar systems in future.

Patrick Kua is the CTO of mobile bank N26, where he is building the engineering group that will change how retail banking works. Previously, Patrick was a principal technical consultant at ThoughtWorks in London. He is the author of three books: The Retrospective Handbook, Talking with Tech Leads, and most recently, Building Evolutionary Architectures. Patrick is a frequent conference speaker and blogger. He is passionate about bringing a balanced focus between people, organizations, and technology.

Presentations

High-performance teams Keynote

We often forget that software is built by people, and without considering how the people work together, architectural visions are wasted. Patrick Kua explores why and how architects should care about high-performance teams and looks at ways architects can influence them.

Introducing evolutionary architecture 90-minute session

How do you build systems that not only last but can easily be changed over time? Architectural choices made now may solve today's problems but may also constrain how you make changes to solve future, unknown problems. Patrick Kua demonstrates how architects can get the best of both worlds, solving today's problems and enabling future change through evolutionary architecture.

The well-rounded architect Session

Being a successful architect requires more than just a good understanding of architecture. Patrick Kua explores the breadth of skills and experience an architect should focus on and outlines the balance of traits that makes a well-rounded architect.

Rachel Laycock is a market technical principal at ThoughtWorks in New York, where she has played the role of coach, trainer, technical lead, architect, and developer, coaching teams on Agile and continuous delivery technical practices. She is now a member of the Technical Advisory Board to the CTO, which regularly produces the ThoughtWorks Technology Radar. Rachel has over 10 years of experience in systems development and has worked on a wide range of technologies and the integration of many disparate systems. She is fascinated by problem solving and has discovered that people problems are often more difficult to solve than software ones.

Presentations

Microservices: Pros and cons Keynote

Rachel and Cassie will present a debate in which they take opposing sides on whether to implement services in a “micro” fashion. In a knockdown style, our discussion will feature the zings and gotchas to each side of the argument. The debate will ultimately leave attendees with a better understanding of the things to consider and practices to follow to decide if microservices are for them.

Robert “r0ml” Lefkowitz is the chief architect for software at Warby Parker. Previously, Robert was a software architect in the insurance, telecommunications, and finance industries. He is also a distinguished engineer of the ACM.

Presentations

Man in the middle: Why three(+)-tier web architectures are insecure Session

Many web frameworks consist of an application server, which performs "business logic," connected to a database. By design, these servers connect to the database with full access rights, defeating most database-enforced security. Robert Lefkowitz demonstrates how a two-tier architecture with modern databases enhances information security.

James Lewis is a principal consultant at ThoughtWorks, where he has worked for nearly a decade. James is primarily interested in building distributed systems using web technologies and has been a keen observer (and participant) in the resurgence of interest in SOA. You can often find him being a loudmouth at conferences, usually on some aspect of building microservices. He’s also been known to offer opinions on lean software engineering, domain-driven design, organizational design, and innovation. . .and Welsh rugby.

Presentations

Training: Transitioning to microservices: Evolutionary approaches for building systems of systems Training Day 2

The accepted wisdom for 40 years has been to write programs that do one thing and do it well, yet we have spent the last decade building monolithic applications and communicating via bloated middleware, hoping that Moore’s law keeps helping us out. There's a better way: microservices. James Lewis explores a consistent and reinforcing set of tools and practices for transitioning to microserves.

Transitioning to microservices: Evolutionary approaches for building systems of systems Training

The accepted wisdom for 40 years has been to write programs that do one thing and do it well, yet we have spent the last decade building monolithic applications and communicating via bloated middleware, hoping that Moore’s law keeps helping us out. There's a better way: microservices. James Lewis explores a consistent and reinforcing set of tools and practices for transitioning to microserves.

Mark Little is a vice president of engineering at Red Hat, where he leads the technical direction, research, and development for Red Hat JBoss Middleware. Mark is also a professor at Newcastle University and Lyon University. Previously, Mark served as Red Hat’s SOA technical development manager and director of standards. Mark was also a chief architect and cofounder at Arjuna Technologies, a spin-off of HP, where he was a distinguished engineer. He has worked in the area of reliable distributed systems since the mid-’80s and holds a PhD in fault-tolerant distributed systems, replication, and transactions.

Presentations

Containers and containerless? Session

Immutable Linux containers and microservices appear to be at odds with application containers, which are typically associated with monolithic application servers. However, these containers provide help that is often taken for granted. Mark Little demonstrates how both types of containers can be used in a complementary manner.

Josh Long is the Spring Developer Advocate at Pivotal. Josh is a Java Champion, author of five books, including O’Reilly’s upcoming Cloud Native Java: Designing Resilient Systems with Spring Boot, Spring Cloud, and Cloud Foundry, creator of three best-selling video trainings, including Building Microservices with Spring Boot Livelessons (with Spring Boot cofounder Phil Webb), and an open source contributor to the Spring Boot, Spring Integration, Spring Cloud, Activiti, and Vaadin projects.

Presentations

Cloud-native Java Session

Speed of evolution is a differentiator, but velocity for velocity’s sake is dangerous. Microservices invite architectural complexity that few are prepared to address. Josh Long explores how high-performance organizations like Ticketmaster, Alibaba, and Netflix make short work of that complexity with Spring Boot and Spring Cloud.

Kyle MacDonald is a respected speaker, advisor, and investor focusing on the development stack, open source, cloud, and container space. He is a strategic advisor to Iron.io and also serves as an advisor to other innovative companies including Red Hat, the New Stack, Big Switch Networks, RackN, and Cloudsoft. Previously Kyle was the VP and GM of cloud and server at Canonical/Ubuntu, where he was responsible for the strategy and execution of the Ubuntu Cloud and Ubuntu Server business, a founding director of the OpenStack Foundation, the chief evangelist at Cloud.com, Inc., and the VP of corporate development and strategy at Hosting.com/Wachovia Capital Partners. Earlier in his career, Kyle held executive leadership positions at Sun Microsystems and AMD.

Presentations

Best practices for implementing serverless architecture Session

Modern applications are moving away from the traditional request/response loop to more event-driven patterns, including "serverless" architecture. Kyle MacDonald explains what this means—especially for the architects themselves—and discusses best practices to address the challenges of service-driven architectures head on when deploying in a serverless environment.

Jan Machacek is CTO at Cake Solutions, where he helps companies achieve exceptional growth and success through the use of modern computing technologies—specifically large-scale machine learning and big data systems, particularly those that interact with the IoT, wearables, mobile, and modern web applications. Jan is a passionate technologist with hands-on experience delivering large-scale systems, with a focus on those that bring together the data science and mathematics with modern engineering practices. He regularly contributes to open source projects and speaks at technical conferences.

Presentations

Microservices with Lagom Session

Jan Machacek offers an overview of the major components in an ML-connected fitness system built on Lightbend's Lagom microservices platform before diving into the most exciting aspects of the Lagom code, which ingests large number of sensor inputs and persists the data to a Cassandra cluster to train (convolutional) neural networks to recognize the details of exercise.

Ted Malaska is a group technical architect on the Battle.net team at Blizzard, helping support great titles like World of Warcraft, Overwatch, and HearthStone. Previously, Ted was a principal solutions architect at Cloudera, helping clients find success with the Hadoop ecosystem, and a lead architect at the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). He has also contributed code to Apache Flume, Apache Avro, Apache Yarn, Apache HDFS, Apache Spark, Apache Sqoop, and many more. Ted is a coauthor of Hadoop Application Architectures, a frequent speaker at many conferences, and a frequent blogger on data architectures.

Presentations

Top five architecture mistakes when moving to distributed execution engines Session

Distributed execution is like single-node execution, but everything is faster, right? Well, the reality is that distributed execution is complex; you must have a strong understanding of the architecture fundamentals to be successful. To help you out, Ted Malaska explores the five biggest architecture mistakes of moving to distributed computing.

If he ever grows up, Steve Marshall wants to be a mighty pirate. Until then, he has to make do with being a software architect at the Ministry of Justice. He’s worked on government services, travel APIs, sites for burgeoning rock bands, award-winning intranets, and a host of things between. When he’s not working or complaining on Twitter, Steve can be found listening to music, playing video games, taking more photos than he has time to process, or going very fast round corners in his car. One day, he might blog on his site again. One day.

Presentations

Don't touch the monolith; or, How lateral architecture design can satisfy your users Session

Booking visits with prisoners used to take hours on the phone, but now it takes minutes on GOV.UK despite the backend remaining unchanged. Steve Marshall shows how architectural choices can dramatically improve how users experience your service and how you can quickly iterate in an environment as resistant to change as the UK’s justice system.

Lorna Mitchell is a Leeds-based developer advocate with IBM Cloud Data Services. She brings her technical expertise on a range of topics to audiences all over the world with her writing and speaking engagements, always delivered with a very practical slant. Lorna is the author of PHP Web Services (O’Reilly), PHP Master (Sitepoint), and Git Workbook (Leanpub) and is regularly published at a number of outlets, including net magazine and her blog, Lornajane.net.

Presentations

The docs-first approach to API development Session

Build and ship the docs before you write a line of code. Lorna Mitchell explains why you should create and sign off on the complete documentation before development of an API even begins. Developers and architects alike will benefit from case studies outlining how this approach enabled very fast turnaround and shipping of APIs in the real world.

As the director of design at CA Technologies’s API Academy, Ronnie Mitra is on a mission to help everyone design better distributed applications. Ronnie has over 20 years of experience developing network-based applications and is a recognized expert on API design, security, and architecture. He is a coauthor of the recently published Microservice Architecture​.

Presentations

Finding the right size: Establishing boundaries in microservices and software architecture Session

Software architecture can be primarily defined by the location and size of its boundaries. Ronnie Mitra discusses the nature of size and boundaries, with a special emphasis on the microservices architectural style, and explores the impact that size limits have on modern software development. Ronnie also provides guidance and strategies for establishing effective boundaries in your architecture.

Kief Morris is cloud practice lead at ThoughtWorks and the author of the upcoming O’Reilly book Infrastructure as Code. Kief works with organizations to understand how to take advantage of the cloud, infrastructure automation, DevOps, and continuous delivery to become more effective at delivering IT services. Originally from Tennessee, Kief has been based in London since the dot-com days.

Presentations

Designing infrastructure like microservices Session

Kief Morris explores some examples of implementing infrastructure capabilities using a microservice philosophy. Kief covers structuring infrastructure and environments using automated platforms and tooling such as cloud and infrastructure as code; organizational aspects, such as the DevOps team question; and aligning ownership of platforms and applications between different teams.

Bryan Moyles is a software engineer at Google with plenty of experience in the beautiful ups of what works and the downs of what doesn’t. Bryan leads a local meetup group to share what he’s learned along his journey and learn some clever bits of wisdom himself from those in the community. Bryan enjoys spending Sunday sessions at his local Starbucks coding and researching, and when he can, he visits his family all over the world. He recently won the FTC’s Humanity Strikes Back competition after developing RoboKiller, an algorithm that could detect and destroy robocalls.

Presentations

How microservices communicate Session

Bryan Moyles explores some of the approaches he considered when building an internal, open source microservice ecosystem, covering a few areas where the differences between direct and queue-based microservices really shine, including horizontal scalability, latency, availability, and loose coupling. You'll leave better equipped to decide what approach will work best within your infrastructure.

Gary O’Connor is the CTO at Doddle, where he is focused on building event-driven microservice architectures in cloud environments. Gary has over a decade’s experience in senior technology roles at IBM, Betfair, and the BBC, where he built and operated microservices in environments ranging from enterprise to startups. Gary is currently scaling a microservice-based SaaS platform for a pioneering UK-based click-and-collect business.

Presentations

Serverless services in action Session

Isolation and autonomy are key design goals when evolving to a microservice architecture. However, these ambitions often come with a number of challenges and costs. Kingsley Davies and Gary O'Connor discuss some of the key benefits and challenges in targeting serverless deployments and offer suggestions on making your service architecture fit for purpose.

Danilo Poccia is a technical evangelist at Amazon Web Services, where he leverages his 20 years of experience to support innovation and to help startups and companies bring their ideas to life. Danilo focuses on event-driven programming and serverless architectures as well as the technical and business impact of mobile platforms and data analytics. Prior to joining AWS, he worked at Sun Microsystems and Oracle. Some of his interests include IT, simulation and modeling, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and photography.

Presentations

Building event-driven serverless applications Session

We've built event-driven user interfaces for decades. What about bringing the same approach to mobile, web, and IoT backend applications? Danilo Poccia explains why, in order to do so, you must understand how data flows and the propagation of changes, as he walks you through using AWS services and reactive programming techniques to build a serverless environment.

Simon Poulton is the continuous delivery evangelist at CA Technologies, where he leads the continuous delivery and digital transformation conversation with CA’s customers across Europe. In the last few years, he has led several large continuous delivery and DevOps initiatives with CA’s European enterprise clients. Simon is a technology professional with over 15 years’ experience in IT and technology and has worked for end users, integrators, and vendors on a diverse array of projects in Europe, Asia Pacific, the Middle East, and Africa. For the last 10 years, he has held senior technical and technical sales posts at several integrators and vendors, where he specialized in taking transformational and innovative platforms into business in areas such as virtualization, the cloud, DevOps, and continuous delivery.

Presentations

Microservices migration strategies Session

How does an enterprise with complex architecture across legacy and state-of-the-art runtimes manage its microservices migration? Simon Poulton explores some of the challenges created by this type of migration and explains how to leverage continuous delivery tools to mitigate risk and provide a high-capacity framework for change.

Aditya Punjani is a Software Engineer (Web) at Facebook, where he works on building high-performance experiences. Previously Aditya was the Tech Lead of Flipkart Lite, the world’s first major Progressive Web App. Aditya likes to push the Web forward and is passionate about JavaScript, network and rendering performance, developer tooling, browser internals, and user experience.

Presentations

Offline-first mobile web apps Session

Aditya Punjani explores the architectural decisions, technologies, and the modern web stack behind Flipkart Lite, one of the first cross-platform progressive web apps. Learn how Aditya's team devised an offline-first, app shell architecture while solving for high performance and SEO with a client-side JavaScript web app.

Hari Ramamurthy is an enterprise architect at The Home Depot with hands-on technical expertise and deep functional knowledge related to omnichannel retailing and third-party logistics operations. Hari has designed and implemented solutions specializing in distributed order management, warehouse management systems, call centers, store order management applications, in-store location tracking, and marketing solutions. He’s led over 10 complex implementations for name-brand Fortune 500 companies across multiple geographies. Hari specializes in designing scalable systems that leverage emerging technologies and performance tuning applications. He’s an Open Group-certified Distinguished IT Specialist.

Presentations

Study the past if you would define the future: How Gang of Four patterns are more relevant than ever with microservice architecture Session

Everyone is familiar with microservice buzzwords, but the fundamentals of design are just as important and relevant as ever. Thomas Gamble and Hari Ramamurthy cover the recommended patterns associated with implementing or migrating to microservices and align them with the well-documented and familiar design patterns from the Gang of Four.

M.-Leander Reimer is a chief technologist for QAware GmbH. A senior Java developer with several years of experience designing complex and large-scale system architectures, he is continuously looking for innovative ways to combine and apply state-of-the-art technology and open source software components in real-world customer projects. As a member of the JCP, he wants to improve Java technology and develop usable technical specifications. He studied computer science at Rosenheim and Staffordshire University.

Presentations

Secure architecture and programming 101 Session

Security is often neglected or even forgotten during the construction and implementation of software systems, but if things go wrong, the reputation and business of your customers—as well as your own—might be at stake. Security needs to be considered from day one. Mario-Leander Reimer shares a set of simple rules, tools, and patterns to make security a first-class citizen.

Mark Richards is an experienced, hands-on software architect focused on the architecture, design, and implementation of microservices architectures, service-oriented architectures, and distributed systems in J2EE and other technologies. He has been involved in the software industry since 1983 and has significant experience and expertise in application, integration, and enterprise architecture. Mark served as the president of the New England Java Users Group from 1999 to 2003. He is the author of numerous technical books and videos from O’Reilly, including Software Architecture Fundamentals (video), Enterprise Messaging (video), and Java Message Service (book), and a regular conference speaker at the No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) symposium series. Mark has spoken at over 100 conferences and user groups around the world on a variety of enterprise-related technical topics. He holds a master’s degree in computer science as well as numerous architect and developer certifications from IBM, Sun, the Open Group, and BEA.

Presentations

Fundamentals of software architecture Training

Being a software architect involves more than just drawing boxes and lines. It requires thinking like an architect, being a leader, and understanding the elements, patterns, and styles necessary to create effective software architectures. In a 2-day training course blending lecture and hands-on real-world group exercises, Mark Richards explores the many aspects of software architecture.

The evolution of software architecture Keynote

Mark Richards discusses the social, economic, and technology factors that have enabled the evolution of software architecture over the past three decades and explores what the future of software architecture might look like.

Training: Fundamentals of software architecture Training Day 2

Being a software architect involves more than just drawing boxes and lines. It requires thinking like an architect, being a leader, and understanding the elements, patterns, and styles necessary to create effective software architectures. In a 2-day training course blending lecture and hands-on real-world group exercises, Mark Richards explores the many aspects of software architecture.

Christian Rolf is a developer on Bitbucket focusing on how to predict, measure, and optimize the performance of cloud and BTF services. Previously, he worked on big data streams, optimizing system architecture for large throughput and spiky lookup load. Christian is unusually friendly for a Swede with a PhD in parallel and distributed systems.

Presentations

Shipping scalability behind the firewall Session

Want to ship scalable systems without wasting dozens of iterations? Atlassian ships behind-the-firewall (BTF) enterprise systems that scale out of the box. Christian Rolf explains how Atlassian uses data flow models to predict system behavior for installations far larger than it can feasibly test. All it takes is a pen, paper, and a touch of math.

Rachel Roumeliotis is a strategic content director at O’Reilly Media, where she leads an editorial team that covers a wide variety of programming topics ranging from full stack to open source in the enterprise to emerging programming languages. Rachel is a programming chair of OSCON and O’Reilly’s Software Architecture Conference. She has been working in technical publishing for 10 years, acquiring content in many areas including mobile programming, UX, computer security, and AI.

Presentations

Closing remarks Keynote

Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis and Neal Ford close the first day of keynotes.

Closing remarks Keynote

Program chairs Neal Ford and Rachel Roumeliotis close the last day of keynotes.

Friday opening remarks Keynote

Program chairs Neal Ford and Rachel Roumeliotis open the second day of keynotes.

Thursday opening remarks Keynote

Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis and Neal Ford open the first day of keynotes.

Kaz Sato is a staff developer advocate on the Cloud Platform team at Google, where he leads the developer advocacy team for machine-learning and data analytics products such as TensorFlow, the Vision API, and BigQuery. Kaz has been leading and supporting developer communities for Google Cloud for over seven years, is a frequent speaker at conferences, including Google I/O 2016, Hadoop Summit 2016 San Jose, Strata + Hadoop World 2016, and Google Next 2015 NYC and Tel Aviv, and has hosted FPGA meetups since 2013.

Presentations

Machine intelligence at Google scale Session

The largest challenge for deep learning is scalability. Google has built a large-scale neural network in the cloud and is now sharing the power. Kazunori Sato introduces pretrained ML services, such as the Cloud Vision API and the Speech API, and explores how TensorFlow and Cloud Machine Learning can accelerate custom model training 10x–40x with Google's distributed training infrastructure.

Jochem Schulenklopper is a Netherlands-based IT architect at Xebia, an international IT consultancy company.

Presentations

How to make them get it: On communicating architecture to business stakeholders Tutorial

Jochem Schulenklopper and Hans-Jürgen Jacobs present relevant theories, techniques, and examples for creating architecture visualizations that are attractive, informative, and easier to understand for nontechnical audiences before walking you through applying them, using to a prepared case, in an interactive small group workshop.

Cassandra Shum is a lead consultant with ThoughtWorks, where she primarily leads and works on a variety of mobile projects and technologies, including domain-driven design and microservices. Over the last six years, she has worked on many different web and mobile applications. Cassandra is one of the leaders in the initiative to organize the women’s group in ThoughtWorks and is involved in promoting more female speakers in technology.

Presentations

Microservices: Pros and cons Keynote

Rachel and Cassie will present a debate in which they take opposing sides on whether to implement services in a “micro” fashion. In a knockdown style, our discussion will feature the zings and gotchas to each side of the argument. The debate will ultimately leave attendees with a better understanding of the things to consider and practices to follow to decide if microservices are for them.

Matt Stine is the global CTO for architecture at Pivotal, where he spends much of his time helping customers develop cloud-native application architectures. Matt is a 17-year veteran of the enterprise IT industry, eight of them spent as consulting solutions architect for multiple Fortune 500 companies and the not-for-profit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. He is the author of Migrating to Cloud-Native Application Architectures (O’Reilly) and the host of the Software Architecture Radio podcast. Matt is obsessed with the idea that enterprise IT doesn’t have to suck. He focuses on Lean/Agile software development methodologies, DevOps, architectural principles, patterns, and practices, and programming paradigms in an attempt to find the perfect storm of techniques that will allow corporate IT departments to function like startup companies and create software that delights users while maintaining a high degree of conceptual integrity. Matt has spoken at conferences ranging from JavaOne to OSCON to YOW!, is a seven-year member of the No Fluff Just Stuff tour, and serves as technical editor of NFJS the Magazine. Matt is also the founder and past president of the Memphis Java User Group.

Presentations

Delivering cloud-native architectures with Spring Cloud and Cloud Foundry Tutorial

Cloud-native architectures enable an idea formed in the morning to be delivered to production in the evening. These distributed systems composed from microservices employ cloud-native frameworks and platforms, allowing you to focus on the code that makes your business different. Matt Stine leads an overview of Cloud Foundry and Spring Cloud and offers practical exercises to get you started.

Reactive fault-tolerant programing with Hystrix and RxJava 90-minute session

Matt Stine explains how to build microservices architectures that are responsive and resilient by applying reactive programming techniques and fault-tolerance patterns, including circuit breakers and bulkheads. Matt then walks you through leveraging Hystrix and RxJava, two popular libraries from Netflix, to implement these patterns.

Martin Thompson is a Java Champion with over two decades of experience building complex and high-performance computing systems. He is most recently known for his work on Aeron and SBE. Previously, he was the cofounder and CTO at LMAX, where he created the Disruptor. Prior to LMAX, Martin worked for Betfair and three different content companies wrestling with the world largest product catalogues and was a lead on some of the most significant C++ and Java systems of the 1990s in the automotive and finance domains. Martin blogs at Mechanical Sympathy and can be found giving training courses on performance and concurrency when he is not cutting code to make systems better.

Presentations

Listening to the design pressures Keynote

Martin Thompson explores the architectures that emerge from applying design patterns required for high performance, resilience, security, usability, and other quality-of-services measures that when not achieved result in total project failure. Martin outlines emergent designs and working practices that succeed in these areas where the design pressures quickly cull that which does not deliver.

Steve Touw is co-founder and CTO of Immuta, a unified data management platform that allows organizations to accelerate innovation with confidence. Steve has a long history of designing large-scale geo-temporal analytics across the US Intelligence community, to include some of their very first Hadoop analytics as well as frameworks to manage complex multi-tenant data policy controls. This experience drove he and his co-founders at Immuta to build a software product that frees data science teams to access and work with high-value data. Prior to Immuta, Steve was the CTO of 42six Solutions where he led a large big data services engineering team which was acquired by Computer Sciences Corporation. Prior to 42six Steve led an advanced analytics team for US Special Operations Command, that company, SPADAC, was later acquired by GeoEye and eventually DigitalGlobe. Steve holds a BS in Geography from the University of Maryland.

Presentations

EU data protection regulation: Architectural design for legal analytics Session

The global populace is asking for the IT industry to be held responsible for the safe-guarding of individual data. If the cat is out of the bag and collection will not stop, then the next logical question is how do we protect the privacy of individuals? Steven Touw examines how to design your data and analytics architecture to keep your data science teams delivering results legally.

Alexis Tual works at JFrog, the creators of Artifactory binary repository, Bintray, Xray and Mission Control. Alexis has a strong Java (and Groovy!) web developer background, but in the past few years he has dedicated his time to CI/CD and automation. Now, he leads the dev effort on Mission Control.

Presentations

From ACID to CAP and back again: Making S3 reliable Session

Alexis Tual discusses JFrog's journey to find harmony between ACID and CAP, reviewing the challenges in building a reliable and atomic system on top of eventually consistent storage and explaining how JFrog solved them in Artifactory for both standalone and clustered active-active architectures.

Visar Ulaj is a creator driven by his passion for creating digital solutions that effectively communicate a clear message and offer an effective experience. Visar draws inspiration from the meaning and wholeness of the solution, where vision, process, experience, and technology together create value.

Presentations

Modular UI design for a microservices world Session

Microservices are widely adopted to ensure modularity, but so far they have mainly been a solution for the backend of applications. Marcus Ahnve and Visar Ulaj describe an approach for designing and implementing a frontend that matches the flexibility of the backend.

Chris Umbel can usually be found traveling North America helping to make Pivotal’s customers successful in whatever phase of their cloud-native journey they are in—focusing not only on software problems but also people and process problems. Chris has been developing software professionally since 1999, when he started with a small but ambitious custom software shop, where he worked on everything from embedded systems to database administration to frontend web work. Searching for bigger problems, he moved on to solving distributed systems problems in the video production and ecommerce industries, gaining experience in natural language information retrieval problems along the way. One of Chris’s recent open source contributions was founding the “natural” general-purpose natural language facility for Node.js.

Presentations

Building microservices with ASP.NET Core Session

Kevin Hoffman and Chris Umbel explain how to build microservices with the new cross-platform, open source ASP.NET Core. You'll learn to build cloud-native services that scale horizontally and can handle massive throughput and use tools like Wercker and Docker for continuous integration and continuous delivery in the cloud.

Daniël van Gils is a polyglot developer advocate at Cloud 66, where he helps other polyglot developers craft Ruby (on Rails) web applications and container-based microservice architectures. An accomplished creative technologist, Daniel has vast and varied experience in application development, Agile workflows, and building container technologies at scale gained working in the web development, creative technologies, and the gaming industry. In his spare time, Daniël experiments with strawberries in his backyard, likes to surf, and practices Improvisational theater.

Presentations

Creating the "right" minimal lovable image and running it in production Tutorial

You want to take that brilliantly containerized crafted application into production, but are your images production ready. . .and will it scale? Daniël van Gils explains how to create the "right" minimal lovable image and succeed with running containers in production in tight collaboration between your team, the devs, and ops.

Kai Waehner is a technology evangelist at Confluent. Kai’s areas of expertise include big data analytics, machine learning, deep learning, messaging, integration, microservices, the internet of things, stream processing, and the blockchain. He is regular speaker at international conferences such as JavaOne, O’Reilly Software Architecture, and ApacheCon and has written a number of articles for professional journals. Kai also shares his experiences with new technologies on his blog.

Presentations

How to apply big data analytics and machine learning to real-time processing of microservice events 90-minute session

With the growth of mobile, the cloud, and the Internet of Things, the world is becoming more connected every year. Big data frameworks leverage machine-learning frameworks such as R, Apache Spark, or H2O to find patterns. Kai Wähner explores "fast data" frameworks, which embed these patterns into real-time processing, and explains how they are strongly related to microservices.

Log analytics and operational intelligence for distributed microservices Session

IT applications and microservices generate terabytes of distributed log data from mobile devices, the Internet of Things, and social networks. Kai Wähner compares open source frameworks and SaaS cloud solutions for operational intelligence and log analytics, explains how these differ from big data stores such as Hadoop, and offers a live demo demonstrating how to analyze distributed microservices.

Marcel Weiher is the chief Objective-C curmudgeon at Microsoft, where he is working on Wunderlist. Marcel learned to program on an Apple II and a PDP-11 and implemented an Objective-C preprocessor and runtime on an Amiga while still in high school. His first job was at NeXT, where he worked in prepress and color science. Marcel later joined the BBC for backend web development before being poached by Apple for their Mac OS X Performance team. He was also the lead for the award-winning Livescribe Mac Desktop.

Presentations

In-process REST Session

REST is the architectural style of the Web and probably the most successful distributed architecture in history. Marcel Weiher explains how, with slight modifications, it is also highly useful for nondistributed applications and simple, high-performance storage architectures on both client and server.

Reactive GUI application architecture with dataflow constraints Session

One reason UI programming remains hard is that the architecture of GUI applications is fundamentally mismatched with the technology we use to implement these applications. Dataflow constraints can be used to get around this mismatch. Marcel Weiher explains how dataflow constraints were successfully used in implementing the Wunderlist Objective-C clients as reactive applications.

Sarah Wells is a principal engineer at the Financial Times currently working on building a semantic publishing platform making it easy to discover and access all the FT’s published content via APIs in a common and flexible format. Sarah has been a developer for 15 years, working across consultancy, financial services, and media.

Presentations

Alert overload: How to adopt a microservices architecture without being overwhelmed with noise Session

You’ve heard all about what microservices can do for you. You’re convinced, so you build some. Reasoning about your functionality is way easier: these services are so simple! But then you get to the point where you have 35 microservices, and all the monitoring and alerting tactics you used for your monoliths are a complete disaster. Something needs to change—Sarah Wells explains what and how.

Phil Wills was lead software architect for the Guardian until he and the company decided that they didn’t need a separate architecture role any more. Phil has previously spoken on a wide range of topics including microservices, Apache Spark, continuous delivery, Scala, and domain-driven design.

Presentations

The end of architecture Session

Last year, after successfully reshaping how the Guardian's software was developed around microservices, continuous delivery, and AWS, the Guardian's software architecture team decided to disband. Phil Wills shares this experience, explaining how to lead by example, not command, the conditions that lead to empowered teams, and why an architecture team should be viewed as a crutch.

Eoin Woods is the CTO at European IT services company Endava, as well as an author, a conference speaker, and an active member of the London software engineering community. Eoin’s main technical interests are software architecture, distributed systems, and computer security.

Presentations

Models, sketches, and everything in between 90-minute session

The word "modeling" brings back memories of analysis paralysis for many software developers, and countless software teams have just decided to stop doing it. In extreme cases, this has led to systems that are the stereotypical “big ball of mud." Eoin Woods and Simon Brown share some practical advice on how how a little well-chosen modeling can help avoid chaos.

Using architecture principles in practice Session

Architects have to balance providing clear guidance for important decisions with the need to let people get on and build their aspects of the system without interference. Eoin Woods explores how architecture principles can help achieve this by making constraints and priorities clear without being unnecessarily prescriptive about how they are to be implemented.