Making Open Work
May 8–9, 2017: Training & Tutorials
May 10–11, 2017: Conference
Austin, TX
 
Meeting Room 9 A/B
Add How to achieve just-in-time scaling without compromising performance to your personal schedule
11:00am How to achieve just-in-time scaling without compromising performance Guru Chahal (Avi Networks), Ranga Rajagopalan (Avi Networks)
Add Slow-mo code to your personal schedule
11:50am Slow-mo code Richard Schneeman (Heroku)
Add Speedy React apps: Learn from @WalmartLabs to your personal schedule
1:45pm Speedy React apps: Learn from @WalmartLabs Alexander Grigoryan (@WalmartLabs)
Meeting Room 9C
Add The life of a large-scale open source project to your personal schedule
11:50am The life of a large-scale open source project Jessica Frazelle (Microsoft)
Add Be(come) a mentor and help others succeed to your personal schedule
1:45pm Be(come) a mentor and help others succeed Anna Ossowski (Django REST framework)
Add The art of documentation and README.md to your personal schedule
2:35pm The art of documentation and README.md Ben Hall (Katacoda | Ocelot Uproar)
Add Open source licensing 101 to your personal schedule
4:15pm Open source licensing 101 Jim Jagielski (ASF)
Add Managing open source contributions in large organizations to your personal schedule
5:05pm Managing open source contributions in large organizations James Ward (Salesforce.com), David Murray (Salesforce.com)
Meeting Room 10 A/B
Add Application security: From zero to hero to your personal schedule
11:00am Application security: From zero to hero Jeremy Anderson (Cambia Health Solutions)
Add Finding your way in the dark: Security from first principles to your personal schedule
11:50am Finding your way in the dark: Security from first principles Susan Sons (Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research, Indiana University)
Add Enhancing cloud security with the TPM to your personal schedule
1:45pm Enhancing cloud security with the TPM James Bottomley (IBM Research)
Add Web server defense: Swift edition to your personal schedule
2:35pm Web server defense: Swift edition Gelareh Taban (IBM)
Add Security starts with you: Social engineering to your personal schedule
4:15pm Security starts with you: Social engineering Tiberius Hefflin (Intel)
Add Web application security: Browsers fight back to your personal schedule
5:05pm Web application security: Browsers fight back Christian Wenz  (Arrabiata Solutions GmbH)
Meeting Room 12
Add Adopting open source in your organization to your personal schedule
11:00am Adopting open source in your organization Edward Thomson (Microsoft)
Add Is it too late to learn how to program? How I become a developer later in life to your personal schedule
1:45pm Is it too late to learn how to program? How I become a developer later in life Alicia Carr (Purple Evolution Inc. (PEVO) | Women Who Code Atlanta)
Add React properly to your personal schedule
2:35pm React properly Ben Ilegbodu (Eventbrite)
Add Building and growing your InnerSource practices to your personal schedule
4:15pm Building and growing your InnerSource practices Margaret Mayer (Capital One), Kranthi Dandamudi (Capital One)
Meeting Room 18 A/B
Add Open source 2025: The future of application development to your personal schedule
11:00am Open source 2025: The future of application development Rod Cope (Rogue Wave Software)
Add Building interfaces for virtual and augmented reality to your personal schedule
11:50am Building interfaces for virtual and augmented reality Erica Stanley (SalesLoft)
Add Global empire: Building for fun and profit to your personal schedule
1:45pm Global empire: Building for fun and profit Michelle Casbon (Qordoba)
Add The ethics of self-driving cars to your personal schedule
2:35pm The ethics of self-driving cars Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
Add MirageOS 3: Smaller, lighter, and more transparent to your personal schedule
4:15pm MirageOS 3: Smaller, lighter, and more transparent Mindy Preston (Docker), Amir Chaudhry (Docker)
Add A less complex web with Ratchet and Jank to your personal schedule
5:05pm A less complex web with Ratchet and Jank Jay Hayes (Big Nerd Ranch)
Meeting Room 18 C/D
Add Intuitive distributed algorithms with F# to your personal schedule
4:15pm Intuitive distributed algorithms with F# Alena Hall (Microsoft Research), Natallia Dzenisenka (Independent Contractor)
Meeting Room 19
Add How and why we're opening our code at Octopus Deploy to your personal schedule
11:00am How and why we're opening our code at Octopus Deploy Damian Brady (Octopus Deploy)
Add What’s your skateboard? to your personal schedule
11:50am What’s your skateboard? Emily Stamey (InQuest)
Add Freedom, innovation, and funds: Options for open source monetization to your personal schedule
1:45pm Freedom, innovation, and funds: Options for open source monetization Monty Widenius (MariaDB Corporation)
Add From 15 to 250: Scaling a distributed, open source engineering team to your personal schedule
5:05pm From 15 to 250: Scaling a distributed, open source engineering team Suyog Rao (Elastic), Michael Basnight (Elastic)
Ballroom E
Add Prometheus: The next-generation monitoring system to your personal schedule
11:50am Prometheus: The next-generation monitoring system Cindy Sridharan (imgix)
Add OCI: Openness standardizes better to your personal schedule
1:45pm OCI: Openness standardizes better Vincent Batts (Red Hat)
Add How I learned to stop being afraid and love the JVM to your personal schedule
4:15pm How I learned to stop being afraid and love the JVM James Turnbull (Empatico)
Add 360-degree observability to your personal schedule
5:05pm 360-degree observability Ilan Rabinovitch (Datadog)
Ballroom F
Add From REST to GraphQL: Why a query language is perfect for writing APIs to your personal schedule
11:00am From REST to GraphQL: Why a query language is perfect for writing APIs David Celis (GitHub), Garen Torikian (GitHub)
Add Building large-scale web applications with TypeScript to your personal schedule
11:50am Building large-scale web applications with TypeScript Jakub Jedryszek (Microsoft)
Add Building containerized microservices with Swift to your personal schedule
1:45pm Building containerized microservices with Swift Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.)
Add Workers, queues, and data to your personal schedule
2:35pm Workers, queues, and data Lorna Mitchell (IBM)
Add A journey into feature toggles to your personal schedule
4:15pm A journey into feature toggles Pete Hodgson (Earnest)
Add Writing modern .NET open source libraries to your personal schedule
5:05pm Writing modern .NET open source libraries Stephen Cleary (Learning Machine)
Ballroom G
Add Mapping versus architecture to your personal schedule
11:00am Mapping versus architecture Robert Lefkowitz (Warby Parker), Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum)
1:45pm TBC
Add Native apps with web technologies using Electron to your personal schedule
2:35pm Native apps with web technologies using Electron Brian Capouch (Saint Joseph's College)
Add A beginner's guide to syscalls to your personal schedule
4:15pm A beginner's guide to syscalls Liz Rice (Aqua Security)
Meeting Room 13 (Sponsored)
Add The index as a first-class citizen to your personal schedule
11:00am The index as a first-class citizen Matthew Jaffee (Pilosa)
Add By every need necessary: A Cloud Foundry roadmap update to your personal schedule
11:50am By every need necessary: A Cloud Foundry roadmap update Chip Childers (Cloud Foundry Foundation)
Add Contributing to Hyperledger to your personal schedule
1:45pm Contributing to Hyperledger Tracy Kuhrt (Hyperledger)
Meeting Room 14 (Sponsored)
Add Monitoring at scale in Salesforce to your personal schedule
11:00am Monitoring at scale in Salesforce Mihai Bojin (Salesforce), Kamil Smuga (Salesforce)
Add Shifting to Kubernetes on OpenShift to your personal schedule
2:35pm Shifting to Kubernetes on OpenShift Seth Jennings (Red Hat)
Meeting Room 15 (Sponsored)
Add Simplifying networking for containers with iCAN to your personal schedule
11:50am Simplifying networking for containers with iCAN Nagaravind Challakere (Huawei)
Add My unexpected contribution experience at Capital One to your personal schedule
1:45pm My unexpected contribution experience at Capital One Jonathan Bodner (Capital One)
Meeting Room 16
Add TensorFlow Day to your personal schedule
11:00am TensorFlow Day Amy Unruh (Google), Yufeng Guo (Google), Ben Hall (Katacoda | Ocelot Uproar), Yufeng Guo (Google), Amy Unruh (Google), Yufeng Guo (Google), Martin Wicke (Google), Vijay Vasudevan (Google), Aaron Schumacher (Deep Learning Analytics), Vijay Vasudevan (Google)
10:20am Morning Break Sponsored by Intel | Room: Expo Hall
3:15pm Afternoon Break Sponsored by Pivotal | Room: Expo Hall
Add Booth Crawl to your personal schedule
5:45pm Event Booth Crawl | Room: Expo Hall
Add Wednesday opening welcome to your personal schedule
Ballroom D
9:00am Wednesday opening welcome Rachel Roumeliotis (O'Reilly Media), Kelsey Hightower (Google)
Add Step 1: Punch a tree to your personal schedule
9:05am Step 1: Punch a tree Evan Booth (Counter Hack)
Add Rebuilding trust through blockchains and open source to your personal schedule
9:55am Rebuilding trust through blockchains and open source Brian Behlendorf (The Hyperledger Project at the Linux Foundation)
Add Sharing America's code to your personal schedule
10:00am Sharing America's code Alvand Salehi (The White House)
Add Closing remarks to your personal schedule
10:15am Closing remarks
Add Wednesday Birds of a Feather to your personal schedule
7:00pm Wednesday Birds of a Feather | Room: Meeting Rooms on Levels 3 and 4
Add Speed Networking to your personal schedule
8:15am Event Speed Networking | Room: Ballroom D Foyer, Level 4
8:45am TBC
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Infrastructure, Performance Networking, Techniques
How to achieve just-in-time scaling without compromising performance
Guru Chahal (Avi Networks), Ranga Rajagopalan (Avi Networks)
Guru Chahal and Ranga Rajagopalan share techniques to intelligently scale application and load-balancing resources automatically and on-demand to achieve just-in-time-scaling across clouds without compromising an application's performance.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Performance Core programming concepts, Ruby, Techniques
Slow-mo code
Richard Schneeman (Heroku)
No one wants to be stuck in the slow lane, especially Rubyists. Richard Schneeman discusses the slow process of writing fast code, exploring several real-world performance optimizations that look strange but make your code faster by fixing performance problems. Richard then rewinds to show how these slow spots were found and fixed. Join Richard to "C" how fast your Ruby can "Go."
1:45pm-2:25pm (40m) Performance JavaScript, Node, Techniques
Speedy React apps: Learn from @WalmartLabs
Alexander Grigoryan (@WalmartLabs)
Alexander Grigoryan explains how @WalmartLabs discovered many opportunities to improve performance during its transformation to Electrode, the universal React/Node.js platform.
2:35pm-3:15pm (40m) Performance DevOps, Techniques, Tools
Using NGINX as an effective and highly available content cache
Kevin Jones (NGINX)
We all know that performance is a critical factor in the success of applications and websites. In many cases, you can make vast improvements to the end-user experience of your application by focusing on some very basic application delivery techniques. Kevin Jones shares techniques utilizing cache features included in NGINX that can help users see better performance.
4:15pm-4:55pm (40m) Infrastructure, Performance Core programming concepts, JavaScript, Networking
From WebSockets to WiSH (web in strict HTTP)
Wenbo Zhu (Google)
The authors of WiSH have been involved with the WebSocket protocol since its beginning but soon realized that the real problem has always been web APIs along with a non-HTTP protocol that is truly harmful to the web. Wenbo Zhu explains why the web is better off with WiSH for deploying scalable and reliable bidirectional communication over the internet.
5:05pm-5:45pm (40m) Performance Python
Doubling OpenStack performance with no code changes by optimizing the Python runtime
Peter Wang (Intel)
Optimizing the Python core language—the interpreter itself—can benefit any large application implemented in Python. OpenStack, a leading cloud-computing solution, is mostly written in Python. Peter Wang shares the technical insights for achieving the best OpenStack performance using a just-in-time (JIT) Python runtime, the PyPy JIT.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Open Source: From Consumer to Contributor Legal
How can I contribute? A guide to making your first open source contribution
Lucy Wyman (Puppet Labs)
This talk is for you—the documentarians, developers, students, or community members wondering what you can contribute to open source and how to get started. Lucy Wyman discusses several ways open source projects need your help, what to look for in a project you're contributing to, and some first steps to making your first pull request.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Open Source: From Consumer to Contributor Linux, Techniques, Tools
The life of a large-scale open source project
Jessica Frazelle (Microsoft)
Jessica Frazelle explains how to contribute to very large-scale open source projects and what it means to be a maintainer.
1:45pm-2:25pm (40m) Open Source: From Consumer to Contributor Techniques, Tools
Be(come) a mentor and help others succeed
Anna Ossowski (Django REST framework)
There is always something new to learn in technology. Even if we are experts in one field, we're beginners in another. It’s important to have a mentor to learn successfully, but it’s equally important to learn how to be a good mentor. Anna Ossowski explores what makes a mentor "good" and shares the tips and tricks of mentorship and concrete ways you can get involved as a mentor.
2:35pm-3:15pm (40m) Open Source: From Consumer to Contributor
The art of documentation and README.md
Ben Hall (Katacoda | Ocelot Uproar)
The README is key to successful open source projects as a gateway to welcoming new users and potential contributors. It defines the tone of the project, explains how to get started, and most importantly, outlines the project's aim. Ben Hall demonstrates how small changes to your documentation approach can have an enormous impact on how users get started.
4:15pm-4:55pm (40m) Open Source: From Consumer to Contributor Business, Techniques
Open source licensing 101
Jim Jagielski (ASF)
Jim Jagielski offers an overview of the various FOSS license types available to the developer, exploring the advantages and disadvantages of each and sharing some helpful hints for picking the right license for your project.
5:05pm-5:45pm (40m) Open Source: From Consumer to Contributor Legal
Managing open source contributions in large organizations
James Ward (Salesforce.com), David Murray (Salesforce.com)
James Ward and David Murray explain how your organization can tackle open source management issues and explore some of the tooling Salesforce built to help insure legal compliance with incoming and outgoing contributions.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Security DevOps, Security
Application security: From zero to hero
Jeremy Anderson (Cambia Health Solutions)
While the rest of the world tries to solve the problems of insecure software with firewalls and intrusion detection, Jeremy Anderson explains how to solve the problem where it starts: at the code that defines it. Join Jeremy to learn how to fix code security defects when they’re created instead of during production when it’s already too late.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Security Techniques
Finding your way in the dark: Security from first principles
Susan Sons (Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research, Indiana University)
As a community, we talk a lot about security goals and trade-offs and about the controls we may use to get there. What we don't talk enough about is first principles. Susan Sons shares the seven information security practice principles developed with her team at IU CACR and introduces a mental model for reasoning about security instead of trying to memorize for security.
1:45pm-2:25pm (40m) Security Security, Tools
Enhancing cloud security with the TPM
James Bottomley (IBM Research)
TPMs are now ubiquitous in the COTS hardware we use to build clouds, but they're not often used to enhance the security of the cloud environment. James Bottomley explains how sequestered trust models like the TPM can be used to enhance cloud security even in an apparently insecure environment.
2:35pm-3:15pm (40m) Security Swift
Web server defense: Swift edition
Gelareh Taban (IBM)
The Swift language was born on the client side, but since it was open sourced in late 2015, it has gained huge momentum in the server community. Gelareh Taban uses an end-to-end example app to explain how security can be built into a Swift client-server application and recommends best practices on Swift security frameworks and specific language features.
4:15pm-4:55pm (40m) Security Business, Security, Techniques
Security starts with you: Social engineering
Tiberius Hefflin (Intel)
Virus? Malware? There’s an app for that. Social engineering? It's a little more complicated. These techniques, used by hackers to gather information on their target, are hard to combat without education. Tiberius Hefflin explains how these attacks take place, how to combat them, and why companies fail to prepare their staff for such an attack.
5:05pm-5:45pm (40m) Security JavaScript
Web application security: Browsers fight back
Christian Wenz  (Arrabiata Solutions GmbH)
Since developers seem to have a hard time writing secure apps, browsers have come to their aid with new techniques and protocols like built-in XSS filters, special HTTP headers, and more that can help prevent many attacks. Christian Wenz offers an overview of these new safeguards, including HSTS, CSP, secure cookies, and much more.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) In Real Life (IRL) Business, Legal
Adopting open source in your organization
Edward Thomson (Microsoft)
Recently, Microsoft went from calling open source "a cancer" to being the biggest contributor on GitHub. Edward Thomson explains how Microsoft, one of the unlikeliest software vendors, began to embrace and even extend (but not extinguish) open source software and how you can begin using and contributing to open source software in your organization.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) In Real Life (IRL) Emerging languages, Java, Techniques
The Paved Road at Netflix: At the junction of freedom and responsibility
Dianne Marsh (Netflix)
The Paved Road, a concept formalizing a set of expectations and commitments between centralized and local teams, is absolutely critical to Netflix's culture of freedom and responsibility. Dianne Marsh shares how Netflix uses this promised path of well-integrated, supported tools toward its polyglot strategy, creating boundaries so that the company can provide value without being overwhelmed.
1:45pm-2:25pm (40m) In Real Life (IRL) Business, Geek lifestyle, Networking
Is it too late to learn how to program? How I become a developer later in life
Alicia Carr (Purple Evolution Inc. (PEVO) | Women Who Code Atlanta)
Adages like you can’t teach an old dog new tricks presume that certain pursuits are for young people only. Some people believe that older people are out of touch with technology—that’s the stereotype, anyway—and programming is no exception. Alicia Carr explains how and why she became an iOS mobile developer at the age of 51.
2:35pm-3:15pm (40m) In Real Life (IRL) JavaScript
React properly
Ben Ilegbodu (Eventbrite)
Eventbrite recently transitioned to a React-based stack. Ben Ilegbodu walks you through the guidelines Eventbrite adopted to prevent immediate technical debt from poorly written React code so that you can apply them to your own teams and projects.
4:15pm-4:55pm (40m) In Real Life (IRL)
Building and growing your InnerSource practices
Margaret Mayer (Capital One), Kranthi Dandamudi (Capital One)
Margaret Mayer and Kranthi Dandamudi share Capital One's experience building and growing its InnerSource practices. This case study touches on the rationale behind the change and the agility at which large organizations can shift to InnerSourcing.
5:05pm-5:45pm (40m) In Real Life (IRL) JavaScript, Techniques
The excitement and mundanity of building Hillaryclinton.com/donate
Bethany Andres-Beck (Independent)
Bethany Andres-Beck shares her experience building a product guaranteed to see hockey stick growth while knowing her company would die on November 8. Here's how it went.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) The Cutting Edge Emerging languages, Techniques, Tools
Open source 2025: The future of application development
Rod Cope (Rogue Wave Software)
What we thought of as the future of open source is already here, so how do we define the next future? Rod Cope explains how different aspects of machine intelligence, augmented reality, high-performance computing, and massive bandwidth will be the fundamental drivers to future application success as we build upon lower barriers to entry and shift from improving technology to improving life.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) The Cutting Edge JavaScript, Techniques, UX/UI
Building interfaces for virtual and augmented reality
Erica Stanley (SalesLoft)
As virtual and augmented applications become more widely used, developers of more traditional media, such as web and mobile platforms, may find themselves building nontraditional interfaces. Erica Stanley offers an overview of the interaction patterns that work well in mixed-reality environments and shares techniques that can be integrated into new or existing applications.
1:45pm-2:25pm (40m) The Cutting Edge Scala, Tools
Global empire: Building for fun and profit
Michelle Casbon (Qordoba)
To establish a global user base, a product needs to support a variety of locales. The challenge with supporting multiple locales is the maintenance and generation of localized strings. Michelle Casbon explains how open source tools like Scala, Apache Spark, Apache Kafka, and Apache PredictionIO (incubating) provide structure for a scalable localization platform with machine learning at its core.
2:35pm-3:15pm (40m) The Cutting Edge Security
The ethics of self-driving cars
Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
Autonomous vehicles will soon be everywhere. Trucks are already driving across Europe, and numerous companies are testing vehicles. But what does this mean for human safety, information security, employment, and city planning? Paul Fenwick examines the impact of autonomous vehicles, focusing on some of the most difficult questions relating to machine ethics and world economies.
4:15pm-4:55pm (40m) The Cutting Edge DevOps, Functional languages, Tools
MirageOS 3: Smaller, lighter, and more transparent
Mindy Preston (Docker), Amir Chaudhry (Docker)
MirageOS, one of the most well-known unikernel projects, has recently added support for several new targets, including KVM via the lightweight hypervisor ukvm. Mindy Preston and Amir Chaudhry discuss the benefits of bringing the library OS approach into the hypervisor for MirageOS 3, as well as other major usability and stability improvements made in this release.
5:05pm-5:45pm (40m) The Cutting Edge Emerging languages, Techniques, Tools
A less complex web with Ratchet and Jank
Jay Hayes (Big Nerd Ranch)
A tremendous amount of complexity has crept into web development. The decisions that got us here were in the name of speed, but the result is that building for the web is significantly more difficult. Using the Ratchet and Jank libraries, Jay Hayes explains how complex logic in view templates and complex JavaScript used to integrate new data into the existing view can address this complexity.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Data, Big and Small Techniques, Tools
Creating and sharing datasets for social impact using child welfare data
Vida Williams (Axis Partners, Inc)
Vida Williams offers an overview of a project that transmuted qualitative indicators of risk and success in foster care to quantitative indicators using real-life child welfare datasets and shares the lessons about capturing, assembling, and sharing datasets learned along the way.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Data, Big and Small Python
How exploring open taxi data from New York City can lead to a new bus route
Anastasia Sagalovitch (NYU)
Anastasia Sagalovitch explains how she used New York City's open taxi dataset with Python to determine areas of frequent pick-ups and drop-offs within a time frame and superimposed those hotspots atop a map of the subway system to identify taxi hotspots that fall within or outside of a particular radius of established subway stops—and used this data as the basis for a proposed bus route.
1:45pm-2:25pm (40m) Data, Big and Small Techniques, Tools
A/B testing at scale: Developing an in-house A/B testing framework for big testing and big data
Mita Mahadevan (Intuit)
Many leading tech companies (Uber, Netflix, etc.) are building scalable, in-house product-testing data platforms from the ground up to enable experimentation and engender a data-driven mentality. Mita Mahadevan explores how these companies are developing in-house A/B testing frameworks using open source tools and shares dos and don’ts for those in the midst of their journey to become data driven.
2:35pm-3:15pm (40m) Data, Big and Small, TensorFlow Java, Techniques, Tools
Distinguish pop music from heavy metal using Apache Spark MLlib
Taras Matyashovskyy (Lohika)
Taras Matyashovsky explains how to use Apache Spark MLlib to build a supervised learning NLP pipeline to distinguish pop music from heavy metal—and have fun in the process.
4:15pm-4:55pm (40m) Data, Big and Small C#/F#/.NET, Functional languages, Networking
Intuitive distributed algorithms with F#
Alena Hall (Microsoft Research), Natallia Dzenisenka (Independent Contractor)
Alena Hall and Natallia Dzenisenka explore the set of algorithms behind distributed systems, including snapshot algorithms, traversal algorithms, election algorithms, and reliable broadcast, giving you a clear understanding of how those systems work.
5:05pm-5:45pm (40m) Data, Big and Small
The next phase of distributed systems with Apache Ignite
Dani Traphagen (GridGain)
Dani Traphagen explores the key paradigm shifts currently impacting those Fortune 500 companies that view disk as a bottleneck. Dani explains how to optimize toward the cache, leveraging it for low-latency, highly available microservices architectures with the hot-and-fresh-out-of-the-kitchen open source project Apache Ignite.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) The Business of Open Source: From Project to Product Business, DevOps, Techniques
How and why we're opening our code at Octopus Deploy
Damian Brady (Octopus Deploy)
Are you thinking about open sourcing your codebase? Octopus Deploy started as a closed source project, but the company is making an effort to open source more of its code. Damian Brady explains why Octopus Deploy choose to open source software that is core to its business, how it chose what parts to open source, and how the company ensured it won't lose intellectual property and market advantage.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) The Business of Open Source: From Project to Product Business, Techniques
What’s your skateboard?
Emily Stamey (InQuest)
User story mapping gives you strategies to view features alongside the problems they solve, allowing you to prioritize features regardless of your technical expertise. Emily Stamey walks you through user story mapping, teaching you how to plan your project as if it were a vehicle and deliver the most valuable features to the customer by answering the question, "What’s your skateboard?"
1:45pm-2:25pm (40m) The Business of Open Source: From Project to Product Business
Freedom, innovation, and funds: Options for open source monetization
Monty Widenius (MariaDB Corporation)
Open source offers developers a community rich in innovation, feedback, and interaction, but many open source vendors find it difficult to create lasting businesses that can compete with proprietary software over the long term. Monty Widenius explores open source monetization options and ways to generate funds necessary for software development while balancing the needs of a dedicated community.
2:35pm-3:15pm (40m) The Business of Open Source: From Project to Product Business, Techniques
Stephen King's practical advice for tech writers
Rikki Endsley (Red Hat)
Rikki Endsley explains how you can improve your writing before you start writing—using solid advice from Stephen King. Rikki shares tips and tricks collected over 15 years in tech publishing writing for audiences of all levels and shows how with proper planning, you can easily repurpose your content for multiple audiences.
4:15pm-4:55pm (40m) The Business of Open Source: From Project to Product Business
It's all business: How contributing to OSS prepares you for entrepreneurship
Safia Abdalla (nteract)
A large, successful open source project runs a lot like a business. Indeed, some large, successful open source projects are businesses. Safia Abdalla explains why open source is the best playground and laboratory for new entrepreneurs and why this is a good thing for open source projects.
5:05pm-5:45pm (40m) The Business of Open Source: From Project to Product Geek lifestyle, Techniques
From 15 to 250: Scaling a distributed, open source engineering team
Suyog Rao (Elastic), Michael Basnight (Elastic)
How do you quickly grow and manage a fully distributed engineering team? Suyog Rao and Michael Basnight share their experiences and lessons learned over five years spent growing an engineering team from 15 to over 200 members in over 30 countries. Suyog and Michael focus on team structures that work well, hiring, communicating effectively, and balancing open source and commercial development.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Infrastructure Go, Java, Tools
UniK: A platform for automating unikernel compilation and deployment
Idit Levine (EMC)
Idit Levine offers an introduction to unikernels and UniK, an open source project written in Go that handles the compilation of libraries and applications for running on a variety of cloud providers and ensures their health.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Infrastructure Go, Techniques, Tools
Prometheus: The next-generation monitoring system
Cindy Sridharan (imgix)
Prometheus is a modern monitoring system perfect for monitoring cloud-native applications. Cindy Sridharan explores the architecture and philosophy of Prometheus and explains how powerful features like the query language, flexible data model, and relabeling can be leveraged to gain valuable insights about application performance.
1:45pm-2:25pm (40m) Infrastructure
OCI: Openness standardizes better
Vincent Batts (Red Hat)
Vincent Batts shares where the Open Container Initiative currently stands on container standards, how container standards have evolved in an open forum, and how this format is worth the effort in gaining agreement.
2:35pm-3:15pm (40m) Infrastructure Java, JavaScript, Tools
Multicloud continuous delivery with Spinnaker: An open source collaboration
Andrew Glover (Netflix)
Andrew Glover shares the technical aspects of multicloud, open source continuous delivery platform Spinnaker, a collaboration between Netflix, Google, Microsoft, and others. The flexible platform supports strong integrations with AWS, GCP, Kubernetes, Azure, Cloud Foundry, and OpenStack. But it’s not all technical. Join Andrew to learn how the OSS community has benefited from this collaboration.
4:15pm-4:55pm (40m) Infrastructure DevOps, Java, Tools
How I learned to stop being afraid and love the JVM
James Turnbull (Empatico)
James Turnbull explores why the JVM inspires such disdain and hatred, taking a potted look at the good, bad, and ugly of the JVM’s history and development. Along the way, James debunks many of the JVM's fallacious historical precedents. You'll leave no longer fearing the JVM.
5:05pm-5:45pm (40m) Infrastructure DevOps, Techniques, Tools
360-degree observability
Ilan Rabinovitch (Datadog)
Many of our organizations are drowning in monitoring data or juggling handfuls of tools, but have we truly achieved observability of our organizational and service health? Ilan Rabinovitch breaks down the expansive landscape of monitoring tooling to help you connect the dots between the different tools in your monitoring tool belt and presents a framework for 360-degree observability.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Adopt This Now Emerging languages, Ruby, Tools
From REST to GraphQL: Why a query language is perfect for writing APIs
David Celis (GitHub), Garen Torikian (GitHub)
For years, REST has been the standard architecture for APIs. But a new technology is emerging, one that's perfect for developing rich, client-friendly APIs: GraphQL. David Celis and Garen Torikian explain why this query language is being adopted by companies like Shopify, Pinterest, and GitHub and show you how you can leverage GraphQL for your own APIs.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Adopt This Now JavaScript
Building large-scale web applications with TypeScript
Jakub Jedryszek (Microsoft)
Jakub Jedryszek explains how TypeScript can help you build and maintain large-scale web applications and demonstrates how to set up your development environment with TypeScript and existing JavaScript libraries, such as gulp, webpack, and lodash, how to take advantage of TypeScript while working with existing frameworks, such as Aurelia, Angular 2, and React, and how to test TypeScript apps.
1:45pm-2:25pm (40m) Adopt This Now, Infrastructure DevOps, Emerging languages, Swift
Building containerized microservices with Swift
Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.)
Microservices, containerization, Swift—three words that bespeak greatness in this modern technology world. Paris Buttfield-Addison, Jonathon Manning, and Tim Nugent explain how to combine them. This is actually useful—come and learn why.
2:35pm-3:15pm (40m) Adopt This Now, Infrastructure Core programming concepts, Tools
Workers, queues, and data
Lorna Mitchell (IBM)
Message queues allow us to level up our applications to survive bursts of activity and perform fast and more reliably. Lorna Mitchell uses best-of-breed open source tool RabbitMQ as the basis for exploring queues and explaining how to make the most of them in your applications.
4:15pm-4:55pm (40m) Adopt This Now Core programming concepts, Techniques, Tools
A journey into feature toggles
Pete Hodgson (Earnest)
Feature toggles (aka feature flags) are a set of patterns that enable dev teams to deliver features to users rapidly and safely. Pete Hodgson leads you on a journey with a dev team as they adopt feature toggles, covering what they are, why they're helpful, and how to use them successfully.
5:05pm-5:45pm (40m) Adopt This Now C#/F#/.NET, Techniques, Tools
Writing modern .NET open source libraries
Stephen Cleary (Learning Machine)
Stephen Cleary covers everything technical you need to know about writing .NET open source libraries that support the latest platforms, including NetStandard targets, NuGet, continuous deployment, and source-level debugging.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Architecture Business
Mapping versus architecture
Robert Lefkowitz (Warby Parker), Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum)
Simon Wardley, the inventor of value chain mapping (Wardley maps), and distinguished enterprise architect Robert "r0ml" Lefkowitz debate whether mapping or architecture is the best method for guiding strategic planning.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Architecture DevOps
The cultural shift: Success with microservices
CJ Johnson (GitHub)
The necessary cultural shift that accompanies the move from monolithic application to microservices is often overlooked and can topple the best-laid plans. CJ Johnson discusses the behaviors, mindset, and messaging necessary to effect a social change across an organization.
1:45pm-2:25pm (40m)
Session
2:35pm-3:15pm (40m) Architecture HTML/CSS, JavaScript, Node
Native apps with web technologies using Electron
Brian Capouch (Saint Joseph's College)
Electron, a project from GitHub that allows native applications to be developed using web development technologies, has gained rapid adoption and is being used by high-profile projects in a variety of application domains. Brian Capouch explains what Electron is all about and shares a simple application to illustrate its use.
4:15pm-4:55pm (40m) Architecture Go, Linux
A beginner's guide to syscalls
Liz Rice (Aqua Security)
Liz Rice started playing with Linux syscalls to understand more about how containers work, which made her wonder what's happening under the hood when you make a system call and what else you can do with them. Liz offers an overview of syscalls—what they are, why they are there, and what you can do with them—live coding in Go to demonstrate some interesting features.
5:05pm-5:45pm (40m) Architecture Java
gRPC 101 for Java developers: Building small and efficient microservices
Ray Tsang (Google)
gRPC is an open source high-performance general RPC framework that puts mobile and HTTP/2 first. Low latency and bandwidth and CPU efficient, gRPC is designed to create massively distributed systems that span data centers and power mobile apps, real-time communications, IoT devices and APIs. Ray Tsang offers an overview of gRPC's capabilities as he live-codes a real-time chatroom.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Sponsored
The index as a first-class citizen
Matthew Jaffee (Pilosa)
What happens when you take the index out of the database and make it a separate application—perhaps one that is distributed, scalable, and takes full advantage of modern, multicore, high-memory hardware? Matthew Jaffee has spent the past few years finding out. He shares fruits of his labor: Pilosa, an open source distributed, sparse bitmap index.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Sponsored
By every need necessary: A Cloud Foundry roadmap update
Chip Childers (Cloud Foundry Foundation)
Chip Childers walks you through current and future efforts of the Cloud Foundry project teams, including Runtime PMC, CAPI, Diego, Garden, BOSH, and the Open Service Broker API, mapping out the evolution of these projects, their councils, and the implications of these updates for Cloud Foundry users.
1:45pm-2:25pm (40m) Sponsored
Contributing to Hyperledger
Tracy Kuhrt (Hyperledger)
Regardless of whether or not you are a developer, there are many ways for you to get involved in open source. Tracy Kuhrt offers an overview of Hyperledger and its projects and outlines the ways that you can participate. You'll leave with a set of initial steps to begin your journey with this growing community.
4:15pm-4:55pm (40m) Sponsored
The eventual consistency of succeeding at microservices
Kenny Bastani (Pivotal)
The transition to microservices can be an exciting change of pace for developers, but for organizations, the path to success with microservices is not without embracing a major cultural shift in the process of how teams build and deliver software. Kenny Bastani shares best practices and patterns for building and scaling event-driven microservice architectures.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Sponsored
Monitoring at scale in Salesforce
Mihai Bojin (Salesforce), Kamil Smuga (Salesforce)
Have you ever had to monitor the health of your service (server stats, application errors, etc.)? Measuring data and plotting is crucial to understand how software behaves in production. But what if you had to monitor the cloud? Mihai Bojin and Kamil Smuga explain how Salesforce approaches monitoring at scale by putting customers first.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Sponsored
Building serverless applications on the Apache OpenWhisk platform
Daniel Krook (IBM)
Apache OpenWhisk on IBM Bluemix provides a powerful and flexible environment for deploying cloud-native applications driven by data, message, and API call events. Daniel Krook explains why serverless architectures are attractive for many emerging cloud workloads and when you should consider OpenWhisk for your next project.
1:45pm-2:25pm (40m) Sponsored
Why people don’t contribute to your open source project
Mike McQuaid (GitHub)
Open source maintainers and users aren't always sure how best to make their projects successful. Mike McQuaid explains how to encourage and increase participation in your open source project. Never worked on open source before? Join in to learn how to work your way up to becoming a maintainer.
2:35pm-3:15pm (40m) Sponsored
Shifting to Kubernetes on OpenShift
Seth Jennings (Red Hat)
Seth Jennings demonstrates how to start an OpenShift cluster in a single command and "port" a simple three-tier application to OpenShift, covering many of the platform features along the way, including automatic container image creation from source code, service discovery, application configuration, lifecycle management, and more.
4:15pm-4:55pm (40m) Sponsored
Developer on the rise: Blurring the line between developer and data scientist with PixieDust
va barbosa (IBM)
Ready to dip your toe into data science? Va Barbosa explains why you should start with notebooks and PixieDust, a new open source library that helps data scientists and developers working in the Jupyter Notebook and Apache Spark be more efficient.
11:00am-11:40am (40m) Sponsored
Solve the colocation conundrum: Performance and density at scale with Kubernetes
Niklas Nielsen (Intel)
Predictable performance or higher utilization? Why not both? Workload colocation is a requirement of any maturing runtime environment, and container schedulers are no different. This challenge has led to new research by Intel in the cloud-native solutions space. Niklas Nielsen explains how to make smarter resource allocations with Kubernetes and Intel’s latest tooling capabilities.
11:50am-12:30pm (40m) Sponsored
Simplifying networking for containers with iCAN
Nagaravind Challakere (Huawei)
Container technology has obvious advantages: it offers simple and faster deployment, portability, and low cost. But the networking challenges are significant. Wei Xu offers an overview of iCAN, a new container networking solution that provides one management framework to work with different network components through an open, friendly modeling mechanism.
1:45pm-2:25pm (40m) Sponsored
My unexpected contribution experience at Capital One
Jonathan Bodner (Capital One)
When Capital One was looking for a tool to help manage its software development pipeline, Jonathan Bodner suggested LGTM, an open source pull request approval system, as a starting point. After fixing bugs and adding new features to LGTM, Jonathan contacted Capital One's open source office so he could return his changes to the community. And that's where things got interesting.
2:35pm-3:15pm (40m) Sponsored
Microservice orchestration for serverless computing
Cathy Zhang (Huawei)
Service graphs allow users to define business logic requirements and workflows, enabling them to arrange cloud functions to execute in sequence or concurrently and handle scaling to accommodate varying event load. Cathy Zhang explains how service graphs address the challenge of creating and managing microservice applications.
4:15pm-4:55pm (40m) Sponsored
How to develop DevOps orchestration with Golang
Quanyi Ma (Huawei)
Quanyi Ma offers an overview of ContainerOps, a DevOps orchestration system written in Golang that has a mechanism for encapsulating plugins or scripts in one or more container images running within a Kubernetes cluster and an orchestration engine integrated with popular CI/CD services like GitHub and Travis CI.
11:00am-5:45pm (6h 45m)
TensorFlow Day
Amy Unruh (Google), Yufeng Guo (Google), Ben Hall (Katacoda | Ocelot Uproar), Yufeng Guo (Google), Amy Unruh (Google), Yufeng Guo (Google), Martin Wicke (Google), Vijay Vasudevan (Google), Aaron Schumacher (Deep Learning Analytics), Vijay Vasudevan (Google)
TensorFlow Day at OSCON has been put together by our partners from Google at the center of the very popular, game-changing, open source project TensorFlow.
10:20am-11:00am (40m)
Break: Morning Break Sponsored by Intel
12:30pm-1:45pm (1h 15m)
Lunch (sponsored by Huawei) and Wednesday Topic Tables
Join other attendees during lunch to share ideas, talk about the issues of the day, and maybe solve a few. Not sure which topic to pick? Don’t worry—it's not a long-term commitment. Try two or three and settle on a different topic tomorrow.
3:15pm-4:15pm (1h)
Break: Afternoon Break Sponsored by Pivotal
5:45pm-7:00pm (1h 15m)
Booth Crawl
Quench your thirst with vendor-hosted libations (plus snacks) while you check out all the cool stuff in the Expo Hall.
9:00am-9:05am (5m)
Wednesday opening welcome
Rachel Roumeliotis (O'Reilly Media), Kelsey Hightower (Google)
Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis and Kelsey Hightower open the first day of keynotes.
9:05am-9:20am (15m)
Step 1: Punch a tree
Evan Booth (Counter Hack)
Fans of the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes will undoubtedly remember when Calvin invented the transmogrifier, an ingenious device that could turn one thing into another with a quick "ZAP!" Evan Booth explains how his adventures in real-world transmogrification have shaped his perspective on open source hardware, manufacturing, and finding potential in the unremarkable.
9:20am-9:30am (10m) Sponsored Keynote
Why choose open infrastructure? (sponsored by IBM)
Christopher Aedo (IBM)
Open source isn’t winning; it’s won. In the last decade, there's been an incredible explosion in open source software. Massive projects have been developed in the open, on open operating systems, using open languages and compilers. But, Christopher Aedo asks, was all the infrastructure open as well?
9:30am-9:45am (15m)
Open source contribution and collaboration: How (and why) Netflix drives industry engagement
Dianne Marsh (Netflix)
Netflix has become well known for its contributions to open source, creating and contributing to over 50 active projects. Dianne Marsh tells the story of Spinnaker to demonstrate how open source contributes to Netflix's success and vice versa.
9:45am-9:55am (10m) Sponsored Keynote
The power of the open source ecosystem (sponsored by Huawei)
Ying Xiong (Huawei)
Ying Xiong discusses the fast-growing open source market in China, exploring the role Huawei plays in China's open source software industry, developer community engagement, and Huawei’s continuous commitment to open source strategy and growing contribution to various open source technologies.
9:55am-10:00am (5m)
Rebuilding trust through blockchains and open source
Brian Behlendorf (The Hyperledger Project at the Linux Foundation)
Global confidence in institutions is in steep decline worldwide. Technology frequently lets us down too. Brian Behlendorf explains why trust is essential to building a functioning society and how it's under serious threat. Brian argues that open source software offers a model for how we can work together, even when we have no reason to trust each other.
10:00am-10:15am (15m)
Sharing America's code
Alvand Salehi (The White House)
Last August, the White House released the Federal Source Code Policy to improve nationwide access to the government’s custom-developed software. Alvin Salehi walks you through some of the government's coolest open source projects available on the newly launched Code.gov.
10:15am-10:20am (5m)
Closing remarks
Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis, Kelsey Hightower, and Scott Hanselman close the first day of keynotes.
7:00pm-9:00pm (2h)
Wednesday Birds of a Feather
Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions provide face-to-face exposure to those interested in the same projects and concepts. BoFs can be organized for individual projects or broader topics (best practices, open data, standards, etc.). BoFs are entirely up to you. We post your topic and provide the space and time. You provide the engaging topic.
8:15am-8:45am (30m)
Speed Networking
Jumpstart your networking at OSCON by coming to Speed Networking on Wednesday morning before the keynote presentations begin. Bring your business cards and prepare a minute of patter about yourself, your projects, and your interests.
8:45am-9:00am (15m)
Plenary