17–19 October 2016: Conference & Tutorials
19–20 October 2016: Training
London, UK

Schedule: Collaboration and community sessions

10:50–11:30 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
George Dunlap (Citrix Systems, UK)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 5 ratings)
George Dunlap discusses the XenProject's experience trying to make a difficult community decision. George outlines the decision-making process, which allowed everyone to feel that their viewpoint was considered despite the lack of any option with clear consensus, to help you navigate similarly difficult waters. Read more.
11:40–12:20 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
Simon Phipps (Public Software CIC), Moritz Bartl (Renewable Freedom Foundation)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Do you need to start an open source foundation? Many open source projects choose to become legal entities to support their collaboration. In the US, there are several general purpose bodies for hosting open source projects, but up to now there have been none in Europe—so Simon Phipps and Moritz Bartl started one. They explain what they are doing to address the need and how you can benefit. Read more.
13:35–14:15 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Beginner
Jo Pearce (Snowthorn Ltd.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.25, 4 ratings)
There are limits to our ability to learn and process information. Overload impacts productivity by causing psychological and physiological stress. Jo Pearce relates findings from cognitive psychology that help us understand how, as developers, we might be overloading both ourselves and those we work with—and what to do about it. Read more.
14:25–15:05 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
Lucy Crompton-Reid (Wikimedia UK)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 2 ratings)
Lucy Crompton-Reid discusses Wikipedia and the other Wikimedia projects in the context of diversity and equality, focusing particularly on the gender gap. Lucy explores the impact of the gender gap on the production and consumption of open knowledge and what Wikimedia UK and the wider global movement is doing to help eradicate bias on one of the leading sources of information in the world. Read more.
16:05–16:45 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
The Comprehensive Kerbal Archive Network (CKAN) has hundreds of contributors, tens of thousands of users, and success metrics measured in decades of human joy delivered. Paul Fenwick uses the example of CKAN to examine how to help maximize your open source project's chance of success from the beginning, with a focus on community building and contributor growth. Read more.
16:05–16:45 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room Level: Non-technical
Zaheda Bhorat (Amazon Web Services)
Zaheda Bhorat shares impactful lessons on open source collaboration techniques and tools. Take away industry best practices that will help you succeed while contributing to the long-term sustainability of open source. Read more.
16:55–17:35 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
Taylor Barnett (Keen IO)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 2 ratings)
While it's not easy to talk about, exploring privilege is necessary if we want to make sure open source is truly open for everyone. Taylor Barnett explores a number of sources of privilege, including axes of identity like race and gender and factors such as family responsibilities, financial resources, and the luxury of free time, and considers how they can affect participation in open source. Read more.
9:30–13:00 Wednesday, 19/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Intermediate
Danese Cooper (NearForm), Cedric Williams (PayPal), Silona Bonewald (Hyperledger)
InnerSource applies the best lessons from open source to proprietary engineering and transforms the cultures that use it. Danese Cooper, Cedric Williams, and Silona Bonewald explain how PayPal and other companies started redesigning their engineering approaches and ended up changing how they work and outline techniques any team can use to build an InnerSource practice in their organization. Read more.