Sponsors
  • Intel
  • Microsoft
  • Google
  • Sun Microsystems
  • BT
  • IBM
  • Yahoo! Inc.
  • Zimbra
  • Atlassian Software Systems
  • Disney
  • EnterpriseDB
  • Etelos
  • Ingres
  • JasperSoft
  • Kablink
  • Linagora
  • MindTouch
  • Mozilla Corporation
  • Novell, Inc.
  • Open Invention Network
  • OpSource
  • RightScale
  • Silicon Mechanics
  • Tenth Planet
  • Ticketmaster
  • Voiceroute
  • White Oak Technologies, Inc.
  • XAware
  • ZDNet

Sponsorship Opportunities

For information on exhibition and sponsorship opportunities at the conference, contact Sharon Cordesse at scordesse@oreilly.com.

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Introduction to Seaside: Powerful Web Application Development in Smalltalk

Tutorial, Web Applications
Location: D139/140 Level: Intermediate
Average rating: ***..
(3.94, 16 ratings)

Sure, Smalltalk is where we got our modern view of windows and mice and “the desktop” and object-oriented programming and extreme programming two decades ago, but what has Smalltalk done for us lately?

I’ll answer this by showing off the Seaside web application framework. Imagine being able to debug a broken web-hit in the middle of the hit, fixing the code, and continuing before the browser knows that something went wrong. Imagine being able to reuse control flows and web components with the ease of OO programming. Imagine being able to do test-driven development, even for HTML delivery. Imagine taking an application from “three guys in Starbucks on a laptop” to “3000 hits per second on your Amazon EC2 cloud” with no major changes in design. No need to imagine… I’ll demonstrate all this and more.

Smalltalk knowledge is not required: I’ll start with a brief overview of Smalltalk using Squeak, the free implementation that’s even included in the OLPC XO. General knowledge of Object-oriented Programming basics would be helpful, though.

Photo of Randal L. Schwartz

Randal L. Schwartz

FLOSS Weekly podcast

Randal L. Schwartz is a renowned expert on the Perl programming language (the lifeblood of the Internet), having contributed to a dozen top-selling books on the subject, and over 250 magazine articles. Schwartz runs a Perl and Smalltalk training and consulting company (Stonehenge Consulting Services, Inc of Portland, Oregon), and is a highly sought-after speaker for his masterful stage combination of technical skill, comedic timing, and crowd rapport. And he’s a pretty good Karaoke
singer, winning contests regularly.

Books authored/coauthored:

  • Programming Perl (multiple editions)
  • Learning Perl (multiple editions)
  • Learning Perl on Win32 Systems
  • Learning Perl Objects References and Modules (multiple editions)
  • Effective Perl Programming: Writing Better Programs with Perl
  • Randal Schwartz’s Perls of Wisdom

Magazine articles and columns:

  • UnixReview Magazine
  • PerformanceComputing Magazine
  • SysAdmin Magazine and Website
  • WebTechniques Magazine and Website
  • Linux Magazine and Website
  • The Perl Journal E-Magazine
  • Apple Developer Works Website

Regular contributor to online forums:

  • perlmonks.org (The Perl Monastery)
  • use.perl.org
  • newsgroups comp.lang.perl.misc et. seq.
  • newsgroup comp.lang.perl.announce (moderator since inception)
  • perl.org mailing lists
  • Perl mailing lists on Yahoo! Groups
  • various Smalltalk and Squeak mailing lists
  • methodsandmessages.vox.com smalltalk blog
  • podcast.insightcruises.com podcast
  • twit.tv/floss podcast

Tom Phoenix

Stonehenge Consulting Services, Inc.

Tom Phoenix has been working in the field of education since 1982. After more than thirteen years of dissections, explosions, work with interesting animals, and high-voltage sparks during his work at a science museum, he started teaching Perl classes for Stonehenge Consulting Services, where he’s worked since 1996. Since then, he has traveled to many interesting locations, so you might see him soon at a Perl Mongers’ meeting. When he has time, he answers questions on Usenet’s comp.lang.perl.misc and comp.lang.perl.moderated newsgroups, and contributes to the development and usefulness of Perl. Besides his work with Perl, Perl hackers, and related topics, Tom spends his time on amateur cryptography and speaking Esperanto. His home is in Portland, Oregon.

OSCON 2008