Polyglot Persistence for Java Developers - Moving Out of the Relational Comfort Zone

Java: JVM
Location: A106
Average rating: ***..
(3.20, 5 ratings)

Relational databases have long been considered the one true way to persist enterprise data. But today, NoSQL databases are emerging as a viable alternative for many applications. They can simplify the persistence of complex data models and offer significantly better scalability, and performance. But using NoSQL databases is very different than the ACID/SQL/JDBC/JPA world that we have become accustomed to. They have different and unfamiliar APIs and a very different and usually limited transaction model. In this presentation, we describe some popular NoSQL databases – Redis, and MongoDB. You will learn about each database’s data model and Java API. We describe the benefits and drawbacks with using NoSQL databases. Finally, you will learn how the Spring Data project simplifies the development of Java applications that use NoSQL databases.

Photo of Chris Richardson

Chris Richardson

Eventuate

Chris Richardson is a developer and architect. He is a Java Champion, a JavaOne Rock Star, and the author of POJOs in Action, which describes how to build enterprise Java applications with frameworks such as Spring and Hibernate. Chris was also the founder of the original CloudFoundry.com, an early Java PaaS for Amazon EC2. Today, he is a recognized thought leader in microservices and speaks regularly at international conferences. Chris is the creator of Microservices.io, a pattern language for microservices, and is writing the book Microservice Patterns, which is available as a Manning MEAP. He provides microservices consulting and training to organizations that are adopting the microservice architecture and is working on his third startup Eventuate, an application platform for developing transactional microservices.