17–19 October 2016: Conference & Tutorials
19–20 October 2016: Training
London, UK

Schedule: Architecture sessions

10:50–11:30 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Heidi Howard (University of Cambridge)
Average rating: ***..
(3.80, 5 ratings)
Heidi Howard explains how to construct resilient distributed systems on top of unreliable components. Starting almost two decades ago, with Leslie Lamport’s Paxos protocol, Heidi leads a journey to today’s data centers, covering interesting impossibility results and demonstrating how to construct new fault-tolerance systems that you can depend upon everyday. Read more.
11:40–12:20 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Average rating: ***..
(3.25, 4 ratings)
There are plenty of talks out there about how to get started with microservices, but in reality you learn by doing. Erin Schnabel and Katherine Stanley explore lessons learned while creating GameOn!, an interactive text-based adventure game that allows you to get hands-on with a microservice architecture to find out what works and what doesn't, and how we as a community can learn from each other. Read more.
13:35–14:15 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 2 ratings)
MVI (Model-View-Intent) is a new architecture made for reactive programming leveraging the power and flexibility of observables. Luca Mezzalira explores why reactive programming will remain a hot topic over the next decade and explains how you can structure an application in pure reactive programming using Cycle.js, React, and hyperscript. Read more.
14:25–15:05 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Beginner
Rachel Reese (Jet.com)
Average rating: ***..
(3.20, 5 ratings)
Jet.com, an ecommerce startup competing with Amazon, is a heavy user of F# and has based its architecture around Azure-based event-driven functional microservices. Over the last several months, Jet has schooled itself on what works and what doesn't for F# and microservices. Rachel Reese walks you through the lessons Jet has learned on its way to developing the platform. Read more.
16:05–16:45 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Beginner
Casey West (Pivotal)
Average rating: ***..
(3.80, 5 ratings)
Cloud adoption has made some aspects of our jobs irrelevant, but this is a good thing. Casey West explores many of the technical skills no longer required in an operationally mature, cloud-based organization; Casey explains why each skill is no longer worth doing manually and offers a collection of open source software solutions that require minimal human effort. Read more.
16:55–17:35 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Average rating: ****.
(4.29, 7 ratings)
Webhooks allow our applications to exchange data as soon as it happens rather than polling using APIs. Lorna Mitchell covers creating, consuming, and deploying webhooks in a modern, microservices world. Read more.
9:30–13:00 Wednesday, 19/10/2016
Location: Balmoral Level: Intermediate
Tony Edwards (Netflix)
Average rating: ***..
(3.50, 2 ratings)
Tony Edwards explores the basics of React and ES6 (ES2015) and demonstrates how to use them to ship awesome code at breakneck speed. By the end of the tutorial, you'll have a demo web app running on Node.js. Read more.
14:00–17:30 Wednesday, 19/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Cassandra Shum (ThoughtWorks), Ryan Oglesby (ThoughtWorks)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 3 ratings)
Having an architecture based on services offers many advantages (like scalability and technical flexibility), but it comes with upfront costs and complexity that few companies are in a position to pay. Cassandra Shum and Ryan Oglesby explore the prerequisites for moving into a microservices architecture and provide tips on how to achieve them via engaging exercises. Read more.
14:00–17:30 Wednesday, 19/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Intermediate
nir kaufman (Mr.)
This workshop is all about modern SPA architecture, focused on popular architectural design pattern Redux. Redux introduces a unidirectional data-flow and a predictable state container that scales. Through a series of live code examples, Nir Kaufman walks you through a complete flow of a typical application, using Angular2 as the presentation layer. Read more.