Everything open source
May 16–17, 2016: Training & Tutorials
May 18–19, 2016: Conference
Austin, TX

OSCON Speakers

New speakers are added continuously. Please check back to see the latest updates to the program.

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Alasdair Allan is a scientist, author, hacker, tinkerer, and journalist who has recently been spending a lot of time thinking about the Internet of Things, which he thinks is broken. He is the author of a number of books and sometimes also stands in front of cameras. You can often find him at conferences talking about interesting things or deploying sensors to measure them. A couple of years ago, he rolled out a mesh network of five hundred sensor motes covering the entirety of Moscone West during Google I/O. He’s still recovering. A few years before that, he caused a privacy scandal by uncovering that your iPhone was recording your location all the time, which caused several class-action lawsuits and a US Senate hearing. Some years on, he still isn’t sure what to think about that.

Alasdair sporadically writes blog posts about things that interest him or, more frequently, provides commentary in 140 characters or less. He is a contributing editor for Make magazine and a contributor to O’Reilly Radar. Alasdair is a former academic. As part of his work, he built a distributed peer-to-peer network of telescopes that, acting autonomously, reactively scheduled observations of time-critical events. Notable successes included contributing to the detection of what was—at the time—the most distant object yet discovered, a gamma-ray burster at a redshift of 8.2.

Presentations

Using the ESP8266 to build the Internet of Things Session

The ESP8266 is a microcontroller with WiFi and GPIO that is sold for as little as two dollars. After 50 years of Moore's Law, we're getting to a place where computing is not just cheap, it’s essentially free. The Internet of Things, which puts both general-purpose computing and sensors everywhere, will be built from blocks like these. Alasdair Allan shows you how.

Kyle Ambert is lead data scientist at Intel’s Artificial Intelligence and Analytics Solutions group, where he uses machine learning and statistical methods to solve real-world big data problems. Currently, his research centers around novel applications of machine learning in the health and life sciences. Kyle contributes to the data science direction of the Trusted Analytics Platform, particularly as it pertains to analytical pipeline and algorithm development. He holds a BA in biological psychology from Wheaton College and a PhD in biomedical informatics from Oregon Health & Science University, where his research focused on text analytics and developing machine-learning optimization solutions for biocuration workflows in the neurosciences.

Presentations

Combining open source elements to launch a new analytics platform Session

Chuck Freedman and Kyle Ambert share lessons learned from a journey combining open source projects, supporting users, and building a community around the Trusted Analytics Platform (TAP).

Chris Aniszczyk is an engineer by trade with a passion for open source and building communities. Currently, Chris is serving as interim executive director of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Previously, at Twitter, he created their open source program (@TwitterOSS) and led their open source efforts for many years. Chris has served for many years on the Eclipse Foundation’s board of directors, representing the committer community, and represents Twitter on the Java Community Process (JCP) organization. In a previous life, he bootstrapped a consulting company, made many mistakes, and led and hacked on many Eclipse.org and Gentoo Linux-related projects. In his spare time, you’ll find Chris doing yoga, writing, running, or cycling.

Presentations

Open source lessons from the TODO Group Session

Members of the TODO Group—an open group of companies who collaborate on practices, tools, and other ways to run successful and effective open source projects and programs—discuss why they started open source offices in their respective companies (Twitter, Netflix, Box, Google, Microsoft, and SanDisk) and share the lessons they learned along the way.

Matt Asay is vice president of mobile at Adobe. With more than a decade in open source and its application in big data and mobile, Matt most recently ran community, marketing, and business development at MongoDB. Previously, he served as VP of business development at real-time analytics company Nodeable (acquired by Appcelerator in October 2012); VP of business development at mobile HTML5 startup Strobe (now part of Facebook); chief operating officer at Canonical, the Ubuntu Linux company; GM, Americas and VP of business development at Alfresco; and part of the team that helped put Novell on its open source track. Matt is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI). He holds a JD from Stanford, where he focused on open source and other IP licensing issues, an MA from the University of Kent at Canterbury, and a BA from Brigham Young University. Matt is a regular columnist for ReadWrite, TechRepublic, and InfoWorld.

Presentations

The truth about open source businesses: Confessions from an ex-open sourceror Session

From the outside, open source companies try to appear to be Fine Upstanding Open Source Citizens™. On the inside of the sausage factory, however, hard decisions and trade-offs are constantly being made. After nearly 15 years of working for some of the industry's best-known open source companies, Matt Asay decided to move on. He explains why and what he learned along the way.

Mark Atwood is a long time participant in the open source community, and is a regular conference speaker. He is the Director of Open Source Engagement at Hewlett Packard Enterprise. His technology interests include software infrastructure and tooling, open source databases, and hackerspaces. He makes his home in the green city of Seattle.

Presentations

Introducing OpenSwitch: The open source, open community enterprise-grade switch network operating system Session

Mark Atwood offers an overview of the OpenSwitch platform, an open source, Linux-based network operating system (NOS) platform that utilizes modern development tools and offers extensive APIs and management interfaces. Chartered as a Linux Foundation project, OpenSwitch provides a fully featured control plane stack with support for layer 2 and layer 3 networking protocols.

Gleb Bahmutov is a JavaScript ninja, image-processing expert, and software quality fanatic. After receiving a PhD in computer science from Purdue University, Gleb worked on laser scanners, 3D reconstruction, and panorama-based virtual tours at EveryScape. Later, Gleb switched to writing browser data visualization software at MathWorks. After a year, Gleb went back to the startup environment and developed software quality analysis tools at uTest (now Applause). Today, Gleb is developing real-time financial analysis tools at Kensho. He blogs about software development topics and links his projects at his website. You can follow him and his work on Twitter as @bahmutov.

Presentations

From procedural to reactive JavaScript with stops Session

JavaScript is an interesting language. It can mimic almost any style you want, from procedural to object-oriented to functional and beyond. Gleb Bahmutov takes a simple problem and solves it using a variety of different approaches, showing each approach's ability to take away the complexity while still being the JavaScript we all love to hate.

Chad Bailey left a career as a rocket scientist to build web apps, and he’s been doing just that for the better part of a decade. Chad currently works on the support team at Heroku, where he helps customers run their databases on one of the largest production Postgres fleets in the world.

Presentations

Static and dynamic data with Postgres, Kafka, and Bottled Water Session

Chad Bailey demonstrates how to put the combination of static and dynamic data to work in your own apps.

Keila Banks is an 13-year-old web designer, programmer, videographer, and publisher of content making use of mostly open source software.

Presentations

The automated teen Session

Using Python, Ruby, and Internet technologies, Keila Banks shows how a teen gets more done with less time and effort.

Stacey Banks is an InfoSec wonk, geek, pirate captain, triathlete, and GRT.

Presentations

Espionage is easy because your security compliance is S#!7 Session

With constantly advancing technology to secure our information systems, why are we still so vulnerable to attack? While there are advanced attacks, the majority are still routine security vulnerabilities that we see time and again. Stacey Banks explains why compliance is not security and adding the latest and greatest technology into an insecure system will not save you.

Boris Baryshnikov is a principal program manager on the Azure Compute team focusing on Linux/OSS on Azure. Previously Boris worked in the Database Systems group focusing on features related to the next generation of the Azure SQL Database platform. Before that he was on the SQL Server Engine Query Processor team working on features for efficient query performance troubleshooting and predictable query processing, including leading the SQL Server 2008 Resource Governor project.

Presentations

Provisioning Cassandra in the cloud Tutorial

AWS, Azure, and GCP all provision clusters differently. Docker, Kubernetes, and Mesos are seeking to simplify that process but haven't fully delivered on that promise. Ben Lackey and Boris Baryshnikov explain the best way to provision with the tools available today as we wait for the perfect orchestration layer to arrive.

Kenny Bastani is a Spring developer advocate at Pivotal. As a passionate blogger and open source contributor, Kenny engages a community of passionate developers on topics ranging from graph databases to microservices. Kenny is a coauthor of the O’Reilly book Cloud Native Java: Designing Resilient Systems with Spring Boot, Spring Cloud, and Cloud Foundry.

Presentations

The cloud-native Java workshop Tutorial

Kenny Bastani demonstrates how to build cloud-native Java applications—designed to fully exploit a cloud platform both in the application layer, where things decompose into microservices, and at the data layer, where NoSQL offers better horizontal scaling and fitness for specific purpose.

Mark Bates is the founder and chief architect of the consulting company Meta42 Labs, based in Boston, MA. Mark spends his days focusing on new application development and consulting for his clients. At night he writes books, raises kids, and occasionally starts a band and tries to “make it.” Mark is the author of three books, Distributed Programming with Ruby (2009), Programming in CoffeeScript (2012), and Conquering the Command Line (2014). Mark also ran the weekly Golang screencast site, Metacasts.tv, acquired by O’Reilly in 2015.

Presentations

Butterfly in reverse: From SOA to monolith Session

Mark Bates discusses how he started building an application “correctly”—using Go, Angular, and SOA—and ended up with the classic monolith architecture you hear people warning against. Mark explains why Go, SOA, and Angular were the wrong choices for this app and why the monolith was the right answer.

Vincent Batts is a software engineer working on all things container architecture in Red Hat’s Office of Technology. He is involved in the Open Containers Initiative as a maintainer, serves on the technical board, and is a maintainer on the appc/spec. A mindful polyglot, Vincent has spent the last 15 years participating in the Linux and open source community. He is an ongoing member on Slackware Linux’s core team, a past maintainer on the Docker project, and the Go compiler for Fedora and Red Hat.

Presentations

Is your open source project ready for the container era? Session

Learn how to package up your open source software project as a containerized offering that developers trust and your community can easily maintain. Diane Mueller, Vincent Batts, and Ryan Jarvinen outline ways to automate your image build and deployment processes using Docker Hub, Kubernetes, OpenShift, and other popular toolchains and explore emerging best practices and container stds.

Currently, Ryan Baxter is focusing on application development in the cloud using various technologies, including Node.js and Docker, and applying those technologies to application solutions around mobile, the IoT, and more. Exploring new languages, frameworks, and technologies and then sharing what he’s learned has always come naturally to Ryan. Even when it wasn’t his day job, Ryan was always driven by this passion and spent his time and energy educating friends, colleagues, and anyone else that would listen. Now, as a developer advocate at IBM, he has found a role that’s a perfect fit. When he’s not coding, Ryan likes spending time with his daughter, ice fishing, and watching the Red Sox.

Presentations

Building an IoT app using MQTT Session

MQTT is an standards-based, lightweight pub/sub messaging protocol ideal for Internet of Things use cases. With implementations in a number of different languages, using MQTT is simple and straightforward. Ryan Baxter walks attendees through building an application that connects to an MQTT broker and can receive data from and issue commands to a number of different IoT devices.

Bert Belder has been a Node.js core contributor since 2011 and is one the longest running Node maintainers still active. In 2013, Bert founded StrongLoop together with fellow core team member Ben Noordhuis. Bert first got involved in open source by doing the Windows port of libuv and has been a leader in the Node community ever since.

Presentations

How open is your enterprise? From contribution to integration and implementation Session

Open source has won. Enterprise organizations around the world are using open source technology and systems and rapidly integrating them into new solutions, platforms, and strategies. Charlie Gracie, Christopher Ferris, Bert Belder, and David Taieb explore the current state of open source technology and discuss how you can help drive adoption, integration, and use within your organization.

Donna Benjamin is the executive director of Creative Contingencies, an Australian company specializing in customized web services, digital research, and event management tools. Donna is a passionate advocate of free and open source software (FOSS) solutions for small business and education. She’s also currently part of the outreach and licensing team of the Open Invention Network and sits on the board of the Drupal Association. In the past, Donna has served as president of Linux Users of Victoria, as a board member of Open Source Industry Australia, and as an advisor to the Ada Initiative. You can read Donna’s thoughts about business on her Creative Contingencies blog and thoughts about everything else at Kattekrab.net.

Presentations

I am your user. Why do you hate me? Session

Open source software projects can be prickly toward their users. Poor documentation and a steep learning curve can make a project community seem hostile. As users of many different open source projects over the years, Donna Benjamin and Leslie Hawthorn have often wondered about this problem and contemplated what to do about it. This session takes their long-standing private rant public.

Keith Bergelt is the CEO of Open Invention Network (OIN), the largest patent nonaggression community in history, organized to support freedom of action in Linux as a key element of open source software. OIN has more than 1,900 community members and owns more than 1,100 global patents and applications. The OIN patent license and member cross-licenses are available royalty free to any party that joins the OIN community. Prior to joining OIN, Keith served as CEO of two hedge funds formed to unlock the considerable asset value of intellectual property in middle market companies. Previously, he served as a senior advisor to the technology investment division at Texas Pacific Group. Keith also headed business development, IP, and licensing for Cambridge Display Technology and established and served as general manager of the Strategic Intellectual Asset Management business unit and director of Technology Strategy at Motorola.

Presentations

Aligning patents and open source Session

A panel of experts holds an open and engaging discussion on patents and open source to uncover the complexities associated with each. The panel discusses the effect of open source software on patents, open sourcing software that already has a patent on it, what happens to other company patents if open sourced patented software is developed, and more. Come ready with questions for the panelists.

Joshua Bernstein recently joined EMC as the new VP of technology for the Emerging Technologies division. Prior to EMC, Josh ran the Siri Deployment and Infrastructure Architecture team at Apple for four and a half years. As a member of the small team, Joshua and his colleagues successfully took Siri from launch to 60,000 servers, deploying in 17 locations worldwide. Prior to working at Apple, Josh was the senior software engineer at Penguin Computing, specializing in design and implementation of large-scale distributed systems management software. In addition, he worked on many high-profile NASA missions, including the design for the image processing pipeline of the HiRISE Camera currently on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Josh is a large contributor to the open source community, contributing to multiple projects including Mesos, HDFS, HBASE, Zookeeper, Samba, OpenMPI, Torque, and the Linux Infiniband Stack. Josh studied computer engineering at the University of Arizona.

Presentations

Open source has changed how you run infrastructure Session

Some of the most successful organizations in the world have disrupted industries—or responded to disruption—by building infrastructure using open source platforms and tools. Josh Bernstein shares first-hand experiences from his days running the Siri Deployment and Infrastructure Architecture team at Apple and discusses why some of the world's largest organizations are using open source.

Rachel Berry is a self-taught programmer and perpetual student of all things tech. Rachel is part of GitHub’s technical support team and loves helping developers be even more awesome than they already are. She spends her spare time hiking with her husband and son, working on a master’s in computer science at Georgia Tech, and teaching Ruby on Rails and GitHub to local nonprofit diversity-in-tech meetups.

Presentations

From behind the contact form: Tips from GitHub Support on helping your community Session

In the last seven years, GitHub Support has gotten over 23,000 questions about your open source projects. Rachel Berry, one of the humans behind the contact form, discusses the questions GitHub Support sees most often and the small changes you can implement to remove confusion and make all the difference for your users and community.

Venkatesh “Venky” Bharadwaj is a data scientist on Intel’s TAP team, where he develops cool solutions for life sciences, retail, and IoT domains. Previously, he worked on the Graph Analytics Operations team at Intel Labs, which aimed to develop graph-based machine-learning solutions for data scientists, and as a software engineer at one of the largest software consultancies in India. Venkatesh holds a master’s degree in computer science from Purdue University, with a research focus on applying text analytics to help translate science learning material to aural cues for visually impaired students, and a degree in computer engineering.

Presentations

Getting started with the Trusted Analytics Platform (TAP) Event

The open source Trusted Analytics Platform (TAP) accelerates the creation of cloud-native applications driven by big data analytics. Chuck Freedman and Venkatesh Bharadwaj offer an overview and demonstration of TAP. You'll use popular open source projects including Spark, Hadoop, Cloud Foundry, and others to work with data and deploy a simple visualization application in the cloud.

Rabin Bhattacharya is a director and assistant general counsel at Capital One, where he has worked for the past four years. Rabin manages all of Capital One’s patent prosecution and licensing activities, serves as Capital One’s intellectual property subject-matter expert for corporate transactions, and provides general legal advice on the adoption of new technologies for financial products. Prior to becoming an attorney, He served as a chief scientist at Philips in the Netherlands, where he both invented and oversaw the research of new solid state lighting systems. Rabin received his JD from Georgetown University, his PhD and MA in electrical engineering from Princeton University, and his BS in engineering from Harvey Mudd College.

Presentations

Aligning patents and open source Session

A panel of experts holds an open and engaging discussion on patents and open source to uncover the complexities associated with each. The panel discusses the effect of open source software on patents, open sourcing software that already has a patent on it, what happens to other company patents if open sourced patented software is developed, and more. Come ready with questions for the panelists.

Eli Bixby is a developer programs engineer at Google currently developing on Google Cloud Platform’s DevOps distributed systems, machine-learning, and big data offerings. He joined Google as a developer programs engineer. Previously, Eli dabbled in several research areas, with papers in biophysics, algorithmic game theory, and most recently computational biology.

Presentations

Diving into machine learning through TensorFlow Tutorial

Machine learning can be an intimidating subject. Julia Ferraioli, Amy Unruh, and Eli Bixby introduce the basics of TensorFlow, an open source deep learning library, and offer practical, hands-on experience with core concepts in machine learning, including how to ingest and prepare raw data for use, run a variety of algorithms to gain insight from the data, and have some fun with visualization.

Patrick Bohrer is a distinguished engineer in IBM’s Cloud division, where his responsibilities include serving as the technical lead for the Mobile Innovation Lab in Austin, Texas, as well as leading IBM’s global Swift engineering efforts. Patrick co-led the 2012 Global Technology Outlook, MobileFirst, which helped set the technical direction for IBM’s current mobile and cloud efforts. Patrick holds a BA in computer science from the University of Texas.

Presentations

Mobile, open source, and the drive to the cloud Session

Open technologies are leading the way to a simplified development experience, end to end, from mobile to the cloud. Patrick Bohrer explores the role of these open technologies in driving down the time it takes to build, integrate, and deliver powerful apps that blur the lines between mobile and cloud.

AJ Bowen is on a mission to containerize all the things and help others to do the same. In the past, AJ has done technical support, evangelism, and customer and developer advocacy at Gandi. Her other experience includes heavy involvement in the Occupy movement in Kansas City, where she discovered the delightful and complicated world of horizontal organization in groups of passionate people with wildly diverse political perspectives, and humanitarian work in Haiti. AJ doesn’t like being told what to do—or telling others what to do—and is on a constant mission to eliminate unnecessary hierarchy.

Presentations

Deployment and orchestration at scale with Docker Swarm Tutorial

Jérôme Petazzoni and AJ Bowen demonstrate building an app from development to production with Docker. Jérôme and AJ run a sample app on a single node with Compose and add scaling and load balancing. They then provision a Swarm cluster with Docker Machine and implement multihost communication with overlay networking. The result will be a highly available, scalable deployment for the application.

Introduction to Docker and containers Tutorial

Docker is an open platform to build, ship, and run any Linux application anywhere. AJ Bowen and Jérôme Petazzoni lead a hands-on tutorial that gives you an opportunity to dive in and see Docker in action. You'll learn about Docker basic concepts and how to run containers, create your own images, interact with the Docker Hub, and stack multiple containers to compose complex applications.

VM Brasseur (aka Vicky) is a manager of technical people, projects, processes, products, and businesses. In her nearly 20 years in the tech industry, Vicky has been an analyst, programmer, product manager, software engineering manager, technical and C-level business consultant, and director of software engineering. She is a winner of the 2014 Perl White Camel Award and a winner of the 2016 O’Reilly Open Source Award. Vicky occasionally blogs, often writes, and frequently tweets at @vmbrasseur. She is also a community moderator for Opensource.com

Presentations

Have it your way: Maximizing drive-through contributions Session

Drive-through contributors: they drop by; they fix their problem; they leave. We'd prefer that these people stick around and join the community, but a good drive-through contribution adds value to your project. VM Brasseur explores methods for maximizing drive-through contributions and offers an argument for using the number of drive-through contributions as a metric for project health.

Erica Brescia is the cofounder and COO of Bitnami. With over 1 million deployments per month, Bitnami provides the largest source of applications and development environments to the world’s leading cloud service providers, such as Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Compute Platform, and Oracle Cloud Platform. Bitnami-packaged apps are consistent, secure, and up to date and can be deployed with a single click, either locally, in a virtual machine, in the cloud, or in a Docker container. Erica has a BS in business administration from the University of Southern California.

Presentations

Hiring awesome engineers: Looking beyond the Valley and the USA Keynote

3 bootcamps. 291 applicants. 42 students. 16 new hires. 0% turnover. The Bitnami Developer Bootcamp has exceeded Bitnami's wildest expectations. Erica Brescia explains how an experiment has turned into an extremely successful hiring channel and has also allowed Bitnami to give back to its local community by providing free, top-notch education to the local developer community.

Kelsey Breseman is an engineer and Steering Committee member of the Tessel Project —an open source organization whose aim is to empower web developers to enter the connected-devices space. Kelsey has been involved in developing consumer drones, research on sleep and temperature, implantable vision devices, and devices for lung cancer diagnosis and studied neural engineering at Olin College. You can see what she’s up to on GitHub.

Presentations

How to build a product when nobody's getting paid Session

Creating a product—particularly a hardware product—is difficult enough as a company. But the challenges of a distributed team are even more intense when all contributors are volunteers. Kelsey Breseman played a major role in transitioning Tessel from a company to a volunteer project. She explains the hurdles the Tessel Project faced and how it overcame them on the way to shipping Tessel 2.

Tessel 2 hack: Hardware for software developers Tutorial

Join Kelsey Breseman in this hands-on tutorial for Tessel 2. Tessel is designed so that you can build physical, Internet-connected devices quickly, even if you have no hardware experience. What do you want to build? A button to call an Uber or set off sirens when your website goes down? Whatever it is, Kelsey will guide you through building it, from concept to prototype.

Mike Brevoort is CTO at Robots and Pencils and cofounder of Beep Boop, a ridiculously simple hosting platform for Slack bots. Mike has nearly 20 years’ experience building real-time distributed systems, service architectures, user experiences, and data science.

Presentations

Why bots, why now, and what you should know All the Bots

The world has gone bot crazy. Is it all hype or an indication of the beginning of a macroshift in technology? Mike Brevoort explains why bots are manifestations of the intersection of conversational user interfaces, more approachable machine-learning capabilities, and a new class of runtimes.

Ben Brown is a veteran software designer and developer. Over the past 20 years, he’s been involved in almost every aspect of technology, from infrastructure to financing. Ben cofounded Howdy.ai, a tool for building customized artificially intelligent digital coworkers that live in messaging apps and chat rooms.

Presentations

All the bots hackathon All the Bots

Our afternoon hackathon is the perfect opportunity to meet and collaborate with like-minded developers. Our assembled speakers and bot experts will be on hand all afternoon to mentor and advise anyone new to bots or help troubleshoot bot creations. This is a safe and welcoming environment for new and experienced bot developers.

Your friendly robot companions: Design for messaging and chat All the Bots

We call them “bots.” They’ve been around for a long time, but they are finally breaking into the mainstream. The opportunity is huge. Ben Brown explores why designing for messaging will become a discipline as important as responsive design, incorporating skills as diverse as copywriting, business analytics, and API programming. And you thought microcopy was important now.

Deborah Bryant is senior director of open source and standards (OSAS) at Red Hat. The OSAS team is dedicated to ensuring that its upstream communities are wildly successful and that Red Hat is appropriately involved in the standards bodies that influence Red Hat’s products. This is done through direct participation in projects, supporting community events, providing infrastructure and other project resources, and helping to promote projects to ensure their use and attraction of future developers. Deborah’s 20-something-year background in tech spans three industries: private industry and startups, the public sector and government, and education. She’s long been an advocate of open source adoption, governance, policy, and economic development.

Deborah serves on numerous boards and councils with public trust agendas and an emphasis on open source as enabling technology, including on the National Steering Committee for Open Source for America, as board adviser to Open Source Digital Voting Foundation, and on Code for America’s and IntraHealth International’s Open Councils. She also serves as an Open Source Initiative (OSI) board director. In 2010, Deborah received an O’Reilly Media Open Source Award in recognition of her contribution to open source communities and advocating the use of free and open source software in government.

Presentations

Open source foundations 101 Session

Open source projects are increasingly opting to form an independent entity—a “foundation”—to serve as the core of their community rather than relying on good will or corporate oversight. Deborah Bryant, Danese Cooper, Sam Ramji, and Deb Nicholson share their experiences and provide introductory guidance on forming, managing, and leading an open source foundation.

With almost two decades in tech, Regina Burkebile is a marketing maven by day and a baby burper by night. Regina is the director of engineering marketing at Salesforce, where she helped launch the open source virtual team in addition to leading efforts that encourage engineers to share more about their innovations with the industry through events, blogs, and social media.

Presentations

Knocking down blockers: Transforming your company into an open source contributor Session

Even if your company understands the benefit of open source contribution, the reality is often much harder. For established companies, many factors can cause higher friction for contributors (like security, legal, executive approval, etc.). Ian Varley and Regina Burkebile share the improvements Salesforce has made to reduce friction and help you accelerate OSS contribution at your company.

Paris Buttfield-Addison is cofounder of Secret Lab, a mobile development studio based in beautiful Hobart, Australia. Secret Lab builds games and apps for mobile devices, including the award-winning ABC Play School iPad games, and the Qantas Joey Playbox. Paris formerly worked as mobile product manager for Meebo (acquired by Google) and writes technical books on mobile and game development for O’Reilly (most recently Learning Swift, 2nd edition, and The Kerbal Player’s Guide). He holds a degree in medieval history and a PhD in computing; he is currently studying law. Paris can be found on Twitter as @parisba online at Paris.id.au.

Presentations

Swift programming for iOS, OS X, and beyond Training

Veteran OS X and iOS developers Tim Nugent, Jonathon Manning, and Paris Buttfield-Addison offer an in-depth introduction to programming in Swift for developing iOS and OS X apps and services.

Swift programming for iOS, OS X, and beyond (Day 2) Training Day 2

Veteran OS X and iOS developers Tim Nugent, Jonathon Manning, and Paris Buttfield-Addison offer an in-depth introduction to programming in Swift for developing iOS and OS X apps and services.

Zhiyuan Cai is a cloud engineer at Huawei mainly focused on OpenStack community contribution. Previously, Zhiyuan worked on projects including Neutron, Keystone, and OpenStack Client but now spends more time on Tricircle, a project aimed at providing an OpenStack API gateway and networking automation for large-scale cloud deployments. Recently, Zhiyuan worked with engineers from NEC to run a demo that utilizes Tricircle to deploy web services with a database cluster backend across China and Japan. Zhiyuan holds a master of computer science.

Presentations

Cloud federation with Tricircle and Ubernetes Session

Tricircle provides an OpenStack API gateway and networking automation solution to manage multiple OpenStack clouds; similarly, Ubernetes also provides unified API to manage multiple Kubernetes clusters. Zhiyuan Cai and Quinton Hoole discuss when it makes sense to use Tricircle and Ubernetes and how it simplifies cloud distribution via OpenStack and Kubernetes.

Brian Capouch is a longtime open source user, programmer, and hacker. In 2016, Brian retired from Saint Joseph’s, a small Indiana college, where he taught CS using 100% open source tools. He is heavily involved in a number of historical restoration projects. The modern web, full stack universal JavaScript, SPAs, and PWAs are his current passions.

Presentations

SPA boot camp Tutorial

Single-page apps utilize the browser rendering engine as a virtualized application container to allow for more fluid and responsive web apps that mimic native applications in performance. Brian Capouch, Danilo Zekovic, and Ben Davisson offer an introduction to single-page apps, presenting an overview of concepts and techniques focused on practical familiarity with this technology.

Stephanie Carlson is a marketing and community specialist at EMC {code}.

Presentations

Managing a large open source community with smart tools Session

Increasing your online presence in the open source community involves more than just writing and committing code. We need to create safe places to collaborate and communicate freely in order to involve more people than just our closest team members. Jonas Rosland and Stephanie Carlson outline a few of the tools they use to tackle this big task and discuss failures, successes, and lessons learned.

Michelle Casbon is director of data science at Qordoba. Michelle’s development experience spans more than a decade across various industries, including media, investment banking, healthcare, retail, and geospatial services. Previously, she was a senior data science engineer at Idibon, where she built tools for generating predictions on textual datasets. She loves working with open source projects and has contributed to Apache Spark and Apache Flume. Her writing has been featured in the AI section of O’Reilly Radar. Michelle holds a master’s degree from the University of Cambridge, focusing on NLP, speech recognition, speech synthesis, and machine translation.

Presentations

How-to: Your first contribution Session

Michelle Casbon explains how, starting with little more than enthusiasm, she made her first contribution to the Apache Spark project this year. Michelle tells the story of this journey, sharing the key lessons she learned in a format that serves as a guide for anyone looking to get started, especially if they don’t know where to begin.

Francesco Cesarini is the founder and technical director of Erlang Solutions. With offices in seven countries on three continents, Erlang Solutions has become the go-to partner for scalable, highly available end-to-end solutions, running conferences, and providing support, consulting, training, certification, and systems development. As technical director, Francesco leads the development and consulting teams and is responsible for the product and research strategies of the company.

Francesco has used Erlang on a daily basis since 1995, when he started his career as an intern at Ericsson’s computer science laboratory, the birthplace of Erlang. He moved on to Ericsson’s Erlang training and consulting arm, where he worked on the R1 release of OTP, applying it to turnkey solutions and flagship telecom applications. In 1999, soon after Erlang was released as open source, Francesco founded what has today become Erlang Solutions. He is the coauthor of Erlang Programming (published by O’Reilly), has lectured at the IT University of Gothenburg for over a decade, and since 2010, has taught the concurrency-oriented programming course at Oxford University. You can find him rambling on twitter using the handle @FrancescoC.

Presentations

Concurrency + Distribution = Scalability + Availability: A journey architecting Erlang systems Session

Erlang/OTP has for years been described as the secret sauce to writing scalable and available systems. However, Erlang alone will not perform any magic. Francesco Cesarini walks attendees through the topology patterns of modern distributed Erlang architectures, discussing the trade-offs in scalability and reliability, the actor model, the failure model, and the built-in distribution model.

Designing and architecting for scalability with Erlang/OTP Tutorial

You need to implement a fault-tolerant, scalable, soft, real-time system with requirements for high availability. It has to be event driven and react to external stimulus, load, and failure. It must always be responsive. Francesco Cesarini outlines the Erlang/OTP approach to architecting a distributed system, breaking down the task into 10 steps that can be applied in other languages as well.

Patrick Chanezon is member of the technical staff at Docker Inc., where he helps to build Docker, an open platform for distributed applications for developers and sysadmins. A software developer and storyteller, Patrick spent 10 years building platforms at Netscape and Sun and 10 more evangelizing platforms at Google, VMware, and Microsoft. His main professional interest is in building and kickstarting the network effect for these wondrous two-sided markets called platforms. Patrick has worked on platforms for portals, ads, commerce, social, the Web, distributed apps, and the cloud.

Presentations

Containers as a service with Docker Open Container Day

Containers as a service (CaaS) provide developers the agility and portability they need to build microservice applications and ops the control required to deploy and maintain these apps in production. Patrick Chanezon offers a detailed overview of the four layers of the Docker ecosystem enabling CaaS—standards, infrastructure, platform, and services—and ends with a demo of CaaS in action.

Doris Chen is a developer evangelist for the western region of the United States at Microsoft, specializing in web technologies such as HTML5, jQuery, JavaScript, Ajax, and Java. Doris has over 15 years of experience in the software industry and has worked in several open source web tier technologies, the Java platform, .NET, and distributed computing technologies. She has developed and delivered over 400 keynotes, technical sessions, and code camps worldwide and published widely at numerous international conferences and user groups, including JavaOne, O’Reilly, WebVisions, SD Forum, and HTML5 and JavaScript meetups.

Doris works to create and foster the community around NetBeans, GlassFish, and related technologies. Before joining Microsoft, she was a technology evangelist at Sun Microsystems. Doris received her PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in computer engineering, specializing in medical informatics. She loves to travel and has visited 48 countries (out of 872) so far. In her spare time, she also enjoys music, movies, and museums.

Presentations

Practical performance tips to make your cross-platform mobile apps faster Session

Apache Cordova is one of the most popular frameworks for cross-platform mobile development. To build Cordova apps that perform well, it’s important to understand how to use the technologies in the most efficient ways. Doris Chen outlines what impacts "native performance," demonstrates how to measure mobile app performance, and shares practical tips for building faster Cordova apps.

A proven DevOps visionary and leader, Chip Childers is vice president of technology at the Cloud Foundry Foundation. Previously, Chip was vice president of product strategy at CumuLogic and spent more than 15 years in engineering leadership positions within the service provider industry, including work at SunGard Availability Services and Qwest Solutions. Chip has served on the board of directors for the Distributed Management Task Force and is a member of the Apache Software Foundation.

Presentations

Going native with Cloud Foundry Session

Chip Childers discusses what it means to be truly “cloud native,” why your organization needs to make the change, and why Cloud Foundry is the right platform for cloud-native applications.

Jerrod Chong is head of solutions at Yubico, where he helps organizations everywhere use YubiKeys. With over 15 years in the security industry, Jerrod is passionate about making strong authentication secure, simple, and scalable. If he’s not convincing you that hardware-backed keys are cool, he is looking for good coffee.

Presentations

Stop sweating the password and learn to love public key cryptography Session

Jerrod Chong explores the emerging FIDO U2F open standard and its elegant public key cryptography for two-factor authentication. Jerrod explains how FIDO U2F—backed by leading Internet and financial services in the FIDO Alliance—allows every service provider to be their own identity provider, over wired and wireless connections, with laptops and mobile devices.

Mishi Choudhary is the legal director at the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC), where she is the primary legal representative of many of the world’s most significant free software developers and nonprofit distributors, including Debian, the Apache Software Foundation, and OpenSSL, and consults with and advises established businesses and startups using free software in their products and service offerings in the US, Europe, India, China, and Korea. Mishi is also an attorney in good standing admitted to practice in New York State. She is the founder of SFLC.in, which under her direction has become the premier nonprofit organization representing the rights of internet users and free software developers in India. Since then, she has divided her time between New York and New Delhi, where she previously she practiced as a High Court and Supreme Court litigator. As of 2015, Mishi is the only lawyer in the world to simultaneously appear on briefs in the US and Indian Supreme Courts in the same term.

Mishi started working with SFLC following the completion of a fellowship during which she earned her LLM from Columbia Law School and was a Stone Scholar. In addition to an LLM, she has an LLB degree and a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Delhi. Mishi is a member of the Bar Council of Delhi, licensed to appear before the Supreme Court of India, all the State High Courts in India, in the State of New York, and before the Southern District of New York. In 2015, she was named one of the Asia Society’s 21 young leaders building Asia’s future. In 2016 she was selected as an Aspen Fellow as part of the Aspen Global Leadership Network.

Presentations

Aligning patents and open source Session

A panel of experts holds an open and engaging discussion on patents and open source to uncover the complexities associated with each. The panel discusses the effect of open source software on patents, open sourcing software that already has a patent on it, what happens to other company patents if open sourced patented software is developed, and more. Come ready with questions for the panelists.

Adrian Cockcroft is vice president of cloud architecture strategy at Amazon Web Services, where he focuses on the needs of cloud-native and “all-in” customers and leads the AWS open source community development program. Adrian has had a long career working at the leading edge of technology and is fascinated by what happens next. He started out as a developer in the UK before joining Sun Microsystems. He was a founding member of eBay research labs and worked at Netflix, where he directed a team working on personalization algorithms and served as a cloud architect, helping teams scale and migrate to AWS and led the Netflix open source program, and worked for VC firm Battery Ventures, where he promoted new ideas around DevOps, microservices, the cloud, and containers. He has also written four books, including Sun Performance and Tuning from Prentice Hall. Adrian holds a degree in applied physics from the City University, London.

Presentations

Microservices application tracing standards and simulators Session

Adrian Cockcroft and Adrian Cole explain how the initial focus on stabilizing the Open Zipkin tool is leading to the involvement of a wider group of people to define a more general portable tracing standard and language bindings for common languages that will let any microservices framework feed portable visualization tools.

Adrian Cole is the original developer of Apache JClouds. He has worked at Mulesoft, Netflix, Square, Twitter, and now Pivotal.

Presentations

Microservices application tracing standards and simulators Session

Adrian Cockcroft and Adrian Cole explain how the initial focus on stabilizing the Open Zipkin tool is leading to the involvement of a wider group of people to define a more general portable tracing standard and language bindings for common languages that will let any microservices framework feed portable visualization tools.

After years of submitting conference topics on things related to her job, Tina Coleman started designing projects and topics she found personally interesting. Some of those she’s shared with kids in local Women in Computing workshops, in hopes of helping the next generation of software engineers get to an aha moment. Following on the success of her talk at OSCON 2014, Tina hopes to share the fun of development with you in 2016. (She’s talked a few times at open source software conferences related to government software, but those were on much-less-fun topics than Furbies.)

Professionally, Tina is a software developer for a government contractor, and her day job uses Java, JavaScript, as well as any other technology or skill needed for a contract. (Go was originally one of these “other required technologies or skills.”) Her strengths include figuring out how to help customers describe what they really need to the team and then slinging code with the team to deliver what the customer really wants.

Presentations

Furby: "Go" away! Session

Two years ago, Tina Coleman linked her daughters' Furby to a Jenkins build system. Great, but who wants to be yelled at by a Furby when their build breaks? (OK, Tina did.) This year, led by her neurotic Furby friend, Tina walks you through Go programming via the Gobot framework, outlining Go's advantages and paradigms.

Lauren Cooney has over 15 years’ experience creating, building, and leading high-growth businesses, platforms, and developer communities for multiple Fortune 500 companies, including BEA Systems (now Oracle), IBM, Microsoft, and Cisco Systems, where she has led product management, open source, product marketing, developer strategy, and new business model creation. Lauren has recently taken on an executive leadership role at Cisco, where she drives open source strategy and STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and math, inclusive of women in technology) for the CTO office. She is passionate about continuous education, new open technologies and solutions, and driving amazing end-user experiences for customers, partners, and developers, as well as further enabling technical education across multiple boundaries and making it freely accessible to all. The Huffington Post and Business Insider have recognized Cooney as a top leader in enterprise software and cloud industries. She frequently speaks at conferences and events and works closely with customers, partners, developers, investors, press, and analysts on multiple topics.

Presentations

Open source and microservices: Your badass, next-gen application architecture Session

Developers are driving the market for cloud consumption and leading the industry to a new era of software-defined disruption. It's no longer a question that elastic and flexible development is the way to innovate and reduce time to market. Ken Owens and Lauren Cooney dig into open source architectures, explain why these solutions need to be open, and deep dive into other related challenges.

Danese Cooper works at PayPal, where she runs OASIS, an office devoted to engineering cultural change through open source, InnerSource, and other key initiatives. Danese also continues to run a successful consultancy to companies wishing to pursue open source strategies, which has served the SETI Foundation, Harris Corporation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Numenta, among other clients. Danese has a 25-year history in the software industry and has long been an advocate for transparent development methodologies. She has managed teams at Symantec and Apple, served as chief open source evangelist for Sun Microsystems, and served as senior director for open source strategies at Intel. Danese advised the R community on open source policy while at REvolution Computing (now Revolution Analytics) and served as chief technical officer for the Wikimedia Foundation. She is a director on the board of the Drupal Association, a chairperson for the Node.js Foundation board, a board advisor for Mozilla and Ushahidi, and a member of the Apache Software Foundation. Danese was also a board member of the Open Source Initiative for 10 years.

Presentations

Open source foundations 101 Session

Open source projects are increasingly opting to form an independent entity—a “foundation”—to serve as the core of their community rather than relying on good will or corporate oversight. Deborah Bryant, Danese Cooper, Sam Ramji, and Deb Nicholson share their experiences and provide introductory guidance on forming, managing, and leading an open source foundation.

Sustainability in open source Keynote

Open source efforts have proved to the world that collaborative development creates and innovates at speed and scale. Companies now know that using open source software is table stakes to be economically competitive. Danese Cooper explains how to ensure that the communities that created these opportunities continue to grow, develop, and inspire more new communities.

Transitioning to InnerSource: Increase delivery velocity, enable smooth collaboration, and produce quality software Tutorial

InnerSource applies the lessons of the best open source projects to proprietary engineering and transforms the cultures that use it. Danese Cooper offers case studies that demonstrate how PayPal and other companies started redesigning their engineering approaches and ended up changing how they work and outlines techniques any team can use to build an InnerSource practice in their organization.

Justin Cormack is a developer with an interest in making systems software more accessible.

Presentations

System software goes weird Session

System software has been a monoculture of C and a land of monoliths, but a new wave of open source system software has started to appear, in languages such as Rust, Go, Haskell, OCaml, and Lua. These projects are developing new sorts of applications and introducing new people to systems programming. Justin Cormack explores what's going on, where it's useful, and the new paths it's leading us down.

David Crespo is a frontend engineer working on commerce at Braintree.

Presentations

Folding time with signals in Elm Session

Elm is a functional language for interactive web apps that compiles to JavaScript—think Haskell for humans. With its signal abstraction, Elm is able to represent values that change over time at the level of its powerful type system. Through a tour of Elm and some live coding, David Crespo demonstrates a new way of thinking about time that you can take back to your language of choice.

Gabrielle Crevecoeur is a technical evangelist at Microsoft specializing in open source development. Her current focus is Node.js. Gabrielle is a recent graduate of Florida State University, where she majored in computer science. She plans to pursue a master’s in electrical engineering in the near future. When Gabrielle is not programming, you can find her playing video games or watching Netflix.

Presentations

Build your child their very own Node.js Frozen bot Session

Gabrielle Crevecoeur dives into the world of NodeBots. Using Node.js, the Johnny-Five framework, and an Arduino, Gabrielle walks participants through creating a bot, step by step. Although the NodeBot you build will respond to voice recognition, you'll leave able to create NodeBots with any functionality you like.

Joe Damato is a low-level computologist who enjoys reading and writing code. Joe is the founder and CEO of packagecloud.io, a service which makes it easy to create secure package repositories for developing and distributing software.

Presentations

Infrastructure as code might be literally impossible Session

Joe Damato explores why infrastructure as code might be literally impossible because none of the core open source software we use actually works.

Kranthi Dandamudi is a senior director of software engineering at Capital One, where he is responsible for building application frameworks and DevOps-related capabilities in the digital engineering space. Kranthi has over 20 years of experience in technology architecture, strategy, application development, and operations/support in the retail and financial industry domains. He lives in Glen Allen, VA, with his wife and two daughters. In his spare time loves to explore new technologies, spending time with his family, and watching and playing sports.

Presentations

Performance case study: Capital One's quick shift from closed source to open source Session

At Capital One, OSS has been instrumental in allowing customers to bank any place, any time and is revolutionizing how our developers are delivering software through a CI/CD pipeline. Kranthi Dandamudi outlines Capital One's conversion from a home-grown web/mobile/API framework to a fully OSS-based solution and describes how it kick-started an InnerSource and open source contribution revolution.

Scott Davis is a Principal Engineer with ThoughtWorks, where he focuses on the leading-edge, innovative, emerging, and nontraditional aspects of web development, such as serverless web apps, mobile web apps (Responsive PWAs), HTML5-based smart TV apps, conversational UIs (like Siri and Alexa), and using web technologies to build IoT solutions.

Scott is the founder of ThirstyHead.com, a Denver-based training and software development consultancy. Scott is also the cofounder of the Denver HTML5 User Group.

Scott has been writing about web development for over 10 years. His books include Getting Started with Grails, Groovy Recipes, GIS for Web Developers, The Google Maps API: Adding Where to Your Web Applications, and JBoss at Work. Scott is also the author of several popular article series at IBM developerWorks, including Mastering MEAN, Mastering Grails, and Practically Groovy. His videos include Architecture of the MEAN Stack, Responsive Mobile Architecture, and On the Road to Angular 2.

Presentations

MEAN architecture Training

Modern 21st-century web development is a story of what David Weinberger calls "small pieces, loosely joined." Join Scott Davis for a 2-day hands-on, lab-driven exploration of the MEAN (MongoDB, Express, AngularJS, Node.js) stack. The best way to learn about each highly cohesive, loosely coupled piece of the MEAN stack is to see it in action.

MEAN architecture (Day 2) Training Day 2

Modern 21st-century web development is a story of what David Weinberger calls "small pieces, loosely joined." Join Scott Davis for a 2-day hands-on, lab-driven exploration of the MEAN (MongoDB, Express, AngularJS, Node.js) stack. The best way to learn about each highly cohesive, loosely coupled piece of the MEAN stack is to see it in action.

Ben Davisson is a junior at Saint Joseph’s College majoring in computer science. Ben is interested in programming, web development, and content creation and manipulation. He is also on the school’s track team.

Presentations

SPA boot camp Tutorial

Single-page apps utilize the browser rendering engine as a virtualized application container to allow for more fluid and responsive web apps that mimic native applications in performance. Brian Capouch, Danilo Zekovic, and Ben Davisson offer an introduction to single-page apps, presenting an overview of concepts and techniques focused on practical familiarity with this technology.

Jose De La Rosa is part of the Dell Linux Engineering team, responsible for delivering optimized Linux solutions to customers. During his time at Dell, Jose has served in different capacities, including testing, debugging, development, system administration, systems engineering, vendor management, and evangelism of emerging technologies to make Dell the best available platform for Linux.

Presentations

Containerizing legacy applications Open Container Day

Docker containers are targeted at microservices: lean, modularized, single-process applications that are easy to quickly deploy. However, older, bloated multiprocess (aka legacy) applications can also take advantage of containers. Jose De La Rosa shares his experiences with containerizing legacy applications at Dell.

Matt DeBergalis is the founder of Meteor, a full stack JavaScript app platform. Before founding Meteor, Matt authored ActBlue, the world’s largest political fundraising platform, raising a quarter-of-a-billion dollars. Before that, Matt was a kernel hacker. Some of his technical credits include the NeXT port of NetBSD and work on the NFSv4 and DAFS specifications while at Network Appliance. As an undergraduate at MIT, Matt built a phone system for his fraternity, fabricating the circuit boards and writing the operating system from scratch.

Presentations

Modern JavaScript architectures: Clients, microservices, and containers Session

Matt DeBergalis discusses two trends driving app development—the shift from the server-based Web to rich applications that run on a diverse set of mobile devices and modern browsers and the growth of microservices running in the cloud that serve these clients—and explores a new paradigm of app development on a unified JavaScript codebase.

Loris Degioanni is the CEO and founder of Sysdig, Inc. and the original creator of the popular open source troubleshooting tool, sysdig. Prior to founding Sysdig, Loris was a senior director of technology at Riverbed Technology, which he joined after the acquisition of CACE Technologies, the company behind the Wireshark open source network analyzer, which he cofounded in 2005. Loris holds a PhD in computer engineering from Politecnico di Torino and lives in Davis, California.

Presentations

The dark art of container monitoring Session

Loris Degioanni explores the state of the art for visibility, monitoring, and troubleshooting for microservices and containers—including live demonstrations of popular tools and methods and the pros and cons of each. Loris puts special emphasis on sysdig, an open source system visibility tool he developed.

Donna Denio is a communications and business development specialist who is passionate about teamwork and generating productive relationships. Donna has over 20 years’ experience helping leaders of multinational companies identify and secure new business opportunities in design and construction. Ten years ago, Donna’s search for ways to optimize team performance led her to the Lego Serious Play methadology. Igniting the power of teams and teamwork continues to make her heart sing. In addition to the United States, Donna has worked in the Philippines and Egypt and loves to bring people from different cultures together. Donna holds an MBA from Northeastern University and studied architecture and interior design at the University of the Philippines.

Presentations

Build to lead: Solve leadership challenges using the Lego Serious Play methodology Cultivate

Dieter Reuther and Donna Denio demonstrate a universal language that helps you maneuver through complex leadership challenges. Using a business case study, they guide attendees through the Lego Serious Play methodology to explain how to break down situations into simple 3D models. This is an interactive session with audience participation. Each attendee will get their own Lego set.

David Dennis is VP of technical marketing at Bitnami. Prior to Bitnami, David worked in product management, technical marketing, and product development leadership roles at GroundWork Open Source, Levanta, Mercury Interactive, HP, and Symantec.

Presentations

Auto-updating and automated container application delivery Open Container Day

Using Chef or Puppet to manage your containers? Manually pushing on green to your orchestration system? David Dennis outlines an easier, better way that notifies you of available stack updates, automatically creates new Dockerfiles, and integrates Slack, Bitnami Stacksmith, Jenkins, and Kubernetes.

Duncan DeVore is an engineer at Lightbend (Typesafe) who specializes in the design and implementation of distributed systems using the tenets of the Reactive Manifesto with Scala, Akka, and the Lightbend stack. Duncan believes in responsible design through functional programming with an abundance of test coverage, and he loves to code, present, and help others work through the challenges of distributed computing. Duncan’s specialties include distributed computing, microservice-based architectures, cloud computing, event sourcing, and CQRS. Duncan’s open source projects include journals for Eventsourced and Akka-Persistence based on the theory of event sourcing and CQRS. He is the coauthor of Reactive Application Development.

Presentations

Reactive system design Tutorial

Duncan DeVore explores the basics of reactive system design, using hands-on examples in Java and Scala to demonstrate how to build applications that are responsive, resilient, and elastic. By the end this session, you will have a firm understanding of why reactive programming is the future of application design.

Always on the move, Angel Diaz is IBM’s VP of cloud architecture and technology. Angel and his team are responsible for the technology, architecture, and strategy behind IBM’s hybrid, open, and secure cloud, which empower IBM’s clients with a new way to work. When he’s not working to bring greater value to clients through a flexible and interoperable cloud, Angel is IBM’s leader for open technology, where he is spearheading an industry IT residence driven by open source code, community, and culture. A master of the art of the possible, Angel has been the driving force behind many of the most important cloud, data, and mobile open technology industry movements—all focused on enabling innovation that is built on simple, practical solutions. With a career rooted in IBM Research—where he has successfully led both business and development teams in building the standards upon which the Web runs—Angel has a unique perspective on technology’s effect on today’s opportunities. In those rare moments of stillness, you might find him vanquishing his foes across Azeroth or forging amazing new worlds in Minecraft with his daughter.

Presentations

Computer science artists unite! An open source retrospective to glimpse our future Keynote

Angel Diaz provides a retrospective on IBM’s deep history and its contributions to the evolution of open source technology in order to catch a glimpse of a future that is rooted in open source technologies. Angel tells the story of open source projects that exemplify the new hardcore concepts we'll all need to accelerate innovation and success.

Chris DiBona is the open source programs manager for Google, where his job includes managing open source-related compliance and outreach programs for the company. Before joining Google, Chris was an editor and author for the hugely popular online website Slashdot.org, and he is an internationally known advocate of open source software and related methodologies. He coedited the award-winning essay compilations Open Sources and Open Sources 2.0 for O’Reilly and writes for a great number of publications. Chris was briefly the Linux guy on TechTV, starred in FLOSS Weekly, and speaks internationally on a variety of open source issues.

Presentations

Open source lessons from the TODO Group Session

Members of the TODO Group—an open group of companies who collaborate on practices, tools, and other ways to run successful and effective open source projects and programs—discuss why they started open source offices in their respective companies (Twitter, Netflix, Box, Google, Microsoft, and SanDisk) and share the lessons they learned along the way.

Jamie Dobson is the CEO of Container Solutions, a professional services company that specializes in strategic advice around technology and programable infrastructure. Jamie is interested in applying postcapitalist economics to building service companies.

Presentations

Postcapitalism Session

Capitalism as an economic system is based on key relationships between profit, costs, labor, and productivity. Jamie Dobson explains how open source software is contributing to undermining these relationships and is therefore undermining capitalism itself.

Cory Doctorow is a science fiction novelist, blogger, and technology activist. Cory is the coeditor of the popular blog Boing Boing and a contributor to the Guardian, the New York Times, Publishers Weekly, Wired, and many other newspapers, magazines, and websites. He was formerly director of European affairs for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a nonprofit civil liberties group that defends freedom in technology law, policy, standards, and treaties. Cory holds an honorary doctorate in computer science from the Open University (UK), where he is a visiting senior lecturer; in 2007, he served as the Fulbright Chair at the Annenberg Center for Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California.

Cory’s novels have been translated into dozens of languages and are published by Tor Books and simultaneously released on the Internet under Creative Commons licenses that encourage their reuse and sharing, a move that increases his sales by enlisting his readers to help promote his work. He has won the Locus and Sunburst Awards and been nominated for the Hugo, Nebula, and British Science Fiction Awards. His latest young adult novel is Pirate Cinema, a story of mashup guerrillas who declare war on the entertainment industry. His latest novel for adults is Rapture of the Nerds, written with Charles Stross and published in 2012. His New York Times bestseller Little brother was published in 2008. Its sequel, Homeland, was published in 2013. His latest short story collection is With a Little Help, available in paperback, ebook, audiobook, and limited edition hardcover. In 2011, Tachyon Books published a collection of his essays, Context: Further Selected Essays on Productivity, Creativity, Parenting, and Politics in the 21st Century (with an introduction by Tim O’Reilly), and IDW published a collection of comic books inspired by his short fiction called Cory Doctorow’s Futuristic Tales of the Here and Now. The Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow, a PM Press Outspoken Authors chapbook, was also published in 2011. His forthcoming books include Anda’s Game, a graphic novel from FirstSecond.

Cory cofounded the open source peer-to-peer software company Opencola, sold to OpenText in 2003, and presently serves on the boards and advisory boards of the Participatory Culture Foundation, the Clarion Foundation, the Glenn Gould Foundation, and the Chabot Space & Science Center’s SpaceTime project. In 2007, Entertainment Weekly called him “the William Gibson of his generation.” He was also named one of Forbes magazine’s Web Celebrities every year from 2007 to 2010 and one of the World Economic Forum’s Young Global Leaders for 2007. On February 3, 2008, Cory became a father. The little girl is called Poesy Emmeline Fibonacci Nautilus Taylor Doctorow and is a marvel that puts all the works of technology and artifice to shame.

Presentations

Open, closed, and demon haunted: An Internet of Things that act like inkjet printers Keynote

Cory Doctorow discusses the stakes of an open source Internet of Things when faced with closed devices that the law prohibits reverse engineering; devices whose security vulnerabilities you may not disclose; demon-haunted devices that treat their owners as adversaries, that seek at every turn to thwart them, that are illegal to even peek at.

Christine Doig is a data scientist at Continuum Analytics. Christine loves Python and sharing her open source findings with others. She has taught tutorials and presented many talks on data science and Python libraries like conda, Blaze, Bokeh, and scikit-learn at EuroPython, PyTexas, PyGotham, PyCon Spain, PyData (Dallas, Berlin), SciPy, and local meetup groups. In her free time, Christine loves to travel and tweet.

Presentations

Navigating the data science Python ecosystem Session

Python's popularity for data science use cases has skyrocketed in recent years due to its ease of use, great developer and user community, and solid core of scientific libraries. Christine Doig explores data science and the state of the Python ecosystem and helps navigate the large amount of open source libraries available for data science in Python, providing a map to guide you on the journey.

Justin Dorfman is MaxCDN’s director of developer relations, where he is responsible for evangelizing the company’s technologies and championing the needs of developers who use the network. Justin started BootstrapCDN in 2012 and is heavily involved with the FOSS community, contributing to Bootstrap, Font Awesome, Grunt, Ionic, jQuery Foundation, Twemoji, Nginx, and OSSCDN.

Presentations

What comes after Git Push Session

Justin Dorfman explores ways that people who do not have backgrounds in software engineering can contribute to the open source movement. Code is just one piece of the puzzle. There's much more to making an open source project successful. Community management, documentation, design, fundraising, and marketing are needed to sustain a project beyond "git push origin master."

Chris Dorros is a systems security engineer at OpenDNS, where he designs resilient infrastructure supporting over 70 billion requests per day. Chris is currently interested in self-healing systems, automated security testing, and systems architecture. Prior to joining OpenDNS, he was lead of security for the Mars Curiosity Rover at NASA/JPL and worked at CERT/CC and Lockheed Martin. Chris holds a BS in computer engineering from UCF and an MS in information security from Carnegie Mellon.

Presentations

Don't fix it. Throw it away! Introduction to disposable infrastructure Tutorial

Disposable infrastructure is a new paradigm for managing a full stack of infrastructure. Chris Dorros explores the benefits of this model, giving you hands-on experience with the most popular tools in this space. You'll see how easy it is to confidently make and roll back changes in production that you'll never want to SSH into a box to "make a quick fix" ever again.

Brian Dorsey is a developer advocate on the Google Cloud Developer Relations team, where he focuses on the open source Kubernetes cluster manager and the Cloud Platform, especially Compute Engine and Cloud Storage. Brian has taught Python at the University of Washington and spoken at both PyCon US and PyCon Japan. He’s a bit of a Python fan (understatement). He’s currently learning Go and enjoying it.

Presentations

Kubernetes: From scratch to production in 2 days Training

Brian Dorsey and Jeff Mendoza lead a 2-day training exploring what you need to know to run distributed, containerized applications: core concepts, common patterns, storage, logging, monitoring, and troubleshooting.

Kubernetes: From scratch to production in 2 days (Day 2) Training Day 2

Brian Dorsey and Jeff Mendoza lead a 2-day training exploring what you need to know to run distributed, containerized applications: core concepts, common patterns, storage, logging, monitoring, and troubleshooting.

Nathan Dotz is a software engineer at Detroit Labs, where miracles are performed on mobile devices, and a founding member of the All Hands Active Hackerspace, which has been working steadfastly to awesomify the brains of creators for over three years. Nathan is an open source contributor, an open education advocate, and a functional programming fanboy.

Presentations

Scala: The Swiss-army language Tutorial

Nathan Dotz leads a hands-on, all-code adventure to take you from zero to "ready to take on the world" with the beloved Scala programming language. Whether you're a seasoned object-oriented veteran or just getting started, this interactive tutorial will bring you up to speed on best practices with the JVM's hottest multiparadigm language.

E. Dunham is the DevOps engineer for Mozilla research, which in practice means shepherding servers for the Rust language and Servo browser engine web presence, continuous integration, and release infrastructure. An alum of the OSU Open Source Lab, E.’s hobbies include carpentry, gardening, and filing “please license your code” issues on GitHub.

Presentations

How to learn Rust Session

E. Dunham walks attendees through the best practices for getting started with a new programming language, using the popular, new systems programming language Rust as an example. You'll leave this talk fully prepared to start working on your first Rust project and take full advantage of the language's famously welcoming community.

Damian Edwards is principal program manager for ASP.NET at Microsoft.

Presentations

Getting started with .NET Core on Mac, Linux, and Windows Tutorial

Damian Edwards and David Fowler explain how to get started developing console and web applications for Mac, Linux, and Windows using the newly open source software .NET Core.

Nadia Eghbal works on community programs at GitHub, where she is building sustainability initiatives. Nadia explores how we can better support open source infrastructure, highlighting current gaps in funding and knowledge. She recently published Roads and Bridges: The Unseen Labor Behind Our Digital Infrastructure with support from the Ford Foundation. Nadia is based in San Francisco.

Presentations

OSCON Contribute (Botkit and Rust) Event

We'll have a multitude of mentors and technology experts on hand to help contributors new to FOSS or existing contributors wishing to advance their skills. Existing contributors are welcome and encouraged to take mentorship roles.

OSCON Contribute (Docker and Kubernetes) Event

We'll have a multitude of mentors and technology experts on hand to help contributors new to FOSS or existing contributors wishing to advance their skills. Existing contributors are welcome and encouraged to take mentorship roles. Contribute is a safe and welcoming environment for new and experienced contributors alike.

OSCON Contribute (Hoodie, Graphite, and HospitalRun) Event

OSCON Contribute is a hacking event focused on welcoming new open source contributors to free and open source (FOSS) projects of all sizes. The core of the event highlights eight FOSS projects across two rooms bustling with energy.

OSCON Contribute (Kubernetes and Python) Event

We'll have a multitude of mentors and technology experts on hand to help contributors new to FOSS or existing contributors wishing to advance their skills. Existing contributors are welcome and encouraged to take mentorship roles.

Heidi Ellis is a professor at Western New England University and has been active in software engineering education for the past 20 years. Heidi has been involving students in humanitarian free and open source software (HFOSS) since 2006 and has been co-PI on four different NSF grants to support this effort. She is part of a group of academics who are working with Red Hat to support Professor’s Open Source Software Experience (POSSE) workshops, which bring professors up to speed on student involvement in HFOSS projects. Heidi has multiple publications and presentations related to student participation in HFOSS.

Presentations

Want students who are ready to contribute? Here's what they should know Session

To contribute to an open source project, students must first learn open source methods, tools, and culture. However, few CS degree programs cover these topics. Gina Likins, Heidi Ellis, and Gregory Hislop outline an NSF-funded effort to advance FOSS learning in undergraduate computing programs and solicit input about the FOSS skills and abilities community members would like to see addressed.

Phil Estes is a senior technical staff member in the office of the CTO of IBM Cloud, focusing on open source strategy and upstream community leadership and helping IBM customers navigate the new world of cloud, containers, and open source. Phil is a core contributor and maintainer on the Docker engine project, where he has contributed key features like user namespace support and multiplatform image capabilities. Phil is also a founding maintainer of the containerd project and participates in the Open Container Initiative (OCI) as a contributor to the development of runC. Phil is a regular speaker at meetups and industry conferences on container technology. He maintains an active blog on container topics.

Presentations

Innovating out in the open Open Container Day

It's almost been a year since the Open Container Initiative (OCI) and its reference OCI-compliant runtime for containers, runC, were announced last June. RunC is now the container execution engine used both by Docker and Cloud Foundry's Garden-Linux project. Phil Estes explains why runC and the OCI community are great places to innovate and develop new features for container execution.

Alex Etling is a New York City-based platform and infrastructure engineer at GameChanger. In his spare time, he focuses on CAP, scaling, and gossip protocols. He also loves sports.

Presentations

Dusty: Building and testing microservices made easy Session

Microservices are becoming the standard in modern technology stacks, but building and maintaining a web of interconnected services locally can be complicated and time consuming for engineers. Alex Etling offers an overview of Dusty, a Docker-based local development environment built with the power to make building, testing, and maintaining microservices easy.

Ben Evans is a cofounder of jClarity, a startup that makes performance tools for development and ops teams. His career highlights to date include holding the position of chief architect for listed derivatives at Deutsche Bank, performance testing the Google IPO, working on the initial UK trials of 3G networks with BT, building award-winning websites for some of Hollywood’s biggest hits of the 90s, developing some of the UK’s very first true ecommerce websites, and providing technology to help some of the UK’s most vulnerable people. Before joining the tech industry, Ben was a researcher in theoretical physics, working on theories which are now being tested at the LHC.

Ben helps to run the London Java Community and represents the user community as a voting member on Java’s governing body, the JCP Executive Committee. He is a Java Champion and JavaOne Rock Star speaker. He is author of The Well-Grounded Java Developer and the new edition of Java in a Nutshell. Ben writes regularly for industry publications and is a frequent speaker at technical conferences worldwide. He holds a master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Cambridge.

Presentations

How to create performance results that don't lie Tutorial

We often talk about performance, but in many cases, analysis is carried out by staff who are not performance specialists. Unfortunately, modern systems are increasingly complex and have subtleties in terms of measurement and interpretation of data, resulting in spurious or just flat-out wrong results. Ben Evans shows how to do performance analysis the right way and avoid the pitfalls.

Ian Eyberg is a founder at DeferPanic, a company dedicated to ensuring that Go becomes the dominant language it deserves to be through phenomenal support and tooling. Ian has worked the gamut from doing static/dynamic analysis at mobile security companies to poker-hand history analysis.

Presentations

Go unikernels Session

Unikernels will overtake the container ecosystem within the next few years. The question is when and in what fashion this will happen. Ian Eyberg argues that Go unikernels are the natural product of this evolutionary cycle and explores the current state of the art in the industry.

Aidan Feldman is an innovation specialist at 18F, a digital services team within the federal government. When not cranking out open source projects or mustachifying the Internet, Aidan can be found performing with various modern dance companies around NYC. He organizes meetups for people learning to code and to get into open source, and teaches Advanced JavaScript at NYU.

Presentations

DevOps at large: Modernizing apps and infrastructure in the federal government Session

The DevOps movement has changed the way that businesses handle the development, deployment, and operations of their systems. Like so many other advances in technology, however, this evolution is coming to government last. Aidan Feldman discusses the challenges of introducing modern processes and infrastructure at the federal level and looks at specific ways that 18F is tackling this problem.

Paul Fenwick is an internationally acclaimed public speaker, developer, and science educator. He is well known for presenting on a diverse range of topics including privacy, neuroscience, and neuroethics, Klingon programming, open source, depression and mental health, advancements in science, diversity, autonomous agents, and minesweeper automation. His dynamic presentation style and quirky humor has delighted audiences worldwide. Paul was awarded the 2013 O’Reilly Open Source award and the 2010 White Camel award, both for outstanding contributions to the open source community. As a freedom-loving scientist, Paul’s goal is to learn everything he can, do amazing things with that knowledge, and give them away for free. (Photograph by Joshua Button)

Presentations

OSCON Contribute (Botkit and Rust) Event

We'll have a multitude of mentors and technology experts on hand to help contributors new to FOSS or existing contributors wishing to advance their skills. Existing contributors are welcome and encouraged to take mentorship roles.

OSCON Contribute (Docker and Kubernetes) Event

We'll have a multitude of mentors and technology experts on hand to help contributors new to FOSS or existing contributors wishing to advance their skills. Existing contributors are welcome and encouraged to take mentorship roles. Contribute is a safe and welcoming environment for new and experienced contributors alike.

OSCON Contribute (Hoodie, Graphite, and HospitalRun) Event

OSCON Contribute is a hacking event focused on welcoming new open source contributors to free and open source (FOSS) projects of all sizes. The core of the event highlights eight FOSS projects across two rooms bustling with energy.

OSCON Contribute (Kubernetes and Python) Event

We'll have a multitude of mentors and technology experts on hand to help contributors new to FOSS or existing contributors wishing to advance their skills. Existing contributors are welcome and encouraged to take mentorship roles.

Julia Ferraioli is a senior developer advocate with Google Cloud Platform. Julia is a polyglot, though in code only, and is excited about machine learning, containers, whiskey, and sprinkles (in roughly that order). Her super powers are finding ways to incorporate her interests into her work and estimating how much stuff can fit inside a container.

Presentations

Blocks in containers: Lessons learned from containerizing Minecraft Session

It’s clear containers are here to stay for building reliable, scalable applications. But what about applications developed prior to the advent of containerization? Using Minecraft as her example, Julia Ferraioli explains why retrofitting technology for containers poses conceptual and practical challenges that require an approach different than starting container native.

Diving into machine learning through TensorFlow Tutorial

Machine learning can be an intimidating subject. Julia Ferraioli, Amy Unruh, and Eli Bixby introduce the basics of TensorFlow, an open source deep learning library, and offer practical, hands-on experience with core concepts in machine learning, including how to ingest and prepare raw data for use, run a variety of algorithms to gain insight from the data, and have some fun with visualization.

Christopher Ferris is an IBM distinguished engineer and CTO of open technology in the IBM Cloud organization. Christopher has been involved in the architecture, design, and engineering of distributed systems for most of his 36+ year career in IT and has been actively engaged in open standards and open source development since 1999. He has technical responsibility for IBM’s strategic open source and standards initiatives, including OpenStack, Cloud Foundry, Open Ledger Project, Open Container Initiative, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, Mesos, Node.js, and Docker. He represents IBM on the Hyperledger Governance Board and chairs the Hyperledger Technical Steering Committee.
Christopher enjoys tennis, both as a spectator and as an avid club player.

Presentations

How open is your enterprise? From contribution to integration and implementation Session

Open source has won. Enterprise organizations around the world are using open source technology and systems and rapidly integrating them into new solutions, platforms, and strategies. Charlie Gracie, Christopher Ferris, Bert Belder, and David Taieb explore the current state of open source technology and discuss how you can help drive adoption, integration, and use within your organization.

From humble beginnings as a PHP4 web developer in grade school, Amanda Folson now works as a developer advocate at GitLab, where she gets to share her passion for technology with others. When she’s not speaking, writing, or shooing cats off her keyboard, you’ll find her consuming APIs and IPAs.

Presentations

Open source for closed source companies Session

Just because you’re selling SaaS doesn’t mean you can’t adopt open source principles in your organization. Amanda Folson explores how individuals and companies can open source their documentation, libraries, and ideas for the greater good of the community in a way that doesn’t mean giving it all away for free.

Brian Foster is an editor at O’Reilly Media focusing on Java and enterprise technologies. Brian has been working in technical publishing for over five years, acquiring content in business, statistical computing, open source programming, and financial engineering as well as several other computer-related topics.

Presentations

Open Container Day opening welcome Open Container Day

Brian Foster opens Open Container Day.

Camille Fournier is the former head of engineering at Rent the Runway. She was previously a vice president at Goldman Sachs. Camille is an Apache ZooKeeper committer and PMC member and a Dropwizard framework PMC member.

Presentations

Hard questions, honest answers Cultivate

In a guided Q&A, Camille Fournier answers questions about the tricky situations we come across as managers and offers approaches for dealing with them. Everything is fair game: dealing with difficult people, giving and receiving feedback, hiring, promotions, goal setting, team structure, culture. . .you name it.

David Fowler is principal software engineer for ASP.NET at Microsoft.

Presentations

Getting started with .NET Core on Mac, Linux, and Windows Tutorial

Damian Edwards and David Fowler explain how to get started developing console and web applications for Mac, Linux, and Windows using the newly open source software .NET Core.

Steve Francia is a Gopher at Google as well as an author, speaker, and developer. Steve is the creator of Hugo, Cobra, spf13-vim. Previously, he was an exec at Docker and MongoDB. Steve serves on the board of Drupal.

Presentations

Building amazing cross-platform command-line apps in Go Tutorial

Go is a great platform for CLI development due to its raw power, easy syntax, and painless distribution. Steve Francia and Ashley McNamara teach the techniques, principles, and libraries you need to build great CLI apps, covering everything from designing commands to working with and parsing flags, config files, and remote config systems and working with environment variables and 12-factor apps.

Chuck Freedman is dedicated to driving platform success and adoption across all industries. An evangelist and inspirational force for a decade, he has engaged and enabled developers, designers, scientists, and engineers with a range of innovative technologies. Chuck applies his unique interest, vision, and experience with a genuine approach towards advocacy and evangelism. Over a 17-year technology career, he has led platform business strategy, marketing, and product development to help businesses drive innovation, partnerships, quality integration, and adoption. Chuck has authored books and articles that inspire use of platforms and engaged audiences at over 50 events and meetups around the world.

Presentations

Combining open source elements to launch a new analytics platform Session

Chuck Freedman and Kyle Ambert share lessons learned from a journey combining open source projects, supporting users, and building a community around the Trusted Analytics Platform (TAP).

Getting started with the Trusted Analytics Platform (TAP) Event

The open source Trusted Analytics Platform (TAP) accelerates the creation of cloud-native applications driven by big data analytics. Chuck Freedman and Venkatesh Bharadwaj offer an overview and demonstration of TAP. You'll use popular open source projects including Spark, Hadoop, Cloud Foundry, and others to work with data and deploy a simple visualization application in the cloud.

Barbara Fusinska is a data solution architect with strong software development background and experience building diverse software systems for a variety of different companies. She believes in the importance of the data and metrics when growing a successful business. Besides collaborating around data architectures, Barbara also enjoys programming. She currently speaks at conferences in between working in London. Barbara tweets at @BasiaFusinska and blogs on Barbarafusinska.com.

Presentations

Analyzing GitHub events with R Session

Every day, there are millions of contributions to open source GitHub projects. GitHub Archive's job is gather that data and make it accessible for further analysis. The R platform is the perfect tool to accomplish this task. Barbara Fusinska demonstrates how to use R to turn unstructured data into actionable statistics.

Data exploration with R Tutorial

The R platform is the #1 environment for statistics, data science, and data visualization, making the world of data analysis much more approachable. R offers a set of tools perfect for data exploration, necessary for drawing any data science conclusions. Barbara Fusinska outlines a set of exercises that introduce the world of data exploration in R and teach you to use R to explore your own data.

Andreia Gaita is a C#/C++ developer and longtime open source and Mono contributor, currently working at GitHub doing .NET and open source and building the GitHub Extension for Visual Studio. For the past 16 years, Andreia has been involved in the development of cross-platform applications, services, and libraries, embedding browser engines, creating bindings, and making tools that help developers be successful. She hails from the sunny city of Lisbon, Portugal, and currently lives in Copenhagen, Denmark, where she bikes a lot.

Presentations

Confessions of a cross-platform developer Session

Andreia Gaita explores cross-platform development, discussing the skills you need and explaining how cross-platform frameworks get built (and what tools are used), how many platforms you can target as a cross-platform developer (hint: it's more than three) and how to go about targeting them, and how a cross-platform development focus can change the way you build code and use software.

Viktor Gamov is a senior solution architect at Hazelcast—a leading open source in-memory data grid (IMDG) company. Viktor joined Hazelcast with comprehensive knowledge and expertise of the enterprise application architectures using open source technologies. He helps companies building distributed systems on the JVM. He is a co-organizer of the Princeton Java Users Group and coauthor of the O’Reilly’s Enterprise Web Development. Viktor has presented at various international conferences on Java and JavaScript-related topics. He holds an MS in computer science.

Presentations

Java 8 puzzlers: The strange, the bizarre, and the wonderful Session

Baruch Sadogursky and Viktor Gamov aren't sure about you, but working with Java 8 made one of the speakers lose all of his hair and the other lose his sleep (or was it the jetlag?). If you still haven't reached the level of Brian Goetz in mastering lambdas and strings, this talk is for you. And if you think you have, we have some bad news for you, you should attend as well.

Wilfred Gee is a software developer who was tired of making money and decided he wanted to make science instead. Pursuing a PhD in astronomy, Wilfred recently completed a bachelor’s degree in Astronomy from the University of Hawaii at Hilo, also obtaining a certificate in Women’s Studies and a minor in English. His previous bachelor’s degree was from the University of Utah in psychology with a minor in cognitive science. Wilfred is also a wannabe Shakespearean actor and, in his free time, likes to rappel down waterfalls.

Presentations

PANOPTES: Open source planet discovery Session

The search for planets outside our solar system has long been the exclusive domain of professional scientists with access to large observatories or expensive space telescopes. Jenny Tong and Wilfred Gee explain how PANOPTES combines off-the-shelf components with open source software to bring exoplanet discovery to the public. Come learn about PANOPTES's challenges, solutions, and discoveries.

Barton George is a senior technologist in the office of the CTO focusing on Dell’s efforts in the DevOps space as well as the open source community. Barton is the founder and lead of Project Sputnik, an Ubuntu-based laptop for developers, now in its fifth generation. Besides working with developers, customers, analysts, and press, he does a fair amount of blogging and tweeting. Prior to Dell, Barton spent 13 years at Sun Microsystems in a variety of roles from manufacturing to product and corporate marketing. His last three years there were spent as an open source evangelist, avid blogger, and driver of Sun’s GNU/Linux strategy and relationships. Barton began his professional career with a four-year stint in Tokyo with Sony working with ISVs for their UNIX-based “NEWS” workstation. Born and raised in Honolulu, Hawaii, Barton headed east for higher education, attending Williams College and Harvard Business School. He happily resides with his three kids in Austin, TX.

Presentations

The Project Sputnik story: Crowdsourcing a developer laptop Session

Barton George tells the story of the developer edition of the Dell XPS 13 laptop, which began life as Project Sputnik, a scrappy skunkworks project to pilot an Ubuntu-based cloud developer platform.

Meghan Gill is director of community and demand generation at MongoDB, helping to build the developer community behind the fastest-growing big data ecosystem. Meghan was the eighth employee and first nonengineering hire at MongoDB. In 2014, she was recognized by AlleyWatch as a Rising Star in Enterprise Technology.

Presentations

Finding the giants: Creating and nurturing open source advocates Tutorial

Open source communities need leaders and contributors to thrive, but successfully engaging them often poses a challenge. Meghan Gill and Francesca Krihely explain how to create champions for your open source community and offer resources to build new advocacy programs. You'll walk away with a plan designed to engage leaders.

Kelsey is the CTO at Sexual Health Innovations, creating technology that advances sexual health and well-being in the United States. SHI is currently building Project Callisto to provide a more empowering, transparent, and confidential reporting experience for college sexual assault survivors. Kelsey cofounded the Lambda Ladies group for women in functional programming and speaks regularly around the world on technical topics. As part of the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project, she led the development and deployment of the searchable Anti-Eviction Pledge site. Outside of SHI, Kelsey pursues the study of baseball, R&B, presidential trivia, and other all-American pursuits.

Presentations

Security on a shoestring Session

Are you confident your web app is secure? Hand-it-over-to-a-team-of-expert-haxx0rs-to-tear-into confident? Kelsey Gilmore-Innis shares how Callisto successfully built a site to store some of the most sensitive data imaginable that passed a formal security audit from the best in the business—and explains how you can too. Content warning: this talk includes discussion of sexual assault.

Jeffrey Goff has spoken at conventions worldwide and is an active contributor to both Perl 5 and Perl 6. Jeff is a senior developer at Evozon Systems, a web design agency in Cluj, Romania, where he architects and builds custom web applications with Perl, HTML, and JavaScript. He is one of the original release managers for Parrot née Perl 6 and has written some core interface modules for Perl 6. At home, when he’s not creating Perl 6 libraries or speaking at conventions, Jeff does origami and travels. You can follow Jeff on Twitter and view his open source contributions on GitHub. He also blogs at The Perl Fisher.

Presentations

Introducing Perl 6 Tutorial

Jeffrey Goff offers an introduction to Perl 6, a powerful new language combining the pedigree of Perl 5 with a brand new metaprogramming system, built-in concurrency, and software-definable grammars, among many other features. You'll leave with a working Perl 6 script and ideas for your next programming project.

Maria Gomez is a tech lead and lead consultant at ThoughtWorks. Over her more than eight years of industry experience, Maria has worked with many different technologies and domains, which has helped her lead teams and advise stakeholders in making the right technology decisions. She has talked about architecture at various conferences in the USA and South America, including SACON 2016, OSCON 2016, Agile Uruguay, and SOALATAM Peru.

Presentations

Transitioning to microservices Tutorial

Agile practices and techniques like continuous delivery are all about being able to react to changes rapidly, but putting them into practice when you have a big monolith application can be difficult. Microservices offer one solution. María Gómez and Cassandra Shum explore the prerequisites for moving into a microservices architecture and provide tips on how to achieve them via engaging exercises.

Georgios Gousios does research with big data in software engineering. Georgios has published more than 40 papers in his field and coedited Beautiful Architectures (O’Reilly, 2009). His research interests include software engineering, systems software, and programming languages.

Presentations

Large-scale GitHub insights Session

GitHub hosts tens of millions of people collaborating on more than 20 million repositories—an unprecedented treasure trove of data for software engineering researchers, companies, and project teams alike. Jeff McAffer, Georgios Gousios, and Kevin Lewis explore tools and techniques for sifting through terabytes of content, present key insights they discovered, and explain how you can follow suit.

Charlie Gracie is an emerging technologies architect for runtimes technology in the IBM Cloud organization. Charlie has been working on garbage collection technology at IBM for 12 years. He was the technical lead responsible for open sourcing the IBM JVM GC technology as part of the Eclipse OMR project. Charlie is also leading a team that is prototyping consuming the Eclipse OMR GC technology in the Ruby MRI VM. When he is not at work, Charlie enjoys playing volleyball, softball, and ultimate frisbee.

Presentations

How open is your enterprise? From contribution to integration and implementation Session

Open source has won. Enterprise organizations around the world are using open source technology and systems and rapidly integrating them into new solutions, platforms, and strategies. Charlie Gracie, Christopher Ferris, Bert Belder, and David Taieb explore the current state of open source technology and discuss how you can help drive adoption, integration, and use within your organization.

Christian Grail is a development architect at SAP in Palo Alto, CA, working in the User Experience and Design team, where he helps to dramatically improve the appearance and usability of enterprise applications. Christian loves working with Angular, SAP UI5, and Node.js and is evangelizing agile development methods like test-driven development, pair programming, and code reviews.

Presentations

How to convince your manager to go open source Session

Very often when discussing whether or not to go open source, you hear concerns about loss of business, inconvenient transparency, and the loss of control. Christian Grail explains how he convinced his managers to go open source. Based on his experience, Christian offers guidance on how you can address concerns about open source and convince your manager to go open source too.

Christopher Grant is a senior architect in the cloud space at HomeDepot.com, where he focuses on enabling change, innovation, and speed of delivery within the organization. Christopher has 20 years’ experience in the industry working with a variety of languages and technologies, including, most recently, microservices, Docker, Python, Go, DevOps, Agile, and other assorted buzzwords.

Presentations

Monolith to microservices: How HomeDepot.com made the switch Session

You’ve read how unicorns like Netflix and Spotify have implemented microservices, but how does that apply to the rest of us horses. Christopher Grant explains how HomeDepot.com approached a migration from a monolithic architecture to a microservice-based platform.

Joseph Gregorio is a software engineer working on the Skia graphics library at Google. Joe is the editor of the Atom Publishing Protocol and the coauthor of the URI Templates spec. He has a deep interest in web technologies: He wrote The RESTFul Web column for the online O’Reilly publication XML.com, wrote the first desktop aggregator written in C#, and has published various Python modules to help in putting together RESTful web services such as mimeparse, httplib2, and the google-api-python-client. Joe is interested in Go, Polymer, Web Components, REST, web services, Python, APIs, URI templates, the Atom Publishing Protocol, big data, and any linear combination of such.

Presentations

Stop writing JavaScript frameworks Session

JavaScript frameworks seem like death and taxes—inevitable and unavoidable. But that's not the way it needs to be, and actually, it must stop. Joseph Gregorio outlines the Zero Framework Manifesto and discusses his implementation experience building and shipping framework-free applications for the past two years.

Jamie Grier is director of applications engineering at data Artisans, where he helps others realize the potential of Apache Flink in their own projects. Jamie has been working on stream processing for the last decade at companies such as Twitter, Gnip, and Boulder Imaging on projects spanning everything from ultra-high-performance video stream processing to social media analytics.

Presentations

A data-streaming architecture with Apache Flink Session

Data stream processing is emerging as a new paradigm for data infrastructure. Its promise is to unify and simplify many existing applications while simultaneously enabling new applications on real-time data. Jamie Grier introduces the data-streaming paradigm and shows how to build a set of simple but representative applications using Apache Flink and Apache Kafka.

Georg Gruetter is a social coding evangelist and software development community leader at Robert Bosch GmbH, where he has been leading the first InnerSource community within Bosch since 2009. Georg is a passionate software developer with over 30 years of experience. Previously, he worked for Daimler Chrysler as a researcher, the Zurich System House as a software engineer, and Line Information GmbH as a consultant. Georg has created two open source projects, XHSI and stashNotifier. He is an avid recumbent cyclist and stargazer and generally collects way too many hobbies.

Presentations

InnerSource overview Session

InnerSource applies lessons from the best open source projects to engineering and transforms cultures that use it. Cedric Williams, Georg Gruetter, Guy Martin, Nithya Ruff, and Panna Pavangadkar explore the factors that keep software teams from collaborating effectively, look at the development model used for Apache Software Foundation projects, and talk about ways to bridge the two approaches.

Arun Gupta is a principal open source technologist at Amazon Web Services. Previously, Arun built and led developer communities at Sun, Oracle, Red Hat, and Couchbase and has deep expertise in leading cross-functional teams to develop and execute strategy, planning and execution of content, marketing campaigns, and programs. He has also led engineering teams at Sun and is a founding member of the Java EE team. An avid runner, a globe trotter, a Java Champion, a JavaOne Rock Star four years in a row, a JUG leader, NetBeans Dream Team member, and a Docker Captain, Arun has authored more than 2,000 blog posts on technology and has given talks in more than 40 countries. He founded the Devoxx4Kids chapter in the US and continues to promote technology education among children. He is easily accessible at @arungupta.

Presentations

Migrate your traditional VM-based clusters to containers Open Container Day

Arun Gupta explains how to migrate a traditional VM-based cluster to a container-based infrastructure. You'll learn the gotchas of Docker Cloud, Kubernetes on Google/Amazon, OpenShift, and Mesos + Marathon.

Jon Haddad has 15 years’ experience in both development and operations. For the last 10, he’s worked at various startups in southern California. For the last two years, he’s been the maintainer of cqlengine, the Python object mapper for Cassandra, now integrated into the native Cassandra driver. Jon is currently a technical evangelist at Datastax, where he continues to focus on advancing Cassandra in the Python, operations, and data science communities. Jon holds a degree in computer science from the University of Vermont.

Presentations

Becoming friends with Cassandra and Spark Tutorial

Jon Haddad and Dani Traphagen explore all the basics you’ll need to become best buds with the radically scalable, always-on, and increasingly popular Apache Cassandra database. But wait, there's more. Jon and Dani also cover using Apache Spark for large-scale data processing. What else do you need to know to make new friends?

Does it quack? Identifying problems that a graph database can solve Session

Jon Haddad discusses the types of business problems that graph tools are well suited to helping solve. Jon offers an overview of some of the popular tools in the market (TinkerPop, Gremlin, GraphX, etc.) and explains where each might fit into your data ecosystem.

Ben Hall is the founder of Ocelot Uproar, a company focused on building products loved by users. Ben has worked as a systems administrator, tester, and software developer and launched several companies. He still finds the time to publish books and speak at conferences. Ben enjoys looking for the next challenges to solve, usually over an occasional beer. Ben recently launched Katacoda, an online learning environment for developers that helps break down the barriers to learning new technologies such as Docker and containers.

Presentations

Understanding Docker security and performance Tutorial

Docker offers a great deal of advantages, simplifying both development and production environments. But there is still uncertainty around the security and performance of containers. Ben Hall uncovers the truth and explains how Docker's security and performance models work in the real world.

Jason Hand is a DevOps evangelist at VictorOps and the organizer of DevOpsDays Rockies. Jason is the author of ChatOps for Dummies and has spent the last eight months presenting and building content on a number of DevOps topics such as blameless postmortems, ChatOps, and the value of context within incident management. A frequent speaker at DevOps meetups around the country, Jason enjoys talking to audiences large and small on a variety of technical and nontechnical subjects.

Presentations

Infrastructure as conversation All the Bots

As ChatOps becomes more common, large-scale systems will change. Infrastructure is commonly “spun up,” configured, and managed via API calls. Through the use of bots and group chat, teams can now move these actions into a new common interface. Jason Hand explores the impact when teams have begun to manage much of their infrastructure from the interface of group chat.

Nathan Handler has been contributing to the open source community for nearly 10 years, primarily through his roles as an Ubuntu and Debian developer. He is currently working as a site reliability engineer on the operations team at Yelp.

Presentations

PaaSTA: Running applications at Yelp Session

PaaSTA, Yelp's platform as a service (PaaS) built on top of open­ source tools, provides tooling for developers to quickly turn their microservice into a monitored, highly available application spanning multiple data centers and cloud regions. Nathan Handler outlines the technologies that power PaaSTA and discusses how Yelp uses PaaSTA to empower developers and solve key problems.

Scott Hanselman is a web developer who has been blogging at Hanselman.com for over a decade. Scott works on Azure and ASP.NET for Microsoft out of his home office in Portland. He has three podcasts: Hanselminutes for tech talk, This Developer’s Life on developers’ lives and loves, and Ratchet & the Geek for pop culture and tech media. Scott has also written a number of books and spoken in person to almost a half million developers worldwide.

Presentations

Thursday opening welcome Keynote

OSCON program chairs Scott Hanselman, Rachel Roumeliotis, and Kelsey Hightower open the second day of keynotes.

Wednesday opening welcome Keynote

OSCON program chairs Kelsey Hightower, Rachel Roumeliotis, and Scott Hanselman open the first day of keynotes.

Rohit Harchandani is a software engineer at Paypal working on a new web browser and communication framework. Previously, after graduating from Carnegie Mellon University, Rohit worked at Bloomberg, creating its fixed income search infrastructure using several open source technologies. He enjoys working on challenging problems using innovative solutions with a lot of emphasis on a robust and clean design.

Presentations

The Seif project Session

Aashish Sheshadri and Rohit Harchandani introduce Seif, an open source project, started at PayPal, with the goal of transitioning the Web into an application delivery system that will be safer, easier to use, and easier to develop for.

Sumana Harihareswara is an open source software contributor and project manager with over a decade of experience in the software industry. She lives in New York City, where she heads Changeset Consulting, which provides short-term, targeted release management for open source projects and the companies that depend on them. Sumana was most recently senior technical writer and engineering community manager at the Wikimedia Foundation. She has also managed projects at Collabora, GNOME, QuestionCopyright.org, Fog Creek Software, Behavior, and Salon.com. Sumana frequently speaks and writes about open source and management; she was keynote speaker at Open Source Bridge in 2012, code4lib in 2014, and Wiki Conference USA in 2014. From mid-2014 to early 2015, she served as a member of the board of directors of the Ada Initiative. Her past leadership in nonprofit, academia, industry, and volunteer organizations earned her an Open Source Citizen Award in 2011. Sumana holds an MS in technology management from Columbia University and a BA in political science from the University of California, Berkeley. She participated in the Recurse Center in 2013 and 2014.

Presentations

Inessential weirdnesses in open source Session

From Monty Python references to Git to mailing lists, Sumana Harihareswara discusses the barriers that often slow down new users and contributors during outreach efforts and explores what's crucial and what to toss.

Brian Harrington, also known as Redbeard, is a principal architect at CoreOS. Brian is a developer, hacker, and technical writer in the areas of open source development and systems administration. He combines his experiences in both defensive and offensive computing with his readings of classical anarchism to present new ideas in organizational hierarchies for software development. Brian has been featured on Al Jazeera as an expert in the field of computer security and has been seen and heard on Bloomberg Television and National Public Radio. He currently resides in Oakland, CA, and was grudgingly elected president of the hackerspace HacDC.

Presentations

Open source is being ruined, and it’s all our fault Session

Open source has changed how businesses, nonprofits, and individuals run software and, increasingly, hardware—both in design and manufacturing. Brian Redbeard Harrington analyzes how open source businesses make money and how they benefit their users and examines the pragmatic challenges ubiquitous to libre software, open hardware, and selling “support” as a model.

An internationally known developer relations strategist and community management expert, Leslie Hawthorn has spent the past decade creating, cultivating, and enabling open source communities. She’s best known for creating the world’s first initiative to involve pre-university students in open source software development, launching Google’s #2 developer blog, and receiving an O’Reilly Open Source Award in 2010. Her career has provided her with the opportunity to develop, hone, and share open source expertise spanning enterprise to NGOs, including senior roles at Google, Red Hat, the Open Source Initiative, the OSU Open Source Lab, and Elastic. She lives with her partner in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Presentations

I am your user. Why do you hate me? Session

Open source software projects can be prickly toward their users. Poor documentation and a steep learning curve can make a project community seem hostile. As users of many different open source projects over the years, Donna Benjamin and Leslie Hawthorn have often wondered about this problem and contemplated what to do about it. This session takes their long-standing private rant public.

Will Hayes is CEO of Lucidworks, a San Francisco-based enterprise search company backed by the world’s strongest and most active open source search community, Apache Solr. Lucidworks provides the search platform for global brands, delivering the enterprise-grade capabilities needed to design, develop, and deploy intelligent search apps at any scale. Companies across industries—from consumer retail and healthcare to insurance and financial services—rely on Lucidworks every day to power their consumer-facing and enterprise search apps. Previously, Will held product and business development positions at big data analysis company Splunk and biotech firm Genentech.

Presentations

Community and commercialization: How to build an open source company in 2016 Session

What does it take to build a profitable and healthy open source company? Will Hayes, CEO of Lucidworks, explains why business success need not come at the expense of the open source community’s integrity. Will explores why companies should avoid commercializing product features with broad, cross-industry appeal and discusses the power of specificity in driving both revenue and committer happiness.

Kelsey Hightower has worn every hat possible throughout his career in tech but most enjoys leadership roles focused on making things happen and shipping software. Kelsey is a strong open source advocate focused on building simple tools that make people smile. When he is not slinging Go code, you can catch him giving technical workshops covering everything from programming and system administration, to his favorite Linux distro of the month.

Presentations

Thursday opening welcome Keynote

OSCON program chairs Scott Hanselman, Rachel Roumeliotis, and Kelsey Hightower open the second day of keynotes.

Wednesday opening welcome Keynote

OSCON program chairs Kelsey Hightower, Rachel Roumeliotis, and Scott Hanselman open the first day of keynotes.

Daniel Hinojosa has been a self-employed developer, teacher, and speaker for private business, education, and government since 1999. Daniel also currently teaches programming at the University of New Mexico Continuing Education. His business revolves around the Java ecosystem, encompassing multiple languages and frameworks. Daniel is a Pomodoro Technique practitioner and is cofounder of the Albuquerque Java User’s Group in New Mexico.

Presentations

These three functional languages: Haskell, Scala, and Clojure Tutorial

Daniel Hinojosa offers a small guided tour of three functional programming languages—Haskell, Scala, and Clojure—highlighting their differences and what they hold in common.

Gregory Hislop is a professor of software engineering and senior associate dean at Drexel University’s College of Computing and Informatics. Gregory has been working on student involvement in open source through a series of NSF grants in partnership with Red Hat. He also spent about 20 years working in the industry, primarily in enterprise systems management products and services. Gregory is a frequent presenter at conferences and workshops.

Presentations

Want students who are ready to contribute? Here's what they should know Session

To contribute to an open source project, students must first learn open source methods, tools, and culture. However, few CS degree programs cover these topics. Gina Likins, Heidi Ellis, and Gregory Hislop outline an NSF-funded effort to advance FOSS learning in undergraduate computing programs and solicit input about the FOSS skills and abilities community members would like to see addressed.

Robert Hoekman, Jr. has authored several books and dozens of articles for a range of publications, including Fast Company magazine’s Co.Design blog. Robert is a columnist for the revered motorcycle culture and lifestyle magazine Iron & Air, where he is also a contributing editor. He has spoken to packed rooms at dozens of events all over the world. Robert’s talents for questioning and challenging conventional wisdom have earned him success in a myriad of professional interests, including design, product strategy consulting, freelance writing, editing, and public speaking. As a veteran of the web industry, he was among the few who practiced user experience before it became a household term and is widely considered to have written several of the profession’s defining guidebooks. Robert lives in downtown Phoenix, Arizona, with his partner, Jodi, and their two dogs, Max and Daisy. Learn more about Robert at Rhjr.net.

Presentations

Talking business: The language of leadership Cultivate

Managers are born from a mastery of nonmanagement skills. Robert Hoekman, Jr. draws from his 16-year career running projects to show you how to throw your ideas on to the table, your problems out the window, and a stack of successes over your shoulder to become the leader your team needs you to be.

Emma Jane Hogbin Westby leads the operations team for shared digital services at United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). She is the author of O’Reilly’s Git for Teams and two books on web development.

Presentations

Git for teams Tutorial

You've dabbled a little in version control using Git. You can follow along with the various tutorials you've found online. But now you've been asked to implement a work flow strategy, and you're not really sure how (or where) to start. You have a lot of choices. Emma Jane Hogbin Westby helps you pick the right one for your project.

Brian Holt is a senior user interface engineer at Netflix. This means he’s using JavaScript to enable your (and his own) House of Cards binge watching. Previously, he worked as the director of Redditgifts frontend at Reddit. When not on a Netflix bender or devouring content on Reddit, Brian is probably hanging out with his wife and their dog, running, traveling, or playing video games. Brian is currently a resident of San Francisco, CA.

Presentations

ES6 + React Tutorial

Brian Holt offers a hands-on, in-depth exploration of React. You’ll discover exactly how React works by building several complete React components, including a small app, and learn how you can apply its simple, declarative power to your applications using the latest ES6 features and syntax. By the end of this training, you'll understand why React is the most talked-about JavaScript library.

Quinton Hoole is a senior engineer on the Kubernetes team at Google and the technical lead for Kubernetes Cluster Federation (fondly known as “Ubernetes”). Before joining Google, Quinton was one of the founding engineers of EC2 at Amazon Web Services, leaving to join Nimbula.com, another pioneering cloud computing startup.

Presentations

Cloud federation with Tricircle and Ubernetes Session

Tricircle provides an OpenStack API gateway and networking automation solution to manage multiple OpenStack clouds; similarly, Ubernetes also provides unified API to manage multiple Kubernetes clusters. Zhiyuan Cai and Quinton Hoole discuss when it makes sense to use Tricircle and Ubernetes and how it simplifies cloud distribution via OpenStack and Kubernetes.

Kirsten Hunter is an API evangelist at Akamai. Kirsten is an unapologetic hacker and passionate advocate for the development community, and her experience supporting and evangelizing REST APIs has given her a unique perspective on developer success. Her technical interests range from graph databases to cloud services. In her copious free time, Kirsten is a gamer, fantasy reader, and all-around rabble rouser. You can find Kirsten’s code samples, recipes, and philosophical musings on her blog, Princess Polymath.

Presentations

Becoming a polyglot: Create a simple API server in four interpreted languages Session

Kirsten Hunter demonstrates how to build a simple backend API with a JavaScript frontend in four different languages—Ruby, Perl, Python, and Node—with the goal of teaching you how to parse what's happening in the code you are seeing and start you on your path to becoming a programming polyglot.

Cate Huston is director of mobile engineering at Ride. Cate has lived and worked in the UK, Australia, Canada, China, and the United States, previously as an engineer at Google, an Extreme Blue intern at IBM, and a ski instructor. She built Show & Hide (available on iTunes) and speaks internationally on mobile development. Her writing has been published on sites as varied as Be Leaderly, Lifehacker, the Daily Beast, the Eloquent Woman, and Model View Culture. She is an advisor at Glowforge, cocurates Technically Speaking, blogs at Accidentally in Code, and is @catehstn on Twitter.

Presentations

Applied humaning for technical interviews Cultivate

So you’re going to be an interviewer. Maybe you get some legal training, but soon enough you’re out there experimenting—with someone else’s career. Aside from the odd polite note from a candidate following up, you get no feedback, so how do you know what you’re doing well (or not)? Cate Huston offers concrete strategies for making the part of the experience you control better for the interviewee.

Solomon Hykes is the founder of Docker and the creator of the Docker open source initiative. A Forbes 30 under 30 and Y Combinator alum, Solomon led dotCloud as CEO through five years of fundraising, business operations, and product launches before focusing entirely on Docker.

Presentations

Incremental revolution: What Docker learned from the open source fire hose Keynote

Since Solomon Hykes unveiled Docker at the PyCon conference three years ago, containers have revolutionized how developers and ops teams build, ship, and run applications. Solomon explores the past, present, and future of our container ecosystem and shares lessons learned from managing successful open source projects across several dimensions: technology, people, products, and business.

Daniel Izquierdo Cortazar is a researcher and one of the founders of Bitergia, a company that provides software analytics for open source ecosystems. Currently the chief data officer at Bitergia, he is focused on the quality of the data, research of new metrics, analysis, and studies of interest for Bitergia customers via data mining and processing. Daniel holds a PhD in free software engineering from the Universidad Rey Juan Carlos in Madrid, where he focused on the analysis of buggy developers activity patterns in the Mozilla community.

Presentations

Analysis of the Xen code review process: An example of software development analytics Session

The Xen Project's code contributions have been growing 10% a year. However, during this period of growth, the code review process became much slower, leading to issues in the community. Lars Kurth and Daniel Izquierdo explain how software development analytics came to the rescue: it provided surprising insights that allowed the project members to understand issues and take corrective action.

Jim Jagielski is a well-known and widely acknowledged expert and visionary in open source, an accomplished coder, and a frequent, engaging presenter on all things open, web, and cloud related. As a developer, Jim has made substantial code contributions to just about every core technology behind the internet and web. In 2012, he was awarded the O’Reilly Open Source Award and in 2015 received the Innovation Luminary Award from the EU. He is best known as one of the developers and cofounders of the Apache Software Foundation, where he has served as both chairman and president and where he’s been on the board of directors since day one. Jim serves as president of the Outercurve Foundation, was a director of the Open Source Initiative (OSI), and works at Capital One as a senior director in the Tech Fellows program. He credits his wife Eileen in keeping him sane.

Presentations

Aligning patents and open source Session

A panel of experts holds an open and engaging discussion on patents and open source to uncover the complexities associated with each. The panel discusses the effect of open source software on patents, open sourcing software that already has a patent on it, what happens to other company patents if open sourced patented software is developed, and more. Come ready with questions for the panelists.

Ryan Jarvinen is an open source community activist at CoreOS, where he focuses on improving developer experience in the container community. He is passionate about open source, open standards, open government, and digital rights. Ryan lives in Oakland, California. You can reach him as ryanj on Twitter, GitHub, and IRC.

Presentations

Is your open source project ready for the container era? Session

Learn how to package up your open source software project as a containerized offering that developers trust and your community can easily maintain. Diane Mueller, Vincent Batts, and Ryan Jarvinen outline ways to automate your image build and deployment processes using Docker Hub, Kubernetes, OpenShift, and other popular toolchains and explore emerging best practices and container stds.

Packaging and maintaining Docker-based solutions with OpenShift Open Container Day

Ryan Jarvinen outlines the processes, tools, and techniques that Red Hat is adopting in order to help improve security for building, running, and maintaining container images. Ryan covers topics such as OpenShift templates and Source-to-Image builds and includes a workflow demonstration showing how operations teams can distribute security patches throughout a Kubernetes cluster.

Isabel Jimenez is a distributed systems engineer at Mesosphere, where she works on Apache Mesos.

Presentations

How do I orchestrate my containers? Session

Isabel Jimenez helps you find your way among multiple orchestration tools by comparing today’s most-popular choices: Docker Swarm, Kubernetes, and Apache Mesos. Isabel offers a demonstration of the tools themselves, as well as their open source communities and environments, and looks into the future of orchestration, which might not be exclusive to containers.

Alex Juarez is a principal engineer at Rackspace, touting nine years with the company. Alex enjoys all things Linux, especially training and mentoring others in its use, and is incredibly qualified to do so as an RHCA/RHCI. When Alex isn’t helping others, he’s crafting killer cocktails and finding the best spots to grub in San Antonio.

Presentations

The things I learned from you: Lessons from being a mentor Session

Being a mentor is equal parts rewarding and terrifying. You know the decisions you made that helped you become successful, but how do you guide somebody else? Big secret: there is no one way or single path to follow. Alex Juarez explains why mentoring is the most rewarding part of his job, covering the lessons he's learned from having the privilege of mentoring individuals and teams.

GitHub has changed the way open source is built, and Brandon Keepers is changing the way GitHub builds open source. An engineer by trade, Brandon believes open source is fundamental to building great products, and great products sustain healthy open source projects. He shares his endeavors on Twitter as @bkeepers and on his blog.

Presentations

A maturity model for embracing open source Session

A maturity model is a tool to assess the effectiveness of behaviors, practices, and processes in producing desired outcomes. Brandon Keepers introduces and explores a maturity model for embracing open source that leads an organization toward more organized and mature processes around consuming, contributing to, and releasing open source projects.

William Kennedy is a managing partner at Ardan Studio, a mobile, web, and systems development company in Miami, Florida. He is a coauthor of the book Go in Action, the author of the blog GoingGo.Net, and the organizer for the Go meetup and MongoDB meetup in Miami. Bill is focused on Go education through his new venture Ardan Labs. He can often be found speaking at conferences and giving workshops both locally and over Hangouts. Bill always finds time to work with individuals and groups who want to take their Go knowledge, blogging, and coding skills to the next level.

Presentations

Ultimate Go Training

William Kennedy offers a 2-day introduction to Go, the open source programming language that makes it easy to build simple, reliable, and efficient software.

Ultimate Go (Day 2) Training Day 2

William Kennedy offers a 2-day introduction to Go, the open source programming language that makes it easy to build simple, reliable, and efficient software.

Andy Kitchen is a crazy programmer with a big heart. When he was a kid, the first program he ever wrote was an “AI.” At the time, he thought this was the coolest thing ever. Later, he realized it was a chatbot. He is now a researcher and consultant in machine learning, specializing in neural networks. He is currently puzzling over how to teach computers to think about thinking and other metaphysical machinations.

Presentations

AbracadaBRAIN! Human learning about machine learning Session

Andy Kitchen offers a zero-to-hero spectacular on the state of the art in machine learning—with live demos. Want to understand how a computer can play Atari games all on its own? How it can dream of electric dog-slugs? Andy explains how it's all possible on this magical mystery tour of deep learning and neural networks.

Clint Kitson is the technical director for the EMC {code} team. EMC {code} contributes to and engages the open source community through topics like containers, persistent applications, and infrastructure as code. Clint and his team focus on further enhancing developer-oriented approaches to running infrastructure and platforms. He is both an advocate and engineer and actively contributes to open source projects, including Docker Engine, to help drive user adoption. Clint is passionate about the changes open source is bringing to infrastructure. Prior to Clint’s container and software infrastructure focus, he played an extensive role as both a customer and evangelist with virtualization, storage, and automation and brings with him 15 years of industry experience helping customers take advantage of new technology.

Presentations

Highly available persistent applications in containers Session

Are you thinking of implementing a container strategy? Clint Kitson explains why having a homogenous approach to persistence across the container ecosystem is the key to a successful strategy.

Janelle Klein is a NFJS tour speaker, author of Idea Flow: How to Measure the PAIN in Software Development, and founder of Open Mastery, an industry collaborative learning network focused on mastering the art of software development with a data-driven feedback loop. Janelle founded Open Mastery to rally the industry in working and learning together to break down the wall of ignorance between managers and developers that drives software projects into the ground. Janelle has also worked with New Iron for the last 10 years as a developer, consultant, and, now, CTO. Her development background is specialized in data-intensive analytic systems from financial core processors to factory automation, supply chain optimization, and statistical process control (SPC). Janelle’s consulting work focuses on continuous delivery infrastructure, database automation, test automation strategies, and helping companies identify and solve their biggest problems.

Presentations

How to build a learning organization Cultivate

Twenty-five years ago, Peter Senge wrote The Fifth Discipline, the seminal guide to building a learning organization. Given their obvious benefits (and Senge's recipe for success), why don't we see more learning organizations? Janelle Klein explains how to build a roadmap for learning how to learn together—from the building blocks of culture to the design of organizational architecture.

Alper Kokmen is a software engineer at PagerDuty in San Francisco. Prior to joining PagerDuty, he worked for early-stage ecommerce companies and Microsoft as a software engineer on products varying from an operating system to a bra-fitting recommendation engine. When away from keyboard, Alper is most likely binge watching TV shows with his wife or training for triathlons.

Presentations

Failure testing: Automating a series of unfortunate events Session

Alper Kokmen explains how PagerDuty has been injecting failure into its production systems manually with minimal effort and why it recently started automating the process to invest more time in coming up with new system-specific failure scenarios.

Tim Krajcar is an engineering manager at New Relic, where he runs the Ruby agent team. He’s been working with open source software since the early ’90s and has built software, web, and infrastructure solutions for companies including Nike, Intel, Standard Insurance, Hitachi, Sutter Home, and McAfee. Tim lives in Portland, Oregon, with his wife, where they recently cofounded two early-stage daughters.

Presentations

Ruby can too scale: Highly performant microservices in Ruby Session

Ruby developers have known for years that our beloved language is one of the most joyful to use. And yet, "Ruby Can't Scale" seems to be a daily article on Hacker News. Tim Krajcar presents some tips and tricks that he's learned at New Relic writing Ruby services that scale to hundreds of thousands of requests per minute.

Francesca Krihely works at MongoDB to help support the global open source community.

Presentations

Finding the giants: Creating and nurturing open source advocates Tutorial

Open source communities need leaders and contributors to thrive, but successfully engaging them often poses a challenge. Meghan Gill and Francesca Krihely explain how to create champions for your open source community and offer resources to build new advocacy programs. You'll walk away with a plan designed to engage leaders.

Bridget Kromhout is a principal technologist for Cloud Foundry at Pivotal. Her CS degree emphasis was in theory, but she now deals with the concrete (if ‘cloud’ can be considered tangible). After 15 years as an operations engineer, she traded being on call for being on a plane. A frequent speaker and program committee member for tech conferences, she leads the devopsdays organization globally and the DevOps community at home in Minneapolis. She podcasts with Arrested DevOps, blogs at Bridgetkromhout.com, and is active in a Twitterverse near you.

Presentations

Managing distributed systems using BOSH Tutorial

BOSH is an open source tool for predictably managing the long-term lifecycle of distributed systems. Bridget Kromhout explains how to create a BOSH release—a versioned collection of configuration properties, configuration templates, startup scripts, source code, binary artifacts, and anything else required to deploy software in a reproducible way.

Bradley M. Kuhn is the president and distinguished technologist at Software Freedom Conservancy, on the board of directors of the Free Software Foundation, and editor-in-chief of Copyleft.org. Bradley began his work in the software freedom movement as a volunteer in 1992, when he became an early adopter of the GNU/Linux operating system and began contributing to various free software projects. He worked during the 1990s as a system administrator and software developer for various companies and taught AP Computer Science at Walnut Hills High School in Cincinnati. His nonprofit career began in 2000, when he was hired by the FSF. As FSF’s executive director from 2001 to 2005, Bradley led FSF’s GPL enforcement, launched its Associate Member program, and invented the Affero GPL.

Bradley was appointed president of Software Freedom Conservancy in April 2006, was Conservancy’s primary volunteer from 2006 to 2010, and has been a full-time staffer since early 2011. Bradley holds a summa cum laude BS in computer science from Loyola University in Maryland and an MS in computer science from the University of Cincinnati, where his master’s thesis discussed methods for dynamic interoperability of free software programming languages. An excerpt from his thesis won the Damien Conway Award for Best Technical Paper in 2000. Bradley also received an O’Reilly Open Source Award in 2012 in recognition for his lifelong policy work on copyleft licensing. He has a blog, is on pump.io, and cohosts the audcast, Free as in Freedom.

Presentations

Aligning patents and open source Session

A panel of experts holds an open and engaging discussion on patents and open source to uncover the complexities associated with each. The panel discusses the effect of open source software on patents, open sourcing software that already has a patent on it, what happens to other company patents if open sourced patented software is developed, and more. Come ready with questions for the panelists.

Alyson La is a data analyst (and former accountant) at GitHub.

Presentations

Data storytelling using the GitHub Archive Session

The GitHub Archive is an open source project which archives public activity on GitHub and makes it easily accessible for analysis. Alyson La explores some interesting projects that have leveraged this rich dataset and explains how you can access the GitHub Archive using Google BigQuery and SQL-like commands to uncover insights and effectively tell a story with the data.

Ben Lackey is a partner architect in the Cloud Strategy group at DataStax, where he works closely with Microsoft and Google to improve user experience in the cloud. Much of this work focuses on provisioning frameworks and best practices.

Presentations

Provisioning Cassandra in the cloud Tutorial

AWS, Azure, and GCP all provision clusters differently. Docker, Kubernetes, and Mesos are seeking to simplify that process but haven't fully delivered on that promise. Ben Lackey and Boris Baryshnikov explain the best way to provision with the tools available today as we wait for the perfect orchestration layer to arrive.

Lisa LaForge is a practicing attorney in Silicon Valley and is a driving force in SanDisk Corporation’s open source program. Lisa chairs SanDisk’s open source steering committee and regularly speaks on open source topics, most recently at the 2015 Linux Collaboration Summit and at the 2015 LinuxCon. She authored an article on data insecurity as an unfair business practice that appeared in the October 2015 issue of CIO Review magazine.

Presentations

Sandbox approval: A streamlined approach to making open source contributions Session

As an organization moves from consuming open source to giving back, compliance professionals need to be able to track and approve open source contributions. Duane O'Brien and Lisa LaForge explain how to use a sandbox approval to streamline contributions and make the process more efficient for both engineers and compliance professionals.

Zoe Landon is a web developer and author, with a focus on frontend development. Zoe’s career has covered the needs of independent small businesses all the way up to massive media conglomerates. In a past life, she created levels and other content for a variety of video games and edited a literary arts magazine. She worked with Sir Christopher Lee that one time but doesn’t have all that many stories from it. Currently, Zoe works in research and design for Marketo, along with running her music discovery project RCRDList and playing drums for the Mighty Missoula. Her remaining time is spent competing in pub quizzes and caring for her pet rabbit, Jordan, who is as good at jumping as his name implies.

Presentations

Technology: So easy your lawyer can do it Session

Technology is a language all its own, and OSS is no different. But as more people from more backgrounds jump into open source, they can quickly become alienated by the specificity of jargon. How, then, do we explain powerful technologies to the everyday person without misleading them? Zoe Landon explains why it takes strong clarity, clever metaphors, and a bit of Shakespeare.

Jason Lantz has been an active user of open source since first installing Linux in 1996. After starting in systems administration, Jason moved into building web applications, mostly in Python. His passion for open source merged with a passion for nonprofits in 2008, which led him toward his current role at Salesforce.org. Jason now spends his time designing tooling to support open source team development on the Salesforce platform. This work led to the creation and release of two open source projects, CumulusCI and mrbelvedere.

Presentations

Radically accessible open source: The story of Salesforce.org’s Nonprofit Starter Pack Session

The open source Salesforce.org Nonprofit Starter Pack has grown to 150K+ users in seven years by combining a proprietary cloud, corporate philanthropy, and open source product delivery. Judi Sohn and Jason Lantz cover how Salesforce.org shepherds its contributors from consumers and users through engagers and community members to contributors.

Brent Laster is a global trainer, presenter, and author. In his day job, he is a senior manager of software development in SAS’s Research and Development Division, based in Cary, North Carolina, where he manages several groups involved with release engineering processes and internal tooling. He also serves as a resource for the use of open source technologies and conducts internal training classes in technologies such as Git, Gerrit, Gradle, and Jenkins, both in the US and abroad. In addition to corporate training, Brent creates and presents workshops for a wide variety of technical conferences. His workshops and informational sessions on open source technologies (and how to apply them) have been presented at such conferences as the Rich Web Experience/Continuous Delivery Experience, UberConf, OSCON, and others. Brent is the author of Professional Git from WROX (forthcoming) and is a contributor to publications such as the No Fluff, Just Stuff magazine. Brent also conducts live web training from time to time. Brent’s passion is teaching and doing so in a way that makes difficult concepts relatable to all. He has been involved in technical training for over 25 years and continues to seek out ways to show others how technology can be used to simplify and automate. You can learn more about Brent and his work on LinkedIn or find him on Twitter at @BrentCLaster.

Presentations

Building a deployment pipeline with Jenkins Tutorial

Brent Laster explains how to use Jenkins and illustrates how to easily integrate it with other open source technologies, such as Git, as he walks attendees through building a simple multistage deployment pipeline (managed and automated through Jenkins) that implements principles of continuous integration and continuous delivery.

David Lawrence has spent most of his life working in and around security. Most recently, David has been leading development of Notary, a new open source content-signing platform based on the Update Framework.

Presentations

Better collaboration through tooling Session

Onboarding is just as painful—if not more so—in the open source world. Ying Li and David Lawrence explain how using the right tooling can drastically increase the speed and success with which potential collaborators and contributors begin to add value to your project and community.

Erin Ledell is a statistician and machine-learning scientist at H2O.ai. Erin is the main author of H2O Ensemble. Before joining H2O, she was the principal data scientist at Wise.io and Marvin Mobile Security (acquired by Veracode in 2012) and the founder of DataScientific, Inc. Erin received her PhD in biostatistics from the University of California, Berkeley, with a designated emphasis in computational science and engineering. Her research focuses on ensemble machine learning, learning from imbalanced binary-outcome data, influence-curve-based variance estimation, and statistical computing. Erin also holds a BS and MA in mathematics.

Presentations

Big data is worthless without artificial intelligence Session

Over the past decade, we've seen a huge increase in data collection. Much of what we do online and in our daily lives is tracked, and every electronic device is generating some form of data. Leveraging real-world datasets from industries such as insurance, medicine, and transportation, Erin Ledell demonstrates how to go from big data to actionable insights using open source software.

Elaine Lee is a data engineer at Avant, where she creates and maintains the tech stack used by data scientists. Elaine was previously a data scientist at Civis Analytics, where she built models that are still in use today by its consulting operations, but she prefers building tools and modules that lower the barriers of doing data science.

Presentations

How to build consistent, scalable workspaces for data science teams Open Container Day

Data science insights are undoubtedly transforming organizations, but the challenges of setting up and maintaining a data science stack that generates those insights are rarely discussed. Elaine Lee describes how Avant’s Data Engineering team built a system with open source projects, centered around Docker, to support data science R&D, continuous integration, and scaling in production.

Erich Lee is an accomplished professional with two startups under his belt and 15 years of consulting experiene. He owns two consulting businesses, WellWater Capital Consulting and Ideaz To Apps, that focus on the areas of technology project management, IT strategy, and organization changes. In addition, Erich is an executive coach who has coached executives and staff along the East Coast on presentations and interpersonal communication. Erich has also started a meetup group, Atlanta Presentation and Communication, focused on interpersonal communication.

Erich is an avid learner and holds an MS in computer science from Clark Atlanta University and an MBA from Yale University. He is currently completing a master’s in applied psychology from the University of Southern California, and in Fall 2016, he will begin a PhD in organization change and behavior at the University of Southern California. In his free time, Erich volunteers as a mentor/coach at hackathon competitions in the Southeast and coaches teams on improving their sales pitches, business models, and business strategies.

Presentations

Transforming big data into experiences that drive behavior changes Session

Data alone lacks the social connection necessary to drive behavior change. However, combining the huge amount of available data with interactive experiences allows us to tell powerful stories that can motivate people to make lasting behavior changes. Erica Stanley and Erich Lee dive into the psychology of behavior change and explain how to convey stories in the data to support desired changes.

Homin Lee is a data scientist for Datadog, where he writes algorithms that process hundreds of billions data points a day. Prior to Datadog, Homin built large-scale machine-learning systems at several startups. Homin has a PhD from Columbia University in computational learning theory and was a Computing Innovation Fellow at the University of Texas at Austin.

Presentations

Detecting outliers and anomalies in real-time at Datadog Session

Datadog provides outlier and anomaly detection functionality to automatically alert on metrics that are difficult to monitor using thresholds alone. Homin Lee discusses the algorithms and open source tools Datadog uses and lessons learned from using these alerts on its own systems, along with some real-life examples on how to avoid false positives and negatives.

Kathy Lee is an IT specialist at Bonneville Power Administration, a federal nonprofit that is part of the Department of Energy. Kathy develops software that supports Power Business Line functions. This includes doing cool stuff like seeing how physical scientists operate the hydroelectric dams. In her spare time, Kathy enjoys spending time with her husband, geriatric canine, and friends. She is also a musician and can be seen once a year on New Year’s Eve on stage with people a lot cooler than she is.

Presentations

Storming the castle: Open source challenges in government Session

Working for the government presents two major hurdles in open source development: getting your hands on open source developed libraries and finding ways to contribute to open source development in the workplace. Kathy Lee and Morgan Senkal discuss these challenges and offer possible solutions.

Rasmus Lerdorf is an engineer at Etsy, known for having gotten the PHP project off the ground in 1995. Rasmus was an infrastructure architect at Yahoo for seven years and has contributed to a number of open source projects over the years. He was born in Greenland, grew up in Denmark and Canada, and has a systems design engineering degree from the University of Waterloo. You can follow him on Twitter at @rasmus.

Presentations

Deploying PHP 7 Session

PHP 7 is here and it brings drastic performance improvements along with new features. Rasmus Lerdorf explains how PHP 7 is likely to impact your application and how to identify potential BC breaks. Now would be a good time to revisit your deploy strategy to make sure it's safe, efficient, and atomic and makes use of the latest features of PHP 7.

Aline is the cofounder and CEO of interviewing.io, an anonymous technical interviewing platform. Before that, she wrote code, ran hiring at Udacity, and launched a successful recruiting firm whose clients included Airbnb, Dropbox, Lever, and more. And she also wrote a lot of angry stuff on the Internet about how technical hiring is biased and systemically broken. Her data-driven posts about how typos matter more than pedigree, how resumes are a low-signal filtering tool, and how technical interviewing performance is arbitrary have reached hundreds of thousands of people, and her work on the subject has appeared in Forbes, the Wall Street Journal, and Fast Company. Last year, after deciding that rather than writing stuff, it might be cool to fix things, she launched interviewing.io, where she’s working on building a community where people are judged by what they can do, rather than how they look on paper.

Presentations

Résumés suck: How to hire better Cultivate

Résumés are a ubiquitous filter of engineering aptitude, but they're not foolproof. Aline Lerner discusses some counterintuitive experimental results around the usefulness of the résumé as a hiring tool and what cues deliver a stronger, more predictable signal. Aline also covers simple strategies you can implement immediately to get better candidates in your funnel and keep them there.

Mark Levy is a positioning consultant and pitch coach who helps his clients become known through the creation of what he calls “their big sexy idea.” Mark’s clients include a former department head in the White House, CEOs of major organizations, a former head of the Strategy Unit of the Harvard Business School, a member of Major League Baseball, and TED and TEDx speakers. Mark has written or coauthored five books, including Accidental Genius, which has been published in 10 languages. He is also the creator and presenter of the O’Reilly video course, Influencing People Honestly. In addition to his business projects, Mark creates magic tricks and shows that have been performed in Carnegie Hall and Las Vegas and on all the major TV networks. He also cocreated the magic-and-innovation talk “Romance and Engineering” with Joel Hodgson, the creator of Mystery Science Theater 3000.

Presentations

What’s important to you? Ethical influence starts with openness Cultivate

The open source philosophy—based on transparency, fairness, and merit—is beginning to permeate every aspect of business. Mark Levy demonstrates how to apply openness as a way of ethically influencing your teams and higher-ups through an approach he calls “What’s important to you?” which is all about being open and honest about your vision, motivations, and goals.

Dana Lewis is a thinker, doer, and teacher of health and digital things—and the developer of an open source, closed-loop artificial pancreas, #DIYPS, the Do-It-Yourself Pancreas System. Dana is also a founder of the #OpenAPS movement to make safe and effective basic Artificial Pancreas System (APS) technology more widely available. She also created and moderates #hcsm, the global healthcare social media community that meets weekly on Twitter, and works at the intersection of all things health and digital. Professionally, Dana serves as director of MDigitalLife for W2O Group, helping organizations understand, engage, and activate the online health ecosystem. She can be found at @DanaMLewis, #DIYPS, and #OpenAPS on Twitter.

Presentations

Closing the loop: Open source community projects are changing healthcare Keynote

What happens when an open source community develops around a group of patients who are frustrated with their medical devices? You end up with an artificial pancreas, of course. Dana Lewis, one of the original creators of the open source artificial pancreas, examines how open source communities enable innovation in unexpected places—like healthcare.

Kevin Lewis is a developer at Microsoft specializing in data warehousing and management using SQL Server and Cosmos. He is currently working with GitHub data from GHTorrent.org using Azure Data Lake.

Presentations

Large-scale GitHub insights Session

GitHub hosts tens of millions of people collaborating on more than 20 million repositories—an unprecedented treasure trove of data for software engineering researchers, companies, and project teams alike. Jeff McAffer, Georgios Gousios, and Kevin Lewis explore tools and techniques for sifting through terabytes of content, present key insights they discovered, and explain how you can follow suit.

After spending more than eight years helping secure video delivery for cable and IPTV set-top boxes, Russell Lewis made the ultimate cord-cutting move by joining the Platform Security team at Netflix. Now he spends his time focused on building a secure foundation, supporting strategic security needs, and raising the bar for security for the Netflix video-streaming service.

Presentations

How Netflix gives all its engineers SSH access to instances running in production Session

Traditional security methods can focus on putting barriers between people and resources, but sometimes the fastest way to solve a problem is to get shell access in production. Russell Lewis explains how Netflix decreased developer friction by building a certificate authority-based SSH bastion solution that balances security and engineering velocity needs.

Sanqi Li is the CTO of products and solutions at Huawei. Previously, Sanqi served as CTO at Tekelec, CTO of Carrier Network Business Group’s IT product line and Core Network product line, president of Data Center & Media Network’s business unit, and as a full tenured professor in the ECE Department at the University of Texas at Austin. He cofounded the high-tech companies GaoHong Telecommunication Technology Inc. in China (acquired by Datang Telecom Group in 2000) and Santera Systems Inc. in the US (acquired by Tekelec in 2003) and co-led and architected the original spin-off of Santera Softswitch to form Spatial Wireless (acquired by Alcatel in 2004). Over his distinguished career, Sanqi has provided technical consulting services to companies including Cisco, AT&T, Verizon, KT, and Samsung and served on the advisory boards of several high-tech startups. He has over 25 patents filed or granted and over 160 papers published in international academic archival journals and best-in-class refereed international conference proceedings. Over 20 PhD students graduated under his supervision.

Presentations

Huawei’s open source journey Keynote

Sanqi Li shares Huawei’s open source stories, covering not only its significant contributions and leading activities in some major open source projects, including Hadoop, Spark, OpenStack, ONOS, OPNFV, OCI, and so on, but also its new initiatives in building open developer platform and open lab partnership programs to further embrace the open, collaborative, and shared digital economy.

Ying Li is an engineer at Docker. Ying was previously at Rackspace. Ying runs an ELK stack at home just for fun.

Presentations

Better collaboration through tooling Session

Onboarding is just as painful—if not more so—in the open source world. Ying Li and David Lawrence explain how using the right tooling can drastically increase the speed and success with which potential collaborators and contributors begin to add value to your project and community.

Joshua Lifton is a cofounder of Crowd Supply.

Presentations

A tale of three laptops: Adventures in creating, funding, and managing open hardware projects Session

Crowd Supply's unique combination of funding model and services has enabled a new and growing breed of open hardware devices and products. Joshua Lifton offers a behind-the-scenes look at several open hardware projects launched and delivered through Crowd Supply to discuss how crowdfunding is opening the way for products that protect user freedom for privacy advocates and everyday consumers.

Gina Likins is part of the University Outreach team at Red Hat, which exists to help universities incorporate open source into their curriculum. Currently, she is driving a project that she hopes will make it easier for instructors to find open source projects to work with and has spent the past two years talking to and working with instructors who are interested in open source. Gina has guest lectured for numerous university classes as part of her university outreach role, led sessions at two CCSC conferences, presented at SCALE13x, OSCON 2015, and LinuxCon 2015 in Seattle and Europe, and keynoted at ApacheCon 2015. She’s a frenetic crafter and is sometimes a backup singer.

Presentations

Want students who are ready to contribute? Here's what they should know Session

To contribute to an open source project, students must first learn open source methods, tools, and culture. However, few CS degree programs cover these topics. Gina Likins, Heidi Ellis, and Gregory Hislop outline an NSF-funded effort to advance FOSS learning in undergraduate computing programs and solicit input about the FOSS skills and abilities community members would like to see addressed.

Bryan Liles works on the Cloud Engineering team at Capital One. When not helping a huge back move to the public cloud, he gets to speak at conferences on topics ranging from machine learning to building the next generation of developers. In his free time, Bryan races cars in straight lines and around turns and builds robots and devices.

Presentations

AppOps: Building successful deployments Tutorial

AppOps is a collection of practices dictating how to move an application from development to production. Bryan Liles walks attendees through releasing an application and applying the AppOps tenets: continuous integration, continuous deployment, logging, metrics, and error handling. By the end of the tutorial, you'll be able to apply AppOps to your own projects.

Richard Lin is a community manager at Huawei. Previously, he worked in GitCafe, a Git service in China, and with the Open Source Software Foundry (OSSF) at Academia Sinica, focusing on open source licensing and business models. Richard devotes much of his time to technical communities, including COSCUP, JSDC.tw, and Shanghai LUG.

Presentations

Creating the open source future of Huawei: The challenges and surprises of transitioning to an open enterprise Session

Richard Lin explains why Huawei is transforming itself from a low-key, conservative software and hardware company to an open source one. In becoming a supporter of and collaborator with the open source software development community, Huawei has earned some hard-won knowledge about how to make this monumental shift while still keeping an enterprise not only running but growing.

Adrienne Lowe is a former personal chef from Atlanta who documents her experience learning Python and teaching others to cook at Coding with Knives. Her project marries her lifelong passion for culinary arts with her enthusiasm for programming and open source software and shows how these disparate subjects can inform one another in compelling ways. In 2015, Adrienne spoke at PyTennessee, DjangoCon Europe, ELAConf, and her local Python user groups PyATL and PyLadiesATL, which she co-organizes. She is also the organizer of Django Girls Atlanta and manages the Your Django Story interview series for Django Girls. Adrienne works as director of advancement for the Django Software Foundation and is the chair of corporate sponsorship for Write the Docs Conferences. She is the tech editor for the second edition of O’Reilly’s Head First Python.

Presentations

Bake the cookies, wear the dress: Leading with confident authenticity Session

Are you interested in speaking at a tech conference but unsure how to share relevant technical information in an engaging way? Are you in a position of leadership or mentorship in open source and want to be perceived as accessible and collaborative? In a fun, lighthearted talk, Adrienne Lowe offers actionable suggestions for inspiring others with your own confident authenticity.

Sammus (Enongo Lumumba-Kasongo) is an Ithaca, NY-based rap artist, producer, and PhD student in the Department of Science & Technology Studies at Cornell University. Labeled the “rap Aisha Tyler” by MTV Iggy for her intelligent lyrics, Sammus has built a following within the underground hip hop scene and has become one of the faces of black female geeks within the growing nerdcore hip hop movement. Since joining NuBlack Music Group in early 2012, she has opened for such artists as Downtown Boys, Busdriver, Ceschi Ramos, Open Mike Eagle, Awkwafina, and Raekwon. Her high-energy, politically charged performances have led to official shows at SXSW, PAX East, and New York Comic Con among other notable events.

Over the past three years, Sammus has released three Bandcamp best-selling albums (including a Kickstarter-funded Metroid tribute EP), as well a collaborative EP with nerdcore MC Random aka Mega Ran, two remastered video game instrumental EPs with DJ Cutman, and a critically acclaimed beat tape. Her unique story has led to coverage in such well-known publications as Noisey, Afropunk, Impose, Okayplayer, Okayafrica, Bitch, The Mary Sue, and the Austin Chronicle, among others. As her Metroid-inspired name reflects, it is her hope that listeners and future fans will be pleasantly surprised by the contrast between the person society says she should be as an artist and who she actually is.

In addition to managing a full-time music career, Enongo has spent the past seven years as a public school and college-level educator. After graduating from Cornell University in 2008 with a double BA in sociology and science & technology studies, she was accepted into the national teaching program Teach for America and placed in Houston, Texas, where she taught elementary math and science from 2008 to 2010. In the fall semester of 2011, Enongo returned to Cornell as a PhD candidate to pursue an interest a wide array of sound studies topics, including sound and gaming as well as the identity politics of community studios. As an academic in training and very vocal feminist, Enongo has produced articles for publications such as Bitch, For Harriet, Sounding Out!, and The Mary Sue related to issues of race, hip-hop, gaming, and feminism.

Presentations

Keynote performance by Sammus Keynote

Rapper, singer, producer, and songwriter Sammus balances her music career with her PhD studies and teaching work at Cornell. Her love of tech, music, and video games comes together in the form of dense and intense lyrics that have wowed fans of nerdcore nationwide. She's joining us at OSCON to share a few songs and a few thoughts about how she got here and where she's going.

Jihong Ma is currently a principle architect at Huawei’s US software lab, where she works on CarbonData, an open source efficient data format for big data analytics. Jihong previously worked at the IBM Spark Technology Center, where she contributed to Apache Spark. She also participated in the development of an M/R-based distributed machine-learning system that has since become Apache SystemML. She has extensive experience in SQL database query processing and is a key member of the DB2 LUW Compiler team. Jihong holds an MS in computer science from the University of Wisconsin—Madison.

Presentations

CarbonData : A new Hadoop-native file format for faster data analysis Session

Are you working with the Hadoop ecosystem but still puzzled how to accelerate big data analytics? Jihong Ma explains why you should check out CarbonData, an indexed and columnar store file format designed for fast analytics, and outlines how it can help speed up queries an order of magnitude faster over petabytes of data.

Quanyi Ma uses his open source expertise as a senior architect and open source container and Go programming language evangelist at Huawei. His interests include DevOps (especially with containers), the Go programming language, and AngularJS. Quanyi is also the organizer and host of Docker meetups in many cities across China, a member of many container conference program committees, and a prolific conference speaker. Quanyi proposed the ContainerOps concept central to DevOps and an application version control system concept similar to Git.

Presentations

Dockyard: An open source container registry for Docker and rkt Session

Quanyi Ma offers an introduction to Dockyard, an open source registry that is currently compatible with Docker and rkt containers. Dockyard gives developers and DevOps engineers the ability to change container runtimes in a Kubernetes cluster while keeping containers secure with CoreOS's Clair.

Ally MacDonald is an editor at O’Reilly Media covering web programming topics. Ally spends a lot of time thinking about how to help developers tackle web development churn, the intersection of design and technology, and tacos.

Presentations

All the bots opening welcome All the Bots

Program emcee Allyson MacDonald opens All the Bots.

Quentin Machu is an engineer on the Quay team at CoreOS and a maintainer of the Clair open source project, which scans containers for vulnerabilities. He is passionate about software engineering and distributed systems. Quentin completed an award-winning OpenStack project as part of his master’s in computer engineering.

Presentations

Clair: Clarity with container security scanning Session

Docker layers can be fast for developers but are also vulnerable if not audited for production. Wouldn't it be great to improve continuous integration with continuous vulnerability detection? Joey Schorr and Quentin Machu offer an overview of Clair, a new open source tool to monitor the security of containers. Come see how it works, get started, and learn how to get involved with the development.

Anil Madhavapeddy is a member of technical staff at Docker, as well as faculty at the Cambridge University Computer Laboratory. Anil was on the original team at Cambridge that developed the Xen hypervisor and is currently hacking on the unikernel movement. Anil has a diverse background in industry at NetApp, XenSource, Citrix, Intel, and NASA. He is an active member of the open source development community with the OpenBSD operating system and more, as well as the steering committee chair of the Commercial Uses of Functional Programming conference.

Presentations

Advanced Docker developer workflows on Mac OS and Windows Open Container Day

Most developers use a Mac or Windows host to develop Docker Linux containers, which complicates filesystem sharing between the host and the Linux container and requires replicating Linux networking configuration locally. Anil Madhavapeddy and Richard Mortier outline ways to make using Docker on a Mac or Windows transparent, thus enabling a rapid test/edit/deployment cycle for microservices.

Unikernels and Docker: From revolution to evolution Session

Richard Mortier and Anil Madhavapeddy demonstrate the integration of MirageOS, Rumprun unikernels, and the Docker container management toolchain, discuss the relationship between MirageOS (clean slate), Rumprun unikernels, and Linux Containers, and show how it is getting steadily easier to extend everyday workflows and deployments with unikernel technology.

Ted Malaska is a group technical architect on the Battle.net team at Blizzard, helping support great titles like World of Warcraft, Overwatch, and HearthStone. Previously, Ted was a principal solutions architect at Cloudera helping clients find success with the Hadoop ecosystem and a lead architect at the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). He has also contributed code to Apache Flume, Apache Avro, Apache Yarn, Apache HDFS, Apache Spark, Apache Sqoop, and many more. Ted is a coauthor of Hadoop Application Architectures, a frequent speaker at many conferences, and a frequent blogger on data architectures.

Presentations

Intro to Apache Spark for Java and Scala developers Session

With the rapid adoption of Apache Spark and the need for programs to span many machines, distributed computing has resurfaced as a hot commodity that can open the door to cool and impactful apps. Ted Malaska introduces Java and Scala devs to Spark concepts such as DAGs, RDDs, and transformations and explains why mindsets must evolve beyond code that runs in a single JVM.

Richard Maldonado is the lead product manager at Dice for the Tech Pro digital experience. With over 15 years in enterprise software and IT solutions, Richard has managed market-leading enterprise software products and spearheaded several efforts to build, partner, and leverage open source projects. He began his career at Sun Microsystems, where he managed products including Sun RFID, Sun Portal Server, OpenPortal, and GlassFish WebSpace Server. He also managed products at Oracle in the Fusion Middleware development organization. Richard holds a bachelor’s degree in management information systems (MIS) from Menlo College and an MBA from Saint Mary’s College.

Presentations

How open source now rocks the tech job market Session

Richard Maldonado shares experiences and drivers behind Dice's move to open source, reviews trends happening in the open source job market, and demonstrates how to leverage the Dice tech community and ecosystem to gain visibility for the open source projects that are important to you.

David Mandala has been a pioneer in the Linux industry since 1995, when his company, THEM Productions, started deploying Linux for businesses. David is currently the Director of Systems at Linaro, where he focuses on Linaro’s infrastructure, ARM servers. He runs the Linaro Hardware Server cluster, is involved with the Linaro Developer Cloud, and works with the 96Board project. He wrote the 96BoardsGPIO library, regularly blogs about 96Boards, and is working to bring the 96Boards to the maker community. Previously, David worked for Canonical, where he was responsible for the ARM port of Ubuntu and for making Ubuntu for ARM as close to Ubuntu for x86 as possible.

Presentations

HiKey: A high-performance ARM 64-bit developing platform for Linaro Session

David Mandala offers an overview of HiKey. With HiKey, developers can easily use the latest Google AOSP SDK to create and debug new and existing peripheral drivers and perform kernel development and other tasks with fewer OEM encumbrances. HiKey can also be used to make VR applications with OSVR, robotic applications with ROS, and secure applications with ARM TrustZone.

Jon Manning is the cofounder of Secret Lab and has worked on apps of all sorts, ranging from iPad games for children to instant messaging clients. He frequently finds himself gesticulating wildly in front of classes full of eager-to-learn developers. Jon has written a whole bunch of books for O’Reilly (and previously Wiley) about iOS development and game development. He recently completed his PhD, where his research studied how people manipulate the ranking systems of social media sites; this means that he literally has a doctorate about jerks on the internet. He wrote Yarn Spinner, an interactive dialogue system, which was used in the 2017 indie game Night in the Woods. Jon can be found as @desplesda on Twitter.

Presentations

Swift programming for iOS, OS X, and beyond Training

Veteran OS X and iOS developers Tim Nugent, Jonathon Manning, and Paris Buttfield-Addison offer an in-depth introduction to programming in Swift for developing iOS and OS X apps and services.

Swift programming for iOS, OS X, and beyond (Day 2) Training Day 2

Veteran OS X and iOS developers Tim Nugent, Jonathon Manning, and Paris Buttfield-Addison offer an in-depth introduction to programming in Swift for developing iOS and OS X apps and services.

Guy Martin is Director of the Open@ADSK initiative at Autodesk. He is responsible for both the company’s external open source strategy and execution, as well as for building collaborative ‘inner source’ communities utilizing best practices from the open source world. Additionally, he represents Autodesk to the larger open source community, including working with industry consortia and foundations such as the Linux Foundation.

Prior to Autodesk, Guy helped found and create the Samsung Open Source Group, a team charged with making sustained contributions to key open source projects on behalf of the company. In a former role at Red Hat, he created the Open Source Enablement consulting offering to help customers take advantage of Red Hat’s expertise in working with open source communities. Guy speaks to audiences of all kinds on open source and community strategy at events like LinuxCon, OSCON, the Community Leadership Summit, and All Things Open.

Presentations

InnerSource overview Session

InnerSource applies lessons from the best open source projects to engineering and transforms cultures that use it. Cedric Williams, Georg Gruetter, Guy Martin, Nithya Ruff, and Panna Pavangadkar explore the factors that keep software teams from collaborating effectively, look at the development model used for Apache Software Foundation projects, and talk about ways to bridge the two approaches.

Peter Martini is an engineer working to make the metal in the cloud a little less rough around the edges, automating business processes during the day and tinkering with low-level machines (parsers, interpreters, and firmware) at night.

Presentations

How to hack your firmware Session

There's no longer any question of whether open source operating systems are viable, but open source firmware is still a scary topic to a lot of people. Peter Martini explains some of the basics and shows you how to get started if you'd like to replace some of the lower-level software on your machines.

Josh Matthews is a platform developer at Mozilla, where he gets to write a lot of Rust code. Josh is a core contributor to Firefox and Servo and a keen mentor of new contributors. He gleefully demolishes any barriers to entry that he comes across in open source projects.

Presentations

Optimizing your project for contribution Session

Many FOSS projects find it difficult to grow beyond a small team of core contributors, but this does not need to be the case. There are tried and true ways to lower the barrier to entry and increase the potential pool of contributors. Joshua Matthews presents a five-point plan that provides a solid foundation for encouraging new contributors.

Madeline Maxwell is professor of communication studies and director of the Project on Conflict Resolution at the University of Texas at Austin, where she teaches and conducts research in the ethnography of communication (the study of the interaction of language and culture). Madeline’s current projects involve adaptations to communication technology and talk in conflict mediation. Madeline is chair of the Graduate Portfolio in Dispute Resolution and the undergraduate interdisciplinary certification program in Conflict Resolution and Peace Studies. She is also a minority liaison officer and chair of the University Standing Committee on Recruitment and Retention of Minority Students.

Presentations

Do well by doing good without getting done wrong: Leadership, negotiation, and communication Cultivate

Madeline Maxwell dives into how leaders use negotiation to avoid wasteful conflicts and make the most of conflicts they have.

Jeff McAffer is the director of open source engineering at Microsoft, where he helps drive the company’s transition to an “open source engagement first” model. Jeff was one of the founders of the Eclipse open source project. He is an active community leader, core contributor, book author, and frequent conference speaker.

Presentations

Large-scale GitHub insights Session

GitHub hosts tens of millions of people collaborating on more than 20 million repositories—an unprecedented treasure trove of data for software engineering researchers, companies, and project teams alike. Jeff McAffer, Georgios Gousios, and Kevin Lewis explore tools and techniques for sifting through terabytes of content, present key insights they discovered, and explain how you can follow suit.

Open source lessons from the TODO Group Session

Members of the TODO Group—an open group of companies who collaborate on practices, tools, and other ways to run successful and effective open source projects and programs—discuss why they started open source offices in their respective companies (Twitter, Netflix, Box, Google, Microsoft, and SanDisk) and share the lessons they learned along the way.

Rushaine McBean is a JavaScript engineer at WNYC Radio. Rushaine primarily codes in JavaScript and turns to Ruby (Ruby on Rails or Sinatra) and Node.js frequently to power her web applications. She’s an organizer of the BoroJS meetup, Manhattan.js. Rushaine earned her undergraduate degree in computer science from Hunter College. When she isn’t writing code, she’s either listening to music or getting developer swag.

Presentations

Into the deep sea of React Native Session

Building maintainable web apps is enough of challenge without thinking about if you need your product on a mobile platform. Wouldn’t it be great to leverage the fundamentals already offered in React for your native apps? Enter React Native. Rushaine McBean explains how to take your JavaScript and React skills and apply them to a React Native app while maintaining a consistent development workflow.

Colin McCabe is a platform software engineer at Cloudera, where he works on HDFS and related technologies. Prior to joining Cloudera, Colin worked on the Ceph Distributed Filesystem and the Linux kernel, among other things. He studied computer science and computer engineering at Carnegie Mellon.

Presentations

Lessons from writing HTraced: A high-performance network daemon in Go Session

HTraced is a new trace collection daemon for the Apache HTrace project, written in Golang. Colin McCabe shares his experiences with the Go programming language and explains the design of HTraced. Colin explores libraries, frameworks, and build systems and discusses what was fun, what was tricky, and how the team optimized overall system performance.

John McClean is an architect at AOL, where he leads the Advertising Demand Side Forecasting team, which builds and runs a system that processes billions of RTB, impression, and viewability records in real time to generate price volume curves and other forecasts for advertising campaigns in milliseconds. John is also the lead developer for AOL open source projects cyclops-react and Microserver. Extracted from AOL’s forecasting system, these projects allow AOL to rapidly deploy new features that work at scale by guiding Java developers along the path of functional, reactive microservices. John has 16 years of software development experience and has been with AOL for 11 years.

Presentations

AOL's return to open source: An overview of Java 8 library cyclops-react Session

AOL is increasingly encouraging its engineers to contribute back to the community. John McClean offers an introductory overview of cyclops-react and demonstrates how it can integrate with other new technologies in the Java 8 ecosystem, such as Pivotal Reactor, Functional Java, and Javaslang.

Patrick McFadin is one of the leading experts in Apache Cassandra and data-modeling techniques. As a consultant and the chief evangelist for Apache Cassandra at DataStax, Patrick has helped build some of the largest and most exciting deployments in production. Prior to DataStax, he was chief architect at Hobsons, an education services company. There, Patrick spoke often on web application design and performance.

Presentations

Open source or proprietary: Choose wisely Session

Will our project be OSS or proprietary? It's an easy question that can lead to some uncomfortable moments in an organization. Sorting through the reasons for and against OSS can be tedious at best and life changing at worst. Don’t let this moment become something you regret. Patrick McFadin outlines the process and gives you some tools to make it through. Hopefully we’ll save a few friendships.

Jay McGavren is a Rails developer who has been working in online developer training since 2011. He is the author of Head First Ruby (O’Reilly, 2015).

Presentations

Ruby: Your next favorite programming language Tutorial

Jay McGavren offers an introduction to the Ruby programming language and demonstrates how it can make you a better, happier, more productive programmer.

Kyla McMullen is the first underrepresented woman to earn a PhD in computer science and engineering from the University of Michigan. She is currently a tenure-track faculty member in the Computer & Information Sciences & Engineering Department at the University of Florida. Her research interests are in the perception, application, and development of 3D audio technologies. She is using this research to create realistic virtual environments, enhance data sonification, augment assistive technologies for persons with visual impairments, and decrease cognitive load in multimodal systems. While earning her PhD, Kyla was a faculty member at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, where she taught computer literacy courses to over 2,000 students.

Kyla has a personal commitment to encouraging women and underrepresented groups to pursue careers in computing and other STEM fields. She is the author of “Beautiful, Black, and Brainy” and “Brilliant Is the New Black”, which showcase hundreds of exceptional young African Americans who excel in STEM fields and don’t fit the typical “scientist” stereotype. She earned her BS in computer science from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), where she was also a Meyerhoff Scholar, and her master’s and PhD degrees in computer science and engineering from the University of Michigan.

Presentations

How did I "git" here? A tale of a CS professor Keynote

Everyone has a story about their first computer, a teacher that inspired them, or that first piece of amazing software that started it all. Kyla McMullen explains how she went from a child interested in technology to a computer science professor—and the software that was there for her along the way. But behind her story is a question: how can we make this journey happen for others?

Tyler McMullen is CTO of Fastly, where he is responsible for the system architecture and leads the company’s technology vision. As part of the founding team, Tyler built the first versions of Fastly’s instant purging system, API, and real-time analytics. Before Fastly, Tyler worked on text analysis and recommendations at Scribd. A self-described technology curmudgeon, Tyler has experience in everything from web design to kernel development and loathes all of it. Especially distributed systems.

Presentations

Load balancing is impossible Session

Load balancing efficiently is a very hard problem. In fact, in the real world, doing it perfectly is impossible. That said, the techniques that most of us use are far from the best we can do. Tyler McMullen outlines what makes load balancing hard and the problems with how we solve it right now and offers techniques to do it better.

Ashley McNamara is the director of technical communities at ObjectRocket by Rackspace, where she acts as a bridge between third-party developers and Rackspace, driving platform adoption through the developer community and driving change into products based on real-world customer/developer feedback. Ashley was a 2014 Hackbright engineering fellow. In her spare time, she’s a mentor at WeWork, General Assembly, AngelHack, and CapitalFactory and is on the board of multiple engineering groups including Redis Austin, Big Data Analytics Club, and Austin All Girl Hack Night. Ashley is passionate about helping more underrepresented individuals join and feel comfortable in tech and is often a resource for new developers trying to find their way.

Presentations

Building amazing cross-platform command-line apps in Go Tutorial

Go is a great platform for CLI development due to its raw power, easy syntax, and painless distribution. Steve Francia and Ashley McNamara teach the techniques, principles, and libraries you need to build great CLI apps, covering everything from designing commands to working with and parsing flags, config files, and remote config systems and working with environment variables and 12-factor apps.

Eric McNulty helps leaders and organizations create long-term value and increase their positive impact on the full range of stakeholders. Eric is a writer, speaker and conversation catalyst, teacher, and advisor and holds an appointment as director of research and professional programs at the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative at Harvard. He has a specialty in crisis and change leadership and has researched and written case studies and articles of numerous crisis events from natural disasters to terror attacks to cyber incidents. He teaches regularly in Harvard and MIT executive education programs and speaks to executive audiences around the world, including at many O’Reilly events, about the challenges of leading in fast moving, unpredictable circumstances.

Presentations

The 21st century leader: Shaping the future Cultivate

Leading in the 21st century requires an artful blend of “same as it ever was” and “you’ve never seen this before.” Eric McNulty shares his extensive experience and proven techniques for instituting effective leadership.

Heather Meeker is a partner in O’Melveny & Myers’s Silicon Valley office, where she advises clients on technology transactions and intellectual property matters, including mergers and acquisitions. Heather’s latest book, Open Source for Business (2015), is a handbook for lawyers, engineers, and businesspersons on open source licensing in business.

Presentations

Aligning patents and open source Session

A panel of experts holds an open and engaging discussion on patents and open source to uncover the complexities associated with each. The panel discusses the effect of open source software on patents, open sourcing software that already has a patent on it, what happens to other company patents if open sourced patented software is developed, and more. Come ready with questions for the panelists.

Fred Melo has been working with Cloud Foundry since its origins and writing software for longer than he’d like to admit. Fred currently works as a technical director at Pivotal. He is especially passionate about scalable and resilient software architectures and spends his time speaking to communities and helping customers on their journeys to transform through software.

Presentations

Building data-driven applications on Cloud Foundry with Spring Event

Fred Melo and Casey West explore DevOps, continuous delivery, and microservices for data-driven applications. Fred and Casey cover the basics of continuous delivery for microservices using Spring Boot and leveraging the built-in capabilities of the open source Cloud Foundry platform.

Jeff Mendoza is a developer relations engineer on the Google Cloud Platform. Jeff is a long time FOSS enthusiast and is currently most interested in container technology. He spends his days making the Kubernetes development experience smoother and his nights playing games of various media.

Presentations

Kubernetes: From scratch to production in 2 days Training

Brian Dorsey and Jeff Mendoza lead a 2-day training exploring what you need to know to run distributed, containerized applications: core concepts, common patterns, storage, logging, monitoring, and troubleshooting.

Kubernetes: From scratch to production in 2 days (Day 2) Training Day 2

Brian Dorsey and Jeff Mendoza lead a 2-day training exploring what you need to know to run distributed, containerized applications: core concepts, common patterns, storage, logging, monitoring, and troubleshooting.

Tessa Mero is the developer evangelist for Cisco. Tessa spends her extra time contributing on a leadership team for the Joomla! Project and has been involved with Joomla! for the past five years. She runs the Seattle PHP meetup and is the organizer of the Pacific Northwest PHP conference. In her free time, Tessa likes to play video games, snowboard, and eat Korean food.

Presentations

Leading an open source project Session

Have you ever struggled to lead an open source project and wondered if there might be tools or techniques that could help your community? Tessa Mero discusses what she’s learned from being involved in leadership within the Joomla! CMS project and explains how you can benefit from it. You'll leave feeling encouraged, inspired, and full of positivity.

Steve Meyers has worked as a PHP and MySQL scalability expert for the last 15 years at such companies as Omniture (now part of Adobe), Spark Networks (owner of JDate), and CrimeReports. He now runs some of the largest independent online communities of college sports fans. When he’s not too busy with all of that, Steve runs the Ski PHP Conference, assists with the OpenWest Conference, is a core team member of the Utah Open Source Foundation, and runs the Provo Linux User Group.

Presentations

Database optimization for web developers Tutorial

Many companies have inadequate database experience because databases like MySQL and PostgreSQL don't require a full-time DBA to administer. Developers now have to have a basic understanding of how to keep their databases happy. Steve Meyers explores how to get the best performance out of your database, covering JOIN order, proper indexing, WHERE filtering, caching, and many other subjects.

As a software engineer for Blackhawk Network (specifically GiftCards.com), Heather Migliorisi implements innovative ideas for the company’s website. Some of those ideas include developing the company’s custom pattern library and code-based style guide, responsive image techniques, and accessibility solutions. In her free time, Heather contributes to the Make WordPress Accessible project, the Accessible SVG Community group and the A11y Project.

Presentations

Making awesome things accessible Session

Open source is the fuel that runs the technology we use to solve many of the problems we face every day. These projects are amazing, heavily distributed, and loved by many. Heather Migliorisi explains how they can be made even better when accessibility is added into the open source mix.

Tiffany Mikell is the CEO/CTO of BSMdotCo. Tiffany has over 10 years of professional experience in technology, entrepreneurship, and education design. She began her career as Java developer and technical architect with a specialization in ERP, BI, and SaaS-based solutions at Accenture, where she led a series of company-wide open source initiatives. In 2010, Tiffany founded a successful technology consulting firm to develop SaaS platforms for nonprofits and social enterprises. In 2013, she helped Dev Bootcamp launch its Chicago location and played a key role on the founding team. Her current ventures are focused on building tools for real-time, browser-based communication with a focus on adult education.

Presentations

Open source as an angel Session

Tiffany Mikell and Kortney Ziegler share the role open source technologies and communities played in their success and explore specific frameworks and projects that have been particularly useful along the bootstrapping journey from industry thought leaders to tech product "unicorn."

Alex Miller works on maintaining Clojure and supporting the Clojure community at Cognitect. Alex coauthored Clojure Applied (Pragmatic Press) and is also the founder of the Strange Loop, Clojure/West, and Lambda Jam conferences.

Presentations

Introduction to Clojure Tutorial

Alex Miller teaches the basics of Clojure, a dynamic functional programming language on the Java Virtual Machine, covering key concepts including expressions and the evaluation model, functions, collections, sequences, state, polymorphism, and concurrency.

H. Wade Minter is the product manager for team sports products at NBC SportsEngine. Wade is also the public address announcer for the National Hockey League’s Carolina Hurricanes and the ring announcer for GOUGE Professional Wrestling. He leads a weird life.

Presentations

Building a pipeline: The case for hiring junior developers Session

Any hiring manager in a technology company knows that the hardest problem to solve is hiring. There never seem to be enough experienced developers available at any given point in time. But many of those same hiring managers will say, "We don't hire junior developers." Tech team-builder Wade Minter makes the case for why your company should hire and train junior developers.

Eben Moglen is a professor of law at Columbia Law School and the founder of the Software Freedom Law Center. Eben began building software as a professional programmer at age 13. He worked as a designer of advanced computer programming languages at IBM from 1979 to 1985. In 1991, he represented Philip Zimmerman, the developer of PGP (“Pretty Good Privacy”), who was threatened with prosecution by the US government for making strong encryption free software that everyone could use. In 1993, Eben joined forces with Richard M. Stallman to provide world-class legal representation and expertise to the free software movement. With Stallman, he conceived, wrote, and created a public process for discussion and adoption of GPLv3, the current version of the world’s most widely used free software license.

In addition to his work with free software developers, Eben has advised major IT companies and national governments around the world. In 2010, he testified before the European Commission on the FOSS consequences of Oracle Corporation’s acquisition of Sun Microsystems and before the US Congress on Internet privacy and consumer protection. He has appeared numerous times on software- and privacy-related issues as amicus curiae before the US Supreme Court. Eben earned his PhD in history and his law degree at Yale University. After law school, he clerked for Judge Edward Weinfeld of the US District Court in New York City and for Justice Thurgood Marshall of the US Supreme Court. He has taught at Columbia Law School since 1987 and has held visiting appointments at Harvard University, Tel Aviv University, and the University of Virginia. In 2003, he was given the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Pioneer Award for efforts on behalf of freedom in the electronic society. Eben is admitted to practice in the State of New York and before the United States Supreme Court.

Presentations

Aligning patents and open source Session

A panel of experts holds an open and engaging discussion on patents and open source to uncover the complexities associated with each. The panel discusses the effect of open source software on patents, open sourcing software that already has a patent on it, what happens to other company patents if open sourced patented software is developed, and more. Come ready with questions for the panelists.

Richard Mortier is a member of faculty in the Systems Research Group at the Cambridge University Computer Lab. His past work includes Internet routing, distributed system performance analysis, network management, aesthetic designable machine-readable codes, and home networking. Richard works at the intersection of systems and networking with human-computer interaction and is currently focused on how to build user-centric systems infrastructure that enables people to better support themselves in a ubiquitous computing world through human-data interaction.

Presentations

Advanced Docker developer workflows on Mac OS and Windows Open Container Day

Most developers use a Mac or Windows host to develop Docker Linux containers, which complicates filesystem sharing between the host and the Linux container and requires replicating Linux networking configuration locally. Anil Madhavapeddy and Richard Mortier outline ways to make using Docker on a Mac or Windows transparent, thus enabling a rapid test/edit/deployment cycle for microservices.

Unikernels and Docker: From revolution to evolution Session

Richard Mortier and Anil Madhavapeddy demonstrate the integration of MirageOS, Rumprun unikernels, and the Docker container management toolchain, discuss the relationship between MirageOS (clean slate), Rumprun unikernels, and Linux Containers, and show how it is getting steadily easier to extend everyday workflows and deployments with unikernel technology.

Alex Moundalexis, a solutions architect for Cloudera, has spent the last two years installing and configuring Hadoop clusters across the globe for a wide variety of commercial and government customers. Before entering the land of big data, Alex spent the better part of 10 years wrangling Linux server farms, writing horrible Perl, and making self-deprecating observations. He likes Oxford commas.

Presentations

Powered by the sun: One geek's experience Session

About a year ago, Alex Moundalexis decided to install solar photovoltaic panels on his roof. From making the initial decision to generating electricity for the first time took about three months, but since then, his small array has provided more than 90% of his home's electrical need. Alex outlines solar PV technology and hardware options and explains how it changed one geek's outlook on energy.

Diane Mueller is the director of community development at Red Hat OpenShift as well as the founder of GetMakered, a mobile 3D-design-and-printing initiative to connect people with 3D technology.

Presentations

Is your open source project ready for the container era? Session

Learn how to package up your open source software project as a containerized offering that developers trust and your community can easily maintain. Diane Mueller, Vincent Batts, and Ryan Jarvinen outline ways to automate your image build and deployment processes using Docker Hub, Kubernetes, OpenShift, and other popular toolchains and explore emerging best practices and container stds.

Stacey Mulcahy is a technical evangelist with Microsoft focusing on the IoT, open source, and web development. Previously, she was the lead developer working with a variety of technologies at Big Spaceship, a digital agency based out of Brooklyn, NY, and worked at Teknision and Fuel Industries in Ottawa, Canada, and IQ Interactive in Atlanta in a variety of technical roles. A technical editor and instructor, Stacey enjoys sharing her love for her work in interactive development. She considers her lack of verbal filter and extreme candor just a small part of her charm.

Presentations

Beyond the browser: JavaScript for physical experiences Tutorial

Stacey Mulcahy explains how to leverage JavaScript to build experiences that go beyond the browser into the physical realm to sense and control the environment with common microcontrollers and Node.js.

Quinn Murphy wandered around the IT landscape for over a decade before discovering the oasis that is web operations. Since that time, he’s been addicted to live opens and open source tools and culture.

Presentations

From first look to first pull: Contributing to your favorite OSS projects Session

Quinn Murphy chronicles his journey from a sysadmin who used OSS software extensively to someone who contributes documentation, information, and code to OSS projects. Quinn explains how becoming a contributor can enhance your career as well as your connection to the software you use every day.

Maria Naggaga is a technical evangelist with Microsoft. Prior to joining Microsoft, Maria got her CS degree from Dalhousie university in Canada. Maria’s major interest is finding interesting ways to use software and hardware to change perception, tell stories, and break stereotypes.

Presentations

"Fearless" open source contributors Session

Contributing to an open source project can be one of the most daunting things to do as a developer. Your code is out there, but is it good? Will people like it? Will they accept you? We can get overwhelmed by the fear of being publicly rejected and harassed by the open source community. Maria Naggaga covers the techniques she uses to be a "fearless" active contributor and contributor advocate.

Chris Nelson is the cofounder and chief scientist at Gaslight, an agile software development firm in Cincinnati. Chris heads up the company’s training program, mentors young developers, and sets technology direction. What does he love most about his job? Sharing what he’s learned from nearly 20 years developing software across a wide range of industries. Chris has given workshops across the country in AngularJS and Ember.js and spent time teaching at Dev Bootcamp in Chicago. He’s spoken at RailsConf, RubyConf, BackboneConf, JavaOne, HTML5 Developer Conference, No Fluff Just Stuff, CodeMash and many others.

Presentations

Low ceremony microservices with Elixir Session

Microservices have long been advocated as an effective means of breaking up a monolithic app into manageable pieces, but managing the resulting horde of services is no mean feat. Chris Nelson explains how, with Elixir, we can leverage the underlying OTP platform to solve many of the key challenges in moving to a microservices architecture.

Deb Nicholson works at the intersection of technology and social justice and has over 15 years of nonprofit management experience. Deb got involved in the free software movement about five years ago when she started working for the Free Software Foundation. She is currently the community outreach director for the Open Invention Network—the defensive patent pool built to protect Linux projects. She is also the community manager for GNU MediaGoblin, a brand-new federated media hosting program. In her spare time, Deb serves on the board of OpenHatch, a small nonprofit dedicated to identifying and mentoring new free software contributors, with a particular interest in building a more diverse free software movement.

Presentations

Open source foundations 101 Session

Open source projects are increasingly opting to form an independent entity—a “foundation”—to serve as the core of their community rather than relying on good will or corporate oversight. Deborah Bryant, Danese Cooper, Sam Ramji, and Deb Nicholson share their experiences and provide introductory guidance on forming, managing, and leading an open source foundation.

Tim Nugent pretends to be a mobile app developer, game designer, and PhD student, and now he’s even pretending to be an author. (He cowrote the latest update to Learning Cocoa with Objective-C for O’Reilly.) When he isn’t busy avoiding being found out as a fraud, Tim spends most of his time designing and creating little apps and games he won’t let anyone see. He also spent a disproportionately long time writing this tiny little bio, most of which was taken up trying to stick a witty sci-fi reference in. . .before he simply gave up. Tim can be found as @The_McJones on Twitter.

Presentations

Swift programming for iOS, OS X, and beyond Training

Veteran OS X and iOS developers Tim Nugent, Jonathon Manning, and Paris Buttfield-Addison offer an in-depth introduction to programming in Swift for developing iOS and OS X apps and services.

Swift programming for iOS, OS X, and beyond (Day 2) Training Day 2

Veteran OS X and iOS developers Tim Nugent, Jonathon Manning, and Paris Buttfield-Addison offer an in-depth introduction to programming in Swift for developing iOS and OS X apps and services.

Duane O’Brien joined PayPal in 2013 to run their open source programs office. He is passionate about enabling smart and meaningful contributions to the open source ecosystem by both developers and corporations. Duane navigates the path between engineering and management, drawing on both his experience as a developer at companies such as Adobe and Autodesk, as well as his experience supporting Agile transformations.

Presentations

Sandbox approval: A streamlined approach to making open source contributions Session

As an organization moves from consuming open source to giving back, compliance professionals need to be able to track and approve open source contributions. Duane O'Brien and Lisa LaForge explain how to use a sandbox approval to streamline contributions and make the process more efficient for both engineers and compliance professionals.

Barry O’Reilly works with leading global organizations on continuous improvement using lean and agile practices and principles. He has been an entrepreneur, employee and consultant. After several startups, his focus shifted towards larger enterprises where he has explored the intersection of business model innovation, product development, organizational design and culture transformation.

He is a co-author of Lean Enterprise: How High Performance Organization Innovate At Scale, the latest addition to the Eric Ries Lean Series with O’Reilly Media, 2015, and a Harvard Business Review must read for would-be CEO’s. He is an internationally sought after speaker and frequent writer for The Economist.

Barry is Founder and CEO of ExecCamp, the entrepreneurial experience for executives, and Antennae it’s mission to help technology led businesses innovate at scale.

Presentations

Enterprise just got entrepreneurial Cultivate

The lifespan of companies is tumbling, from an average of 67 years in the 1920s to 15 years today. The enterprises that survive embrace the entrepreneurial mindset, culture, and approach. Barry O'Reilly shares how he is helping Fortune 500 companies rekindle their innovative spirit to tackle uncertainty and win.

Andrew Odewahn is the CTO of O’Reilly Media, where he helps define and create the new products, services, and business models that will help O’Reilly continue to make the transition to an increasingly digital future. The author of two books on database development, he has experience as a software developer and consultant in a number of industries, including manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, and publishing. Andrew holds an MBA from New York University and a degree in computer science from the University of Alabama. He’s also thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine.

Presentations

All the bots hackathon All the Bots

Our afternoon hackathon is the perfect opportunity to meet and collaborate with like-minded developers. Our assembled speakers and bot experts will be on hand all afternoon to mentor and advise anyone new to bots or help troubleshoot bot creations. This is a safe and welcoming environment for new and experienced bot developers.

Katrina Owen is as an advocate on the Open Source team at GitHub. She accidentally became a developer while pursuing a degree in molecular biology. When programming, her focus is on automation, workflow optimization, and refactoring. Katrina works primarily in Go and Ruby, contributes to several open source projects, and is the creator of Exercism.io.

Presentations

The bait and switch of open source Session

Open source sells itself as being about technical problems—delightfully thorny technical problems at that. However, successful projects are filled with people, which introduces a whole different set of problems. Katrina Owen illustrates the many ways in which things went wrong for Exercism because she didn’t treat people problems as first-class citizens.

Ken Owens is chief technology officer of Cloud Infrastructure Services at Cisco Systems, where he is responsible for creating and communicating technical and scientific vision and strategy for Cloud Infrastructure Services (CIS) business. Ken brings a compelling view of technology trends in enterprise IT (e.g., infrastructure, computing, SaaS, virtualization, and the cloud) and evangelizes the technology roadmap for the business. Before joining Cisco in 2014, he spent over seven years at Savvis as the chief scientist, CTO, and VP of security and virtualization technologies. Prior assignments include five years as a network security architect at the A.G. Edwards & Sons, Inc. and Edward Jones brokerage firms in St. Louis, Mo, and 10 years in the design and architecture of communications systems and components for Erlang Technologies, Tellabs, and Wiltel. Ken holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering from Missouri University of Science and Technology.

Presentations

Open source and microservices: Your badass, next-gen application architecture Session

Developers are driving the market for cloud consumption and leading the industry to a new era of software-defined disruption. It's no longer a question that elastic and flexible development is the way to innovate and reduce time to market. Ken Owens and Lauren Cooney dig into open source architectures, explain why these solutions need to be open, and deep dive into other related challenges.

Tapabrata Pal has 20 years of IT experience in various technology roles (developer, operations engineer, and architect) in the retail, healthcare, and finance industries. Over the last three years, Tapabrata has served as director of Capital One’s Enterprise Architecture group and led the company’s DevOpsSec initiatives. He is currently Senior Director and Senior Engineering Fellow focused on DevOps, and Continuous Delivery at large scale in a regulated environment. Previously, Tapabrata spent some time in academics doing doctoral and postdoctoral research in the field of solid state physics.

Presentations

From closed to open and beyond: A real-life story from a regulated company Session

Over the past four years, Capital One has transformed itself from being “closed source first” to “open source first" and has actively started contributing to open source projects. Tapabrata Pal explores some of the key initiatives that drove this transformation and offers fascinating details about how this transformation took place and lessons learned.

Michael Paulson is a native Montanan, MSU alum, and senior software engineer at Netflix, where he spends his time developing libraries for TV, websites, and mobile. The majority of Michael’s career has been in JavaScript, primarily focused on the data layer between the frontend and middle tier.

Presentations

Run, Falcor, run Session

Have you ever tried to improve the performance of a JavaScript library? Where did you start? Did you blindly adjust knobs and dials, hoping to find the magic bullet? For the last two years, Netflix has been laser focused on making Falcor as fast as possible. Michael Paulson explains how he and his team significantly improved performance of Falcor.

Panna Pavangadkar is the Global Head of ‘Developer Experience’ at Bloomberg L.P. Her team enables engineers to build an environment where they can focus on learning and creating innovative solutions.

Panna was previously a Technical Fellow, Vice President at Goldman Sachs leading major transformational changes across multiple disciplines, managing Application Development Platforms, Capacity Management and Database Engineering. Prior to that, she worked at JP Morgan and Chase, and other consulting engagements across India and Singapore. She has a Masters in Information Systems a Bachelors in Economics.

Panna loves to read, crochet and pay it forward by coaching and mentoring other aspiring technical women.

Presentations

InnerSource overview Session

InnerSource applies lessons from the best open source projects to engineering and transforms cultures that use it. Cedric Williams, Georg Gruetter, Guy Martin, Nithya Ruff, and Panna Pavangadkar explore the factors that keep software teams from collaborating effectively, look at the development model used for Apache Software Foundation projects, and talk about ways to bridge the two approaches.

Jérôme Petazzoni works at Docker, where he helps others to containerize all the things. Jérôme was part of the team that built, scaled, and operated the dotCloud PaaS before it became Docker. When annoyed he threatens to replace things with a very small shell script.

Presentations

Deployment and orchestration at scale with Docker Swarm Tutorial

Jérôme Petazzoni and AJ Bowen demonstrate building an app from development to production with Docker. Jérôme and AJ run a sample app on a single node with Compose and add scaling and load balancing. They then provision a Swarm cluster with Docker Machine and implement multihost communication with overlay networking. The result will be a highly available, scalable deployment for the application.

Introduction to Docker and containers Tutorial

Docker is an open platform to build, ship, and run any Linux application anywhere. AJ Bowen and Jérôme Petazzoni lead a hands-on tutorial that gives you an opportunity to dive in and see Docker in action. You'll learn about Docker basic concepts and how to run containers, create your own images, interact with the Docker Hub, and stack multiple containers to compose complex applications.

Brandon Philips is CTO of CoreOS, where he helps build modern Linux server infrastructure. Prior to CoreOS, Brandon worked at Rackspace hacking on cloud monitoring and was a Linux kernel developer at SUSE. As a graduate of Oregon State’s Open Source Lab, he is passionate about open source technologies.

Presentations

Containers at scale thanks to Kubernetes Tutorial

Security, easy scaling, and high availability are essential needs for real-world application infrastructure. Brandon Philips offers a how-to talk and tutorial demonstrating how to set up a production-ready cluster with full TLS, manage the cluster through scaling and upgrade, and build the cluster for high availability. Brandon also addresses upgrading Kubernetes while keeping availability.

Distributed computing powered with etcd: Overview and future Session

Etcd is an open source distributed consistent key-value store. It has become a mature cornerstone of a variety of systems in the container ecosystem for networking, service discovery, configuration management, and load balancing. Brandon Philips dives into etcd, exploring its history, its new v3 API, production use cases, and how it powers reliable distributed systems.

Mike Pirnat has been wrangling Pythons at meaningful connections-leader American Greetings since 2000. In his time there, Mike’s written a ton of code, guided major technology improvements, and battled the forces of darkness (you know—IE and JavaScript). Lately, he’s excited about security, REST APIs, and organizing and emceeing AG’s annual Hack Day. He is the author of How to Make Mistakes in Python and cohosts and produces From Python Import Podcast whenever the stars are properly aligned. You can find him online at Mike.pirnat.com.

Presentations

Shiny! Let's be bad guys: Exploiting and mitigating the top 10 web app vulnerabilities Tutorial

The Internet is a dangerous place, filled with evildoers out to attack your code for fun or profit, so it's not enough to just ship your awesome new web app—you have to take the security of your application, your users, and your data seriously. Get into the mindset of the bad guys, as Mike Pirnat discusses, exploits, and mitigates the most common web app security flaws in a controlled environment.

Steven Pousty is a PaaS-dust spreader (aka developer evangelist) with OpenShift. Steve goes around and shows off all the great work the OpenShift engineers do. He can teach you about PaaS with Java, Python, PostgreSQL MongoDB, and some JavaScript. Steve has deep subject area expertise in GIS/spatial analysis, statistics, and ecology. He has spoken at over 50 conferences and led over 30 workshops at conferences such as Monktoberfest, MongoNY, JavaOne, FOSS4G, CTIA, AjaxWorld, GeoWeb, Where2.0, and OSCON. Before OpenShift, Steve was a developer evangelist for LinkedIn, deCarta, and ESRI. Steve has a PhD in ecology from the University of Connecticut. He likes building interesting applications and helping developers create great solutions.

Presentations

Sweet deployment flows with Docker, Kubernetes, and OpenShift Open Container Day

You've probably wished you could magically learn deployment strategies like Canary Deployments, A/B, or Blue Green. Join Steven Pousty to see how easy it can be. Steven walks you through taking a source repository, building a Docker image, changing the source, and building a new Docker image before showing three different automatic advanced deployments handled by the platform.

Katharina Probst is an engineering manager at Netflix, where she leads the API team and helps bring Netflix streaming to millions of people around the world. Prior to joining Netflix, Katharina was on the cloud computing team at Google, where she saw cloud computing from the provider side. Her interests include scalable, distributed systems, cloud computing, and building effective and successful teams. Katharina holds a PhD in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University.

Presentations

#ILookLikeAnEngManager Session

There’s never a dull moment for a female engineering leader. Sometimes you deal with subtle discrimination; often you simply have fun in a job that is both about people and tech. Katharina Probst discusses the good, the bad, and the ugly of being a woman and engineering leader, as well as what both men and women can do to work toward better representation of women in engineering leadership.

Ilan Rabinovitch is director of technical community and evangelism at Datadog. Previously, Ilan spent a number of years leading infrastructure and reliability engineering teams at organizations such as Ooyala and Edmunds.com. He’s active in the open source and DevOps communities, where he is a co-organizer of events such as SCALE, Texas Linux Fest, DevOpsDay LA, and DevOpsDays Silicon Valley.

Presentations

Monitoring in motion: Monitoring containers and dynamic infrastructure Open Container Day

We rely on our monitoring to tell us when our services, applications, or infrastructure diverge from "normal." Ilan Rabinovitch takes a deep dive into techniques for leveraging service discovery into your monitoring workflow and explains how to instrument your code in your containers and track the performance and availability of your applications as they move around.

Luciano Ramalho is a technical principal at ThoughtWorks and the author of Fluent Python (O’Reilly, 2015). Luciano was a web developer before the Netscape IPO in 1995 and since 1998, has worked on some of the largest news portals in Brazil using Python. He has spoken multiple times at OSCON, PyCon, PythonBrasil, FISL, and RuPy. Luciano is a fellow of the Python Software Foundation and cofounder of Garoa Hacker Clube, the first hackerspace in Brazil.

Presentations

Fluent Python: Implementing intuitive and productive APIs Tutorial

Python is so consistent that we can often infer the behavior of new objects by assuming they work like the built-ins. The Python data model is the foundation of this consistent behavior. Luciano Ramalho explores the construction of Pythonic objects: classes that feel "natural" to a Python programmer and leverage some of the best language features by implementing key protocols of the data model.

A 20-year veteran of the Silicon Valley and Seattle technology scenes, Sam Ramji brings a wealth of business, product, and open source experience to the CEO role at the Cloud Foundry Foundation. Previously, he led strategy for API powerhouse Apigee, designed and led Microsoft’s open source strategy, and drove product strategy for BEA WebLogic Integration. Sam is a member of multiple industry advisory boards.

Presentations

The case for a unified and interoperable open cloud ecosystem Keynote

Sam Ramji explains why a platform should come with the expectation of an open and transparent approach, describes the opportunity for an open cloud ecosystem, and explores how transparency enables rapid innovation. From containers to networking, storage to services, an open platform ecosystem must deliver pluggability as a core aspect of its approach to the data center stack.

Andrew Randall is the general manager of Metaswitch’s Project Calico, an open source and pure layer 3 approach to data center networking. Andy previously served as vice president of marketing and business/corporate development at Metaswitch and held various positions in engineering and general management in the areas of unified communications and web-based conferencing. He holds advanced degrees in business, software engineering, mathematics, and philosophy from Columbia University, UC Berkeley, Stirling University, and the University of Oxford.

Presentations

Rethinking security from the ground up with a microservices mindset Open Container Day

Recent high-profile data breaches have made it clear that traditional security based on n-tier application partitioning is broken. As we move into the container era, there is a huge opportunity to revolutionize security by rendering developer intent directly into the network fabric. Andrew Randall presents an open source approach to this problem, leveraging proven IP networking and Linux concepts.

Rachel Reese is a longtime software engineer and math geek who can often be found talking to random strangers about the joys of functional programming and F#. Rachel currently works for Jet.com in New York City. She has helped run the Nashville F# User group, @NashFSharp, and the Burlington, Vermont, functional programming user group, @VTFun. She’s also an ASPInsider, an F# MVP, a Xamarin MVP, a community enthusiast, one of the founding @lambdaladies, and a Rachii. You can find her on her blog, Rachelree.se.

Presentations

Real-time democratizing of event-driven big data Session

Jet.com has A LOT of data. Rachel Reese explains how the team at Jet used F# and an event-based microservices architecture to safely, quickly, and relevantly process and explore all this data and covers how Jet handles processing events from 300+ microservices into its data warehouse in real time so that it can optimally react to its customers' wants and needs.

Georgia Reh is a mathematician, science educator, pylady, gopher, rock climber, immediate friend of every dog she’s ever met, cheese enthusiast, caffeine addict, freakishly good minesweeper player, and professionally trained marshmallow roaster.

Presentations

How to teach Git Session

Version control is a necessary piece of the Python community, and Git has a steep learning curve. Georgia Reh discusses the lessons she's learned teaching Git to beginners so you won't have to make the same mistakes.

Dieter Reuther is a leadership consultant who focuses on people, process, and technology. He helps organizations balance creative chaos with structure to bring out the best in teams and individuals. As a strong believer in the power positive leadership can have on people’s motivation, performance, and effectiveness, Dieter breaks down barriers, cultivates teams, and helps them solve complex problems. He is a certified Lego Serious Play facilitator and uses this methodology to tap into creative energies, modes of thought, and ways of seeing that many adults have forgotten they even possess.

Dieter launched and ran his own design firm in Germany. After 13 years as a director in design operations and information technology at Ziba Design, a global innovation and design consultancy, he started his own consulting firm in Boston. As a member of the advisory council of Design Museum Boston, he is actively involved in building bridges between creative groups in the greater Boston area and educating the public about design. He holds a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Technical University Munich, Germany, and an MBA from George Fox University.

Presentations

Build to lead: Solve leadership challenges using the Lego Serious Play methodology Cultivate

Dieter Reuther and Donna Denio demonstrate a universal language that helps you maneuver through complex leadership challenges. Using a business case study, they guide attendees through the Lego Serious Play methodology to explain how to break down situations into simple 3D models. This is an interactive session with audience participation. Each attendee will get their own Lego set.

Leading developer relations and marketing for cloud hosting provider Exoscale, Matthew Revell has been active in open source since the early 2000s. Before Exoscale, Matthew ran EMEA Developer Advocacy at Couchbase. Before that, he held leadership roles at Basho and Canonical.

Presentations

NoSQL's biggest lie: SQL never went away Session

The NoSQL revolution was based on a falsehood. It was never about SQL; it was about alternatives to relational databases. The thing is, even with all the promise of scalability, speed, and availability, the need to query never went away. Matthew Revell examines how NoSQL databases are bringing back SQL—and other methods—to make it easier to query data, whatever the model.

Liz Rice is the technology evangelist at container security specialists Aqua Security. Previously, she cofounded container startup Microscaling Systems, which built a real-time scaling engine and the popular image inspector, MicroBadger. Liz has a wealth of software development, team, and product management experience from her years spent working on network protocols and distributed systems and in digital technology sectors such as VOD, music, and VoIP. When not building startups and writing code, Liz loves riding bikes in places with better weather than her native London.

Presentations

Scheduling for the container age: Forget Tetris—what about 4D? Session

Containers are revolutionizing data center utilization, with pioneers getting more than 5x better utilization than the industry average using clever scheduling algorithms. Liz Rice offers an overview of interesting work being done on physical packing and explains what happens when we bring in a fourth dimension: time.

Alvin Richards is the VP of product at Aerospike, the leading high-performance NoSQL database. In prior lives, Alvin ran engineering teams at Docker and MongoDB, leading the revolution of microservices and NoSQL; was technical director at NetApp, working to integrate databases and virtual infrastructures with storage; and worked at Oracle on the database kernel.

Presentations

Multihost, multinetwork persistent containers Session

Containers are considered ephemeral: they can be thrown away, updated, or redeployed. But what if you need persistence or, heaven forbid, you use a database? With some live hacking, Alvin Richards showcases the core Docker components—Machine, Engine, Swarm, and Compose—along with integration with Aerospike so you can deploy persistent database containers across multiple hosts and networks.

Blithe Rocher is a software engineer based in Oakland, CA. Blithe works for Fastly as part of the core engineering team to build the customer-facing Configuration API. Prior to becoming a developer, she received a PhD in physical chemistry from the University of Southern California. Blithe is passionate about teaching other women how to become developers. She helped organize Rails Girls ATL, a monthly meetup for women interested in learning about programming. When she’s not crafting web applications, she spends time traveling, riding her bike, or with her dog, Nola.

Presentations

Microservices war stories Session

As more teams move toward microservices architectures, an increasing number of stories have arisen about the pain of poor choices. Attempts to move away from one large, tightly coupled application often result in many smaller, yet still tightly coupled applications. Blithe Rocher covers some of the pitfalls and lessons learned from building several service-oriented systems.

Kevin Rockwood is a lead developer at Gaslight, an agile software development shop in Cincinnati. He writes web apps in Ruby, Elixir, Erlang, Phoenix, and JavaScript, and he’s always focused on creating clear and concise code. Kevin shares his love for technology through teaching. He helped lead a Ruby on Rails class at Northern Kentucky University and has taught Ember.js and AngularJS workshops around the country. Kevin has also spoken at ProductCamp Cincinnati, Cincy Web Tech Day, and many technical meetup groups.

Presentations

Elixir: Why processes trump objects Session

Processes are the fundamental building blocks of the Elixir language. Kevin Rockwood explores how process-oriented architecture embodies the principles that object-oriented architecture always intended and explains how you can use processes to tackle complex problems that other languages could only dream about.

Serial tech entrepreneur Kishau Rogers is the founder and CEO of technology ventures such as Websmith Group Inc., TimeStudy, PeerLoc, and most recently, Websmith Studio, Websmith’s community innovation center. Kishau has over 20 years of industry experience, specializing in using computer science and systems-thinking principles to influence how we develop, build, grow, and mature great ideas. Under her leadership, the Websmith brand has operated for over 12 years, partnering with entrepreneurs and organizations in successfully bringing their technology ideas from conceptualization to commercialization. Kishau has spearheaded many social impact technology projects, most recently serving as an advisor to the US White House Hackathon for Foster Care. She is the recent recipient of the Lyn McDermid Community Impact Award and the Metropolitan Business League’s Entrepreneur of the Year Award. Kishau has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, NFIB, JavaWorld, and other publications. Kishau is committed to community service and leadership in technology and actively serves on advisory boards for institutions such as Virginia Commonwealth University’s School of Engineering, the Metropolitan Business League, and ECPI. Kishau holds a computer science degree from Virginia Commonwealth University. Follow her on Twitter at @kishau.

Presentations

Open sourcing the lean startup methodology Session

Kishau Rogers proposes a framework for launching enterprise-wide innovation centers that use open source technology in all aspects of business innovation, from rapid prototype development and open collaboration to customer discovery, while following a roadmap for commercial product development.

Jessica Rose is a self-taught technologist obsessed with fostering better access to technical education and digital spaces for all. In addition to helping DreamFactory build a developer community around their open source product, Jessica has also founded Open Code and cofounded Trans*Code. She’s always interested in hearing more about great open source or educational projects, so come chat with her about what you’ve been working on.

Presentations

Impostor syndrome and individual competence Session

Jessica Rose explains how cognitive biases work to undermine our estimation of our individual skills. Who do these cognitive biases affect? And how do they collectively shape the face of the software development industry? Jessica examines the impact of these biases on personal and professional relationships among individuals and groups and discusses what can be done to diagnose and cope with them.

Internal comms for better leadership Cultivate

Effective communication is about more than just speaking clearly. Jessica Rose explains why learning to put your thoughts forward compellingly, listening, and creating an environment where communication thrives are also vital and explores strategies for effective communication across companies comprised of employees with varied technical skill levels.

Jonas Rosland is a developer advocate at EMC. Jonas is a lover of all things tech. He has spoken at several events including VMworld, EMC World, PuppetCamp, and PuppetConf.

Presentations

Managing a large open source community with smart tools Session

Increasing your online presence in the open source community involves more than just writing and committing code. We need to create safe places to collaborate and communicate freely in order to involve more people than just our closest team members. Jonas Rosland and Stephanie Carlson outline a few of the tools they use to tackle this big task and discuss failures, successes, and lessons learned.

Rachel Roumeliotis is a strategic content director at O’Reilly Media, where she leads an editorial team that covers a wide variety of programming topics ranging from full stack to open source in the enterprise to emerging programming languages. Rachel is a programming chair of OSCON and O’Reilly’s Software Architecture Conference. She has been working in technical publishing for 10 years, acquiring content in many areas including mobile programming, UX, computer security, and AI.

Presentations

Thursday opening welcome Keynote

OSCON program chairs Scott Hanselman, Rachel Roumeliotis, and Kelsey Hightower open the second day of keynotes.

Wednesday opening welcome Keynote

OSCON program chairs Kelsey Hightower, Rachel Roumeliotis, and Scott Hanselman open the first day of keynotes.

Nithya A. Ruff is the senior director for Comcast’s Open Source Strategy practice. Nithya first glimpsed the power of open source while at SGI in the ‘90s and has been building bridges between hardware developers and the open source community ever since. Previously, she created and managed Western’s Digital’s Open Source office and has held leadership positions at Wind River (an Intel company), Synopsys, Avaya, Tripwire, and Eastman Kodak. Nithya has been a passionate advocate for opening doors to new people in open source for many years and has promoted diverse ways of contributing to open source projects. She is coleader of the Women of OpenStack (WOO) group and a liaison into the OpenStack Foundation. Her work has included partnering with NCWIT on a Male Allies Workshop and panel and serving as a mentor at OpenStack. She is also a sponsor of the Women in Open Source (WIOS) Lunch at the Linux Foundation and an active leader of WIOS, advocating for reducing barriers for women and underrepresented minorities. Nithya was invited to be on a diversity leader panel at the 2015 All Things Open conference and has spoken at a number of other conferences, including OSCON, SCALE, Grace Hopper, OpenStack, and Red Hat Summit. Her writing on open source and best practices for increasing diversity has appeared in Light Reading, the Huffington Post, Opensource.com, and the San Jose Business Journal. You can often find her on social media promoting dialogue on diversity and open source. In recognition of her work in open source both on the business and community side, Nithya was named to CIO Magazine’s most influential women in open source list. In 2014, she was invited to be president of SanDisk’s Women’s Innovation Network (WIN), dedicated to the development of women’s highest potential in the work place. Nithya holds an MS in computer science from NDSU and an MBA from the University of Rochester’s Simon Business School. She lives in the Bay Area and is a proud mother of two daughters.

Presentations

InnerSource overview Session

InnerSource applies lessons from the best open source projects to engineering and transforms cultures that use it. Cedric Williams, Georg Gruetter, Guy Martin, Nithya Ruff, and Panna Pavangadkar explore the factors that keep software teams from collaborating effectively, look at the development model used for Apache Software Foundation projects, and talk about ways to bridge the two approaches.

Is marketing in open source a "four-letter word"? Session

Nithya Ruff argues that marketing is not a "four-letter word" and explains why we should be doing more of it in open source. Whether it's called advocacy or evangelizing, we need to do it to promote projects, sell more open source-based software, and attract more users and developers.

Open source lessons from the TODO Group Session

Members of the TODO Group—an open group of companies who collaborate on practices, tools, and other ways to run successful and effective open source projects and programs—discuss why they started open source offices in their respective companies (Twitter, Netflix, Box, Google, Microsoft, and SanDisk) and share the lessons they learned along the way.

Laurel Ruma is the director of talent for O’Reilly Media. Most recently, Laurel cochaired Where 2.0, OSCON Java, and Gov 2.0 Expo. She joined O’Reilly after working for five years at various IT analyst firms in the Boston area. Laurel is the coeditor of Open Government, published by O’Reilly.

Presentations

Closing remarks Cultivate

Program chair Laurel Ruma wraps up the first day of Cultivate.

Closing remarks Cultivate

Program chair Laurel Ruma wraps up the second day of Cultivate.

Welcome Cultivate

Program chair Laurel Ruma welcomes you to the first day of Cultivate.

Welcome Cultivate

Program chair Laurel Ruma welcomes you to the second day of Cultivate.

Baruch Sadogursky (aka JBaruch) is the developer advocate at JFrog, where he hangs out with JFrog’s tech leaders, writes code around the JFrog platform and its ecosystem, and then speaks and blogs about it all on the JFrog and Bintray blogs. Baruch has been doing this for the last dozen years or so and enjoys every minute of it. He is a professional conference speaker on DevOps, Java, and Groovy topics and is a regular at the industry’s most prestigious events, such as JavaOne (where he was awarded a Rock Star award), DockerCon, Devoxx, DevOps Days, OSCON, and Qcon.

Presentations

Java 8 puzzlers: The strange, the bizarre, and the wonderful Session

Baruch Sadogursky and Viktor Gamov aren't sure about you, but working with Java 8 made one of the speakers lose all of his hair and the other lose his sleep (or was it the jetlag?). If you still haven't reached the level of Brian Goetz in mastering lambdas and strings, this talk is for you. And if you think you have, we have some bad news for you, you should attend as well.

Karen M. Sandler is the executive director of the Software Freedom Conservancy. Karen is known for her advocacy for free software, particularly in relation to the software on medical devices. Previously, she was executive director of the GNOME Foundation, where she has since been elected to the board of directors, and general counsel of the Software Freedom Law Center. Karen co-organizes Outreachy, the award-winning outreach program for women, and is an advisor to the Ada Initiative. She is also pro bono counsel to the FSF and GNOME and pro bono general counsel to QuestionCopyright.Org. Karen is a recipient of the O’Reilly Open Source Award and cohost of the oggcast Free as in Freedom.

Presentations

Before you sign: Employment agreements and free software Session

While a new job offer is exciting, you likely won't have as much negotiation power after you formally accept the job. Making sure you have a clear understanding of your employment arrangement and how it affects the software you work on is a critical part of signing the paperwork. Karen Sandler discusses important provisions in these contracts and suggests things to ask for from new employers.

Open source foundations 101 Session

Open source projects are increasingly opting to form an independent entity—a “foundation”—to serve as the core of their community rather than relying on good will or corporate oversight. Deborah Bryant, Danese Cooper, Sam Ramji, and Deb Nicholson share their experiences and provide introductory guidance on forming, managing, and leading an open source foundation.

Joey Schorr is a lead software engineer on the Quay team at CoreOS. Joey was cofounder of DevTable, a company he started after leaving Google to focus on building a web-based IDE, which was acquired by CoreOS.

Presentations

Clair: Clarity with container security scanning Session

Docker layers can be fast for developers but are also vulnerable if not audited for production. Wouldn't it be great to improve continuous integration with continuous vulnerability detection? Joey Schorr and Quentin Machu offer an overview of Clair, a new open source tool to monitor the security of containers. Come see how it works, get started, and learn how to get involved with the development.

Matt Schuetze is the director of product management at Azul Systems, where he is responsible for managing requirements and charting product roadmaps for Zing and Zulu, Azul’s two Java runtime product families. Matt is excited to help usher in the budding Zulu Embedded product offering from Azul, covering aspects of both industrial and consumer embedded applications. Matt is also the Azul alternate on the Executive Committee of the Java Community Process, helps run the Detroit Java User Group, and regularly speaks at Java user groups and industry trade shows. He has a master’s degree in nuclear engineering from MIT and a bachelor’s degree in engineering physics from the University of Michigan.

Presentations

Java 9 sneak peek: An embedded tale Session

Matt Schuetze walks you through the realities of doing embedded Java development, exposes the breadth of choices to make in boards and setups, and shows the ways that modern Java Standard Edition is leveraged to the hilt.

Maria Seaver is the chief experience officer at Springbox in Austin, where she leads the user experience team to create design and strategies around users, business, and technology needs. Maria has been working in the digital space for 13 years and has a deep passion for human-centered design, experience research, and design exploration. Maria has worked in various capacities as a designer, creative director, and coder, and she has designed award-winning work for Cisco, IBM, Dell, HP, Mary Kay, and Hampton Inn. Maria has also spoken at SXSW and taught as an adjunct at the University of Texas at Austin.

Presentations

Introduction to design thinking Cultivate

Maria Seaver offers an introduction to design thinking, a process that balances user needs, business objectives, and technology constraints. Maria outlines design thinking's five key areas—empathy building, problem framing, ideation, prototyping, and validation—and explains how they help teams learn about users, discover opportunities, solve problems, meet needs, and test their assumptions.

Wendy Seltzer is policy counsel to the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) at MIT, where she leads the Technology & Society Domain’s focus on privacy, security, web payments, and social web standards. Wendy researches openness in intellectual property, innovation, privacy, and free expression online. As a fellow with Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Wendy founded the Lumen Project (formerly Chilling Effects Clearinghouse), helping bring transparency to online content removal requests. She serves on the board of directors of the Tor Project, which promotes privacy and anonymity research, education, and technology, and the World Wide Web Foundation. Wendy seeks to improve technology policy in support of user-driven innovation and communication.

Presentations

Securing the Open Web Platform Session

One of the Web's greatest strengths is its generality—its openness to new links and unexpected uses. Openness also means that different applications and users have different security goals and threat models: a mash-up desired by one may be dangerous to another. Wendy Seltzer explores design patterns and modularity to support a platform for trustworthy application development.

Morgan Senkal moved to Portland, OR, from the far East (New England) back in the very early ’90s (before it was cool) after a failed attempt at becoming a rocket scientist (too much paperwork at NASA). After a few years in the carpentry trade building movie sets and fancy houses and a few more years working as a drafter helping to build silicon manufacturing plants and silicon crystal growing chambers, she finally discovered her true calling was software development. An agile evangelist, Morgan loves building software to solve business issues and automate processes. In short, she loves building stuff. Morgan is also a musician, writer, and martial artist (although rarely at the same time). She occasionally plays bass with friends and tenor drum for a local marching band and does the random DJ gig. She digs movies, the Portland tech community, historical fiction, most outdoor activities (except skydiving), and traveling to strange foreign lands (like Canada). Morgan has one dog, one cat, and two amazing nephews.

Presentations

Storming the castle: Open source challenges in government Session

Working for the government presents two major hurdles in open source development: getting your hands on open source developed libraries and finding ways to contribute to open source development in the workplace. Kathy Lee and Morgan Senkal discuss these challenges and offer possible solutions.

Nick Shadrin is a web application delivery professional with many years of international experience. He has worked in various roles for major IT vendors and cloud companies and currently works as a technical solutions architect for NGINX. Previously, Nick implemented website-optimization systems for some major well-known websites.

Presentations

HTTP/2: Protocol overview, use cases, and benchmarks Session

After 16 years of solid use, the HTTP protocol finally got a major update. HTTP/2—based on SPDY—introduces new, major performance enhancements and features. Nick Shadrin offers a detailed overview of the protocol, outlines some cases when it significantly helps your website performance, and explains why, in some cases, the older version of the protocol performs better.

Davey Shafik is a developer evangelist at Akamai Technologies. A full-time developer with over 15 years of experience in PHP and related technologies, Davey has written several books and numerous articles and spoken at conferences the world over. He is best known for his book the Zend PHP Certification Study Guide and as the creator of PHP Archive for PHP 5.3 and release manager for PHP 7.1. Davey is passionate about improving the tech community. He co-organizes the Prompt initiative (mhprompt.org), dedicated to lifting the stigma surrounding mental health discussions, and has worked with PHPWomen since its inception.

Presentations

Every millisecond counts: Performance and UX Session

User expectations are higher than ever when it comes to web performance—so much so that we've created an entirely new application architecture just to make websites feel faster than they actually are. Davey Shafik explains how we can improve user experience at any scale through performance optimizations at every layer of the stack from backend to browser.

Aashish Sheshadri is a software engineer at PayPal working on the Seif project to enable a safe and effective relationship on the web. He graduated with a Masters degree from the University of Texas at Austin. As a graduate student his research was focussed on enabling reliability and relevance of the crowd in the context of human computation and crowdsourcing. He enjoys exploring the space where research meets application to enable practical solutions.

Presentations

The Seif project Session

Aashish Sheshadri and Rohit Harchandani introduce Seif, an open source project, started at PayPal, with the goal of transitioning the Web into an application delivery system that will be safer, easier to use, and easier to develop for.

Beerud Sheth is the cofounder and CEO of Gupshup, where he is responsible for the overall strategy, execution, and growth. Under his leadership, Gupshup has become the global leader in messaging and bots. Beerud also founded Elance, the world’s largest online services marketplace, where he played various leadership roles at different stages of the company’s growth, including product and business strategy, product management, and marketing and business development, and remains on the board of directors. Previously, he worked in the financial services industry, modeling, structuring, and trading fixed-income securities and derivatives at Merrill Lynch and Citicorp Securities. He is a frequent speaker at industry events and holds two technology patents. Beerud earned an MS in computer science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where his graduate research involved developing autonomous learning software agents for personalized news filtering, and a BTech in computer science from IIT Bombay, where he was awarded the Institute Silver Medal.

Presentations

The easiest and fastest way to build advanced, cross-platform bots All the Bots

You want to build a bot, but where do you start? How do you spec, script, dev, test, host, publish, monitor, promote, and track one? Drawing on his experience building and deploying dozens of bots, Beerud Sheth explores bot building and offers an introduction to some tools that simplify the bot lifecycle.

Amir Shevat is the head of developer relations at Slack. Previously Amir was the global startup outreach lead in Google Play and led scalable programs in developer relations and Google Campus Tel Aviv. Amir has also founded and sold several startups. He is a developer at heart with a passion for B2C and mobile.

Presentations

Building bots for business All the Bots

Business travel bots, expense bots, hiring bots. . .there are many great bots that can make our working lives simpler, more pleasant, and more productive. Amir Shevat discusses different conversational interactions, demos some code examples, and explores the world of bots for business.

Cassandra Shum is a lead consultant with ThoughtWorks, where she primarily leads and works on a variety of mobile projects and technologies, including domain-driven design and microservices. Over the last six years, she has worked on many different web and mobile applications. Cassandra is one of the leaders in the initiative to organize the women’s group in ThoughtWorks and is involved in promoting more female speakers in technology.

Presentations

Transitioning to microservices Tutorial

Agile practices and techniques like continuous delivery are all about being able to react to changes rapidly, but putting them into practice when you have a big monolith application can be difficult. Microservices offer one solution. María Gómez and Cassandra Shum explore the prerequisites for moving into a microservices architecture and provide tips on how to achieve them via engaging exercises.

Nick Silkey is a systems engineer who has worked on multiple products within Rackspace Cloud, including Cloud Identity and Cloud Feeds. Most recently, Nick joined the Cloud DNS product team, where he works on driving design and implementation of release engineering for the control plane for the Managed Cloud DNS API, powered by OpenStack Designate. He is also actively involved in helping to curate vibrant technical communities within the Austin area tech scene.

Presentations

Think outside the container Session

There is much more to Docker than just deploying your flagship application. Carolyn VanSlyck, Ash Wilson, and Nick Silkey look at three use cases for Docker that go beyond the typical software development pipeline. You'll leave knowing how you can use Docker on the side, even if you haven't tackled Dockerizing your application.

Doug Simmons is a senior technologist, quality advocate, and developer of test infrastructure, tools, and frameworks at PayPal. Doug is the lead developer for SeLion, a Selenium-based open source test framework. As a technical diver and member of Bay Area Underwater Explorers, Doug unplugs by exploring, documenting, teaching, and dreaming of the ocean depths off the coast of California and abroad.

Presentations

Get testing with SeLion Session

When you need to do functional test automation on mobile or web applications, the effort required to create an enterprise-wide, scalable solution is sizable. Doug Simmons explores SeLion, an open source project created at PayPal, which gives engineers the infrastructure, tooling, and framework needed to get testing.

Joseph Sirosh is the corporate vice president of Microsoft’s Data group, leading the database, big data, and machine-learning products, as well as a talented team of engineers, data scientists, and product leaders who are developing tools and services to transform data at scale into actionable intelligence. Joseph joined Microsoft from Amazon, where he was most recently the vice president for the Global Inventory Platform, responsible for the science and software behind Amazon’s supply chain and order fulfillment systems, as well as the central machine-learning group, which he built and led. Before joining Amazon, Joseph worked for Fair Isaac Corp. as vice president of research and development, where he led R&D projects for DARPA, homeland security, and several government organizations. He is passionate about machine learning and its applications and has been active in the field since 1990. Joseph holds a PhD in computer science from the University of Texas at Austin and a BTech in computer science and engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Chennai.

Presentations

The unreasonable effectiveness of open data, open source, and open science Keynote

Have you heard the story of a rock star, the school teacher and a cosmic mystery? Join Microsoft’s Joseph Sirosh for a conversation about how the “unreasonable effectiveness” of OPEN (source, data, science, cloud) is accelerating humanity’s rate of progress.

Eric Soelzer is the product manager of Howdy, a tool for building bots and other types of software that live in messaging applications. Eric is an economist and biz dev operative who has been working online for nearly 10 years in digital agencies and ecommerce businesses.

Presentations

All the bots hackathon All the Bots

Our afternoon hackathon is the perfect opportunity to meet and collaborate with like-minded developers. Our assembled speakers and bot experts will be on hand all afternoon to mentor and advise anyone new to bots or help troubleshoot bot creations. This is a safe and welcoming environment for new and experienced bot developers.

Judi Sohn has been actively involved in the nonprofit technology community since 2006, when she was managing operations for a colorectal cancer advocacy organization. Since then, Judi has worked for both product and consulting partners who serve nonprofit organizations on the Salesforce platform. She holds four Salesforce certifications and was named a Salesforce MVP in 2011. At Salesforce.org, Judi manages and facilitates community contributions to open source projects, including the Nonprofit Starter Pack.

Presentations

Radically accessible open source: The story of Salesforce.org’s Nonprofit Starter Pack Session

The open source Salesforce.org Nonprofit Starter Pack has grown to 150K+ users in seven years by combining a proprietary cloud, corporate philanthropy, and open source product delivery. Judi Sohn and Jason Lantz cover how Salesforce.org shepherds its contributors from consumers and users through engagers and community members to contributors.

Andrew Spyker is a software engineer on Netflix’s Cloud Platform team, where he works on overall consistency in the areas of architecture, performance, and open source. Recently, Andrew has been focused on the Netflix container cloud for batch- and service-style applications.

Presentations

Open source lessons from the TODO Group Session

Members of the TODO Group—an open group of companies who collaborate on practices, tools, and other ways to run successful and effective open source projects and programs—discuss why they started open source offices in their respective companies (Twitter, Netflix, Box, Google, Microsoft, and SanDisk) and share the lessons they learned along the way.

Erica Stanley is a software engineer, researcher, and tinkerer. Erica holds a BS and MS in computer science from Clark Atlanta University, where she conducted research in virtual reality and 3D data modeling. She has also conducted postgraduate research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she specialized in graphics, data visualization, and telepresence. Erica is active in the Atlanta technology community. She helps develop and teach youth coding programs, speaks at local hackathons, conferences, and user groups, and cofounded the Atlanta network of Women Who Code, where she leads new developer workshops and organizes monthly tech talks, hack nights, and networking events for women technologists.

Presentations

Transforming big data into experiences that drive behavior changes Session

Data alone lacks the social connection necessary to drive behavior change. However, combining the huge amount of available data with interactive experiences allows us to tell powerful stories that can motivate people to make lasting behavior changes. Erica Stanley and Erich Lee dive into the psychology of behavior change and explain how to convey stories in the data to support desired changes.

James Stewart is director of technology at the UK Government Digital Service, where he is building GOV.UK and making services “digital by default.” James lives in Hackney, east London with his wife and two kids.

Presentations

From developer to management coach Session

As every organization becomes a software organization, senior leaders with no technology background regularly have to make technology decisions. To help their teams succeed, architects must learn to coach those leaders in how to deliver and operate high-quality services. James Stewart covers a range of techniques that help develop understanding and capability among senior leadership.

Kevin Stewart is vice president of engineering at NodeSource. Previously, Kevin was a 10-year veteran at Adobe and one of the original engineering leaders for Creative Cloud, where his team built the very first service offering, Creative Cloud Assets, and spearheaded its migration from Ruby to Node. Prior to Adobe, Kevin held leadership roles at multiple software companies and digital agencies, where he helped shape the engineering culture by improving development and delivery practices and encouraged cross-functional teams. While currently residing in Seattle, Kevin is a lifelong New Yorker with dreams of relocating to a sunny island in the Caribbean. When he’s not helping teams build great products, Kevin can be found spending time with his family or at the gym trying to stay (get) in shape.

Presentations

Managing while black Session

While there has been much discussion about diversity in tech from the standpoint of individual contributors, we do not hear much from people of color in leadership roles. Kevin Stewart explores the challenges they face and explains why we might want to rethink how we approach diversity in the tech industry.

Ben Striegel is one of the earliest members of the Rust community, having stumbled across the language in 2011, and has been an active contributor to the project ever since. Today, Ben is a member of Rust’s official community outreach team and focuses on teaching and mentoring newcomers and interfacing with other open source communities.

Presentations

Rust: Fearless systems programming for the modern developer Tutorial

Ben Striegel leads an active, hands-on introduction to Rust, a new systems programming language from Mozilla that emphasizes guaranteed memory safety (no segfaults!), fearless concurrency (no data races!), and lightning-fast, zero-overhead execution (no garbage collector!). Ben explains Rust’s novel characteristics and demonstrates how you can put them to work in your own projects.

Marc Sugiyama is a senior architect at Erlang Solutions, Inc., where his projects have included developing an OpenFlow controller and sample applications for the IvanOS project, design and code reviews, and providing training at conferences and for clients. A Bay Area native, Marc has more than 30 years of software development experience and has worked on everything from testing frameworks in Tcl at Sybase and Cisco to SMP relational database engines in C at Sybase, an MMO engine in Twisted Python for Pixverse (a company he cofounded), and a large-scale real-time chat system in Erlang for hi5 Networks. Prior to joining Erlang Solutions, he built a call handling service in Erlang for Ribbit/British Telecom, leading a team of developers in Brazil, Sweden, the US, and the UK. A published author, Marc wrote his first magazine articles and books while still in high school. He has presented at Sybase user group meetings and the Colorado Software Summit. Marc holds a BS in engineering and a masters of engineering from Harvey Mudd College. He serves on the board of trustees of the College Preparatory School in Oakland, CA, and currently serves on the College Preparatory School Advisory Council and the board of directors of the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation.

Presentations

Painlessly functional and concurrent: An introduction to Elixir Tutorial

Elixir is a functional programming language with a familiar syntax. Marc Sugiyama explores the basics of the language and explains why you want to use Elixir to write concurrent, scalable, and robust programs.

David Taieb is the STSM for the Cloud Data Services Developer Advocacy team at IBM, where he leads a team of avid technologists with the mission of educating developers on the art of possible with cloud technologies. He’s passionate about building open source tools, such as the PixieDust Python library for the Jupyter Notebook and Apache Spark, that help improve developer’s productivity and overall experience. Previously, David was the lead architect for the Watson Core UI and Tooling team based in Littleton, Massachusetts, where he led the design and development of a Unified Tooling Platform to support all the Watson Tools, including accuracy analysis, test experiments, corpus ingestion, and training data generation. Before that, he was the lead architect for the Domino Server OSGi team responsible for integrating the eXpeditor J2EE Web Container in Domino and building first-class APIs for the developer community. David started with IBM in 1996, working on various globalization technologies and products including Domino Global Workbench and a multilingual content management system for the Websphere Application Server. David enjoys sharing his experience by speaking at conferences and meeting as many people as possible. You’ll find him at various events like the Strata Data Conference, Velocity, and IBM Interconnect.

Presentations

How open is your enterprise? From contribution to integration and implementation Session

Open source has won. Enterprise organizations around the world are using open source technology and systems and rapidly integrating them into new solutions, platforms, and strategies. Charlie Gracie, Christopher Ferris, Bert Belder, and David Taieb explore the current state of open source technology and discuss how you can help drive adoption, integration, and use within your organization.

Hanneli Tavante is a software developer at Codemine42. With experience in Java, C++ and Ruby, Hanneli works mostly with backend development and project architecture. She contributes to open source projects and organizes Cassandra, Science, and Rust meetups in Sao Paulo. Hanneli enjoys spreading knowledge and learning new topics in conferences around the globe. She also likes coffee, GIFs, Legos, and mathematics.

Presentations

Type theory 101 Session

Have you always wanted to understand the principles of type theory, but thought it was too complicated since it has a lot of lambda calculus and algebras? Hanneli Tavante explores the concepts behind type theory in a friendly way, demonstrating that any developer can understand its principles and apply them to improve their architecture decisions.

As an evangelist at Microsoft, Bruno Terkaly spends time writing code and giving live presentations on building cloud-based applications using the Windows Azure Platform. Some of his key responsibilities include assisting and directly engaging with some of the largest software brands in the world to help them understand and adopt Azure as a public cloud platform; acting as an architect and advisor taking existing on-premises and AWS architectures and migrating them to a scalable, fault-tolerant, highly available, and robust global public cloud presence; and finding gaps in the platform from lessons learned in the field to help engineering roadmaps better meet customer needs. Bruno also has a strong interest in mobile computing and is convinced that both mobile and cloud platforms are poised for huge growth over the next 10 years.

Bruno’s depth of knowledge comes from years of experience in the field. Prior to evangelism, Bruno was a Microsoft premier field engineer, helping customers in remote locations work through extreme troubleshooting scenarios, including problem isolation and correction, live and postmortem debugging, on-the-fly application design and code reviews, performance tuning (IIS, SQL Server, .NET), application stability, porting/migration assistance, configuration management, prerollout testing, and general development consulting. Since Turbo C and 8086 Assembler in the late 80s, Bruno has kept busy teaching and writing code in a multitude of platforms, languages, frameworks, SDKs, libraries, and APIs. Bruno is the founder of Bay Area Azure Meeting, where over the past year, he has engaged audiences about cloud technologies. Bruno has also traveled all around the US and in Europe conducting cloud bootcamps and seminars.

Presentations

Demystifying cloud-based data stores with Linux and Java Tutorial

Bruno Terkaly explores provisioning and programming against the most popular SQL data stores (including SQL Server, Azure SQL DB, MySQL, Postgres), NoSQL data stores (such as DocumentDB, MongoDB, Cassandra, and Redis), and Azure (Table, Blob, and Queue). All demos will use the Azure portal, the Linux command prompt, and Eclipse with Java.

Edward Thomson is a senior program manager at Microsoft, where he focuses on Git and the version control tools in Visual Studio Team Services and ensures that customers are successful while using them. Previously, he was a software engineer building version control tools at Microsoft, GitHub, and SourceGear. He remains the maintainer of the libgit2 project. Edward is the author of the Git for Visual Studio training course from O’Reilly and a contributor to Professional Team Foundation Server 2013.

Presentations

Deep dive into Git Session

Git has quickly become an incredibly popular version control system, but how does it actually work? It's very different from a centralized version control system, and understanding how it models history allows you to understand how to use it. Edward Thomson explains how Git actually works under the hood, the fundamentals of a repository, and how this makes Git fast and flexible.

Everett Toews is a developer advocate at Rackspace making the cloud easy to use for developers and operators. Sometimes dev, sometimes ops, and sometimes advocate, Everett is interested in composing systems using APIs, SDKs, CLIs, and Docker. He likes to teach what he learns along the way.

Presentations

Effective Docker Swarm Session

Swarm—Docker's answer to clustering—treats a group of Docker hosts as a single host. Everett Toews explains how to Swarm with Carina, a service that builds Docker Swarm clusters for you.

Intro to Docker Swarm Open Container Day

Everett Toews offers an introduction to Docker Swarm and explains what it takes to develop and deploy an application on it.

Jenny Tong is a developer advocate on cloud at Google. In this role, she helps developers build cool stuff on all sorts of platforms. Previously, Jenny worked in a wide variety of software roles from robotics at NASA to developer advocacy for Google Glass. She is passionate about education, especially on the subjects of technology and science. If she’s away from her laptop, Jenny’s probably skating around a roller derby track or hanging from aerial silk.

Presentations

PANOPTES: Open source planet discovery Session

The search for planets outside our solar system has long been the exclusive domain of professional scientists with access to large observatories or expensive space telescopes. Jenny Tong and Wilfred Gee explain how PANOPTES combines off-the-shelf components with open source software to bring exoplanet discovery to the public. Come learn about PANOPTES's challenges, solutions, and discoveries.

Dani Traphagen is a solution architect for GridGain, where she consults on high-tech caching architectures. Previously, Dani consulted at DataStax and led technical training internationally on Apache Cassandra and DataStax Enterprise. Her passion for teaching began while working in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department at the University of California, Berkeley, where she taught scientists technical skills, helped create a data science course, and raised awareness about the growing open science community. Dani has since volunteered with and generated training content for a number of organizations, including software carpentry, women in technology, rOpenSci, and GitHub. Earlier in her career, Dani worked in cartilage tissue engineering at the University of California, San Francisco, where her interests for heavy machinery, science, and code fused. If you don’t catch Dani behind a computer, you’ll often see her in the wild, backpacking, riding her bike, or climbing things. She also makes sure to keep the coffee business afloat in her hometown of Hermosa Beach.

Presentations

Becoming friends with Cassandra and Spark Tutorial

Jon Haddad and Dani Traphagen explore all the basics you’ll need to become best buds with the radically scalable, always-on, and increasingly popular Apache Cassandra database. But wait, there's more. Jon and Dani also cover using Apache Spark for large-scale data processing. What else do you need to know to make new friends?

Ariel Tseitlin is a partner at Scale Venture Partners focused on investments in the cloud and security industries. He currently sits on the board of directors at Agari and CloudHealth Technologies. Previously, Ariel was director of cloud solutions at Netflix, where he was responsible for creating and operating one of the most modern cloud infrastructures in the industry, accounting for a full third of all US downstream Internet traffic at peak. Ariel’s team built many of the Netflix OSS components like Asgard and the Simian Army, including the Chaos Monkey, making the Netflix streaming service more resilient, reliable, and manageable. Prior to Netflix, Ariel was VP of technology and products at Sungevity and before that was the founder and CEO of CTOWorks, a software consultancy helping early-stage entrepreneurs deliver their first product to market. Earlier in his career, Ariel held senior management positions at Siebel Systems and Oracle. Ariel holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science from UC Berkeley and an MBA with honors from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

Presentations

Building a fundable open source company Session

You've got a great idea, and you realize that open source is the way to build it. So how do you pick the right business model to grow your idea into a big company? Ariel Tseitlin explores what has worked in the past and what investors want to see to give you funding, along the way identifying the factors that differentiate successful businesses from unsuccessful ones.

Kyle Tyacke is a full stack web developer with over 12 years of experience covering a broad spectrum of industries. Now working as an API Evangelist for Akamai, Kyle spends his days helping developers streamline their workflows and create new integrations with the Akamai OPEN Platform. When he’s not speaking at conferences or teaching people about APIs, Kyle is an avid home brewer and will gladly spend hours chatting about any and all things beer related.

Presentations

Continuous integration for open source projects with Travis CI Session

Continuous integration (CI) can reduce the hassles of managing open source projects, improve code quality, and make merging a joy. But it can be hard to understand and a chore to setup and manage. Kyle Tyacke breaks down the concepts of continuous integration and takes a look at Travis CI, a free, hosted solution that makes it easy to add continuous integration to your open source projects.

Amy Unruh is a developer programs engineer at Google for the Google Cloud Platform, where she works with TensorFlow as well as many other Cloud Platform technologies. Amy has a PhD in CS/AI, has worked in academia, at several startups, and in industrial R&D, and has published a book on App Engine.

Presentations

Diving into machine learning through TensorFlow Tutorial

Machine learning can be an intimidating subject. Julia Ferraioli, Amy Unruh, and Eli Bixby introduce the basics of TensorFlow, an open source deep learning library, and offer practical, hands-on experience with core concepts in machine learning, including how to ingest and prepare raw data for use, run a variety of algorithms to gain insight from the data, and have some fun with visualization.

Carolyn VanSlyck is a software developer from Chicago who loves all things automation, developer tools, and helping others learn new technologies. Carolyn develops tools for OpenStack and Docker, in addition to writing Docker tutorials to get people started working with Docker and Carina. Inspired by her experiences teaching Docker, she created How to Whale, where you can learn Docker in your web browser.

Presentations

Think outside the container Session

There is much more to Docker than just deploying your flagship application. Carolyn VanSlyck, Ash Wilson, and Nick Silkey look at three use cases for Docker that go beyond the typical software development pipeline. You'll leave knowing how you can use Docker on the side, even if you haven't tackled Dockerizing your application.

Formerly the lead of the Open Source program and Technical Operations Platform team at Box, Inc, Benjamin VanEvery is currently doing “everything engineering” for New York based Simon Data. An avid software developer since the dot-com crash, Benjamin has experience shared between enterprise software development and technical operations in both the .NET and Red Hat worlds. Benjamin is passionate about education and helping make open source software a better place.

Presentations

Open source lessons from the TODO Group Session

Members of the TODO Group—an open group of companies who collaborate on practices, tools, and other ways to run successful and effective open source projects and programs—discuss why they started open source offices in their respective companies (Twitter, Netflix, Box, Google, Microsoft, and SanDisk) and share the lessons they learned along the way.

Kevin Vangundy is an avid cyclist, podcast fiend, and sci-fi junkie who is taking you from ideation to execution with Neo4j.

Presentations

Fundamentals of Neo4j Tutorial

Neo4j, an open source graph database, allows users to store data in a property graph. Instead of tables and foreign keys, data is stored as nodes and relationships; users can query data by writing graph traversals instead of complicated table joins. Nicole White and Kevin Vangundy offer an overview of the fundamentals of Neo4j largely focused on Neo4j's open source graph query language, Cypher.

Based in Austin, TX, Ian Varley currently works on the core infrastructure development team at Salesforce.com. Ian holds a master’s degree in software engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. His thesis, “No Relation: The Mixed Blessings Of Non-Relational Databases,” was an early and widely cited analysis of design patterns in NoSQL databases.

Presentations

Knocking down blockers: Transforming your company into an open source contributor Session

Even if your company understands the benefit of open source contribution, the reality is often much harder. For established companies, many factors can cause higher friction for contributors (like security, legal, executive approval, etc.). Ian Varley and Regina Burkebile share the improvements Salesforce has made to reduce friction and help you accelerate OSS contribution at your company.

Open source and OSCON are partly Larry Wall’s fault. Larry also wrote some programs people seem to like.

Presentations

Perl 6: Believe it or not! Session

Sure, Perl is the granddaddy of open source languages, but now with the Perl 6 redesign, Perl is also, once again, an emerging language with great flexibility and potential, designed to scale into your future, with world-class support for Unicode, FP, OO, concurrent, and reactive programming. Larry Wall explores Perl 6 and explains why he expects the Perl 6 community and ecosystem to blossom.

Simon Wardley is a researcher for the Leading Edge Forum focused on the intersection of IT strategy and new technologies. Simon is a seasoned executive who has spent the last 15 years defining future IT strategies for companies in the FMCG, retail, and IT industries—from Canon’s early leadership in the cloud-computing space in 2005 to Ubuntu’s recent dominance as the top cloud operating system. As a geneticist with a love of mathematics and a fascination for economics, Simon has always found himself dealing with complex systems, whether in behavioral patterns, the environmental risks of chemical pollution, developing novel computer systems, or managing companies. He is a passionate advocate and researcher in the fields of open source, commoditization, innovation, organizational structure, and cybernetics.

Simon’s most recent published research, “Clash of the Titans: Can China Dethrone Silicon Valley?,” assesses the high-tech challenge from China and what this means to the future of global technology industry competition. His previous research covers topics including the nature of technological and business change over the next 20 years, value chain mapping, strategies for an increasingly open economy, Web 2.0, and a lifecycle approach to cloud computing. Simon is a regular presenter at conferences worldwide and has been voted one of the UK’s top 50 most influential people in IT in Computer Weekly’s 2011 and 2012 polls.

Presentations

Crossing the river by feeling the stones Keynote

Deng Xiaoping once described managing the economy as crossing the river by feeling the stones. But in a world of constant change, how do you determine the right thing to do? Which pebble to tread on? Simon Wardley explains how situational awareness applies to the world of open source and explores how you can map your environment, identify opportunities to exploit, and learn to play the game.

Rachel Simone Weil is an experimental designer, video game historian, and developer based in Austin, Texas. She currently writes weird and whimsical code at Microsoft. Rachel received an MFA in design from the University of Texas, where she studied the intersections of video game history and girls’ cultures and subcultures.

Presentations

ConnectedNES: The world premiere of a WiFi-enabled 8-bit game console Session

Rachel Weil premieres ConnectedNES, a unique project that wirelessly and seamlessly connects her beloved NES 8-bit game console to the Internet, and introduces its first custom application: a real-time Twitter client. Rachel describes the technical challenges of building ConnectedNES and talks about its future as a collaborative platform.

Working in Internet infrastructure, web app security, and design taught Casey West to be a paranoid, UX-oriented, problem-solving Internet plumber. His earliest contributions to Perl live on to this day on your Mac. Casey’s speaking and writing topics range from open source communities and culture to technical architecture and automation tips and tricks. Casey wears the mantle of principal technologist focused on Pivotal’s Cloud Foundry platform and lives in Pittsburgh, where he’s raising three sarcastic children.

Presentations

Building data-driven applications on Cloud Foundry with Spring Event

Fred Melo and Casey West explore DevOps, continuous delivery, and microservices for data-driven applications. Fred and Casey cover the basics of continuous delivery for microservices using Spring Boot and leveraging the built-in capabilities of the open source Cloud Foundry platform.

Redefining culture fit Session

All too often we define culture fit as conformity to a series of workplace traditions: ping pong, pour-over coffee, or whiskey on Fridays. This model of culture is meant to highlight ways in which we’re similar at work but is ultimately superficial and exclusionary. Casey West explains what members of majority groups can do to influence the inclusivity of open source.

The twelve-factor container Session

In 2012, Adam Wiggins wrote "The Twelve-Factor App," an essay widely considered canon for building cloud-native applications. The advent of the container ecosystem transformed these principles into hard constraints. Casey West reviews what you can—and cannot—do with containers if you want to maintain repeatability, reliability, and portability.

Estelle Weyl started her professional life in architecture and then managed teen health programs. In 2000, Estelle took the natural step of becoming a web standardista. She is the Open Web and performance evangelist for Instart Logic and has consulted for Kodak Gallery, SurveyMonkey, Samsung, Yahoo, Visa, and Apple, among others. Estelle shares esoteric tidbits learned while programming and detailed grids of CSS3 and HTML5 browser support in her blog. She is a coauthor of Mobile HTML5, CSS3: The Definitive Guide, and HTML5 and CSS3 for the Real World. While not coding, Estelle works in construction, dehippifying her 1960s throwback abode.

Presentations

Straightforward accessibility Tutorial

Creating accessible, performant websites can be simple when you understand the basics. Semantic markup helps ensure accessibility, improving performance and making your site accessible to screen readers and keyboard users. Estelle Weyl explores accessibility features native to semantic elements and demonstrates how to add additional accessibility with a sprinkling of ARIA roles and attributes.

Nicole White is a data scientist at Neo4j interested in data engineering, visualization, and science.

Presentations

Fundamentals of Neo4j Tutorial

Neo4j, an open source graph database, allows users to store data in a property graph. Instead of tables and foreign keys, data is stored as nodes and relationships; users can query data by writing graph traversals instead of complicated table joins. Nicole White and Kevin Vangundy offer an overview of the fundamentals of Neo4j largely focused on Neo4j's open source graph query language, Cypher.

Cedric Williams is an InnerSource advocate for PayPal helping to grow the InnerSource Commons community. A technologist, pilot, coach, and advocate for individual freedoms, Cedric aspires to use narrative and technology to make communities powerful.

Presentations

InnerSource overview Session

InnerSource applies lessons from the best open source projects to engineering and transforms cultures that use it. Cedric Williams, Georg Gruetter, Guy Martin, Nithya Ruff, and Panna Pavangadkar explore the factors that keep software teams from collaborating effectively, look at the development model used for Apache Software Foundation projects, and talk about ways to bridge the two approaches.

Vida Williams is managing partner at a new firm based in Richmond, Virginia, that is helping companies big and small demystify big data by contextualizing their data to tell the story of their company and write its more effective and profitable future, as well as an adjunct instructor at Virginia Commonwealth University’s DaVinci Center for Innovation. She works with youth in her community through her program Hacktastic and a robotics and engineering club she founded. Vida embarked on a career in data over 15 years ago on a project to transform voluminous EPA data from a mainframe to a relational system. Vida entered the project as a technical writer but quickly became smitten with the techniques of articulating data into a structure for deeper and more probing storytelling. Her love affair with data continued more passionately over the years. She has remained faithful that data, when fully and completely contextualized, can tell an enterprise everything there is to know about itself—the good, the bad, and the ugly.

Presentations

Civic data: Using open source data to create socially impactful data-driven products Session

A plethora of data has been made freely available on the Web. A large chunk of this data is civic data: on education, social welfare, demographics, and the like. Vida Williams explains how this data can be assembled into open source products that can help states, cities, municipalities, nonprofit organizations, and citizens make decisions that will positively impact their immediate neighborhoods.

Ash Wilson builds developer tools, SDKs, and a content management system on the Developer Experience team at Rackspace. His interests include programming languages, IDEs, chatbots, continuous integration and delivery, configuration management, and Docker.

Presentations

Think outside the container Session

There is much more to Docker than just deploying your flagship application. Carolyn VanSlyck, Ash Wilson, and Nick Silkey look at three use cases for Docker that go beyond the typical software development pipeline. You'll leave knowing how you can use Docker on the side, even if you haven't tackled Dockerizing your application.

Emily Xie is a software engineer at Squarespace. Previously, she spent her days making art with code as a Tech Resident at Pioneer Works, a Brooklyn-based experimental arts center. Outside of work, Emily enjoys cooking, photography, and video games.

Presentations

Dissecting Git's guts Tutorial

Emily Xie explores what happens under the hood with Git “porcelain” (the high-level commands through which users typically interact with Git) via the usage and examination of Git “plumbing” (the lower-level actions). Emily demystifies Git, providing attendees with a basic understanding of how it works and giving them more confidence using it.

Saron Yitbarek is the founder of CodeNewbie, the most supportive community of programmers and people learning to code, and hosts the weekly CodeNewbie Podcast.

Presentations

What we take for granted: Examining the barriers to contributing to open source Session

Being an open source contributor assumes access to resources many don’t have: technical knowledge and tools, a socioeconomic status that allows coding without compensation, etc. Saron Yitbarek explains how we can work toward a more inclusive open source space for all by understanding the environment required to contribute and what groups are least likely to have access to these resources.

Stefano Zacchiroli is associate professor of computer science at Université Paris Diderot, currently on leave at Inria. His research interests span formal methods, software preservation, and free and open source software engineering. He is a cofounder and current CTO of the Software Heritage project. He has been an official member of the Debian Project since 2001 and served three terms as Debian project leader. Stefano is a board director of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) and recipient of the 2015 O’Reilly Open Source Award.

Presentations

Open source foundations 101 Session

Open source projects are increasingly opting to form an independent entity—a “foundation”—to serve as the core of their community rather than relying on good will or corporate oversight. Deborah Bryant, Danese Cooper, Sam Ramji, and Deb Nicholson share their experiences and provide introductory guidance on forming, managing, and leading an open source foundation.

Danilo Zekovic is a software developer at Compass Holding, where he develops web applications for clients. Originally from Novi Sad, Serbia, Danilo is interested in anything that involves programming, web development, and related technologies. Danilo holds a degree from Saint Joseph’s College.

Presentations

SPA boot camp Tutorial

Single-page apps utilize the browser rendering engine as a virtualized application container to allow for more fluid and responsive web apps that mimic native applications in performance. Brian Capouch, Danilo Zekovic, and Ben Davisson offer an introduction to single-page apps, presenting an overview of concepts and techniques focused on practical familiarity with this technology.

Wenbo Zhu is currently a software engineer at Google responsible for Google’s frontend networking frameworks. He has contributed to various web protocol-related standards and open source projects. His current work involves building scalable and robust real-time messaging stacks for internet clients to interact with cloud services. Wenbo holds a PhD degree in computer engineering and has authored the so-called COLOR algorithm for managing performance/consistency trade-offs of geographically replicated cloud services.

Presentations

Scalable bidirectional communication over the Web Session

Recent advances in transports and frameworks have made it possible to deploy large-scale, low-latency bidirectional communication over HTTP without losing original benefits like scalability and safety. Wenbo Zhu offers an overview of the use cases for enabling bidirectional communication as well as a demo that runs a distributed, shared whiteboard application from a browser.

Kortney Ziegler is the COO and lead experience architect for BSMdotCo, as well as an award-winning filmmaker, early Internet blogger, professor, and technology founder with over 10 years of education design, media, and ecommerce experience. Kortney is the first person to receive a PhD in African American studies from Northwestern University and the founder of TransH4CK—a virtual hackathon series recently funded by the Marc and Laura Andreessen Foundation that has recently partnered with Harvard’s Innovation Lab. By leveraging his extensive experience in interactive education design, Kortney is uniquely positioned to transform access to relevant and valuable education in markets currently underserved.

Presentations

Open source as an angel Session

Tiffany Mikell and Kortney Ziegler share the role open source technologies and communities played in their success and explore specific frameworks and projects that have been particularly useful along the bootstrapping journey from industry thought leaders to tech product "unicorn."