Everything open source
May 16–17, 2016: Training & Tutorials
May 18–19, 2016: Conference
Austin, TX

Schedule: Business of OSS sessions

11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Amanda Folson (GitLab)
Average rating: ****.
(4.20, 5 ratings)
Just because you’re selling SaaS doesn’t mean you can’t adopt open source principles in your organization. Amanda Folson explores how individuals and companies can open source their documentation, libraries, and ideas for the greater good of the community in a way that doesn’t mean giving it all away for free. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Intermediate
Average rating: ****.
(4.12, 8 ratings)
Open source has changed how businesses, nonprofits, and individuals run software and, increasingly, hardware—both in design and manufacturing. Brian Redbeard Harrington analyzes how open source businesses make money and how they benefit their users and examines the pragmatic challenges ubiquitous to libre software, open hardware, and selling “support” as a model. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Tags: featured
Jamie Dobson (Container Solutions)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 12 ratings)
Capitalism as an economic system is based on key relationships between profit, costs, labor, and productivity. Jamie Dobson explains how open source software is contributing to undermining these relationships and is therefore undermining capitalism itself. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Nithya Ruff (Comcast)
Nithya Ruff argues that marketing is not a "four-letter word" and explains why we should be doing more of it in open source. Whether it's called advocacy or evangelizing, we need to do it to promote projects, sell more open source-based software, and attract more users and developers. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Ariel Tseitlin (Scale Venture Partners)
Average rating: ***..
(3.50, 4 ratings)
You've got a great idea, and you realize that open source is the way to build it. So how do you pick the right business model to grow your idea into a big company? Ariel Tseitlin explores what has worked in the past and what investors want to see to give you funding, along the way identifying the factors that differentiate successful businesses from unsuccessful ones. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Jim Jagielski (ASF), Bradley Kuhn (Software Freedom Conservancy), Heather Meeker (O'Melveny & Myers'), Rabin Bhattacharya (Capital One), Keith Bergelt (Open Invention Network), Mishi Choudhary (Software Freedom Law Center), Eben Moglen (Columbia Law School)
Average rating: ****.
(4.83, 6 ratings)
A panel of experts holds an open and engaging discussion on patents and open source to uncover the complexities associated with each. The panel discusses the effect of open source software on patents, open sourcing software that already has a patent on it, what happens to other company patents if open sourced patented software is developed, and more. Come ready with questions for the panelists. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Karen Sandler (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Average rating: ****.
(4.75, 4 ratings)
While a new job offer is exciting, you likely won't have as much negotiation power after you formally accept the job. Making sure you have a clear understanding of your employment arrangement and how it affects the software you work on is a critical part of signing the paperwork. Karen Sandler discusses important provisions in these contracts and suggests things to ask for from new employers. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Intermediate
Tiffany Mikell (BSMdotCo), Kortney Ziegler (BSMdotCo)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
Tiffany Mikell and Kortney Ziegler share the role open source technologies and communities played in their success and explore specific frameworks and projects that have been particularly useful along the bootstrapping journey from industry thought leaders to tech product "unicorn." Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Kishau Rogers (Websmith Group)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 2 ratings)
Kishau Rogers proposes a framework for launching enterprise-wide innovation centers that use open source technology in all aspects of business innovation, from rapid prototype development and open collaboration to customer discovery, while following a roadmap for commercial product development. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Patrick McFadin (DataStax)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 3 ratings)
Will our project be OSS or proprietary? It's an easy question that can lead to some uncomfortable moments in an organization. Sorting through the reasons for and against OSS can be tedious at best and life changing at worst. Don’t let this moment become something you regret. Patrick McFadin outlines the process and gives you some tools to make it through. Hopefully we’ll save a few friendships. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Matt Asay (Adobe)
Average rating: ****.
(4.80, 5 ratings)
From the outside, open source companies try to appear to be Fine Upstanding Open Source Citizens™. On the inside of the sausage factory, however, hard decisions and trade-offs are constantly being made. After nearly 15 years of working for some of the industry's best-known open source companies, Matt Asay decided to move on. He explains why and what he learned along the way. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B
Deborah Bryant (Red Hat), Danese Cooper (PayPal), Deb Nicholson (Software Freedom Conservancy), Stefano Zacchiroli (Software Heritage), Karen Sandler (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 5 ratings)
Open source projects are increasingly opting to form an independent entity—a “foundation”—to serve as the core of their community rather than relying on good will or corporate oversight. Deborah Bryant, Danese Cooper, Sam Ramji, and Deb Nicholson share their experiences and provide introductory guidance on forming, managing, and leading an open source foundation. Read more.