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Perl 5.10 for People Who Are Not (Totally) Insane

Perl, Programming
Location: Portland 256 Level: Novice
Average rating: ****.
(4.52, 25 ratings)

All the hype about perl 5.10 can sound a little intimidating. User-level pragmata! Overloadable smartmatching operator! Thread-safe refkey hashes! For Pete’s sake, have you heard about lexically scoped pluggable regexp engines?

It’s enough to make you think that 5.10’s changes are just for the hard-core perl hackers, but it couldn’t be further from the truth! The new version of Perl is full of changes that are easy to use and pack lots of useful benefits for doing plain old every day Perl programming.

We’ll look at the new features, small and large, and see why you, too, will love 5.10.

People planning to attend this session also want to see:

Photo of Ricardo Signes

Ricardo Signes

Pobox.com

Ricardo Signes was thrust into the job market with only a rudimentary humanities education, and was forced to learn to fend for himself. He is now a full-time Perl programmer, maintainer of the Perl Email Project, and frequent contributor to the CPAN.

OSCON 2008