October 30–31, 2016: Training
October 31–November 2, 2016: Tutorials & Conference
New York, NY
 
Grand Ballroom West
9:00am The industrial age of website bots: How to detect and block automated attacks Ido Safruti (PerimeterX), Christopher Federico (PerimeterX)
1:30pm Applying Docker security Ben Hall (Katacoda | Ocelot Uproar)
Trianon Ballroom
9:00am Microservices and security Sam Newman (Independent)
1:30pm Applying threat modeling to building secure software Andrea Doherty (EMC Corporation), Danny Dhillon (EMC Corporation)
Rendezvous Trianon
9:00am Writing secure Node code Guy Podjarny (Snyk), Danny Grander (Snyk)
1:30pm Using Python to automate forensics Philip Polstra (Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania)
5:00pm Event Ignite Security (sponsored by GitHub) | Room: Rendezvous Trianon Andrew Kalat (Elavon), Jerry Bell (Stelesys)
Mercury Ballroom
9:00am Modern identity and access management for the Web Jim Manico (Manicode Security)
1:30pm Drilling into network data with Apache Drill Charles Givre (Deutsche Bank)
12:30pm Lunch | Room: Americas Hall 1
8:00am Morning Coffee Service | Room: 3rd Floor Promenade
10:30am Morning Break | Room: Trianon Foyer, 3rd Floor
3:00pm Afternoon Break | Room: Trianon Foyer, 3rd Floor
9:00am-12:30pm (3h 30m) Tools and processes
The industrial age of website bots: How to detect and block automated attacks
Ido Safruti (PerimeterX), Christopher Federico (PerimeterX)
Bots are a reality, and it’s hard to separate your users and good bots (e.g., search) from the bad ones (brute force, fraud, scrapers, etc.). Ido Safruti and Chris Federico review how bots work, explain how to operate a few common bots, and, most importantly, show what you can do to detect and block malicious activity while enabling your users and good bots to work uninterrupted.
1:30pm-5:00pm (3h 30m) Tools and processes
Applying Docker security
Ben Hall (Katacoda | Ocelot Uproar)
Docker offers a lot of advantages, simplifying both development and production environments, but there is still uncertainty around the security of containers. Ben Hall shares his experiences while leading a hands-on demonstration of Docker and container security.
9:00am-12:30pm (3h 30m) Tools and processes
Microservices and security
Sam Newman (Independent)
Security is everyone’s job, even if you’re not a specialist. Sam Newman shares a model that shows how developers can think about application security and play their part. From there, Sam explores the specific challenges in microservice architectures and explains how application security principles can be applied to these often much more complex application architectures.
1:30pm-5:00pm (3h 30m) Tools and processes
Applying threat modeling to building secure software
Andrea Doherty (EMC Corporation), Danny Dhillon (EMC Corporation)
Threat modeling is an essential element in building secure software that is resilient to attack. Yet threat modeling is often seen as too specialized and time consuming to include in the software development process. Andrea Doherty and Danny Dhillon walk you through a pragmatic approach to threat modeling that can be applied within your existing structured and Agile processes.
9:00am-12:30pm (3h 30m) Tools and processes
Writing secure Node code
Guy Podjarny (Snyk), Danny Grander (Snyk)
Some of the very things that make JavaScript awesome can also leave it exposed. Guy Podjarny and Danny Grander use (and abuse) a vulnerable Node.js application called Goof to demonstrate various common vulnerabilities and dependencies. For each item, Guy and Danny explain the issue, show an exploit on Goof, and, most importantly, demonstrate how to avoid or defend against it.
1:30pm-5:00pm (3h 30m) Tools and processes
Using Python to automate forensics
Philip Polstra (Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania)
Philip Polstra offers an overview of Python basics and demonstrates how to leverage this popular scripting language in order to automate many common tasks found in forensic investigations. You'll gain a deeper understanding of FAT and NTFS filesystems and see firsthand how to glean pertinent information from a filesystem image in minutes with Python.
5:00pm-6:30pm (1h 30m)
Ignite Security (sponsored by GitHub)
Andrew Kalat (Elavon), Jerry Bell (Stelesys)
If you had five minutes on stage, what would you say? What if you only got 20 slides and they rotated automatically after 15 seconds? Would you pitch a project? Launch a website? Teach a hack? We’ll find out again at this year's Ignite Security.
9:00am-12:30pm (3h 30m) Security in context (security datasci)
Modern identity and access management for the Web
Jim Manico (Manicode Security)
Modern identity and access management (IAM) on the Web is complex, putting a great burden on developers who have to integrate with modern authentication or access control layers. Jim Manico demystifies the relationship between modern protocols and frameworks such as OIDC, SAML, and OAuth that make up the core of modern web IAM.
1:30pm-5:00pm (3h 30m) Tools and processes
Drilling into network data with Apache Drill
Charles Givre (Deutsche Bank)
Drill is an open source, schema-free SQL engine that can query all kinds of data. Applying Drill to network security problems potentially offers a leap forward in network analysis. Charles Givre demonstrates how to use Drill to query simple data, complex data, and data from databases and big data sources and walks you through writing your own functions to extend Drill's functionality.
12:30pm-1:30pm (1h)
Break: Lunch
8:00am-9:00am (1h)
Break: Morning Coffee Service
10:30am-11:00am (30m)
Break: Morning Break
3:00pm-3:30pm (30m)
Break: Afternoon Break