Everything open source
May 16–17, 2016: Training & Tutorials
May 18–19, 2016: Conference
Austin, TX

Schedule: Open Source 101 sessions

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9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Location: Meeting Room 19 Level: Intermediate
Daniel Hinojosa (Evolutionnext.com)
Average rating: ****.
(4.23, 13 ratings)
Daniel Hinojosa offers a small guided tour of three functional programming languages—Haskell, Scala, and Clojure—highlighting their differences and what they hold in common. Read more.
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1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Location: Ballroom B Level: Intermediate
Brian Holt (Netflix)
Average rating: ****.
(4.25, 28 ratings)
Brian Holt offers a hands-on, in-depth exploration of React. You’ll discover exactly how React works by building several complete React components, including a small app, and learn how you can apply its simple, declarative power to your applications using the latest ES6 features and syntax. By the end of this training, you'll understand why React is the most talked-about JavaScript library. Read more.
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11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom C Level: Non-technical
Maria Naggaga (Microsoft )
Average rating: ****.
(4.40, 5 ratings)
Contributing to an open source project can be one of the most daunting things to do as a developer. Your code is out there, but is it good? Will people like it? Will they accept you? We can get overwhelmed by the fear of being publicly rejected and harassed by the open source community. Maria Naggaga covers the techniques she uses to be a "fearless" active contributor and contributor advocate. Read more.
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11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom C Level: Intermediate
Sumana Harihareswara (Changeset Consulting)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 9 ratings)
From Monty Python references to Git to mailing lists, Sumana Harihareswara discusses the barriers that often slow down new users and contributors during outreach efforts and explores what's crucial and what to toss. Read more.
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1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom C Level: Non-technical
Tags: featured
Saron Yitbarek (CodeNewbie)
Average rating: ****.
(4.90, 10 ratings)
Being an open source contributor assumes access to resources many don’t have: technical knowledge and tools, a socioeconomic status that allows coding without compensation, etc. Saron Yitbarek explains how we can work toward a more inclusive open source space for all by understanding the environment required to contribute and what groups are least likely to have access to these resources. Read more.
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2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom C Level: Non-technical
Average rating: ***..
(3.75, 4 ratings)
Very often when discussing whether or not to go open source, you hear concerns about loss of business, inconvenient transparency, and the loss of control. Christian Grail explains how he convinced his managers to go open source. Based on his experience, Christian offers guidance on how you can address concerns about open source and convince your manager to go open source too. Read more.
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4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom C Level: Non-technical
Tags: featured
Ian Varley (Salesforce.com), Regina Burkebile (Salesforce.com)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 6 ratings)
Even if your company understands the benefit of open source contribution, the reality is often much harder. For established companies, many factors can cause higher friction for contributors (like security, legal, executive approval, etc.). Ian Varley and Regina Burkebile share the improvements Salesforce has made to reduce friction and help you accelerate OSS contribution at your company. Read more.
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5:10pm–5:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom C Level: Intermediate
Michelle Casbon (Qordoba)
Average rating: ****.
(4.38, 8 ratings)
Michelle Casbon explains how, starting with little more than enthusiasm, she made her first contribution to the Apache Spark project this year. Michelle tells the story of this journey, sharing the key lessons she learned in a format that serves as a guide for anyone looking to get started, especially if they don’t know where to begin. Read more.
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11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Non-technical
Quinn Murphy (Netsuite)
Average rating: ***..
(3.86, 7 ratings)
Quinn Murphy chronicles his journey from a sysadmin who used OSS software extensively to someone who contributes documentation, information, and code to OSS projects. Quinn explains how becoming a contributor can enhance your career as well as your connection to the software you use every day. Read more.
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11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Non-technical
Justin Dorfman (MaxCDN)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 3 ratings)
Justin Dorfman explores ways that people who do not have backgrounds in software engineering can contribute to the open source movement. Code is just one piece of the puzzle. There's much more to making an open source project successful. Community management, documentation, design, fundraising, and marketing are needed to sustain a project beyond "git push origin master." Read more.
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1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Non-technical
VM Brasseur (Hewlett Packard Enterprise)
Average rating: ****.
(4.86, 7 ratings)
Drive-through contributors: they drop by; they fix their problem; they leave. We'd prefer that these people stick around and join the community, but a good drive-through contribution adds value to your project. VM Brasseur explores methods for maximizing drive-through contributions and offers an argument for using the number of drive-through contributions as a metric for project health. Read more.
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2:40pm–3:20pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Intermediate
Duane O'Brien (PayPal), Lisa LaForge (SanDisk Corp)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
As an organization moves from consuming open source to giving back, compliance professionals need to be able to track and approve open source contributions. Duane O'Brien and Lisa LaForge explain how to use a sandbox approval to streamline contributions and make the process more efficient for both engineers and compliance professionals. Read more.
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5:10pm–5:50pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Intermediate
Gina Likins (Red Hat), Heidi Ellis (Western New England University), Gregory Hislop (Drexel University)
To contribute to an open source project, students must first learn open source methods, tools, and culture. However, few CS degree programs cover these topics. Gina Likins, Heidi Ellis, and Gregory Hislop outline an NSF-funded effort to advance FOSS learning in undergraduate computing programs and solicit input about the FOSS skills and abilities community members would like to see addressed. Read more.