Sponsors
  • Intel
  • Microsoft
  • Google
  • Sun Microsystems
  • BT
  • IBM
  • Yahoo! Inc.
  • Zimbra
  • Atlassian Software Systems
  • Disney
  • EnterpriseDB
  • Etelos
  • Ingres
  • JasperSoft
  • Kablink
  • Linagora
  • MindTouch
  • Mozilla Corporation
  • Novell, Inc.
  • Open Invention Network
  • OpSource
  • RightScale
  • Silicon Mechanics
  • Tenth Planet
  • Ticketmaster
  • Voiceroute
  • White Oak Technologies, Inc.
  • XAware
  • ZDNet

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the conference, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com.

Media Partner Opportunities

Download the Media & Promotional Partner Brochure (PDF) for more information on trade opportunities with O'Reilly conferences, or contact mediapartners@oreilly.com.

Press and Media

For media-related inquiries, contact Maureen Jennings at maureen@oreilly.com.

OSCON Newsletter

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Contact Us

View a complete list of OSCON 2008 Contacts

Jeremy Hogan
Community Manager, Hyperic, Inc.

Jeremy has been riddled with open source cooties since the 90’s. From early adopter edge of network deployments, on over the chasm to broad acceptance among the Fortune 500 and working with communities at CollabNet, Red Hat, Lulu and Hyperic.

As Red Hat’s first Community Relations Manager, Jeremy lived through the transition from boxed product revenue to subscription revenue and helped launch the Fedora Project.

Turn ons: Southern Rock, Irish Ale, Buffalo Wings, New York Pizza
Turn offs: locks, gates, walls, doors, Disney and the word ‘no’

Sessions

Administration, Emerging Topics, Linux, Programming
Location: Portland 255 Level: Novice
Joe Brockmeier (Red Hat), Ross Turk (SourceForge, Inc.), Jono Bacon (Canonical Ltd), John Mark Walker (EdX.org), Jeremy Hogan (Hyperic, Inc.) Moderated by: Joe Brockmeier
Average rating: ****.
(4.20, 5 ratings)
Over the past ten years nothing has impacted business more than community. Whether through the openness of software development spurred by Linux or the dismantling of media empires through blogging, the rise of communities has been the driving force in how we work and live today. For open source developers, what has to happen to maintain and grow the communities they've built? Read more.
OSCON 2008