July 13–16, 2020

Interactive sessions

New: Interactive sessions (powered by Katacoda) give you the chance to manipulate technology in real time to discover how it works. You’ll input, edit, run code and render live results as you learn with guided instruction.

Wednesday, July 15

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11:00am–12:30pm Wednesday, 07/15/2020
Location: C123
Adrian Cockcroft (Amazon Web Services)
Modern applications are designed to respond dynamically to usage and environment, evolve rapidly, and deliver updates to customers in near real time through continuous delivery. These applications are rapidly prototyped using serverless event-driven patterns, and the underlying technologies are a mix of web services and open source languages, tooling, and libraries. Read more.
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11:00am–12:30pm Wednesday, 07/15/2020
Location: C124
Lauren Schaefer (MongoDB)
When you want to develop modern apps for huge amounts of potentially unstructured data, document databases can be the best option. Come discover the benefits of changing your mindset from the tabular way of modeling data. We’ll compare and contrast terms and concepts, explain the benefits, and walk through data modeling basics so you feel confident as you begin using document databases. Read more.
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1:45pm–3:15pm Wednesday, 07/15/2020
Location: C124
Nathan Stocks (GitHub)
Rust is a systems programming language that runs blazingly fast, prevents segfaults, and guarantees thread safety. This session is a fast-paced introduction to Rust concepts, features, community, and language fundamentals: a crash course that will teach you why Rust is awesome, and how to use some of the awesomeness. Thought about getting into low-level systems programming? Start here. Read more.
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4:15pm–5:45pm Wednesday, 07/15/2020
Location: C124
Hayden Barnes (Canonical)
The opportunity and challenge of Windows Subsystem for Linux, what it is, what it can do for you, the role it plays in the Linux and broader open source ecosystem, and how Ubuntu is advancing this new category of Linux. Read more.
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4:15pm–5:45pm Wednesday, 07/15/2020
Location: C123
Matt Dorn (Red Hat), Michael Hrivnak (Red Hat)
This is an entry-level workshop for both application developers and system administrators interested in building and managing Operators for Kubernetes environments. It is designed for those who have a basic knowledge of Kubernetes and want to learn how to apply domain or application-specific knowledge to automate common operational tasks. Read more.

Thursday, July 16

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11:00am–12:30pm Thursday, 07/16/2020
Location: C123
Brent Laster (SAS)
It's nearly impossible to do much in open source these days without being able to use Git. And even though most people know enough Git to do the basics, there's a lot more they can do by understanding the advanced concepts and operations I'll detail clearly and simply in this presentation. This presentation has been done at many conferences and is always well received. Read more.
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11:00am–12:30pm Thursday, 07/16/2020
Location: C124
Ismael Faro (IBM Research)
The Quantum computing some of the most sophisticated and in the same time interesting technologies that is raising nowadays. Start to understand some of the principles and how interact with them, is challenging and exciting in the same time. In this talk will try to collapse this superposition between theory and practical from a Developer point of view, creating your first tiny Quantum simulator. Read more.
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1:45pm–3:15pm Thursday, 07/16/2020
Location: C124
An ability to handle conversations well is crucial for every chat or voice assistant to ensure good user experience. In this hands-on workshop you will learn how you can use open source tools and machine learning techniques to build assistants that go beyond simple FAQ interactions - handle the multi-turn conversations, remember the context and scale in production. Read more.
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1:45pm–3:15pm Thursday, 07/16/2020
Location: C123
Dean Wampler (Anyscale)
Ray is a system for scaling Python apps from single machines to large clusters. It solves common problems in scalable, distributed computing, so Python developers don’t need this expertise. We'll explore examples that show how Ray sits between broad, but inflexible frameworks, and low-level libraries that are hard to use. The lessons learned are broadly applicable to all application developers. Read more.

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