17–19 October 2016: Conference & Tutorials
19–20 October 2016: Training
London, UK

Sessions

Monday, 17 October

10:50–11:30 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Balmoral Level: Intermediate
Florian Gilcher (asquera GmbH)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 2 ratings)
The Rust type system is often discussed, especially in its relation to memory management; it allows for memory safety as a static guarantee at compile time. But if that were its only specialty, Rust would be a one-trick pony. Florian Gilcher uses Rust to present elegant, compiler-supported solutions for common problems of everyday applications as well as the infrastructure around them. Read more.
10:50–11:30 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Heidi Howard (University of Cambridge)
Average rating: ***..
(3.80, 5 ratings)
Heidi Howard explains how to construct resilient distributed systems on top of unreliable components. Starting almost two decades ago, with Leslie Lamport’s Paxos protocol, Heidi leads a journey to today’s data centers, covering interesting impossibility results and demonstrating how to construct new fault-tolerance systems that you can depend upon everyday. Read more.
10:50–11:30 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
Patrick McFadin (DataStax)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
Will our project be OSS or proprietary? It's an easy question that can lead to some uncomfortable moments in an organization. Sorting through the reasons for and against OSS can be tedious at best and life changing at worst. Don’t let this moment become something you regret. Patrick McFadin outlines the process and gives you some tools to make it through. Hopefully we’ll save a few friendships. Read more.
10:50–11:30 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room
Chi Onwurah (Parliament)
Average rating: ***..
(3.33, 3 ratings)
The fourth industrial age is driven by technology, particularly software and algorithms. Chi Onwurah explores how open source is helping to deliver the industrial landscape we want. Read more.
10:50–11:30 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Windsor Suite Level: Non-technical
Jeni Tennison (Open Data Institute)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 1 rating)
Open data is traveling the same road as open source. It started as a tech-driven desire for more information but is turning into a cultural change—one that changes business models, focuses policy interventions, and drives community engagement. Jeni Tennison explores how open data both requires and catalyzes systemic changes. Read more.
10:50–11:30 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Park Suite (Sponsored)
Arpan Nanavati (@WalmartLabs)
Average rating: ****.
(4.20, 5 ratings)
Arpan Nanavati tells the story of how @WalmartLabs successfully migrated to the Electrode platform (built on React and Node.js) with efficiency and speed. Read more.
11:40–12:20 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Balmoral Level: Beginner
Brent Beer (GitHub)
Average rating: ***..
(3.50, 2 ratings)
Your company is moving to a DevOps development culture. . .but you have no idea what that really means. Brent Beer offers an overview of ChatOps, a way of moving your DevOps culture through your company's chat client to your developers' fingertips, outlining clear steps to ship code faster and safer today. Read more.
11:40–12:20 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Average rating: ***..
(3.25, 4 ratings)
There are plenty of talks out there about how to get started with microservices, but in reality you learn by doing. Erin Schnabel and Katherine Stanley explore lessons learned while creating GameOn!, an interactive text-based adventure game that allows you to get hands-on with a microservice architecture to find out what works and what doesn't, and how we as a community can learn from each other. Read more.
11:40–12:20 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
Tracy Osborn (Hello Web Books)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 4 ratings)
"If you build it, they will come," they say. Not so! Marketing is crucial for anything you build that you want people to find and use. How should you market your app, your open source project, your mobile app, or anything else you build—especially as a time-strapped developer? Tracy Osborn offers marketing tips and recommendations to make sure that what you build is seen and used. Read more.
11:40–12:20 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room Level: Non-technical
Laura Czajkowski (Couchbase)
Average rating: **...
(2.67, 3 ratings)
Scaling company culture can be difficult even when the majority of your company is in the same office. Nowadays, this is rarely the case; most of the time you’re split over multiple continents. Laura Czajkowski breaks down the cultural challenges faced when working in a distributed team and looks at some solutions that can be brought in to help. Read more.
11:40–12:20 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Windsor Suite Level: Non-technical
Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee), Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab), Jon Manning (Secret Lab)
Open data is cool, especially when it comes from the government. What’s even cooler than open data? Games. Games are cool. So why not combine them? Tim Nugent, Paris Buttfield-Addison, and Jonathon Manning explore the potential for spreading the word about open data—and providing deeper engagement with data—through game development. Read more.
11:40–12:20 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Park Suite (Sponsored)
Danese Cooper (NearForm), Cedric Williams (PayPal), Silona Bonewald (Hyperledger)
Average rating: ****.
(4.75, 4 ratings)
Danese Cooper, Silona Bonewald and Cedric Williams provide a quick introduction to innersource. Read more.
13:35–14:15 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Balmoral Level: Intermediate
Patrick Chanezon (Docker)
Average rating: ***..
(3.67, 3 ratings)
Containers as a service (CaaS) provide developers the agility and portability they need to build microservice applications and ops the control required to deploy and maintain these apps in production. Patrick Chanezon offers a detailed overview of the latest evolutions in the Docker ecosystem enabling CaaS, from in-container development on a Mac to CI/CD in the cloud to deployment in production. Read more.
13:35–14:15 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 2 ratings)
MVI (Model-View-Intent) is a new architecture made for reactive programming leveraging the power and flexibility of observables. Luca Mezzalira explores why reactive programming will remain a hot topic over the next decade and explains how you can structure an application in pure reactive programming using Cycle.js, React, and hyperscript. Read more.
13:35–14:15 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
Karen Sandler (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 4 ratings)
There has been a recent increase in global enforcement initiatives around the GPL, the majority of which are coordinated and consistently undertaken. Karen Sandler breaks down what's happening and what you need to know about them. Karen outlines the principles of community-oriented GPL enforcement and explains how they impact enforcement discussions and promote overall compliance. Read more.
13:35–14:15 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room Level: Intermediate
Daniel Bryant (Datawire)
Average rating: ****.
(4.38, 8 ratings)
All is not completely rosy in microservice-land. It's often a sign of an architectural approach’s maturity that anti-patterns begin to be identified and classified alongside well-established principles and practices. Daniel Bryant introduces seven deadly sins from real projects, which left unchecked could easily ruin your next microservices project. Read more.
13:35–14:15 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Windsor Suite Level: Non-technical
yodit stanton (opensensors.io)
Average rating: **...
(2.00, 1 rating)
Yodit Stanton shines a light on the real IoT revolution quietly happening away from the spotlight and marketing dollars. Yodit explains how makers are using open data to solve real needs in multiple contexts, looking at examples from all over the world where communities and businesses are deploying sensors around problems from air and water quality to mobility and parking. Read more.
14:25–15:05 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Balmoral Level: Beginner
Ivan Danyliuk (Typeform)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
Ivan Daniluk explains concurrency in Go using the power of 3D modeling and animations. Ivan offers a demo of his tool that can visually represent concurrent Go programs using WebGL in a browser. You'll explore common concurrency patterns through real-time 3D animations and learn how parallelism differs from concurrency. Read more.
14:25–15:05 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Beginner
Rachel Reese (Jet.com)
Average rating: ***..
(3.20, 5 ratings)
Jet.com, an ecommerce startup competing with Amazon, is a heavy user of F# and has based its architecture around Azure-based event-driven functional microservices. Over the last several months, Jet has schooled itself on what works and what doesn't for F# and microservices. Rachel Reese walks you through the lessons Jet has learned on its way to developing the platform. Read more.
14:25–15:05 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
VM Brasseur (Juniper Networks)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 2 ratings)
VM Brasseur looks at community from a business perspective and explores the effect community can have on an organization's bottom line. Although there are communities everywhere, Vicky approaches the topic—communities, their members, and their contributors—from a free and open source perspective. Read more.
14:25–15:05 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room Level: Non-technical
lebron james (Doteveryone)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 3 ratings)
Doteveryone’s work with the NHS aims to improve care for older people in the final phases of life by demonstrating what's possible with new technologies, targeting the furthest first—the most socially and digitally excluded. Laura James shares experiences and lessons learned navigating complicated organizations and IT systems, people and ethics, and standards and prototyping. Read more.
14:25–15:05 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Windsor Suite Level: Intermediate
Diego Ceccarelli (Bloomberg LP)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 2 ratings)
Learning to rank is a technique used by all the big search engines (Google, Bing, Yandex, etc.) to improve the quality of search. At the moment, there is not an open source solution available, but Bloomberg is working on an open source plugin for Solr (an open source search engine). Diego Ceccarelli presents learning-to-rank key concepts and explains how the Solr plugin works. Read more.
14:25–15:05 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Park Suite (Sponsored)
Katrina Owen (GitHub)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 5 ratings)
Open source sells itself as being about technical problems—delightfully thorny technical problems at that. However, successful projects are filled with people, which introduces a whole different set of problems. Katrina Owen illustrates the many ways in which things went wrong for Exercism because she didn’t treat people problems as first-class citizens. Read more.
16:05–16:45 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Balmoral Level: Beginner
Jeffrey Goff (Evozon Systems)
Average rating: ***..
(3.00, 4 ratings)
Join Jeffrey Goff to learn about the top 10 features that Perl 6 brings to the table, including Unicode support, functional programming, reactive and concurrent programming, built-in expression grammars, built-in vector operators, and a full metaprogramming system with support for roles. Jeffrey discusses where Perl 6 started, where it is today, and where the language is going in the future. Read more.
16:05–16:45 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Beginner
Casey West (Pivotal)
Average rating: ***..
(3.80, 5 ratings)
Cloud adoption has made some aspects of our jobs irrelevant, but this is a good thing. Casey West explores many of the technical skills no longer required in an operationally mature, cloud-based organization; Casey explains why each skill is no longer worth doing manually and offers a collection of open source software solutions that require minimal human effort. Read more.
16:05–16:45 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
Matt Asay (Adobe), kelly stirman (MongoDB)
Average rating: ****.
(4.67, 3 ratings)
From the outside, open source companies try to appear to be Fine Upstanding Open Source Citizens™. However, inside the sausage factory, hard decisions and trade-offs are constantly being made. Matt Asay and Kelly Stirman explain how to build a 21st-century open source business without selling your soul. . .or your software. Read more.
16:05–16:45 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room Level: Beginner
Wade Minter (Custom Communications)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Any hiring manager in a technology company knows that the hardest problem to solve is hiring. There never seem to be enough experienced developers available at any given point in time. But many of those same hiring managers will say, "We don't hire junior developers." Tech team-builder Wade Minter makes the case for why your company should hire and train junior developers. Read more.
16:05–16:45 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Windsor Suite Level: Non-technical
Alice Casey (360Giving), Edafe Onerhime (Open Data Services)
At present, it's not possible to find a complete dataset on all charitable grants in the UK. Alice Casey and Edafe Onerhime offer an overview of 360Giving, which supports funding organizations in publishing their grants data in an open, standardized way and helps people to understand and use that data to support decision making and learning across the charitable giving sector. Read more.
16:55–17:35 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Balmoral
Nick O'LEARY (IBM)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
An open Internet of Things (IoT) industry is critical. Nick O'Leary introduces Node-RED, an open source tool for wiring together hardware devices, APIs, and online services using a visual flow-based programming model that allows users to quickly create apps using an easy drag-and-drop interface. Read more.
16:55–17:35 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Average rating: ****.
(4.29, 7 ratings)
Webhooks allow our applications to exchange data as soon as it happens rather than polling using APIs. Lorna Mitchell covers creating, consuming, and deploying webhooks in a modern, microservices world. Read more.
16:55–17:35 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Beginner
Amanda Folson (GitLab)
Just because you’re selling SaaS doesn’t mean you can’t adopt open source principles in your organization. Amanda Folson explores how individuals and companies can open source their documentation, libraries, and ideas for the greater good of the community in a way that doesn’t mean giving it all away for free. Read more.
16:55–17:35 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room Level: Intermediate
Alasdair Allan (Babilim Light Industries)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 3 ratings)
The ESP8266 is a microcontroller with WiFi and GPIO that is sold for as little as two dollars. After 50 years of Moore's Law, we're getting to a place where computing is not just cheap—it’s essentially free. The Internet of Things, which puts both general-purpose computing and sensors everywhere, will be built from blocks like these. Alasdair Allan shows you how. Read more.
16:55–17:35 Monday, 17/10/2016
Location: Windsor Suite Level: Intermediate
Colin Charles (Percona)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
Forking in the open source world means going with different goals and design directions. How do you pick a winner? Colin Charles offers practical examples from the MariaDB world (MySQL fork), as well as lessons from other projects like LibreOffice, LibreSSL, SuiteCRM, and Jenkins. If you have to fork and want to do it well, this journey through the MariaDB server world is for you. Read more.

Tuesday, 18 October

10:50–11:30 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Balmoral Level: Beginner
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
The Hyperledger Project, a collaborative software initiative building a distributed ledger and smart contract platform, is a real test for FOSS. Many contributors are new to public collaboration, much of this space is still being defined, and some companies have made huge bets on particular outcomes. Arnaud Le Hors explains how the project balances these challenges and ships production code. Read more.
10:50–11:30 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Ilan Rabinovitch (Datadog)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 2 ratings)
It only takes monitoring a few machines and applications for it to become very complicated to identify and fix issues in your environment. Knowing which metrics to watch and how to use them to troubleshoot will help you solve problems more quickly. Ilan Rabinovitch covers the three types of monitoring data, what to collect, what should trigger an alert, and how to avoid pager fatigue. Read more.
10:50–11:30 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
George Dunlap (Citrix Systems, UK)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 5 ratings)
George Dunlap discusses the XenProject's experience trying to make a difficult community decision. George outlines the decision-making process, which allowed everyone to feel that their viewpoint was considered despite the lack of any option with clear consensus, to help you navigate similarly difficult waters. Read more.
10:50–11:30 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room Level: Non-technical
Adam Cooper (GDS, gov.uk)
Adam Cooper offers lessons from building GOV.UK Verify, a standards-based, federated, cross-government identity assurance service—the first of its kind in the world. Read more.
10:50–11:30 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Windsor Suite
Marc Burgauer (Lloyds Banking Group)
In order to make an Open Source project successful, we often need the help of others. By sharing the problem in public, we find other people who have the same problem. They have the same need and are looking too for ideas how to satisfy that need. Creating a Community of Practice is often key to finding solutions that also benefit people who lack the skills to solve the problem on their own. Read more.
11:40–12:20 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Balmoral Level: Beginner
Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab), Jon Manning (Secret Lab), Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 2 ratings)
Microservices. Containerization. Swift. Three words that bespeak greatness in this modern technology world. Paris Buttfield-Addison, Jonathon Manning, and Tim Nugent explain how to combine them. This is actually useful—come and learn why. Read more.
11:40–12:20 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Beginner
Joe Damato (packagecloud.io)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Infrastructure as code might be literally impossible because none of the core open source software we use actually works. Joe Damato explores commonly held misconceptions about fundamental infrastructure tools and commonly used system libraries and presents some surprising failure cases that resulted in security vulnerabilities, broken software, and infrastructure management nightmares. Read more.
11:40–12:20 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
Simon Phipps (Public Software CIC), Moritz Bartl (Renewable Freedom Foundation)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Do you need to start an open source foundation? Many open source projects choose to become legal entities to support their collaboration. In the US, there are several general purpose bodies for hosting open source projects, but up to now there have been none in Europe—so Simon Phipps and Moritz Bartl started one. They explain what they are doing to address the need and how you can benefit. Read more.
11:40–12:20 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room Level: Non-technical
Average rating: ***..
(3.67, 3 ratings)
GCHQ deals with high-complexity issues in terms of technology and engineering. Like any progressive organization, it keeps an eye on emerging trends and schools of thought so that it can adapt and evolve to be the best it can be. Speakers from GCHQ examine the characteristics GCHQ is embracing and the directions it's traveling. Join in to hear GCHQ's ideas for software development and change. Read more.
11:40–12:20 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Windsor Suite Level: Non-technical
Deb Nicholson (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 3 ratings)
The FOSS community is full of passionate people with many, many differing ideas on how to achieve our shared goals. Disagreements seem inevitable, but what if they could be handled rationally, in a way that left everyone feeling at least OK about the outcome? Deb Nicholson covers strategies for handling conflict and offers tips on how to scale your conflict resolution skills like a boss. Read more.
13:35–14:15 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Joseph Lynch (Yelp)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 3 ratings)
In the past few years, there has been a proliferation of production-ready open source databases, giving developers and operators more choices than ever. Joseph Lynch explores how Yelp has combined complimentary data stores to provide a powerful data tier for our developers. Along the way, Joseph shares lessons learned about deployment, configuration, and monitoring from a production environment. Read more.
13:35–14:15 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Beginner
Jo Pearce (Snowthorn Ltd.)
Average rating: ****.
(4.25, 4 ratings)
There are limits to our ability to learn and process information. Overload impacts productivity by causing psychological and physiological stress. Jo Pearce relates findings from cognitive psychology that help us understand how, as developers, we might be overloading both ourselves and those we work with—and what to do about it. Read more.
13:35–14:15 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room Level: Beginner
Richard Pope (memespring.co.uk)
Politics is about the distribution of power in society. In the early 21st century, digital products are exerting influence on how power is distributed among us. Richard Pope explains why software is now politics and what your responsibilities are in this new world. Read more.
13:35–14:15 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Windsor Suite Level: Intermediate
Holden Karau (Independent)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Apache Spark is one of the most popular tools for big data and with 400+ open pull requests as of this writing, very active in terms of development as well. With such a large volume of contributions, it can be hard to know how to begin contributing yourself. Holden Karau offers advice on finding good issues, formatting code, finding reviewers, and what to expect in the code review process. Read more.
14:25–15:05 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Balmoral Level: Beginner
Eli Bixby (Google)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 2 ratings)
TensorFlow is Google’s open source framework for machine intelligence. Eli Bixby gives a conceptual overview of TensorFlow, as well as a cursory introduction to some concepts in deep learning, and provides a short example of putting the concepts to use with TFLearn, TensorFlow’s high-level API wrapper. Read more.
14:25–15:05 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Beginner
anne currie (Container Solutions)
Average rating: *....
(1.00, 1 rating)
Orchestrators like Kubernetes, Mesos/Marathon, and Docker Swarm are increasingly playing a role in infrastructure, controlling where your code executes. Anne Currie introduces the main characteristics of orchestrators and considers how using them affects both the psychology and the tools required to manage your infrastructure. Read more.
14:25–15:05 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
Lucy Crompton-Reid (Wikimedia UK)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 2 ratings)
Lucy Crompton-Reid discusses Wikipedia and the other Wikimedia projects in the context of diversity and equality, focusing particularly on the gender gap. Lucy explores the impact of the gender gap on the production and consumption of open knowledge and what Wikimedia UK and the wider global movement is doing to help eradicate bias on one of the leading sources of information in the world. Read more.
14:25–15:05 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room Level: Non-technical
GCHQ has access to diverse, creative, and talented people, allowing it to take huge leaps in technical innovation. The company wanted to know what would happen if it could offer this innovation back into the public domain. This session recounts GCHQ’s journey, including the challenges and lessons learned for high-security organizations thinking about open sourcing software. Read more.
14:25–15:05 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Windsor Suite Level: Intermediate
Robert Lefkowitz (Warby Parker)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 3 ratings)
The Schumpeterian sensibility of our age is that incumbents get disrupted. So when one asserts that open source has won, the logical follow-up questions are: What will disrupt the incumbent? What comes next? Robert Lefkowitz explains why the answer is the democratization of software. Read more.
16:05–16:45 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Balmoral Level: Beginner
Eloise Macdonald-Meyer (Takeflight)
Average rating: *....
(1.00, 1 rating)
Eloise Macdonald-Meyer offers an introduction to Wagtail, an open source content management system built on Django. Eloise discusses the pros and cons of the system, its unique features and nature as an open source project, and the future of the project and explains how to get started with Wagtail. Read more.
16:05–16:45 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Idit Levine (solo.io)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 2 ratings)
Unikernels are rapidly gaining momentum in the market: Docker acquired Unikernel Systems, and Google trends show it's a leading topic. Idit Levine explores Unik, a open source orchestration system for unikernels that is a useful tool in the cloud-native application space, and explains how to integrate Unik as a backend to Docker, Kubernetes, and Cloud Foundry runtime. Read more.
16:05–16:45 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
The Comprehensive Kerbal Archive Network (CKAN) has hundreds of contributors, tens of thousands of users, and success metrics measured in decades of human joy delivered. Paul Fenwick uses the example of CKAN to examine how to help maximize your open source project's chance of success from the beginning, with a focus on community building and contributor growth. Read more.
16:05–16:45 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Windsor Suite Level: Intermediate
Steve George (Independent Consultant)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
Achieving competitive advantage is a key driver for companies' involvement in open source. Drawing on experiences from product development at Canonical, Steve George examines the role of innovation and open source for creating and capturing business value and explores the barriers, benefits, and lessons learned. Read more.
16:05–16:45 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Park Suite (Sponsored)
Brian Doll (SourceClear)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 3 ratings)
How many security vulnerabilities are lurking in the open source libraries that make up the majority of your codebase? For maintainers and developers alike, managing security in an open source world isn't so straightforward. Brian Doll offers an overview of different types of vulnerabilities and explores some tools and tips on how best to stay safe. Read more.
16:55–17:35 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Balmoral Level: Intermediate
Dvir Volk (Redis Labs)
The new Redis module system gives you the ability to extend Redis by loading dynamic libraries into it, creating new commands that operate on different data types or perform functions that Redis wasn't designed for. Dvir Volk explains how the Redis module system was designed and how developers can take advantage of the power of Redis to create new commands and different data types. Read more.
16:55–17:35 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Sandringham Level: Intermediate
Steve Pousty (Red Hat)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 3 ratings)
Steve Pousty outlines the processes, tools, and techniques that Red Hat is adopting in order to help improve security for building, running, and maintaining container images. Steve covers topics such as OpenShift templates and source-to-image builds and includes a workflow demonstration showing how operations teams can distribute security patches throughout a Kubernetes cluster. Read more.
16:55–17:35 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Buckingham Room Level: Non-technical
Taylor Barnett (Keen IO)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 2 ratings)
While it's not easy to talk about, exploring privilege is necessary if we want to make sure open source is truly open for everyone. Taylor Barnett explores a number of sources of privilege, including axes of identity like race and gender and factors such as family responsibilities, financial resources, and the luxury of free time, and considers how they can affect participation in open source. Read more.
16:55–17:35 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Blenheim Room Level: Non-technical
James Smith (Something New)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Openness is a political idea, and our democracy is changing for the network age. Something New is a startup political party in the UK built for the network age and founded on open source principles. The party created an open source manifesto, ran it in the 2015 general election, and is now building momentum for the future. Join James Smith to learn what an open source democratic future looks like. Read more.
16:55–17:35 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Windsor Suite
Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
We live in a competitive world. That competition forces change. It has always forced change. Change is normal. The question is not whether our organisations will change, that’s a given, but can we see this change before it hits us, do we know where we’re heading or are we simply floating aimlessly being carried by a river? It certainly feels that way sometimes. Read more.
16:55–17:35 Tuesday, 18/10/2016
Location: Park Suite (Sponsored)
Kenny Bastani (Pivotal)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Platform engineering is the art of automating the practices and principles of software delivery. Kenny Bastani explores how platform engineers use open source tools like Cloud Foundry and Spring Boot to automate how developers build and operate cloud-native applications. Read more.