Everything open source
May 16–17, 2016: Training & Tutorials
May 18–19, 2016: Conference
Austin, TX

Schedule: Full listing

Monday, 05/16/2016

7:30am

7:30am–9:00am Monday, 05/16/2016
Location: Level 4 Pre-Function
- 9:00am Morning Coffee Service | 10:30am - 11:00am Morning Break (1h 30m)

9:00am

9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Architecture
Location: Ballroom B Level: Intermediate
Duncan DeVore (Lightbend)
Average rating: **...
(2.95, 40 ratings)
Duncan DeVore explores the basics of reactive system design, using hands-on examples in Java and Scala to demonstrate how to build applications that are responsive, resilient, and elastic. By the end this session, you will have a firm understanding of why reactive programming is the future of application design. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom C Level: Intermediate
Damian Edwards (Microsoft), David Fowler (Microsoft)
Average rating: **...
(2.83, 12 ratings)
Damian Edwards and David Fowler explain how to get started developing console and web applications for Mac, Linux, and Windows using the newly open source software .NET Core. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom E Level: Intermediate
Nicole White (Neo4j), Kevin Vangundy (Neo Technology)
Average rating: ****.
(4.84, 19 ratings)
Neo4j, an open source graph database, allows users to store data in a property graph. Instead of tables and foreign keys, data is stored as nodes and relationships; users can query data by writing graph traversals instead of complicated table joins. Nicole White and Kevin Vangundy offer an overview of the fundamentals of Neo4j largely focused on Neo4j's open source graph query language, Cypher. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Ballroom F Level: Intermediate
Brandon Philips (CoreOS, Inc)
Average rating: ***..
(3.52, 23 ratings)
Security, easy scaling, and high availability are essential needs for real-world application infrastructure. Brandon Philips offers a how-to talk and tutorial demonstrating how to set up a production-ready cluster with full TLS, manage the cluster through scaling and upgrade, and build the cluster for high availability. Brandon also addresses upgrading Kubernetes while keeping availability. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Hardware
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Kelsey Breseman (Tessel Project)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 10 ratings)
Join Kelsey Breseman in this hands-on tutorial for Tessel 2. Tessel is designed so that you can build physical, Internet-connected devices quickly, even if you have no hardware experience. What do you want to build? A button to call an Uber or set off sirens when your website goes down? Whatever it is, Kelsey will guide you through building it, from concept to prototype. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
In Real Life
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Jay McGavren (Treehouse)
Average rating: ****.
(4.43, 14 ratings)
Jay McGavren offers an introduction to the Ruby programming language and demonstrates how it can make you a better, happier, more productive programmer. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Meeting Room 18 A/B Level: Intermediate
Jeffrey Goff (Evozon Systems)
Average rating: **...
(2.62, 8 ratings)
Jeffrey Goff offers an introduction to Perl 6, a powerful new language combining the pedigree of Perl 5 with a brand new metaprogramming system, built-in concurrency, and software-definable grammars, among many other features. You'll leave with a working Perl 6 script and ideas for your next programming project. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Meeting Room 18 C/D Level: Intermediate
Francesco Cesarini (Erlang Solutions Ltd)
Average rating: ***..
(3.93, 14 ratings)
You need to implement a fault-tolerant, scalable, soft, real-time system with requirements for high availability. It has to be event driven and react to external stimulus, load, and failure. It must always be responsive. Francesco Cesarini outlines the Erlang/OTP approach to architecting a distributed system, breaking down the task into 10 steps that can be applied in other languages as well. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Open Source 101
Location: Meeting Room 19 Level: Intermediate
Daniel Hinojosa (Evolutionnext.com)
Average rating: ****.
(4.23, 13 ratings)
Daniel Hinojosa offers a small guided tour of three functional programming languages—Haskell, Scala, and Clojure—highlighting their differences and what they hold in common. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Performance
Location: Meeting Room 6 Level: Intermediate
Ben Evans (jClarity)
Average rating: ***..
(3.62, 13 ratings)
We often talk about performance, but in many cases, analysis is carried out by staff who are not performance specialists. Unfortunately, modern systems are increasingly complex and have subtleties in terms of measurement and interpretation of data, resulting in spurious or just flat-out wrong results. Ben Evans shows how to do performance analysis the right way and avoid the pitfalls. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Meeting Room 9 Level: Intermediate
Bryan Liles (Heptio)
Average rating: ***..
(3.21, 19 ratings)
AppOps is a collection of practices dictating how to move an application from development to production. Bryan Liles walks attendees through releasing an application and applying the AppOps tenets: continuous integration, continuous deployment, logging, metrics, and error handling. By the end of the tutorial, you'll be able to apply AppOps to your own projects. Read more.

12:30pm

12:30pm–1:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Location: Level 4 Pre-Function
- 1:30pm Lunch ~ Exhibit Hall 2-3 | 3:00pm - 3:30pm Afternoon Break sponsored by Google (1h)

1:30pm

1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Open Source 101
Location: Ballroom B Level: Intermediate
Brian Holt (Microsoft)
Average rating: ****.
(4.25, 28 ratings)
Brian Holt offers a hands-on, in-depth exploration of React. You’ll discover exactly how React works by building several complete React components, including a small app, and learn how you can apply its simple, declarative power to your applications using the latest ES6 features and syntax. By the end of this training, you'll understand why React is the most talked-about JavaScript library. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom C Level: Intermediate
Bruno Terkaly (Microsoft)
Average rating: *....
(1.88, 8 ratings)
Bruno Terkaly explores provisioning and programming against the most popular SQL data stores (including SQL Server, Azure SQL DB, MySQL, Postgres), NoSQL data stores (such as DocumentDB, MongoDB, Cassandra, and Redis), and Azure (Table, Blob, and Queue). All demos will use the Azure portal, the Linux command prompt, and Eclipse with Java. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Security
Location: Ballroom E Level: Intermediate
Mike Pirnat (American Greetings)
Average rating: ****.
(4.15, 20 ratings)
The Internet is a dangerous place, filled with evildoers out to attack your code for fun or profit, so it's not enough to just ship your awesome new web app—you have to take the security of your application, your users, and your data seriously. Get into the mindset of the bad guys, as Mike Pirnat discusses, exploits, and mitigates the most common web app security flaws in a controlled environment. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Ballroom F Level: Intermediate
AJ Bowen (Dominant Paradigm Subversion, Inc), Jérôme Petazzoni (ENIX SAS)
Average rating: ****.
(4.61, 54 ratings)
Docker is an open platform to build, ship, and run any Linux application anywhere. AJ Bowen and Jérôme Petazzoni lead a hands-on tutorial that gives you an opportunity to dive in and see Docker in action. You'll learn about Docker basic concepts and how to run containers, create your own images, interact with the Docker Hub, and stack multiple containers to compose complex applications. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Stacey Mulcahy (Microsoft)
Average rating: ****.
(4.56, 9 ratings)
Stacey Mulcahy explains how to leverage JavaScript to build experiences that go beyond the browser into the physical realm to sense and control the environment with common microcontrollers and Node.js. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Performance
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Advanced
Marc Sugiyama (Erlang Solutions, Inc)
Average rating: ****.
(4.12, 8 ratings)
Elixir is a functional programming language with a familiar syntax. Marc Sugiyama explores the basics of the language and explains why you want to use Elixir to write concurrent, scalable, and robust programs. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Meeting Room 18 A/B Level: Intermediate
Steve Francia (Google), Ashley McNamara (Rackspace)
Average rating: ****.
(4.32, 22 ratings)
Go is a great platform for CLI development due to its raw power, easy syntax, and painless distribution. Steve Francia and Ashley McNamara teach the techniques, principles, and libraries you need to build great CLI apps, covering everything from designing commands to working with and parsing flags, config files, and remote config systems and working with environment variables and 12-factor apps. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
In Real Life
Location: Meeting Room 18 C/D Level: Intermediate
Estelle Weyl (Instart Logic)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 4 ratings)
Creating accessible, performant websites can be simple when you understand the basics. Semantic markup helps ensure accessibility, improving performance and making your site accessible to screen readers and keyboard users. Estelle Weyl explores accessibility features native to semantic elements and demonstrates how to add additional accessibility with a sprinkling of ARIA roles and attributes. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Collaboration
Location: Meeting Room 19 Level: Non-technical
Meghan Gill (MongoDB), Francesca Krihely (MongoDB)
Average rating: ***..
(3.60, 5 ratings)
Open source communities need leaders and contributors to thrive, but successfully engaging them often poses a challenge. Meghan Gill and Francesca Krihely explain how to create champions for your open source community and offer resources to build new advocacy programs. You'll walk away with a plan designed to engage leaders. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Meeting Room 6 Level: Intermediate
Kenny Bastani (Pivotal)
Average rating: ***..
(3.80, 10 ratings)
Kenny Bastani demonstrates how to build cloud-native Java applications—designed to fully exploit a cloud platform both in the application layer, where things decompose into microservices, and at the data layer, where NoSQL offers better horizontal scaling and fitness for specific purpose. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Meeting Room 9 Level: Intermediate
Brent Laster (SAS)
Average rating: ***..
(3.67, 18 ratings)
Brent Laster explains how to use Jenkins and illustrates how to easily integrate it with other open source technologies, such as Git, as he walks attendees through building a simple multistage deployment pipeline (managed and automated through Jenkins) that implements principles of continuous integration and continuous delivery. Read more.

5:00pm

5:00pm–6:30pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Location: Ballroom A
Average rating: ****.
(4.25, 68 ratings)
If you had five minutes on stage, what would you say? What if you only got 20 slides, and they rotated automatically after 15 seconds? Would you pitch a project? Launch a website? Teach a hack? We’ll find out at our annual Ignite event at OSCON. Read more.

7:00pm

7:00pm–9:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Location: Meeting Rooms on Levels 3 and 4
Average rating: ***..
(3.33, 3 ratings)
Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions provide face-to-face exposure to those interested in the same projects and concepts. BoFs can be organized for individual projects or broader topics (best practices, open data, standards, etc.). BoFs are entirely up to you. We post your topic and provide the space and time. You provide the engaging topic. Read more.

7:30pm

7:30pm–11:00pm Monday, 05/16/2016
Location: Depart from Palazzo, 1st floor
Average rating: ****.
(4.60, 20 ratings)
The OSCON 5K Glow Fun Run/Walk is back—and updated for Austin. This year, local guides will lead small groups on an Austin City Tour run/walk. Starting from the Austin Convention Center, the route will follow the Lady Bird Trail along the river to offer incredible city views and pass some of Austin's most popular sights. Read more.

Tuesday, 05/17/2016

7:30am

7:30am–9:00am Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Location: Level 4 Pre-Function
- 9:00am Morning Coffee Service | 10:30 - 11:00am Morning Break sponsored by LucidWorks (1h 30m)

9:00am

9:00am–5:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Sponsored
Location: Ballroom A
Average rating: ****.
(4.19, 26 ratings)
Open Container Day at OSCON is a gathering of industry practitioners presenting their takes on the state of container-based solutions, infrastructure, cloud-native computing, continuous delivery, DevOps, microservices, and where this industry segment is going in 2016 and beyond. Talks will be vendor neutral and straight to the point. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom B Level: Intermediate
Julia Ferraioli (Google), Amy Unruh (Google), Eli Bixby (Google)
Average rating: ***..
(3.11, 27 ratings)
Machine learning can be an intimidating subject. Julia Ferraioli, Amy Unruh, and Eli Bixby introduce the basics of TensorFlow, an open source deep learning library, and offer practical, hands-on experience with core concepts in machine learning, including how to ingest and prepare raw data for use, run a variety of algorithms to gain insight from the data, and have some fun with visualization. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Architecture
Location: Ballroom C Level: Intermediate
Nathan Dotz (Detroit Labs)
Average rating: ***..
(3.33, 18 ratings)
Nathan Dotz leads a hands-on, all-code adventure to take you from zero to "ready to take on the world" with the beloved Scala programming language. Whether you're a seasoned object-oriented veteran or just getting started, this interactive tutorial will bring you up to speed on best practices with the JVM's hottest multiparadigm language. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Architecture
Location: Ballroom E Level: Advanced
Bridget Kromhout (Microsoft)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 2 ratings)
BOSH is an open source tool for predictably managing the long-term lifecycle of distributed systems. Bridget Kromhout explains how to create a BOSH release—a versioned collection of configuration properties, configuration templates, startup scripts, source code, binary artifacts, and anything else required to deploy software in a reproducible way. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Architecture
Location: Ballroom F Level: Intermediate
Maria Gomez (ThoughtWorks), Cassandra Shum (ThoughtWorks)
Average rating: ***..
(3.85, 40 ratings)
Agile practices and techniques like continuous delivery are all about being able to react to changes rapidly, but putting them into practice when you have a big monolith application can be difficult. Microservices offer one solution. María Gómez and Cassandra Shum explore the prerequisites for moving into a microservices architecture and provide tips on how to achieve them via engaging exercises. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Ben Striegel (The Rust Programming Language)
Average rating: ***..
(3.73, 11 ratings)
Ben Striegel leads an active, hands-on introduction to Rust, a new systems programming language from Mozilla that emphasizes guaranteed memory safety (no segfaults!), fearless concurrency (no data races!), and lightning-fast, zero-overhead execution (no garbage collector!). Ben explains Rust’s novel characteristics and demonstrates how you can put them to work in your own projects. Read more.
9:00am–5:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Hardware, Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 9
Average rating: ****.
(4.67, 3 ratings)
Join us for a one-day extravaganza devoted to the wild and wonderful world of bots, from messaging to automation, APIs to hosting options, Slack to Twitter, and AI basics to the craziest bots we can find. In the morning, leading bot makers tell their stories, setting the scene for an afternoon hackathon, where you can work with experts to start making your own bots. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Collaboration
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Danese Cooper (PayPal)
Average rating: ****.
(4.58, 12 ratings)
InnerSource applies the lessons of the best open source projects to proprietary engineering and transforms the cultures that use it. Danese Cooper offers case studies that demonstrate how PayPal and other companies started redesigning their engineering approaches and ended up changing how they work and outlines techniques any team can use to build an InnerSource practice in their organization. Read more.
9:00am–5:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16A
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 2 ratings)
The open source Trusted Analytics Platform (TAP) accelerates the creation of cloud-native applications driven by big data analytics. Chuck Freedman and Venkatesh Bharadwaj offer an overview and demonstration of TAP. You'll use popular open source projects including Spark, Hadoop, Cloud Foundry, and others to work with data and deploy a simple visualization application in the cloud. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16B
Fred Melo (Pivotal), Casey West (Pivotal)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Fred Melo and Casey West explore DevOps, continuous delivery, and microservices for data-driven applications. Fred and Casey cover the basics of continuous delivery for microservices using Spring Boot and leveraging the built-in capabilities of the open source Cloud Foundry platform. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Data
Location: Meeting Room 18 A/B Level: Intermediate
Jon Haddad (The Last Pickle), Dani Traphagen (GridGain)
Average rating: ***..
(3.47, 15 ratings)
Jon Haddad and Dani Traphagen explore all the basics you’ll need to become best buds with the radically scalable, always-on, and increasingly popular Apache Cassandra database. But wait, there's more. Jon and Dani also cover using Apache Spark for large-scale data processing. What else do you need to know to make new friends? Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Meeting Room 18 C/D Level: Intermediate
Alex Miller (Cognitect)
Average rating: ****.
(4.20, 5 ratings)
Alex Miller teaches the basics of Clojure, a dynamic functional programming language on the Java Virtual Machine, covering key concepts including expressions and the evaluation model, functions, collections, sequences, state, polymorphism, and concurrency. Read more.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Collaboration
Location: Meeting Room 19 Level: Intermediate
Emily Xie (http://xie-emily.com/)
Average rating: ****.
(4.29, 31 ratings)
Emily Xie explores what happens under the hood with Git “porcelain” (the high-level commands through which users typically interact with Git) via the usage and examination of Git “plumbing” (the lower-level actions). Emily demystifies Git, providing attendees with a basic understanding of how it works and giving them more confidence using it. Read more.

12:30pm

12:30pm–1:30pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Location: Level 4 Pre-Function
- 1:30pm Lunch ~ Exhibit Hall 2-3 | 3:00pm - 3:30pm Afternoon Break sponsored by Capital One (1h)

1:30pm

1:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom B Level: Intermediate
Barbara Fusinska (Google)
Average rating: ***..
(3.69, 16 ratings)
The R platform is the #1 environment for statistics, data science, and data visualization, making the world of data analysis much more approachable. R offers a set of tools perfect for data exploration, necessary for drawing any data science conclusions. Barbara Fusinska outlines a set of exercises that introduce the world of data exploration in R and teach you to use R to explore your own data. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Performance
Location: Ballroom C Level: Intermediate
Steve Meyers (Utah Open Source Foundation)
Average rating: ***..
(3.62, 8 ratings)
Many companies have inadequate database experience because databases like MySQL and PostgreSQL don't require a full-time DBA to administer. Developers now have to have a basic understanding of how to keep their databases happy. Steve Meyers explores how to get the best performance out of your database, covering JOIN order, proper indexing, WHERE filtering, caching, and many other subjects. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Collaboration
Location: Ballroom E Level: Non-technical
Average rating: ***..
(3.88, 24 ratings)
You've dabbled a little in version control using Git. You can follow along with the various tutorials you've found online. But now you've been asked to implement a work flow strategy, and you're not really sure how (or where) to start. You have a lot of choices. Emma Jane Hogbin Westby helps you pick the right one for your project. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom F Level: Intermediate
Jérôme Petazzoni (ENIX SAS), AJ Bowen (Dominant Paradigm Subversion, Inc)
Average rating: ****.
(4.70, 23 ratings)
Jérôme Petazzoni and AJ Bowen demonstrate building an app from development to production with Docker. Jérôme and AJ run a sample app on a single node with Compose and add scaling and load balancing. They then provision a Swarm cluster with Docker Machine and implement multihost communication with overlay networking. The result will be a highly available, scalable deployment for the application. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Architecture
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
Average rating: ****.
(4.24, 17 ratings)
Python is so consistent that we can often infer the behavior of new objects by assuming they work like the built-ins. The Python data model is the foundation of this consistent behavior. Luciano Ramalho explores the construction of Pythonic objects: classes that feel "natural" to a Python programmer and leverage some of the best language features by implementing key protocols of the data model. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Brian Capouch (Saint Joseph's College), Danilo Zekovic (Symphony ), Ben Davisson (Saint Joseph's College)
Average rating: ***..
(3.65, 17 ratings)
Single-page apps utilize the browser rendering engine as a virtualized application container to allow for more fluid and responsive web apps that mimic native applications in performance. Brian Capouch, Danilo Zekovic, and Ben Davisson offer an introduction to single-page apps, presenting an overview of concepts and techniques focused on practical familiarity with this technology. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16B
TBC
1:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Meeting Room 18 A/B Level: Intermediate
Chris Dorros (Cisco Systems Inc)
Average rating: ***..
(3.42, 12 ratings)
Disposable infrastructure is a new paradigm for managing a full stack of infrastructure. Chris Dorros explores the benefits of this model, giving you hands-on experience with the most popular tools in this space. You'll see how easy it is to confidently make and roll back changes in production that you'll never want to SSH into a box to "make a quick fix" ever again. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
In Real Life
Location: Meeting Room 18 C/D Level: Advanced
Ben Lackey (DataStax), Boris Baryshnikov (Microsoft Corp.)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
AWS, Azure, and GCP all provision clusters differently. Docker, Kubernetes, and Mesos are seeking to simplify that process but haven't fully delivered on that promise. Ben Lackey and Boris Baryshnikov explain the best way to provision with the tools available today as we wait for the perfect orchestration layer to arrive. Read more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
In Real Life
Location: Meeting Room 19 Level: Intermediate
Ben Hall (Katacoda | Ocelot Uproar)
Average rating: ****.
(4.20, 15 ratings)
Docker offers a great deal of advantages, simplifying both development and production environments. But there is still uncertainty around the security and performance of containers. Ben Hall uncovers the truth and explains how Docker's security and performance models work in the real world. Read more.

5:00pm

5:00pm–6:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Location: Exhibit Hall 4
Average rating: ****.
(4.37, 70 ratings)
Grab a drink and kick off OSCON by meeting and mingling with exhibitors and fellow attendees. Read more.

6:30pm

6:30pm–9:00pm Tuesday, 05/17/2016
Location: Coppertank Event Center
Average rating: ***..
(3.19, 16 ratings)
For our first year in Texas, we want to showcase a few of the many things Austin has to offer. Our attendee party will take place a few blocks from the Austin Convention Center at the Coppertank Event Center (504 Trinity St.), where you’ll have the opportunity to network while enjoying the best of local food, drink, and entertainment. Read more.

Wednesday, 05/18/2016

7:30am

7:30am–8:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom D Foyer
Morning Coffee Service (1h 15m)

8:45am

8:45am–8:55am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Kelsey Hightower (Google), Rachel Roumeliotis (O'Reilly Media), Scott Hanselman (Microsoft)
Average rating: ****.
(4.12, 40 ratings)
OSCON program chairs Kelsey Hightower, Rachel Roumeliotis, and Scott Hanselman open the first day of keynotes. Read more.

8:55am

8:55am–9:05am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Average rating: ***..
(3.94, 82 ratings)
Rapper, singer, producer, and songwriter Sammus balances her music career with her PhD studies and teaching work at Cornell. Her love of tech, music, and video games comes together in the form of dense and intense lyrics that have wowed fans of nerdcore nationwide. She's joining us at OSCON to share a few songs and a few thoughts about how she got here and where she's going. Read more.

9:05am

9:05am–9:20am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Solomon Hykes (Docker)
Average rating: ****.
(4.39, 80 ratings)
Since Solomon Hykes unveiled Docker at the PyCon conference three years ago, containers have revolutionized how developers and ops teams build, ship, and run applications. Solomon explores the past, present, and future of our container ecosystem and shares lessons learned from managing successful open source projects across several dimensions: technology, people, products, and business. Read more.

9:20am

9:20am–9:30am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Angel Diaz (IBM)
Average rating: **...
(2.86, 69 ratings)
Angel Diaz provides a retrospective on IBM’s deep history and its contributions to the evolution of open source technology in order to catch a glimpse of a future that is rooted in open source technologies. Angel tells the story of open source projects that exemplify the new hardcore concepts we'll all need to accelerate innovation and success. Read more.

9:30am

9:30am–9:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Kyla McMullen (University of Florida)
Average rating: ****.
(4.52, 90 ratings)
Everyone has a story about their first computer, a teacher that inspired them, or that first piece of amazing software that started it all. Kyla McMullen explains how she went from a child interested in technology to a computer science professor—and the software that was there for her along the way. But behind her story is a question: how can we make this journey happen for others? Read more.

9:45am

9:45am–9:55am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Sanqi Li (Huawei)
Average rating: **...
(2.43, 81 ratings)
Sanqi Li shares Huawei’s open source stories, covering not only its significant contributions and leading activities in some major open source projects, including Hadoop, Spark, OpenStack, ONOS, OPNFV, OCI, and so on, but also its new initiatives in building open developer platform and open lab partnership programs to further embrace the open, collaborative, and shared digital economy. Read more.

9:55am

9:55am–10:00am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Sam Ramji (Cloud Foundry Foundation)
Average rating: ***..
(3.73, 63 ratings)
Sam Ramji explains why a platform should come with the expectation of an open and transparent approach, describes the opportunity for an open cloud ecosystem, and explores how transparency enables rapid innovation. From containers to networking, storage to services, an open platform ecosystem must deliver pluggability as a core aspect of its approach to the data center stack. Read more.

10:00am

10:00am–10:15am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Joseph Sirosh (Microsoft)
Average rating: ****.
(4.19, 73 ratings)
Have you heard the story of a rock star, the school teacher and a cosmic mystery? Join Microsoft’s Joseph Sirosh for a conversation about how the “unreasonable effectiveness” of OPEN (source, data, science, cloud) is accelerating humanity’s rate of progress. Read more.

10:15am

10:15am–10:20am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Average rating: ****.
(4.23, 35 ratings)
Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis, Kelsey Hightower, and Scott Hanselman close the first day of keynotes. Read more.

10:20am

10:20am–11:05am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Exhibit Hall
Morning Break sponsored by Rackspace (45m)

11:05am

11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom B Level: Non-technical
Erica Stanley (SalesLoft), Erich Lee (Ideaz To Apps)
Average rating: ***..
(3.31, 13 ratings)
Data alone lacks the social connection necessary to drive behavior change. However, combining the huge amount of available data with interactive experiences allows us to tell powerful stories that can motivate people to make lasting behavior changes. Erica Stanley and Erich Lee dive into the psychology of behavior change and explain how to convey stories in the data to support desired changes. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Open Source 101
Location: Ballroom C Level: Non-technical
Maria Naggaga (Microsoft )
Average rating: ****.
(4.40, 5 ratings)
Contributing to an open source project can be one of the most daunting things to do as a developer. Your code is out there, but is it good? Will people like it? Will they accept you? We can get overwhelmed by the fear of being publicly rejected and harassed by the open source community. Maria Naggaga covers the techniques she uses to be a "fearless" active contributor and contributor advocate. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Performance
Location: Ballroom E Level: Intermediate
Davey Shafik (Akamai)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 25 ratings)
User expectations are higher than ever when it comes to web performance—so much so that we've created an entirely new application architecture just to make websites feel faster than they actually are. Davey Shafik explains how we can improve user experience at any scale through performance optimizations at every layer of the stack from backend to browser. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
In Real Life
Location: Ballroom F Level: Non-technical
Katrina Owen (GitHub)
Average rating: ****.
(4.75, 8 ratings)
Open source sells itself as being about technical problems—delightfully thorny technical problems at that. However, successful projects are filled with people, which introduces a whole different set of problems. Katrina Owen illustrates the many ways in which things went wrong for Exercism because she didn’t treat people problems as first-class citizens. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Average rating: ***..
(3.71, 14 ratings)
The DevOps movement has changed the way that businesses handle the development, deployment, and operations of their systems. Like so many other advances in technology, however, this evolution is coming to government last. Aidan Feldman discusses the challenges of introducing modern processes and infrastructure at the federal level and looks at specific ways that 18F is tackling this problem. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Architecture
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Ian Eyberg (DeferPanic)
Average rating: **...
(2.87, 15 ratings)
Unikernels will overtake the container ecosystem within the next few years. The question is when and in what fashion this will happen. Ian Eyberg argues that Go unikernels are the natural product of this evolutionary cycle and explores the current state of the art in the industry. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 14
Chuck Freedman (Intel), Kyle Ambert (Intel)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
Chuck Freedman and Kyle Ambert share lessons learned from a journey combining open source projects, supporting users, and building a community around the Trusted Analytics Platform (TAP). Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16A
Matt Schuetze (Azul Systems)
Average rating: *....
(1.00, 1 rating)
Matt Schuetze walks you through the realities of doing embedded Java development, exposes the breadth of choices to make in boards and setups, and shows the ways that modern Java Standard Edition is leveraged to the hilt. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16B
Everett Toews (Rackspace)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 7 ratings)
Swarm—Docker's answer to clustering—treats a group of Docker hosts as a single host. Everett Toews explains how to Swarm with Carina, a service that builds Docker Swarm clusters for you. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 17B
Diane Mueller (Red Hat OpenShift), Vincent Batts (Red Hat), Ryan Jarvinen (Red Hat)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 3 ratings)
Learn how to package up your open source software project as a containerized offering that developers trust and your community can easily maintain. Diane Mueller, Vincent Batts, and Ryan Jarvinen outline ways to automate your image build and deployment processes using Docker Hub, Kubernetes, OpenShift, and other popular toolchains and explore emerging best practices and container stds. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom A Level: Intermediate
Larry Wall (Craigslist)
Average rating: ****.
(4.20, 25 ratings)
Sure, Perl is the granddaddy of open source languages, but now with the Perl 6 redesign, Perl is also, once again, an emerging language with great flexibility and potential, designed to scale into your future, with world-class support for Unicode, FP, OO, concurrent, and reactive programming. Larry Wall explores Perl 6 and explains why he expects the Perl 6 community and ecosystem to blossom. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Business of OSS
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Amanda Folson (GitLab)
Average rating: ****.
(4.20, 5 ratings)
Just because you’re selling SaaS doesn’t mean you can’t adopt open source principles in your organization. Amanda Folson explores how individuals and companies can open source their documentation, libraries, and ideas for the greater good of the community in a way that doesn’t mean giving it all away for free. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Collaboration
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Non-technical
Casey West (Pivotal)
Average rating: ****.
(4.83, 6 ratings)
All too often we define culture fit as conformity to a series of workplace traditions: ping pong, pour-over coffee, or whiskey on Fridays. This model of culture is meant to highlight ways in which we’re similar at work but is ultimately superficial and exclusionary. Casey West explains what members of majority groups can do to influence the inclusivity of open source. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Leadership
Location: Meeting Room 10 A/B Level: Non-technical
Tessa Mero (Cisco)
Average rating: ****.
(4.22, 9 ratings)
Have you ever struggled to lead an open source project and wondered if there might be tools or techniques that could help your community? Tessa Mero discusses what she’s learned from being involved in leadership within the Joomla! CMS project and explains how you can benefit from it. You'll leave feeling encouraged, inspired, and full of positivity. Read more.

11:55am

11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom B Level: Intermediate
Ted Malaska (Capital One)
Average rating: ****.
(4.46, 13 ratings)
With the rapid adoption of Apache Spark and the need for programs to span many machines, distributed computing has resurfaced as a hot commodity that can open the door to cool and impactful apps. Ted Malaska introduces Java and Scala devs to Spark concepts such as DAGs, RDDs, and transformations and explains why mindsets must evolve beyond code that runs in a single JVM. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Open Source 101
Location: Ballroom C Level: Intermediate
Sumana Harihareswara (Changeset Consulting)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 9 ratings)
From Monty Python references to Git to mailing lists, Sumana Harihareswara discusses the barriers that often slow down new users and contributors during outreach efforts and explores what's crucial and what to toss. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Performance
Location: Ballroom E Level: Intermediate
Tags: featured
Michael Paulson (Netflix)
Average rating: ****.
(4.62, 16 ratings)
Have you ever tried to improve the performance of a JavaScript library? Where did you start? Did you blindly adjust knobs and dials, hoping to find the magic bullet? For the last two years, Netflix has been laser focused on making Falcor as fast as possible. Michael Paulson explains how he and his team significantly improved performance of Falcor. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
In Real Life
Location: Ballroom F Level: Intermediate
Heather Migliorisi (Blackhawk Network)
Average rating: ****.
(4.17, 6 ratings)
Open source is the fuel that runs the technology we use to solve many of the problems we face every day. These projects are amazing, heavily distributed, and loved by many. Heather Migliorisi explains how they can be made even better when accessibility is added into the open source mix. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Casey West (Pivotal)
Average rating: ****.
(4.24, 17 ratings)
In 2012, Adam Wiggins wrote "The Twelve-Factor App," an essay widely considered canon for building cloud-native applications. The advent of the container ecosystem transformed these principles into hard constraints. Casey West reviews what you can—and cannot—do with containers if you want to maintain repeatability, reliability, and portability. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Architecture
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Mark Bates (Meta42 Labs, LLC)
Average rating: ****.
(4.55, 11 ratings)
Mark Bates discusses how he started building an application “correctly”—using Go, Angular, and SOA—and ended up with the classic monolith architecture you hear people warning against. Mark explains why Go, SOA, and Angular were the wrong choices for this app and why the monolith was the right answer. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 14
Zhiyuan Cai (Huawei), Quinton Hoole (Google)
Tricircle provides an OpenStack API gateway and networking automation solution to manage multiple OpenStack clouds; similarly, Ubernetes also provides unified API to manage multiple Kubernetes clusters. Zhiyuan Cai and Quinton Hoole discuss when it makes sense to use Tricircle and Ubernetes and how it simplifies cloud distribution via OpenStack and Kubernetes. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16A
Will Hayes (Lucidworks)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 2 ratings)
What does it take to build a profitable and healthy open source company? Will Hayes, CEO of Lucidworks, explains why business success need not come at the expense of the open source community’s integrity. Will explores why companies should avoid commercializing product features with broad, cross-industry appeal and discusses the power of specificity in driving both revenue and committer happiness. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16B
Chip Childers (Cloud Foundry Foundation)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 2 ratings)
Chip Childers discusses what it means to be truly “cloud native,” why your organization needs to make the change, and why Cloud Foundry is the right platform for cloud-native applications. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 17B
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 3 ratings)
Open technologies are leading the way to a simplified development experience, end to end, from mobile to the cloud. Patrick Bohrer explores the role of these open technologies in driving down the time it takes to build, integrate, and deliver powerful apps that blur the lines between mobile and cloud. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom A Level: Intermediate
Richard Mortier (University of Cambridge, UK), Anil Madhavapeddy (Docker, Inc)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 18 ratings)
Richard Mortier and Anil Madhavapeddy demonstrate the integration of MirageOS, Rumprun unikernels, and the Docker container management toolchain, discuss the relationship between MirageOS (clean slate), Rumprun unikernels, and Linux Containers, and show how it is getting steadily easier to extend everyday workflows and deployments with unikernel technology. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Business of OSS
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Intermediate
Average rating: ****.
(4.12, 8 ratings)
Open source has changed how businesses, nonprofits, and individuals run software and, increasingly, hardware—both in design and manufacturing. Brian Redbeard Harrington analyzes how open source businesses make money and how they benefit their users and examines the pragmatic challenges ubiquitous to libre software, open hardware, and selling “support” as a model. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Collaboration
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Non-technical
Donna Benjamin (Creative Contingencies), Leslie Hawthorn (Red Hat)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 12 ratings)
Open source software projects can be prickly toward their users. Poor documentation and a steep learning curve can make a project community seem hostile. As users of many different open source projects over the years, Donna Benjamin and Leslie Hawthorn have often wondered about this problem and contemplated what to do about it. This session takes their long-standing private rant public. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Leadership
Location: Meeting Room 10 A/B Level: Non-technical
Tags: featured
Kevin Stewart (Heptio)
Average rating: ****.
(4.89, 9 ratings)
While there has been much discussion about diversity in tech from the standpoint of individual contributors, we do not hear much from people of color in leadership roles. Kevin Stewart explores the challenges they face and explains why we might want to rethink how we approach diversity in the tech industry. Read more.

12:35pm

12:35pm–1:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Exhibit Hall
Lunch Sponsored by Huawei (1h 15m)

1:50pm

1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom B Level: Intermediate
Barbara Fusinska (Google)
Average rating: ***..
(3.08, 12 ratings)
Every day, there are millions of contributions to open source GitHub projects. GitHub Archive's job is gather that data and make it accessible for further analysis. The R platform is the perfect tool to accomplish this task. Barbara Fusinska demonstrates how to use R to turn unstructured data into actionable statistics. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Open Source 101
Location: Ballroom C Level: Non-technical
Tags: featured
Saron Yitbarek (CodeNewbie)
Average rating: ****.
(4.90, 10 ratings)
Being an open source contributor assumes access to resources many don’t have: technical knowledge and tools, a socioeconomic status that allows coding without compensation, etc. Saron Yitbarek explains how we can work toward a more inclusive open source space for all by understanding the environment required to contribute and what groups are least likely to have access to these resources. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Performance
Location: Ballroom E Level: Intermediate
Doris Chen (Microsoft)
Average rating: ****.
(4.62, 8 ratings)
Apache Cordova is one of the most popular frameworks for cross-platform mobile development. To build Cordova apps that perform well, it’s important to understand how to use the technologies in the most efficient ways. Doris Chen outlines what impacts "native performance," demonstrates how to measure mobile app performance, and shares practical tips for building faster Cordova apps. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
In Real Life
Location: Ballroom F Level: Non-technical
Kelsey Breseman (Tessel Project)
Average rating: ****.
(4.80, 5 ratings)
Creating a product—particularly a hardware product—is difficult enough as a company. But the challenges of a distributed team are even more intense when all contributors are volunteers. Kelsey Breseman played a major role in transitioning Tessel from a company to a volunteer project. She explains the hurdles the Tessel Project faced and how it overcame them on the way to shipping Tessel 2. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Kyle Tyacke (Akamai)
Average rating: ***..
(3.75, 8 ratings)
Continuous integration (CI) can reduce the hassles of managing open source projects, improve code quality, and make merging a joy. But it can be hard to understand and a chore to setup and manage. Kyle Tyacke breaks down the concepts of continuous integration and takes a look at Travis CI, a free, hosted solution that makes it easy to add continuous integration to your open source projects. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Architecture
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Kirsten Hunter (Akamai)
Average rating: ***..
(3.83, 18 ratings)
Kirsten Hunter demonstrates how to build a simple backend API with a JavaScript frontend in four different languages—Ruby, Perl, Python, and Node—with the goal of teaching you how to parse what's happening in the code you are seeing and start you on your path to becoming a programming polyglot. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 14
Mark Atwood (Hewlett Packard Enterprise)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
Mark Atwood offers an overview of the OpenSwitch platform, an open source, Linux-based network operating system (NOS) platform that utilizes modern development tools and offers extensive APIs and management interfaces. Chartered as a Linux Foundation project, OpenSwitch provides a fully featured control plane stack with support for layer 2 and layer 3 networking protocols. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16A
Jihong MA (Huawei)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
Are you working with the Hadoop ecosystem but still puzzled how to accelerate big data analytics? Jihong Ma explains why you should check out CarbonData, an indexed and columnar store file format designed for fast analytics, and outlines how it can help speed up queries an order of magnitude faster over petabytes of data. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16B
Kranthi Dandamudi (Capital One)
Average rating: ****.
(4.71, 7 ratings)
At Capital One, OSS has been instrumental in allowing customers to bank any place, any time and is revolutionizing how our developers are delivering software through a CI/CD pipeline. Kranthi Dandamudi outlines Capital One's conversion from a home-grown web/mobile/API framework to a fully OSS-based solution and describes how it kick-started an InnerSource and open source contribution revolution. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 17B
Doug Simmons (PayPal)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
When you need to do functional test automation on mobile or web applications, the effort required to create an enterprise-wide, scalable solution is sizable. Doug Simmons explores SeLion, an open source project created at PayPal, which gives engineers the infrastructure, tooling, and framework needed to get testing. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom A Level: Intermediate
Nick Shadrin (NGINX)
Average rating: ****.
(4.06, 34 ratings)
After 16 years of solid use, the HTTP protocol finally got a major update. HTTP/2—based on SPDY—introduces new, major performance enhancements and features. Nick Shadrin offers a detailed overview of the protocol, outlines some cases when it significantly helps your website performance, and explains why, in some cases, the older version of the protocol performs better. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Business of OSS
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Tags: featured
Jamie Dobson (Container Solutions)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 12 ratings)
Capitalism as an economic system is based on key relationships between profit, costs, labor, and productivity. Jamie Dobson explains how open source software is contributing to undermining these relationships and is therefore undermining capitalism itself. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Collaboration
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Non-technical
Chris Aniszczyk (Cloud Native Computing Foundation), Nithya Ruff (Comcast), Jeff McAffer (Microsoft), Chris DiBona (Google), Benjamin VanEvery (Simon Data, Inc.), Andrew Spyker (Netflix)
Average rating: ***..
(3.64, 11 ratings)
Members of the TODO Group—an open group of companies who collaborate on practices, tools, and other ways to run successful and effective open source projects and programs—discuss why they started open source offices in their respective companies (Twitter, Netflix, Box, Google, Microsoft, and SanDisk) and share the lessons they learned along the way. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Leadership
Location: Meeting Room 10 A/B Level: Non-technical
James Stewart (jystewart.net)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 6 ratings)
As every organization becomes a software organization, senior leaders with no technology background regularly have to make technology decisions. To help their teams succeed, architects must learn to coach those leaders in how to deliver and operate high-quality services. James Stewart covers a range of techniques that help develop understanding and capability among senior leadership. Read more.

2:40pm

2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom B Level: Non-technical
Alyson La (GitHub, Inc.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 10 ratings)
The GitHub Archive is an open source project which archives public activity on GitHub and makes it easily accessible for analysis. Alyson La explores some interesting projects that have leveraged this rich dataset and explains how you can access the GitHub Archive using Google BigQuery and SQL-like commands to uncover insights and effectively tell a story with the data. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Open Source 101
Location: Ballroom C Level: Non-technical
Average rating: ***..
(3.75, 4 ratings)
Very often when discussing whether or not to go open source, you hear concerns about loss of business, inconvenient transparency, and the loss of control. Christian Grail explains how he convinced his managers to go open source. Based on his experience, Christian offers guidance on how you can address concerns about open source and convince your manager to go open source too. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Performance
Location: Ballroom E Level: Intermediate
Tyler McMullen (Fastly)
Average rating: ****.
(4.36, 11 ratings)
Load balancing efficiently is a very hard problem. In fact, in the real world, doing it perfectly is impossible. That said, the techniques that most of us use are far from the best we can do. Tyler McMullen outlines what makes load balancing hard and the problems with how we solve it right now and offers techniques to do it better. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
In Real Life
Location: Ballroom F Level: Non-technical
Tags: featured
Jessica Rose (FutureLearn)
Average rating: ****.
(4.95, 19 ratings)
Jessica Rose explains how cognitive biases work to undermine our estimation of our individual skills. Who do these cognitive biases affect? And how do they collectively shape the face of the software development industry? Jessica examines the impact of these biases on personal and professional relationships among individuals and groups and discusses what can be done to diagnose and cope with them. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Performance
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Adrian Cockcroft (Amazon Web Services), Adrian Cole (Pivotal)
Average rating: ***..
(3.31, 13 ratings)
Adrian Cockcroft and Adrian Cole explain how the initial focus on stabilizing the Open Zipkin tool is leading to the involvement of a wider group of people to define a more general portable tracing standard and language bindings for common languages that will let any microservices framework feed portable visualization tools. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Architecture
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Tim Krajcar (New Relic)
Average rating: ****.
(4.14, 7 ratings)
Ruby developers have known for years that our beloved language is one of the most joyful to use. And yet, "Ruby Can't Scale" seems to be a daily article on Hacker News. Tim Krajcar presents some tips and tricks that he's learned at New Relic writing Ruby services that scale to hundreds of thousands of requests per minute. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 14
Open source has won. Enterprise organizations around the world are using open source technology and systems and rapidly integrating them into new solutions, platforms, and strategies. Charlie Gracie, Christopher Ferris, Bert Belder, and David Taieb explore the current state of open source technology and discuss how you can help drive adoption, integration, and use within your organization. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16A
Judi Sohn (Salesforce.org), Jason Lantz (Salesforce.org)
The open source Salesforce.org Nonprofit Starter Pack has grown to 150K+ users in seven years by combining a proprietary cloud, corporate philanthropy, and open source product delivery. Judi Sohn and Jason Lantz cover how Salesforce.org shepherds its contributors from consumers and users through engagers and community members to contributors. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16B
Carolyn Van Slyck (Rackspace), Ash Wilson (Rackspace), Nick Silkey (Rackspace)
Average rating: **...
(2.50, 10 ratings)
There is much more to Docker than just deploying your flagship application. Carolyn VanSlyck, Ash Wilson, and Nick Silkey look at three use cases for Docker that go beyond the typical software development pipeline. You'll leave knowing how you can use Docker on the side, even if you haven't tackled Dockerizing your application. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 17B
Ken Owens (Cisco Systems), Lauren Cooney (Cisco)
Average rating: **...
(2.50, 4 ratings)
Developers are driving the market for cloud consumption and leading the industry to a new era of software-defined disruption. It's no longer a question that elastic and flexible development is the way to innovate and reduce time to market. Ken Owens and Lauren Cooney dig into open source architectures, explain why these solutions need to be open, and deep dive into other related challenges. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom A Level: Intermediate
Liz Rice (Aqua Security)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 2 ratings)
Containers are revolutionizing data center utilization, with pioneers getting more than 5x better utilization than the industry average using clever scheduling algorithms. Liz Rice offers an overview of interesting work being done on physical packing and explains what happens when we bring in a fourth dimension: time. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Business of OSS
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Nithya Ruff (Comcast)
Nithya Ruff argues that marketing is not a "four-letter word" and explains why we should be doing more of it in open source. Whether it's called advocacy or evangelizing, we need to do it to promote projects, sell more open source-based software, and attract more users and developers. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Collaboration
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Non-technical
Cedric Williams (PayPal), Georg Gruetter (Robert Bosch GmbH), Guy Martin (Autodesk), Nithya Ruff (Comcast), Panna Pavangadkar (Bloomberg L.P.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.70, 10 ratings)
InnerSource applies lessons from the best open source projects to engineering and transforms cultures that use it. Cedric Williams, Georg Gruetter, Guy Martin, Nithya Ruff, and Panna Pavangadkar explore the factors that keep software teams from collaborating effectively, look at the development model used for Apache Software Foundation projects, and talk about ways to bridge the two approaches. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Leadership
Location: Meeting Room 10 A/B Level: Non-technical
Adrienne Lowe (Juice Analytics)
Average rating: ****.
(4.64, 11 ratings)
Are you interested in speaking at a tech conference but unsure how to share relevant technical information in an engaging way? Are you in a position of leadership or mentorship in open source and want to be perceived as accessible and collaborative? In a fun, lighthearted talk, Adrienne Lowe offers actionable suggestions for inspiring others with your own confident authenticity. Read more.

3:20pm

3:20pm–4:20pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Exhibit Hall
Afternoon Break (1h)

4:20pm

4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom B Level: Intermediate
Erin Ledell (H2O.ai)
Average rating: ***..
(3.81, 16 ratings)
Over the past decade, we've seen a huge increase in data collection. Much of what we do online and in our daily lives is tracked, and every electronic device is generating some form of data. Leveraging real-world datasets from industries such as insurance, medicine, and transportation, Erin Ledell demonstrates how to go from big data to actionable insights using open source software. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Open Source 101
Location: Ballroom C Level: Non-technical
Tags: featured
Ian Varley (Salesforce.com), Regina Burkebile (Salesforce.com)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 6 ratings)
Even if your company understands the benefit of open source contribution, the reality is often much harder. For established companies, many factors can cause higher friction for contributors (like security, legal, executive approval, etc.). Ian Varley and Regina Burkebile share the improvements Salesforce has made to reduce friction and help you accelerate OSS contribution at your company. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Performance
Location: Ballroom E Level: Intermediate
Loris Degioanni (Sysdig)
Average rating: ****.
(4.58, 12 ratings)
Loris Degioanni explores the state of the art for visibility, monitoring, and troubleshooting for microservices and containers—including live demonstrations of popular tools and methods and the pros and cons of each. Loris puts special emphasis on sysdig, an open source system visibility tool he developed. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
In Real Life
Location: Ballroom F Level: Intermediate
Blithe Rocher (Fastly)
Average rating: ***..
(3.74, 23 ratings)
As more teams move toward microservices architectures, an increasing number of stories have arisen about the pain of poor choices. Attempts to move away from one large, tightly coupled application often result in many smaller, yet still tightly coupled applications. Blithe Rocher covers some of the pitfalls and lessons learned from building several service-oriented systems. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Alex Etling (GameChanger)
Average rating: ***..
(3.86, 7 ratings)
Microservices are becoming the standard in modern technology stacks, but building and maintaining a web of interconnected services locally can be complicated and time consuming for engineers. Alex Etling offers an overview of Dusty, a Docker-based local development environment built with the power to make building, testing, and maintaining microservices easy. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Architecture
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Matt DeBergalis (Meteor)
Average rating: ****.
(4.19, 16 ratings)
Matt DeBergalis discusses two trends driving app development—the shift from the server-based Web to rich applications that run on a diverse set of mobile devices and modern browsers and the growth of microservices running in the cloud that serve these clients—and explores a new paradigm of app development on a unified JavaScript codebase. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 14
John McClean (AOL)
AOL is increasingly encouraging its engineers to contribute back to the community. John McClean offers an introductory overview of cyclops-react and demonstrates how it can integrate with other new technologies in the Java 8 ecosystem, such as Pivotal Reactor, Functional Java, and Javaslang. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16A
Joshua Bernstein (EMC {code})
Average rating: ****.
(4.67, 3 ratings)
Some of the most successful organizations in the world have disrupted industries—or responded to disruption—by building infrastructure using open source platforms and tools. Josh Bernstein shares first-hand experiences from his days running the Siri Deployment and Infrastructure Architecture team at Apple and discusses why some of the world's largest organizations are using open source. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16B
Alvin Richards (Aerospike)
Containers are considered ephemeral: they can be thrown away, updated, or redeployed. But what if you need persistence or, heaven forbid, you use a database? With some live hacking, Alvin Richards showcases the core Docker components—Machine, Engine, Swarm, and Compose—along with integration with Aerospike so you can deploy persistent database containers across multiple hosts and networks. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 17B
Quanyi Ma (Huawei)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
Quanyi Ma offers an introduction to Dockyard, an open source registry that is currently compatible with Docker and rkt containers. Dockyard gives developers and DevOps engineers the ability to change container runtimes in a Kubernetes cluster while keeping containers secure with CoreOS's Clair. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom A Level: Intermediate
David Crespo (Braintree)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 3 ratings)
Elm is a functional language for interactive web apps that compiles to JavaScript—think Haskell for humans. With its signal abstraction, Elm is able to represent values that change over time at the level of its powerful type system. Through a tour of Elm and some live coding, David Crespo demonstrates a new way of thinking about time that you can take back to your language of choice. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Business of OSS
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Ariel Tseitlin (Scale Venture Partners)
Average rating: ***..
(3.50, 4 ratings)
You've got a great idea, and you realize that open source is the way to build it. So how do you pick the right business model to grow your idea into a big company? Ariel Tseitlin explores what has worked in the past and what investors want to see to give you funding, along the way identifying the factors that differentiate successful businesses from unsuccessful ones. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Collaboration
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Non-technical
Zoe Landon (Marketo)
Average rating: ***..
(3.33, 3 ratings)
Technology is a language all its own, and OSS is no different. But as more people from more backgrounds jump into open source, they can quickly become alienated by the specificity of jargon. How, then, do we explain powerful technologies to the everyday person without misleading them? Zoe Landon explains why it takes strong clarity, clever metaphors, and a bit of Shakespeare. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Leadership
Location: Meeting Room 10 A/B Level: Non-technical
Wade Minter (Custom Communications)
Average rating: ****.
(4.60, 5 ratings)
Any hiring manager in a technology company knows that the hardest problem to solve is hiring. There never seem to be enough experienced developers available at any given point in time. But many of those same hiring managers will say, "We don't hire junior developers." Tech team-builder Wade Minter makes the case for why your company should hire and train junior developers. Read more.

5:10pm

5:10pm–5:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom B Level: Intermediate
Vida Williams (Axis Partners, Inc)
Average rating: ***..
(3.75, 8 ratings)
A plethora of data has been made freely available on the Web. A large chunk of this data is civic data: on education, social welfare, demographics, and the like. Vida Williams explains how this data can be assembled into open source products that can help states, cities, municipalities, nonprofit organizations, and citizens make decisions that will positively impact their immediate neighborhoods. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Open Source 101
Location: Ballroom C Level: Intermediate
Michelle Casbon (Google)
Average rating: ****.
(4.38, 8 ratings)
Michelle Casbon explains how, starting with little more than enthusiasm, she made her first contribution to the Apache Spark project this year. Michelle tells the story of this journey, sharing the key lessons she learned in a format that serves as a guide for anyone looking to get started, especially if they don’t know where to begin. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Performance
Location: Ballroom E Level: Intermediate
Wenbo Zhu (Google)
Average rating: ***..
(3.41, 17 ratings)
Recent advances in transports and frameworks have made it possible to deploy large-scale, low-latency bidirectional communication over HTTP without losing original benefits like scalability and safety. Wenbo Zhu offers an overview of the use cases for enabling bidirectional communication as well as a demo that runs a distributed, shared whiteboard application from a browser. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
In Real Life
Location: Ballroom F Level: Non-technical
Alex Moundalexis (Cloudera)
Average rating: ****.
(4.25, 4 ratings)
About a year ago, Alex Moundalexis decided to install solar photovoltaic panels on his roof. From making the initial decision to generating electricity for the first time took about three months, but since then, his small array has provided more than 90% of his home's electrical need. Alex outlines solar PV technology and hardware options and explains how it changed one geek's outlook on energy. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Tags: featured
Brandon Philips (CoreOS, Inc)
Average rating: ****.
(4.67, 12 ratings)
Etcd is an open source distributed consistent key-value store. It has become a mature cornerstone of a variety of systems in the container ecosystem for networking, service discovery, configuration management, and load balancing. Brandon Philips dives into etcd, exploring its history, its new v3 API, production use cases, and how it powers reliable distributed systems. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Architecture
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Tags: featured
Gleb Bahmutov (Cypress.io)
Average rating: ****.
(4.69, 16 ratings)
JavaScript is an interesting language. It can mimic almost any style you want, from procedural to object-oriented to functional and beyond. Gleb Bahmutov takes a simple problem and solves it using a variety of different approaches, showing each approach's ability to take away the complexity while still being the JavaScript we all love to hate. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 14
David Mandala (Linaro)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
David Mandala offers an overview of HiKey. With HiKey, developers can easily use the latest Google AOSP SDK to create and debug new and existing peripheral drivers and perform kernel development and other tasks with fewer OEM encumbrances. HiKey can also be used to make VR applications with OSVR, robotic applications with ROS, and secure applications with ARM TrustZone. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom A Level: Non-technical
Tags: featured
Andy Kitchen (Silverpond)
Average rating: ****.
(4.69, 16 ratings)
Andy Kitchen offers a zero-to-hero spectacular on the state of the art in machine learning—with live demos. Want to understand how a computer can play Atari games all on its own? How it can dream of electric dog-slugs? Andy explains how it's all possible on this magical mystery tour of deep learning and neural networks. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Business of OSS
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Jim Jagielski (ASF), Bradley Kuhn (Software Freedom Conservancy), Heather Meeker (O'Melveny & Myers'), Rabin Bhattacharya (Capital One), Keith Bergelt (Open Invention Network), Mishi Choudhary (Software Freedom Law Center), Eben Moglen (Columbia Law School)
Average rating: ****.
(4.83, 6 ratings)
A panel of experts holds an open and engaging discussion on patents and open source to uncover the complexities associated with each. The panel discusses the effect of open source software on patents, open sourcing software that already has a patent on it, what happens to other company patents if open sourced patented software is developed, and more. Come ready with questions for the panelists. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Collaboration
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Non-technical
Daniel Izquierdo (Bitergia)
Average rating: **...
(2.83, 6 ratings)
The Xen Project's code contributions have been growing 10% a year. However, during this period of growth, the code review process became much slower, leading to issues in the community. Lars Kurth and Daniel Izquierdo explain how software development analytics came to the rescue: it provided surprising insights that allowed the project members to understand issues and take corrective action. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Leadership
Location: Meeting Room 10 A/B Level: Non-technical
Katharina Probst (Netflix)
Average rating: ****.
(4.83, 6 ratings)
There’s never a dull moment for a female engineering leader. Sometimes you deal with subtle discrimination; often you simply have fun in a job that is both about people and tech. Katharina Probst discusses the good, the bad, and the ugly of being a woman and engineering leader, as well as what both men and women can do to work toward better representation of women in engineering leadership. Read more.

5:50pm

5:50pm–7:15pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Exhibit Hall 4
Average rating: ****.
(4.03, 39 ratings)
Quench your thirst with vendor-hosted libations (and snacks) while you check out all the cool stuff in the Expo Hall. Read more.

7:00pm

7:00pm–9:00pm Wednesday, 05/18/2016
Location: Meeting Rooms on Levels 3 and 4
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions provide face-to-face exposure to those interested in the same projects and concepts. BoFs can be organized for individual projects or broader topics (best practices, open data, standards, etc.). BoFs are entirely up to you. We post your topic and provide the space and time. You provide the engaging topic. Read more.

Thursday, 05/19/2016

7:30am

7:30am–8:50am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Ballroom D Foyer
Morning Coffee Service (1h 20m)

8:50am

8:50am–8:55am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Scott Hanselman (Microsoft), Rachel Roumeliotis (O'Reilly Media), Kelsey Hightower (Google)
Average rating: ****.
(4.27, 15 ratings)
OSCON program chairs Scott Hanselman, Rachel Roumeliotis, and Kelsey Hightower open the second day of keynotes. Read more.

8:55am

8:55am–9:05am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Average rating: ****.
(4.71, 51 ratings)
Cory Doctorow discusses the stakes of an open source Internet of Things when faced with closed devices that the law prohibits reverse engineering; devices whose security vulnerabilities you may not disclose; demon-haunted devices that treat their owners as adversaries, that seek at every turn to thwart them, that are illegal to even peek at. Read more.

9:05am

9:05am–9:20am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Erica Brescia (Bitnami)
Average rating: ***..
(3.92, 50 ratings)
3 bootcamps. 291 applicants. 42 students. 16 new hires. 0% turnover. The Bitnami Developer Bootcamp has exceeded Bitnami's wildest expectations. Erica Brescia explains how an experiment has turned into an extremely successful hiring channel and has also allowed Bitnami to give back to its local community by providing free, top-notch education to the local developer community. Read more.

9:20am

9:20am–9:30am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Danese Cooper (PayPal)
Average rating: ****.
(4.05, 38 ratings)
Open source efforts have proved to the world that collaborative development creates and innovates at speed and scale. Companies now know that using open source software is table stakes to be economically competitive. Danese Cooper explains how to ensure that the communities that created these opportunities continue to grow, develop, and inspire more new communities. Read more.

9:30am

9:30am–9:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Dana Lewis (W2OGroup)
Average rating: ****.
(4.83, 47 ratings)
What happens when an open source community develops around a group of patients who are frustrated with their medical devices? You end up with an artificial pancreas, of course. Dana Lewis, one of the original creators of the open source artificial pancreas, examines how open source communities enable innovation in unexpected places—like healthcare. Read more.

9:45am

9:45am–10:00am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum)
Average rating: ****.
(4.41, 46 ratings)
Deng Xiaoping once described managing the economy as crossing the river by feeling the stones. But in a world of constant change, how do you determine the right thing to do? Which pebble to tread on? Simon Wardley explains how situational awareness applies to the world of open source and explores how you can map your environment, identify opportunities to exploit, and learn to play the game. Read more.

10:00am

10:00am–10:10am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Ballroom D
The 12th Annual O’Reilly Open Source Award winners will be announced. Read more.

10:10am

10:10am–10:20am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Ballroom D
Average rating: ****.
(4.11, 9 ratings)
Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis, Scott Hanselman, and Kelsey Hightower close the second day of keynotes. Read more.

10:20am

10:20am–11:05am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Exhibit Hall
Morning Break sponsored by Cisco (45m)

11:00am

11:00am–2:00pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Rooms 4, 5 and 6
Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia), Nadia Eghbal (GitHub)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 1 rating)
We'll have a multitude of mentors and technology experts on hand to help contributors new to FOSS or existing contributors wishing to advance their skills. Existing contributors are welcome and encouraged to take mentorship roles. Read more.

11:05am

11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
In Real Life
Location: Ballroom B Level: Non-technical
Alex Juarez (Rackspace)
Average rating: **...
(2.50, 6 ratings)
Being a mentor is equal parts rewarding and terrifying. You know the decisions you made that helped you become successful, but how do you guide somebody else? Big secret: there is no one way or single path to follow. Alex Juarez explains why mentoring is the most rewarding part of his job, covering the lessons he's learned from having the privilege of mentoring individuals and teams. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom C Level: Intermediate
Rushaine McBean (Kickstarter)
Average rating: **...
(2.80, 5 ratings)
Building maintainable web apps is enough of challenge without thinking about if you need your product on a mobile platform. Wouldn’t it be great to leverage the fundamentals already offered in React for your native apps? Enter React Native. Rushaine McBean explains how to take your JavaScript and React skills and apply them to a React Native app while maintaining a consistent development workflow. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Collaboration
Location: Ballroom E Level: Intermediate
Georgia Reh (Intel)
Average rating: ****.
(4.36, 14 ratings)
Version control is a necessary piece of the Python community, and Git has a steep learning curve. Georgia Reh discusses the lessons she's learned teaching Git to beginners so you won't have to make the same mistakes. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom F Level: Intermediate
Homin Lee (Datadog)
Average rating: ****.
(4.20, 15 ratings)
Datadog provides outlier and anomaly detection functionality to automatically alert on metrics that are difficult to monitor using thresholds alone. Homin Lee discusses the algorithms and open source tools Datadog uses and lessons learned from using these alerts on its own systems, along with some real-life examples on how to avoid false positives and negatives. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Joe Damato (packagecloud.io)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 11 ratings)
Joe Damato explores why infrastructure as code might be literally impossible because none of the core open source software we use actually works. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Architecture
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Andreia Gaita (GitHub)
Average rating: ****.
(4.25, 4 ratings)
Andreia Gaita explores cross-platform development, discussing the skills you need and explaining how cross-platform frameworks get built (and what tools are used), how many platforms you can target as a cross-platform developer (hint: it's more than three) and how to go about targeting them, and how a cross-platform development focus can change the way you build code and use software. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 14
Chad Bailey (Heroku )
Average rating: ****.
(4.25, 4 ratings)
Chad Bailey demonstrates how to put the combination of static and dynamic data to work in your own apps. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16A
Richard Lin (Huawei)
Average rating: **...
(2.33, 3 ratings)
Richard Lin explains why Huawei is transforming itself from a low-key, conservative software and hardware company to an open source one. In becoming a supporter of and collaborator with the open source software development community, Huawei has earned some hard-won knowledge about how to make this monumental shift while still keeping an enterprise not only running but growing. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16B
Barton George (Dell)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 2 ratings)
Barton George tells the story of the developer edition of the Dell XPS 13 laptop, which began life as Project Sputnik, a scrappy skunkworks project to pilot an Ubuntu-based cloud developer platform. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 17B
Clint Kitson (EMC {code})
Average rating: ****.
(4.75, 4 ratings)
Are you thinking of implementing a container strategy? Clint Kitson explains why having a homogenous approach to persistence across the container ecosystem is the key to a successful strategy. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Security
Location: Ballroom A Level: Intermediate
Kelsey Gilmore-Innis (Sexual Health Innovations)
Average rating: ****.
(4.38, 8 ratings)
Are you confident your web app is secure? Hand-it-over-to-a-team-of-expert-haxx0rs-to-tear-into confident? Kelsey Gilmore-Innis shares how Callisto successfully built a site to store some of the most sensitive data imaginable that passed a formal security audit from the best in the business—and explains how you can too. Content warning: this talk includes discussion of sexual assault. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Business of OSS
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Karen Sandler (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Average rating: ****.
(4.75, 4 ratings)
While a new job offer is exciting, you likely won't have as much negotiation power after you formally accept the job. Making sure you have a clear understanding of your employment arrangement and how it affects the software you work on is a critical part of signing the paperwork. Karen Sandler discusses important provisions in these contracts and suggests things to ask for from new employers. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Open Source 101
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Non-technical
Quinn Murphy (GitHub)
Average rating: ***..
(3.86, 7 ratings)
Quinn Murphy chronicles his journey from a sysadmin who used OSS software extensively to someone who contributes documentation, information, and code to OSS projects. Quinn explains how becoming a contributor can enhance your career as well as your connection to the software you use every day. Read more.
11:05am–11:45am Thursday, 05/19/2016
Hardware
Location: Meeting Room 10 A/B Level: Intermediate
Gabrielle Crevecoeur (Microsoft)
Average rating: ****.
(4.31, 16 ratings)
Gabrielle Crevecoeur dives into the world of NodeBots. Using Node.js, the Johnny-Five framework, and an Arduino, Gabrielle walks participants through creating a bot, step by step. Although the NodeBot you build will respond to voice recognition, you'll leave able to create NodeBots with any functionality you like. Read more.

11:55am

11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
In Real Life
Location: Ballroom B Level: Non-technical
Average rating: ****.
(4.44, 25 ratings)
You’ve read how unicorns like Netflix and Spotify have implemented microservices, but how does that apply to the rest of us horses. Christopher Grant explains how HomeDepot.com approached a migration from a monolithic architecture to a microservice-based platform. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom C Level: Intermediate
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 6 ratings)
PHP 7 is here and it brings drastic performance improvements along with new features. Rasmus Lerdorf explains how PHP 7 is likely to impact your application and how to identify potential BC breaks. Now would be a good time to revisit your deploy strategy to make sure it's safe, efficient, and atomic and makes use of the latest features of PHP 7. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Collaboration
Location: Ballroom E Level: Non-technical
Rachel Berry (GitHub)
Average rating: ****.
(4.17, 6 ratings)
In the last seven years, GitHub Support has gotten over 23,000 questions about your open source projects. Rachel Berry, one of the humans behind the contact form, discusses the questions GitHub Support sees most often and the small changes you can implement to remove confusion and make all the difference for your users and community. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom F Level: Intermediate
Matthew Revell (Exoscale)
Average rating: ****.
(4.27, 15 ratings)
The NoSQL revolution was based on a falsehood. It was never about SQL; it was about alternatives to relational databases. The thing is, even with all the promise of scalability, speed, and availability, the need to query never went away. Matthew Revell examines how NoSQL databases are bringing back SQL—and other methods—to make it easier to query data, whatever the model. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Colin McCabe (Cloudera)
Average rating: ***..
(3.60, 5 ratings)
HTraced is a new trace collection daemon for the Apache HTrace project, written in Golang. Colin McCabe shares his experiences with the Go programming language and explains the design of HTraced. Colin explores libraries, frameworks, and build systems and discusses what was fun, what was tricky, and how the team optimized overall system performance. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Architecture
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Francesco Cesarini (Erlang Solutions Ltd)
Erlang/OTP has for years been described as the secret sauce to writing scalable and available systems. However, Erlang alone will not perform any magic. Francesco Cesarini walks attendees through the topology patterns of modern distributed Erlang architectures, discussing the trade-offs in scalability and reliability, the actor model, the failure model, and the built-in distribution model. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16A
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 1 rating)
Richard Maldonado shares experiences and drivers behind Dice's move to open source, reviews trends happening in the open source job market, and demonstrates how to leverage the Dice tech community and ecosystem to gain visibility for the open source projects that are important to you. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Room 16B
TBC
11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Security
Location: Ballroom A Level: Intermediate
Wendy Seltzer (W3C MIT)
Average rating: **...
(2.92, 12 ratings)
One of the Web's greatest strengths is its generality—its openness to new links and unexpected uses. Openness also means that different applications and users have different security goals and threat models: a mash-up desired by one may be dangerous to another. Wendy Seltzer explores design patterns and modularity to support a platform for trustworthy application development. Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Business of OSS
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Intermediate
Tiffany Mikell (BSMdotCo), Kortney Ziegler (BSMdotCo)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
Tiffany Mikell and Kortney Ziegler share the role open source technologies and communities played in their success and explore specific frameworks and projects that have been particularly useful along the bootstrapping journey from industry thought leaders to tech product "unicorn." Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Open Source 101
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Non-technical
Justin Dorfman (MaxCDN)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 3 ratings)
Justin Dorfman explores ways that people who do not have backgrounds in software engineering can contribute to the open source movement. Code is just one piece of the puzzle. There's much more to making an open source project successful. Community management, documentation, design, fundraising, and marketing are needed to sustain a project beyond "git push origin master." Read more.
11:55am–12:35pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Hardware
Location: Meeting Room 10 A/B Level: Intermediate
Tags: featured
Alasdair Allan (Babilim Light Industries)
Average rating: ****.
(4.75, 12 ratings)
The ESP8266 is a microcontroller with WiFi and GPIO that is sold for as little as two dollars. After 50 years of Moore's Law, we're getting to a place where computing is not just cheap, it’s essentially free. The Internet of Things, which puts both general-purpose computing and sensors everywhere, will be built from blocks like these. Alasdair Allan shows you how. Read more.

12:35pm

12:35pm–1:50pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Exhibit Hall
Lunch (1h 15m)

1:50pm

1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
In Real Life
Location: Ballroom B Level: Non-technical
Keila Banks (Student)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 6 ratings)
Using Python, Ruby, and Internet technologies, Keila Banks shows how a teen gets more done with less time and effort. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom C Level: Intermediate
E. Dunham (Mozilla)
Average rating: ****.
(4.08, 13 ratings)
E. Dunham walks attendees through the best practices for getting started with a new programming language, using the popular, new systems programming language Rust as an example. You'll leave this talk fully prepared to start working on your first Rust project and take full advantage of the language's famously welcoming community. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Collaboration
Location: Ballroom E Level: Non-technical
Jeff McAffer (Microsoft), Georgios  Gousios  (TU Delft), Kevin Lewis (Microsoft)
Average rating: ***..
(3.50, 6 ratings)
GitHub hosts tens of millions of people collaborating on more than 20 million repositories—an unprecedented treasure trove of data for software engineering researchers, companies, and project teams alike. Jeff McAffer, Georgios Gousios, and Kevin Lewis explore tools and techniques for sifting through terabytes of content, present key insights they discovered, and explain how you can follow suit. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom F Level: Intermediate
Rachel Reese (Jet.com)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 2 ratings)
Jet.com has A LOT of data. Rachel Reese explains how the team at Jet used F# and an event-based microservices architecture to safely, quickly, and relevantly process and explore all this data and covers how Jet handles processing events from 300+ microservices into its data warehouse in real time so that it can optimally react to its customers' wants and needs. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Isabel Jimenez (Mesosphere)
Average rating: ***..
(3.18, 11 ratings)
Isabel Jimenez helps you find your way among multiple orchestration tools by comparing today’s most-popular choices: Docker Swarm, Kubernetes, and Apache Mesos. Isabel offers a demonstration of the tools themselves, as well as their open source communities and environments, and looks into the future of orchestration, which might not be exclusive to containers. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Architecture
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Chris Nelson (Gaslight)
Average rating: ***..
(3.50, 2 ratings)
Microservices have long been advocated as an effective means of breaking up a monolithic app into manageable pieces, but managing the resulting horde of services is no mean feat. Chris Nelson explains how, with Elixir, we can leverage the underlying OTP platform to solve many of the key challenges in moving to a microservices architecture. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 14
Aashish Sheshadri and Rohit Harchandani introduce Seif, an open source project, started at PayPal, with the goal of transitioning the Web into an application delivery system that will be safer, easier to use, and easier to develop for. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16A
Brandon Keepers (GitHub)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 2 ratings)
A maturity model is a tool to assess the effectiveness of behaviors, practices, and processes in producing desired outcomes. Brandon Keepers introduces and explores a maturity model for embracing open source that leads an organization toward more organized and mature processes around consuming, contributing to, and releasing open source projects. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Sponsored
Location: Meeting Room 16B
Alper Kokmen (PagerDuty)
Average rating: ***..
(3.75, 4 ratings)
Alper Kokmen explains how PagerDuty has been injecting failure into its production systems manually with minimal effort and why it recently started automating the process to invest more time in coming up with new system-specific failure scenarios. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Security
Location: Ballroom A Level: Intermediate
Russell Lewis (Netflix, Inc.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.43, 21 ratings)
Traditional security methods can focus on putting barriers between people and resources, but sometimes the fastest way to solve a problem is to get shell access in production. Russell Lewis explains how Netflix decreased developer friction by building a certificate authority-based SSH bastion solution that balances security and engineering velocity needs. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Business of OSS
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Kishau Rogers (Websmith Group)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 2 ratings)
Kishau Rogers proposes a framework for launching enterprise-wide innovation centers that use open source technology in all aspects of business innovation, from rapid prototype development and open collaboration to customer discovery, while following a roadmap for commercial product development. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Open Source 101
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Non-technical
VM Brasseur (@vmbrasseur)
Average rating: ****.
(4.86, 7 ratings)
Drive-through contributors: they drop by; they fix their problem; they leave. We'd prefer that these people stick around and join the community, but a good drive-through contribution adds value to your project. VM Brasseur explores methods for maximizing drive-through contributions and offers an argument for using the number of drive-through contributions as a metric for project health. Read more.
1:50pm–2:30pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Hardware
Location: Meeting Room 10 A/B Level: Intermediate
Tina Coleman (Hayden Software)
Average rating: ****.
(4.67, 6 ratings)
Two years ago, Tina Coleman linked her daughters' Furby to a Jenkins build system. Great, but who wants to be yelled at by a Furby when their build breaks? (OK, Tina did.) This year, led by her neurotic Furby friend, Tina walks you through Go programming via the Gobot framework, outlining Go's advantages and paradigms. Read more.

2:40pm

2:40pm–3:20pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
In Real Life
Location: Ballroom B Level: Non-technical
Kathy Lee (Bonneville Power Administration), Morgan Senkal (Metal Toad)
Average rating: ****.
(4.20, 5 ratings)
Working for the government presents two major hurdles in open source development: getting your hands on open source developed libraries and finding ways to contribute to open source development in the workplace. Kathy Lee and Morgan Senkal discuss these challenges and offer possible solutions. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom C Level: Intermediate
Justin Cormack (Docker)
Average rating: ****.
(4.40, 5 ratings)
System software has been a monoculture of C and a land of monoliths, but a new wave of open source system software has started to appear, in languages such as Rust, Go, Haskell, OCaml, and Lua. These projects are developing new sorts of applications and introducing new people to systems programming. Justin Cormack explores what's going on, where it's useful, and the new paths it's leading us down. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Collaboration
Location: Ballroom E Level: Intermediate
Ying Li (Docker), David Lawrence (Docker)
Average rating: ***..
(3.44, 9 ratings)
Onboarding is just as painful—if not more so—in the open source world. Ying Li and David Lawrence explain how using the right tooling can drastically increase the speed and success with which potential collaborators and contributors begin to add value to your project and community. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom F Level: Intermediate
Jon Haddad (The Last Pickle)
Average rating: ****.
(4.11, 9 ratings)
Jon Haddad discusses the types of business problems that graph tools are well suited to helping solve. Jon offers an overview of some of the popular tools in the market (TinkerPop, Gremlin, GraphX, etc.) and explains where each might fit into your data ecosystem. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 6 ratings)
PaaSTA, Yelp's platform as a service (PaaS) built on top of open­ source tools, provides tooling for developers to quickly turn their microservice into a monitored, highly available application spanning multiple data centers and cloud regions. Nathan Handler outlines the technologies that power PaaSTA and discusses how Yelp uses PaaSTA to empower developers and solve key problems. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Architecture
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Julia Ferraioli (Google)
Average rating: ****.
(4.11, 18 ratings)
It’s clear containers are here to stay for building reliable, scalable applications. But what about applications developed prior to the advent of containerization? Using Minecraft as her example, Julia Ferraioli explains why retrofitting technology for containers poses conceptual and practical challenges that require an approach different than starting container native. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Security
Location: Ballroom A Level: Non-technical
Average rating: **...
(2.69, 16 ratings)
With constantly advancing technology to secure our information systems, why are we still so vulnerable to attack? While there are advanced attacks, the majority are still routine security vulnerabilities that we see time and again. Stacey Banks explains why compliance is not security and adding the latest and greatest technology into an insecure system will not save you. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Business of OSS
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Patrick McFadin (DataStax)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 3 ratings)
Will our project be OSS or proprietary? It's an easy question that can lead to some uncomfortable moments in an organization. Sorting through the reasons for and against OSS can be tedious at best and life changing at worst. Don’t let this moment become something you regret. Patrick McFadin outlines the process and gives you some tools to make it through. Hopefully we’ll save a few friendships. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Open Source 101
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Intermediate
Duane O'Brien (Indeed.com), Lisa LaForge (SanDisk Corp)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
As an organization moves from consuming open source to giving back, compliance professionals need to be able to track and approve open source contributions. Duane O'Brien and Lisa LaForge explain how to use a sandbox approval to streamline contributions and make the process more efficient for both engineers and compliance professionals. Read more.
2:40pm–3:20pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Hardware
Location: Meeting Room 10 A/B Level: Non-technical
Joshua Lifton (Crowd Supply)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 1 rating)
Crowd Supply's unique combination of funding model and services has enabled a new and growing breed of open hardware devices and products. Joshua Lifton offers a behind-the-scenes look at several open hardware projects launched and delivered through Crowd Supply to discuss how crowdfunding is opening the way for products that protect user freedom for privacy advocates and everyday consumers. Read more.

3:00pm

3:00pm–6:00pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Meeting Rooms 4, 5 and 6
Nadia Eghbal (GitHub), Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
We'll have a multitude of mentors and technology experts on hand to help contributors new to FOSS or existing contributors wishing to advance their skills. Existing contributors are welcome and encouraged to take mentorship roles. Contribute is a safe and welcoming environment for new and experienced contributors alike. Read more.

3:20pm

3:20pm–4:20pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Exhibit Hall
Afternoon Break sponsored by AOL (1h)

4:20pm

4:20pm–5:00pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
In Real Life
Location: Ballroom B Level: Intermediate
Tapabrata Pal (Capital One)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 5 ratings)
Over the past four years, Capital One has transformed itself from being “closed source first” to “open source first" and has actively started contributing to open source projects. Tapabrata Pal explores some of the key initiatives that drove this transformation and offers fascinating details about how this transformation took place and lessons learned. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom C
Rachel Weil (Microsoft)
Average rating: ****.
(4.83, 6 ratings)
Rachel Weil premieres ConnectedNES, a unique project that wirelessly and seamlessly connects her beloved NES 8-bit game console to the Internet, and introduces its first custom application: a real-time Twitter client. Rachel describes the technical challenges of building ConnectedNES and talks about its future as a collaborative platform. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Collaboration
Location: Ballroom E Level: Non-technical
Joshua Matthews (Mozilla)
Average rating: ****.
(4.80, 5 ratings)
Many FOSS projects find it difficult to grow beyond a small team of core contributors, but this does not need to be the case. There are tried and true ways to lower the barrier to entry and increase the potential pool of contributors. Joshua Matthews presents a five-point plan that provides a solid foundation for encouraging new contributors. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom F Level: Intermediate
Christine Doig (Continuum Analytics)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 6 ratings)
Python's popularity for data science use cases has skyrocketed in recent years due to its ease of use, great developer and user community, and solid core of scientific libraries. Christine Doig explores data science and the state of the Python ecosystem and helps navigate the large amount of open source libraries available for data science in Python, providing a map to guide you on the journey. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Ballroom G Level: Intermediate
Tags: featured
Edward Thomson (Microsoft)
Average rating: ****.
(4.88, 17 ratings)
Git has quickly become an incredibly popular version control system, but how does it actually work? It's very different from a centralized version control system, and understanding how it models history allows you to understand how to use it. Edward Thomson explains how Git actually works under the hood, the fundamentals of a repository, and how this makes Git fast and flexible. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Architecture
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Hanneli Tavante (Codemine42)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 4 ratings)
Have you always wanted to understand the principles of type theory, but thought it was too complicated since it has a lot of lambda calculus and algebras? Hanneli Tavante explores the concepts behind type theory in a friendly way, demonstrating that any developer can understand its principles and apply them to improve their architecture decisions. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Security
Location: Ballroom A Level: Intermediate
Joey Schorr (CoreOS), Quentin Machu (CoreOS)
Average rating: ****.
(4.75, 4 ratings)
Docker layers can be fast for developers but are also vulnerable if not audited for production. Wouldn't it be great to improve continuous integration with continuous vulnerability detection? Joey Schorr and Quentin Machu offer an overview of Clair, a new open source tool to monitor the security of containers. Come see how it works, get started, and learn how to get involved with the development. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Business of OSS
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B Level: Non-technical
Matt Asay (Adobe)
Average rating: ****.
(4.80, 5 ratings)
From the outside, open source companies try to appear to be Fine Upstanding Open Source Citizens™. On the inside of the sausage factory, however, hard decisions and trade-offs are constantly being made. After nearly 15 years of working for some of the industry's best-known open source companies, Matt Asay decided to move on. He explains why and what he learned along the way. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
In Real Life
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Intermediate
Tags: featured
Baruch Sadogursky (JFrog), Viktor Gamov (Hazelcast)
Average rating: ****.
(4.88, 8 ratings)
Baruch Sadogursky and Viktor Gamov aren't sure about you, but working with Java 8 made one of the speakers lose all of his hair and the other lose his sleep (or was it the jetlag?). If you still haven't reached the level of Brian Goetz in mastering lambdas and strings, this talk is for you. And if you think you have, we have some bad news for you, you should attend as well. Read more.
4:20pm–5:00pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Hardware
Location: Meeting Room 10 A/B Level: Intermediate
Peter Martini (Bloomberg)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 2 ratings)
There's no longer any question of whether open source operating systems are viable, but open source firmware is still a scary topic to a lot of people. Peter Martini explains some of the basics and shows you how to get started if you'd like to replace some of the lower-level software on your machines. Read more.

5:10pm

5:10pm–5:50pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
In Real Life
Location: Ballroom B Level: Intermediate
Jennifer Tong (Google), Wilfred Gee (Macquarie University / Project PANOPTES)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 3 ratings)
The search for planets outside our solar system has long been the exclusive domain of professional scientists with access to large observatories or expensive space telescopes. Jenny Tong and Wilfred Gee explain how PANOPTES combines off-the-shelf components with open source software to bring exoplanet discovery to the public. Come learn about PANOPTES's challenges, solutions, and discoveries. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
The New Stuff
Location: Ballroom C Level: Intermediate
Kevin Rockwood (Gaslight)
Average rating: ***..
(3.60, 5 ratings)
Processes are the fundamental building blocks of the Elixir language. Kevin Rockwood explores how process-oriented architecture embodies the principles that object-oriented architecture always intended and explains how you can use processes to tackle complex problems that other languages could only dream about. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Collaboration
Location: Ballroom E Level: Non-technical
Jonas Rosland (VMware), Stephanie Carlson (EMC {code})
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 2 ratings)
Increasing your online presence in the open source community involves more than just writing and committing code. We need to create safe places to collaborate and communicate freely in order to involve more people than just our closest team members. Jonas Rosland and Stephanie Carlson outline a few of the tools they use to tackle this big task and discuss failures, successes, and lessons learned. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Data
Location: Ballroom F Level: Intermediate
Jamie Grier (data Artisans)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 6 ratings)
Data stream processing is emerging as a new paradigm for data infrastructure. Its promise is to unify and simplify many existing applications while simultaneously enabling new applications on real-time data. Jamie Grier introduces the data-streaming paradigm and shows how to build a set of simple but representative applications using Apache Flink and Apache Kafka. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Infrastructure
Location: Ballroom G
TBC
5:10pm–5:50pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Architecture
Location: Meeting Room 12 Level: Intermediate
Joseph Gregorio (Google)
Average rating: ****.
(4.07, 14 ratings)
JavaScript frameworks seem like death and taxes—inevitable and unavoidable. But that's not the way it needs to be, and actually, it must stop. Joseph Gregorio outlines the Zero Framework Manifesto and discusses his implementation experience building and shipping framework-free applications for the past two years. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Security
Location: Ballroom A Level: Intermediate
Jerrod Chong (Yubico)
Average rating: ****.
(4.67, 6 ratings)
Jerrod Chong explores the emerging FIDO U2F open standard and its elegant public key cryptography for two-factor authentication. Jerrod explains how FIDO U2F—backed by leading Internet and financial services in the FIDO Alliance—allows every service provider to be their own identity provider, over wired and wireless connections, with laptops and mobile devices. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Business of OSS
Location: Meeting Room 9 A/B
Deborah Bryant (Red Hat), Danese Cooper (PayPal), Deb Nicholson (Software Freedom Conservancy), Stefano Zacchiroli (Software Heritage), Karen Sandler (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 5 ratings)
Open source projects are increasingly opting to form an independent entity—a “foundation”—to serve as the core of their community rather than relying on good will or corporate oversight. Deborah Bryant, Danese Cooper, Sam Ramji, and Deb Nicholson share their experiences and provide introductory guidance on forming, managing, and leading an open source foundation. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Open Source 101
Location: Meeting Room 9C Level: Intermediate
Gina Likins (Red Hat), Heidi Ellis (Western New England University), Gregory Hislop (Drexel University)
To contribute to an open source project, students must first learn open source methods, tools, and culture. However, few CS degree programs cover these topics. Gina Likins, Heidi Ellis, and Gregory Hislop outline an NSF-funded effort to advance FOSS learning in undergraduate computing programs and solicit input about the FOSS skills and abilities community members would like to see addressed. Read more.
5:10pm–5:50pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Hardware
Location: Meeting Room 10 A/B Level: Intermediate
Ryan Baxter (IBM)
Average rating: ****.
(4.67, 3 ratings)
MQTT is an standards-based, lightweight pub/sub messaging protocol ideal for Internet of Things use cases. With implementations in a number of different languages, using MQTT is simple and straightforward. Ryan Baxter walks attendees through building an application that connects to an MQTT broker and can receive data from and issue commands to a number of different IoT devices. Read more.

5:50pm

5:50pm–6:05pm Thursday, 05/19/2016
Location: Exhibit Hall
Average rating: **...
(2.75, 4 ratings)
Mobile App Test Read more.