17–19 October 2016: Conference & Tutorials
19–20 October 2016: Training
London, UK

OSCON Speakers

New speakers are added regularly. Please check back to see the latest updates to the agenda.

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Alasdair Allan is a scientist, author, hacker, tinkerer, and journalist who has recently been spending a lot of time thinking about the Internet of Things, which he thinks is broken. He is the author of a number of books and sometimes also stands in front of cameras. You can often find him at conferences talking about interesting things or deploying sensors to measure them. A couple of years ago, he rolled out a mesh network of five hundred sensor motes covering the entirety of Moscone West during Google I/O. He’s still recovering. A few years before that, he caused a privacy scandal by uncovering that your iPhone was recording your location all the time, which caused several class-action lawsuits and a US Senate hearing. Some years on, he still isn’t sure what to think about that.

Alasdair sporadically writes blog posts about things that interest him or, more frequently, provides commentary in 140 characters or less. He is a contributing editor for Make magazine and a contributor to O’Reilly Radar. Alasdair is a former academic. As part of his work, he built a distributed peer-to-peer network of telescopes that, acting autonomously, reactively scheduled observations of time-critical events. Notable successes included contributing to the detection of what was—at the time—the most distant object yet discovered, a gamma-ray burster at a redshift of 8.2.

Presentations

Using the ESP8266 to build the Internet of Things Session

The ESP8266 is a microcontroller with WiFi and GPIO that is sold for as little as two dollars. After 50 years of Moore's Law, we're getting to a place where computing is not just cheap—it’s essentially free. The Internet of Things, which puts both general-purpose computing and sensors everywhere, will be built from blocks like these. Alasdair Allan shows you how.

Based in Berlin, Germany, Lauri Apple is responsible for developing Zalando’s open source culture and promoting its projects industry wide. Lauri also leads Zalando’s InnerSource initiative to drive the open source collaboration model internally and project manages a development team. Before joining Zalando, Lauri was the tech evangelist at Gilt Groupe in New York City. Her life before technology evangelism included stints as a journalist, PR consultant/social media strategist, and law student at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law.

Presentations

Building an open source culture at Europe’s largest fashion platform Keynote

In March 2015, the leadership of Berlin-based Zalando gathered the company’s entire tech team and announced a new way of working—something called “Radical Agility.” Lauri Apple explains how Radical Agility deeply transformed Zalando’s open source development efforts by freeing up engineers to experiment, create, and innovate.

Matt Asay is vice president of mobile at Adobe. With more than a decade in open source and its application in big data and mobile, Matt most recently ran community, marketing, and business development at MongoDB. Previously, he served as VP of business development at real-time analytics company Nodeable (acquired by Appcelerator in October 2012); VP of business development at mobile HTML5 startup Strobe (now part of Facebook); chief operating officer at Canonical, the Ubuntu Linux company; GM, Americas and VP of business development at Alfresco; and part of the team that helped put Novell on its open source track. Matt is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI). He holds a JD from Stanford, where he focused on open source and other IP licensing issues, an MA from the University of Kent at Canterbury, and a BA from Brigham Young University. Matt is a regular columnist for ReadWrite, TechRepublic, and InfoWorld.

Presentations

Inside the open source sausage factory: Lessons learned from decades selling open source Session

From the outside, open source companies try to appear to be Fine Upstanding Open Source Citizens™. However, inside the sausage factory, hard decisions and trade-offs are constantly being made. Matt Asay and Kelly Stirman explain how to build a 21st-century open source business without selling your soul. . .or your software.

Taylor Barnett is an Austinite and developer who loves helping build inclusive communities. Taylor is on the Community team at Keen IO, where she tries to be an empathic voice within Documentation and Support, builds fun projects, and helps developers through code, conversations, and high fives. She also strives to help Keen IO become a better corporate open source citizen. Taylor was introduced to developer communities while studying computer science at the University of Texas at Austin. She helped create an early student hackathon and focused on growing the student developer community at UT Austin and at other universities worldwide in an inclusive manner. She was also an early advocate and leader for adopting measures to help increase inclusivity in hackathons. Today, Taylor mentors multiple student hacker organizations and their members. She was one of the founding members of the Women Who Code Austin chapter, where she is currently an organizer and helps mentor members.

Presentations

Exploring privilege in open source communities Session

While it's not easy to talk about, exploring privilege is necessary if we want to make sure open source is truly open for everyone. Taylor Barnett explores a number of sources of privilege, including axes of identity like race and gender and factors such as family responsibilities, financial resources, and the luxury of free time, and considers how they can affect participation in open source.

Moritz Bartl serves as the director of the Renewable Freedom Foundation in Germany and is cofounder of the Center for the Cultivation of Technology. Moritz has been active in the free software and hacker community for over 15 years; he’s a core member of the Tor project, a fellow at the Hermes Center for Transparency, cofounder and board member of the OpenLab Augsburg hackerspace, and a board member of the CypherChaikana project for Central Asian citizen infrastructure projects. As director of a digital human rights foundation, he works in close partnerships with many international NGOs in technology, open source advocacy, and tech policy areas. Moritz studied computer science at TU Dresden, with a focus on privacy and anonymity, software engineering, project management, and machine learning.

Presentations

Project umbrellas for Europe Session

Do you need to start an open source foundation? Many open source projects choose to become legal entities to support their collaboration. In the US, there are several general purpose bodies for hosting open source projects, but up to now there have been none in Europe—so Simon Phipps and Moritz Bartl started one. They explain what they are doing to address the need and how you can benefit.

Kenny Bastani is a Spring developer advocate at Pivotal. As a passionate blogger and open source contributor, Kenny engages a community of passionate developers on topics ranging from graph databases to microservices. Kenny is a coauthor of the O’Reilly book Cloud Native Java: Designing Resilient Systems with Spring Boot, Spring Cloud, and Cloud Foundry.

Presentations

Using microservices to strangle monoliths Session

Platform engineering is the art of automating the practices and principles of software delivery. Kenny Bastani explores how platform engineers use open source tools like Cloud Foundry and Spring Boot to automate how developers build and operate cloud-native applications.

Brent Beer is a solutions engineer for GitHub in Amsterdam, helping bring Git and GitHub to developers across the world. Brent has used Git and GitHub for over five years in university classes and contributions to open source projects and professionally as a web developer. While working as a trainer for GitHub, he also became a published author for O’Reilly.

Presentations

ChatOps: How to enhance your DevOps workflow Session

Your company is moving to a DevOps development culture. . .but you have no idea what that really means. Brent Beer offers an overview of ChatOps, a way of moving your DevOps culture through your company's chat client to your developers' fingertips, outlining clear steps to ship code faster and safer today.

Francine Bennett is a data scientist and the CEO and cofounder of Mastodon C, a group of Agile big data specialists who offer the open source Hadoop-powered technology and the technical and analytical skills to help organizations to realize the potential of their data. Before founding Mastodon C, Francine spent a number of years working on big data analysis for search engines, helping them to turn lots of data into even more money. She enjoys good coffee, running, sleeping as much as possible, and exploring large datasets.

Presentations

Monday opening welcome Keynote

Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis, Simon Wardley, and Francine Bennett open the first day of keynotes.

Tuesday opening welcome Keynote

Program chairs Simon Wardley, Francine Bennett, and Rachel Roumeliotis open the second day of keynotes.

Zaheda Bhorat is the head of open source strategy at AWS, where she also leads the open source program office. A computer scientist, Zaheda is a long-time active contributor to open source and open standards communities. Previously, Zaheda shaped the first-ever open source program office at Google, launched successful programs including Google Summer of Code, and represented Google on many industry standards executive boards across multiple technologies; served as a senior technology advisor for the Office of the CTO at the UK Government Digital Service, where she co-led the open standards policy, in use by the UK government on open document formats; and was responsible for OpenOffice.org, and later NetBeans.org, at Sun Microsystems, where she built a thriving global volunteer community and delivered the first user version, OpenOffice 1.0. Zaheda is passionate about education, open source, and the positive impact of collaboration for social good. She serves on the board of directors of the Mifos Initiative, an open source effort that is positioning financial institutions to become digitally connected providers of financial services to the poor, and speaks internationally on topics related to open source.

Presentations

Ignite your impact with open source

Zaheda Bhorat shares impactful lessons on open source collaboration techniques and tools. Take away industry best practices that will help you succeed while contributing to the long-term sustainability of open source.

Eli Bixby is a developer programs engineer at Google currently developing on Google Cloud Platform’s DevOps distributed systems, machine-learning, and big data offerings. He joined Google as a developer programs engineer. Previously, Eli dabbled in several research areas, with papers in biophysics, algorithmic game theory, and most recently computational biology.

Presentations

Deep learning with TensorFlow Session

TensorFlow is Google’s open source framework for machine intelligence. Eli Bixby gives a conceptual overview of TensorFlow, as well as a cursory introduction to some concepts in deep learning, and provides a short example of putting the concepts to use with TFLearn, TensorFlow’s high-level API wrapper.

Diving into machine learning through TensorFlow Tutorial

Amy Unruh and Eli Bixby offer practical, hands-on experience with TensorFlow, an open source library for deep learning. Amy and Eli introduce the basics of TensorFlow, show how to build neural net models with TensorFlow and train them both locally and in the cloud, and explain how to use trained models for prediction. In the process, they'll have some fun with visualization.

Silona Bonewald is the director of InnerSource at Paypal. You can find out more about her at Silona.org.

Presentations

A quick intro to Innersource Session

Danese Cooper, Silona Bonewald and Cedric Williams provide a quick introduction to innersource.

Transitioning to InnerSource: Increase delivery velocity, enable smooth collaboration, and produce quality software Tutorial

InnerSource applies the best lessons from open source to proprietary engineering and transforms the cultures that use it. Danese Cooper, Cedric Williams, and Silona Bonewald explain how PayPal and other companies started redesigning their engineering approaches and ended up changing how they work and outline techniques any team can use to build an InnerSource practice in their organization.

A champion and proponent for open source and open governance, Kris Borchers is director of JavaScript at the Linux Foundation, where he leads the effort to support the technology and provide the guidance needed to navigate the world of open source JavaScript by bringing together some of the latest in JavaScript advancements and the extended ecosystems of community-driven projects.

Presentations

Evolving the JavaScript ecosystem Keynote

Join Kris Borchers for a talk on evolving the JavaScript ecosystem.

VM Brasseur (aka Vicky) is a manager of technical people, projects, processes, products, and businesses. In her nearly 20 years in the tech industry, Vicky has been an analyst, programmer, product manager, software engineering manager, technical and C-level business consultant, and director of software engineering. She is a winner of the 2014 Perl White Camel Award and a winner of the 2016 O’Reilly Open Source Award. Vicky occasionally blogs, often writes, and frequently tweets at @vmbrasseur. She is also a community moderator for Opensource.com

Presentations

The business of community Session

VM Brasseur looks at community from a business perspective and explores the effect community can have on an organization's bottom line. Although there are communities everywhere, Vicky approaches the topic—communities, their members, and their contributors—from a free and open source perspective.

Daniel Bryant is an independent technical consultant and the CTO at SpectoLabs, where he specializes in enabling continuous delivery within organizations through the identification of value streams, the creation of build pipelines, and the implementation of effective testing strategies. Daniel’s technical expertise focuses on DevOps tooling, cloud and container platforms, and microservice implementations. He contributes to several open source projects, writes for InfoQ, O’Reilly, and Voxxed, and regularly presents at international conferences, including OSCON, QCon, and JavaOne.

Presentations

The seven (more) deadly sins of microservices Session

All is not completely rosy in microservice-land. It's often a sign of an architectural approach’s maturity that anti-patterns begin to be identified and classified alongside well-established principles and practices. Daniel Bryant introduces seven deadly sins from real projects, which left unchecked could easily ruin your next microservices project.

Marc Burgauer has experienced professional life as a biologist, an award-winning performance artist and musician, software developer, business analyst, enterprise database architect and early web applications programmer, manager and startup founder and is currently working as an agile coach at Lloyds Banking Group.

Presentations

Communities of Practice Session

In order to make an Open Source project successful, we often need the help of others. By sharing the problem in public, we find other people who have the same problem. They have the same need and are looking too for ideas how to satisfy that need. Creating a Community of Practice is often key to finding solutions that also benefit people who lack the skills to solve the problem on their own.

Paris Buttfield-Addison is cofounder of Secret Lab, a mobile development studio based in beautiful Hobart, Australia. Secret Lab builds games and apps for mobile devices, including the award-winning ABC Play School iPad games, and the Qantas Joey Playbox. Paris formerly worked as mobile product manager for Meebo (acquired by Google) and writes technical books on mobile and game development for O’Reilly (most recently Learning Swift, 2nd edition, and The Kerbal Player’s Guide). He holds a degree in medieval history and a PhD in computing; he is currently studying law. Paris can be found on Twitter as @parisba online at Paris.id.au.

Presentations

Building containerized microservices with Swift Session

Microservices. Containerization. Swift. Three words that bespeak greatness in this modern technology world. Paris Buttfield-Addison, Jonathon Manning, and Tim Nugent explain how to combine them. This is actually useful—come and learn why.

Engaging with open data through video games Session

Open data is cool, especially when it comes from the government. What’s even cooler than open data? Games. Games are cool. So why not combine them? Tim Nugent, Paris Buttfield-Addison, and Jonathon Manning explore the potential for spreading the word about open data—and providing deeper engagement with data—through game development.

Alice Casey works at Nesta, funding and supporting innovative social projects and working with activists and entrepreneurs. Alice is also a director of 360Giving, which helps charitable foundations and funding bodies publish their data openly and use it effectively.

Presentations

Open funding data: 360Giving's journey so far Session

At present, it's not possible to find a complete dataset on all charitable grants in the UK. Alice Casey and Edafe Onerhime offer an overview of 360Giving, which supports funding organizations in publishing their grants data in an open, standardized way and helps people to understand and use that data to support decision making and learning across the charitable giving sector.

Diego Ceccarelli is a software engineer at Bloomberg LP working on the News Search R&D team, where he focuses on improving search relevance for financial news. Before joining Bloomberg, Diego was a researcher in information retrieval at the National Council of Research in Italy, while completing his PhD in the same field at the University of Pisa.

Presentations

Open sourcing learning to rank in Solr Session

Learning to rank is a technique used by all the big search engines (Google, Bing, Yandex, etc.) to improve the quality of search. At the moment, there is not an open source solution available, but Bloomberg is working on an open source plugin for Solr (an open source search engine). Diego Ceccarelli presents learning-to-rank key concepts and explains how the Solr plugin works.

Patrick Chanezon is member of the technical staff at Docker Inc., where he helps to build Docker, an open platform for distributed applications for developers and sysadmins. A software developer and storyteller, Patrick spent 10 years building platforms at Netscape and Sun and 10 more evangelizing platforms at Google, VMware, and Microsoft. His main professional interest is in building and kickstarting the network effect for these wondrous two-sided markets called platforms. Patrick has worked on platforms for portals, ads, commerce, social, the Web, distributed apps, and the cloud.

Presentations

Docker from development to production Session

Containers as a service (CaaS) provide developers the agility and portability they need to build microservice applications and ops the control required to deploy and maintain these apps in production. Patrick Chanezon offers a detailed overview of the latest evolutions in the Docker ecosystem enabling CaaS, from in-container development on a Mac to CI/CD in the cloud to deployment in production.

Colin Charles is the chief evangelist at Percona. Previously, Colin was on the founding team of MariaDB Server, worked at MySQL, and worked actively on the Fedora and OpenOffice.org projects. Colin has been a MySQL user since 2000. He’s well known within open source communities in APAC and has spoken at many conferences.

Presentations

Forking successfully Session

Forking in the open source world means going with different goals and design directions. How do you pick a winner? Colin Charles offers practical examples from the MariaDB world (MySQL fork), as well as lessons from other projects like LibreOffice, LibreSSL, SuiteCRM, and Jenkins. If you have to fork and want to do it well, this journey through the MariaDB server world is for you.

Adam Cooper is lead technical architect for the Identity Assurance Programme within the Government Digital Service, part of the UK Cabinet Office. Responsible for the overall technical architecture of the UK eID service, GOV.UK Verify, Adam is also an expert contributor to the eIDAS Regulation regarding cross-border eID and champions international standards with bodies such as OASIS, OpenID Foundation, FIDO Alliance, ISO, ETSI, and the W3C.

Presentations

How GOV.UK Verify is using open standards to disrupt the identity market Session

Adam Cooper offers lessons from building GOV.UK Verify, a standards-based, federated, cross-government identity assurance service—the first of its kind in the world.

Danese Cooper works at PayPal, where she runs OASIS, an office devoted to engineering cultural change through open source, InnerSource, and other key initiatives. Danese also continues to run a successful consultancy to companies wishing to pursue open source strategies, which has served the SETI Foundation, Harris Corporation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Numenta, among other clients. Danese has a 25-year history in the software industry and has long been an advocate for transparent development methodologies. She has managed teams at Symantec and Apple, served as chief open source evangelist for Sun Microsystems, and served as senior director for open source strategies at Intel. Danese advised the R community on open source policy while at REvolution Computing (now Revolution Analytics) and served as chief technical officer for the Wikimedia Foundation. She is a director on the board of the Drupal Association, a chairperson for the Node.js Foundation board, a board advisor for Mozilla and Ushahidi, and a member of the Apache Software Foundation. Danese was also a board member of the Open Source Initiative for 10 years.

Presentations

A quick intro to Innersource Session

Danese Cooper, Silona Bonewald and Cedric Williams provide a quick introduction to innersource.

How InnerSource is like FLOSSing Keynote

Danese Cooper explains how InnerSource is like FLOSSing.

Transitioning to InnerSource: Increase delivery velocity, enable smooth collaboration, and produce quality software Tutorial

InnerSource applies the best lessons from open source to proprietary engineering and transforms the cultures that use it. Danese Cooper, Cedric Williams, and Silona Bonewald explain how PayPal and other companies started redesigning their engineering approaches and ended up changing how they work and outline techniques any team can use to build an InnerSource practice in their organization.

Kate Craig-Wood is an award-winning leading female IT entrepreneur and the CEO of cloud-hosting provider Memset. Kate champions the cause of British SMEs and is a committed advocate of the British government’s IT SME agenda. She passionately believes in a future based on open standards and open source technologies. An environmentalist, Kate is currently working part-time on a PhD in cloud computing and climate change. Kate strives to be a role model encouraging younger girls into STEM. Her interests include energy efficiency, virtualization, cybersecurity, deep learning networks, the blockchain, big data analytics, scuba diving, skiing, airsoft, LGBT affairs, online gaming (MUDs), and her dog, Monty.

Presentations

The blockchain and open source: The new world order Keynote

IT moves in cycles. The cloud is just the latest of several rounds of centralization of IT resources. Now, blockchain technology has the potential to drive the next redistribution. Kate Craig-Wood explores how and why the blockchain will change IT as we know it.

Lucy Crompton-Reid is chief executive of Wikimedia UK, where she is working with the staff team, board of trustees, and wider Wikimedia community to develop a new strategy and business plan for the charity and help shape the work of the programs team. She is also driving forward the organization’s advocacy, communications, and fundraising activities and engaging new strategic partners. Lucy has worked in the cultural, voluntary, and public sectors for nearly two decades, holding senior roles at Arts Council England, the British Refugee Council, and the House of Lords. Most recently, she was chief executive of the national literature charity Apples and Snakes, England’s leading organization for performance poetry and spoken word. Throughout her career, Lucy has had a particular focus on widening participation and brings a strong commitment to learning, public engagement, and diversity in her role at Wikimedia UK.

Presentations

Yes, I mind the gender gap Session

Lucy Crompton-Reid discusses Wikipedia and the other Wikimedia projects in the context of diversity and equality, focusing particularly on the gender gap. Lucy explores the impact of the gender gap on the production and consumption of open knowledge and what Wikimedia UK and the wider global movement is doing to help eradicate bias on one of the leading sources of information in the world.

Anne Currie is the cofounder and CTO of Microscaling Systems. Anne was an engineer for a very long time before it was fashionable, and she’s done everything from working on Microsoft Exchange in Seattle during the browser wars to running IT for an international ecommerce lingerie retailer.

Presentations

A brief history of orchestration Session

Orchestrators like Kubernetes, Mesos/Marathon, and Docker Swarm are increasingly playing a role in infrastructure, controlling where your code executes. Anne Currie introduces the main characteristics of orchestrators and considers how using them affects both the psychology and the tools required to manage your infrastructure.

Laura Czajkowski is an open source advocate and regular conference speaker who is passionate about getting everyone from students at primary school to professionals at tier 1 banks involved in open source communities, both on IRC and in face-to-face discussions. Laura has been active in open source communities since 2000; in that time, she has been involved in leading and organizing conferences on software testing, documentation, and advocacy. Laura served for four years on the Ubuntu Local council and currently sits as an elected Ubuntu member on the Community council.

Presentations

Dealing with cultural diversity and internal advocacy within a distributed team Session

Scaling company culture can be difficult even when the majority of your company is in the same office. Nowadays, this is rarely the case; most of the time you’re split over multiple continents. Laura Czajkowski breaks down the cultural challenges faced when working in a distributed team and looks at some solutions that can be brought in to help.

Joe Damato is a low-level computologist who enjoys reading and writing code. Joe is the founder and CEO of packagecloud.io, a service which makes it easy to create secure package repositories for developing and distributing software.

Presentations

Infrastructure as code might be literally impossible Session

Infrastructure as code might be literally impossible because none of the core open source software we use actually works. Joe Damato explores commonly held misconceptions about fundamental infrastructure tools and commonly used system libraries and presents some surprising failure cases that resulted in security vulnerabilities, broken software, and infrastructure management nightmares.

Ivan Daniluk is a senior software engineer at Typeform. Ivan has more than a decade of experience in writing networking software for security market. He’s an active member of the Go community, a conference speaker (most recently at GopherCon 2016), the host of the GolangShow podcast, and organizer of Golang meetups, the author of numerous articles about Go, and the author of a few popular projects for Gophers. Ivan enjoys helping people to learn about Go and programming and is highly interested in neural networks, artificial intelligence, neuroscience, visualizations, and new approaches to education in general. His hobbies include figure skating, the Argentine tango, yachting, and astronomy.

Presentations

Visualizing concurrency in Go Session

Ivan Daniluk explains concurrency in Go using the power of 3D modeling and animations. Ivan offers a demo of his tool that can visually represent concurrent Go programs using WebGL in a browser. You'll explore common concurrency patterns through real-time 3D animations and learn how parallelism differs from concurrency.

Laurent is VP, Customer Experience @WalmartLabs, building experiences that bridge the digital and in-store experience across devices for Walmart’s customers. Under his leadership, @WalmartLabs has increased its commitment to modern technologies and open source development including releasing Electrode, an application platform built on React and Node.js for web and mobile. Laurent has proven experience in leadership, architecting and shipping large scale distributed systems from the ground up. Prior to working at WalmartLabs, he held various leadership roles ranging from CTO to Sr. Director Engineering at unicorn startups like Zynga and large scale business like Paypal and Netflix.

Presentations

Introducing Electrode, an open source release from @WalmartLabs Keynote

@WalmartLabs has successfully transitioned its application platform to React and Node.js. That platform is now open sourced for the world to use. Laurent Desegur discusses the problems @WalmartLabs aims to solve and the benefits of Electrode.

Roberto Di Cosmo is the director of IRILL, a research structure dedicated to free and open source software quality, as well as a full professor in computer science at Université Paris Diderot. He is currently on leave from Inria to lead the Software Heritage project. Previously, he taught for almost a decade at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris and successfully led the European research project Mancoosi. Roberto’s research interests span a wide spectrum from the semantics of programming languages, type systems, rewriting, and linear logic to functional programming and parallel and distributed programming. He currently focuses on new scientific problems posed by the general adoption of free software, with a particular focus on static analysis of large software collections. Roberto is a longtime free software advocate and has contributed to its adoption with the best-selling book Hijacking the World, seminars, articles, and software. He also created Systematic’s free software thematic group, which has helped fund over 40 research and development projects.

Presentations

Why and how Software Heritage is building the universal software archive Keynote

Software Heritage's mission is to collect, organize, preserve, and share the source code of all publicly available software. Roberto Di Cosmo surveys the motivations behind the launch of Software Heritage, which has already archived more than 3 billion unique source code files and 650 million unique commits, spanning more than 25 million FOSS projects from major software development hubs.

Cory Doctorow is a science fiction novelist, blogger, and technology activist. Cory is the coeditor of the popular blog Boing Boing and a contributor to the Guardian, the New York Times, Publishers Weekly, Wired, and many other newspapers, magazines, and websites. He was formerly director of European affairs for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a nonprofit civil liberties group that defends freedom in technology law, policy, standards, and treaties. Cory holds an honorary doctorate in computer science from the Open University (UK), where he is a visiting senior lecturer; in 2007, he served as the Fulbright Chair at the Annenberg Center for Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California.

Cory’s novels have been translated into dozens of languages and are published by Tor Books and simultaneously released on the Internet under Creative Commons licenses that encourage their reuse and sharing, a move that increases his sales by enlisting his readers to help promote his work. He has won the Locus and Sunburst Awards and been nominated for the Hugo, Nebula, and British Science Fiction Awards. His latest young adult novel is Pirate Cinema, a story of mashup guerrillas who declare war on the entertainment industry. His latest novel for adults is Rapture of the Nerds, written with Charles Stross and published in 2012. His New York Times bestseller Little brother was published in 2008. Its sequel, Homeland, was published in 2013. His latest short story collection is With a Little Help, available in paperback, ebook, audiobook, and limited edition hardcover. In 2011, Tachyon Books published a collection of his essays, Context: Further Selected Essays on Productivity, Creativity, Parenting, and Politics in the 21st Century (with an introduction by Tim O’Reilly), and IDW published a collection of comic books inspired by his short fiction called Cory Doctorow’s Futuristic Tales of the Here and Now. The Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow, a PM Press Outspoken Authors chapbook, was also published in 2011. His forthcoming books include Anda’s Game, a graphic novel from FirstSecond.

Cory cofounded the open source peer-to-peer software company Opencola, sold to OpenText in 2003, and presently serves on the boards and advisory boards of the Participatory Culture Foundation, the Clarion Foundation, the Glenn Gould Foundation, and the Chabot Space & Science Center’s SpaceTime project. In 2007, Entertainment Weekly called him “the William Gibson of his generation.” He was also named one of Forbes magazine’s Web Celebrities every year from 2007 to 2010 and one of the World Economic Forum’s Young Global Leaders for 2007. On February 3, 2008, Cory became a father. The little girl is called Poesy Emmeline Fibonacci Nautilus Taylor Doctorow and is a marvel that puts all the works of technology and artifice to shame.

Presentations

How you got here Keynote

Open licenses have served us well for more than two decades, but they need help if we're going to survive the era in which computers invade our bodies and the structures we keep those bodies in. Cory Doctorow explains that we can lock the whole future Web open, if we do it right.

As vice president of marketing and community, Brian Doll helps keep open source software safe at SourceClear, the security company for developers. Brian has been building and selling things online since the mid-nineties and has held leadership positions in both business and technical roles in the software, ecommerce, and financial services industries. Always the optimist, Brian believes we’re only just beginning to apply the power of the Internet to improve the world.

Presentations

Managing security in an open source world Session

How many security vulnerabilities are lurking in the open source libraries that make up the majority of your codebase? For maintainers and developers alike, managing security in an open source world isn't so straightforward. Brian Doll offers an overview of different types of vulnerabilities and explores some tools and tips on how best to stay safe.

George Dunlap is a senior engineer on the open source Xen team at Citrix in Cambridge, England. He began working with the Xen project while a graduate student at the University of Michigan and has done work in many areas of Xen, including performance analysis, scheduling, and memory management. George is a committer and maintainer for the scheduling and mm subsystems in Xen and also serves on the Xen security response team. He writes technical articles regularly for the Xenproject.org blog, including one describing in detail the Intel SYSRET vulnerability, and has had articles published on Linux.com. George holds a PhD from the University of Michigan.

Presentations

Making community decisions without consensus Session

George Dunlap discusses the XenProject's experience trying to make a difficult community decision. George outlines the decision-making process, which allowed everyone to feel that their viewpoint was considered despite the lack of any option with clear consensus, to help you navigate similarly difficult waters.

Tony Edwards works as a UI engineer at Netflix on the Acquisition UI team. He lives in San Francisco and loves architecture, music, art, and food.

Presentations

Introduction to ES6 and React Tutorial

Tony Edwards explores the basics of React and ES6 (ES2015) and demonstrates how to use them to ship awesome code at breakneck speed. By the end of the tutorial, you'll have a demo web app running on Node.js.

Paul Fenwick is an internationally acclaimed public speaker, developer, and science educator. He is well known for presenting on a diverse range of topics including privacy, neuroscience, and neuroethics, Klingon programming, open source, depression and mental health, advancements in science, diversity, autonomous agents, and minesweeper automation. His dynamic presentation style and quirky humor has delighted audiences worldwide. Paul was awarded the 2013 O’Reilly Open Source award and the 2010 White Camel award, both for outstanding contributions to the open source community. As a freedom-loving scientist, Paul’s goal is to learn everything he can, do amazing things with that knowledge, and give them away for free. (Photograph by Joshua Button)

Presentations

Building healthy open source communities. . .in space Session

The Comprehensive Kerbal Archive Network (CKAN) has hundreds of contributors, tens of thousands of users, and success metrics measured in decades of human joy delivered. Paul Fenwick uses the example of CKAN to examine how to help maximize your open source project's chance of success from the beginning, with a focus on community building and contributor growth.

Ignite OSCON (sponsored by PayPal) Event

If you had five minutes on stage, what would you say? What if you only got 20 slides, and they rotated automatically after 15 seconds? Would you pitch a project? Launch a website? Teach a hack? We’ll find out again at this year's Ignite OSCON.

From humble beginnings as a PHP4 web developer in grade school, Amanda Folson now works as a developer advocate at GitLab, where she gets to share her passion for technology with others. When she’s not speaking, writing, or shooing cats off her keyboard, you’ll find her consuming APIs and IPAs.

Presentations

Open source for closed source companies Session

Just because you’re selling SaaS doesn’t mean you can’t adopt open source principles in your organization. Amanda Folson explores how individuals and companies can open source their documentation, libraries, and ideas for the greater good of the community in a way that doesn’t mean giving it all away for free.

Steve Francia is a Gopher at Google as well as an author, speaker, and developer. Steve is the creator of Hugo, Cobra, spf13-vim. Previously, he was an exec at Docker and MongoDB. Steve serves on the board of Drupal.

Presentations

Building amazing cross-platform command-line apps in Go Tutorial

Ashley McNamara and Steve Francia demonstrate how to create user-friendly command-line interfaces and command suites before walking you through building your own app. By the end of the workshop, you’ll have a working knowledge of Go and your very own functioning CLI app.

Steve George has been professionally involved with open source since 2006, when he joined Canonical with a mission to develop Ubuntu as a platform and create an open source business. At Canonical, he led a range of efforts including creating Canonical’s corporate business, developing Ubuntu as a popular cloud and server platform, and enabling the growth of the business to 800 people across 40 countries. In a career spanning 20 years, Steve has worked in a range of technical and business roles in the technology sector. His interest and support for FOSS goes back to 1997, when he got hold of his first copy of Slackware on floppy disk.

Presentations

Open source as a strategy in innovation Session

Achieving competitive advantage is a key driver for companies' involvement in open source. Drawing on experiences from product development at Canonical, Steve George examines the role of innovation and open source for creating and capturing business value and explores the barriers, benefits, and lessons learned.

Florian Gilcher is a member of the global Rust community team and chairman of Rust Community Europe e.V.. He’s one of the organizers of the Rustfest conference as well as the longest-running Rust meetups, the Rust Hack and Learn Berlin.

Presentations

Useful Rust Session

The Rust type system is often discussed, especially in its relation to memory management; it allows for memory safety as a static guarantee at compile time. But if that were its only specialty, Rust would be a one-trick pony. Florian Gilcher uses Rust to present elegant, compiler-supported solutions for common problems of everyday applications as well as the infrastructure around them.

Jeffrey Goff is a senior developer at Evozon Systems, a web design agency in Cluj, Romania, where he architects and builds custom web applications with Perl, HTML, and JavaScript. One of the original release managers for Parrot (née Perl 6), Jeff is an active contributor to both Perl 5 and Perl 6 and has written some core interface modules for Perl 6. At home, when he’s not creating Perl 6 libraries or speaking at conventions, he does origami and travels. You can follow Jeff on Twitter and view his open source contributions on GitHub. He also blogs at The Perl Fisher.

Presentations

The top 10 things you need to know about Perl 6 Session

Join Jeffrey Goff to learn about the top 10 features that Perl 6 brings to the table, including Unicode support, functional programming, reactive and concurrent programming, built-in expression grammars, built-in vector operators, and a full metaprogramming system with support for roles. Jeffrey discusses where Perl 6 started, where it is today, and where the language is going in the future.

Heidi Howard is currently working toward a PhD at the Cambridge University Computer Lab, under the supervision of Jon Crowcroft. Her research interest is fault tolerance, consistency, and consensus in modern distributed systems. Previously, Heidi worked as a research assistant and undergraduate researcher at Cambridge University under the supervision of Anil Madhavapeddy, Jon Crowcroft, and Robert Mullins. Her past work includes middlebox traversal, DNS, privacy-preserving systems, and wireless community networks. Heidi holds a BA in computer science from Pembroke College at the Cambridge University. You can reach her at her blog or on Twitter as @heidiann360.

Presentations

Distributed consensus: Making impossible possible Session

Heidi Howard explains how to construct resilient distributed systems on top of unreliable components. Starting almost two decades ago, with Leslie Lamport’s Paxos protocol, Heidi leads a journey to today’s data centers, covering interesting impossibility results and demonstrating how to construct new fault-tolerance systems that you can depend upon everyday.

Laura James is an engineer with varied experience in innovative organizations and sectors, focused on enabling new technologies to help people and society. Laura is currently technical director at Doteveryone, where she demonstrates how digital technologies can create public value in healthcare and beyond. Laura is also a cofounder of Field Ready, an NGO transforming humanitarian aid through distributed digital manufacturing, and an advisor to Weir PLC, Good Night Lamp, Polysolar, and the ContentMine. Previously, she cofounded Makespace, a community workshop and inventing shed in Cambridge, and was CEO of Open Knowledge, a global nonprofit network unlocking knowledge to empower people. Laura has worked at startups including AlertMe.com, a connected home system, where she was the first employee and VP of engineering, and Evi.com, where she built an AI platform for search. Laura has also worked in R&D at AT&T Labs in the US and UK and as chief operating officer at CARET, a dynamic innovation department at the University of Cambridge developing open source systems to support teaching and research. Laura holds a master’s and PhD degree in engineering from the University of Cambridge, received the Royal Academy of Engineering leadership award and a NESTA Crucible fellowship, and is a chartered engineer.

Presentations

Open innovation for the NHS: Navigating complexity Session

Doteveryone’s work with the NHS aims to improve care for older people in the final phases of life by demonstrating what's possible with new technologies, targeting the furthest first—the most socially and digitally excluded. Laura James shares experiences and lessons learned navigating complicated organizations and IT systems, people and ethics, and standards and prototyping.

Holden Karau is a transgender Canadian Apache Spark committer, an active open source contributor, and coauthor of Learning Spark and High Performance Spark. When not in San Francisco working as a software development engineer at IBM’s Spark Technology Center, Holden speaks internationally about Spark and holds office hours at coffee shops at home and abroad. She makes frequent contributions to Spark, specializing in PySpark and machine learning. Prior to IBM, she worked on a variety of distributed, search, and classification problems at Alpine, Databricks, Google, Foursquare, and Amazon. She holds a bachelor of mathematics in computer science from the University of Waterloo.

Presentations

Getting started contributing to Apache Spark Session

Apache Spark is one of the most popular tools for big data and with 400+ open pull requests as of this writing, very active in terms of development as well. With such a large volume of contributions, it can be hard to know how to begin contributing yourself. Holden Karau offers advice on finding good issues, formatting code, finding reviewers, and what to expect in the code review process.

Google Developer Expert (GDE) in web technologies and Angular, worldwide conference speaker, workshop mentor, Angular evangelist, and tech community leader.
Head of the Angular department at 500Tech, a top front-end consultancy based in Tel Aviv.

Presentations

Data flow architecture with Redux and Angular 2 Tutorial

This workshop is all about modern SPA architecture, focused on popular architectural design pattern Redux. Redux introduces a unidirectional data-flow and a predictable state container that scales. Through a series of live code examples, Nir Kaufman walks you through a complete flow of a typical application, using Angular2 as the presentation layer.

Brian Ketelsen is an experienced leader of technical teams with a strong focus on data warehouses and distributed computing. Writing software for various platforms since 1993, Brian has honed his broad technical skills in a variety of roles ranging from DBA to CIO. A prolific open source enthusiast, he has contributed to some of the largest Go projects, including Docker, Kubernetes, etcd, SkyDNS, Kong, Go-Kit, and Goa. Brian cowrote Go in Action (Manning Press) and spends much of his free time fostering the Go community. He co-organizes GopherCon, the yearly conference for Go programmers held each summer in Denver, and helps organize the Tampa Go Meetup. Brian holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science.

Presentations

TRAINING: Containers and Kubernetes: From scratch to production in two days 2-Day Training

Brian Ketelsen offers an introduction to developing and managing container-based applications for deployment to Kubernetes and Google Container Engine. Through a combination of instructor-led presentations, demonstrations, and hands-on labs, you'll learn the key concepts and practices for deploying and maintaining applications using Kubernetes.

Arnaud Le Hors is senior technical staff member of open web technologies at IBM. Arnaud has been working on open technologies for over 20 years, focusing on standards and open source development, both as a staff member of standards development organizations (SDOs) such as W3C and as a representative for IBM. Arnaud has been involved in every aspect of the standards development process, including the technical, strategic, political, and legal aspects, both internal and external to an SDO and to companies like IBM. Arnaud was editor of several key web specifications including HTML and DOM. He has also participated in open source projects such as Xerces, the Apache XML parser. Arnaud is currently the main representative for IBM at W3C, the chair of the W3C RDF Data Shapes working group, and a member of the Hyperledger Project Technical Steering Committee.

Presentations

Hyperledger: Distributed computing with FOSS DNA Session

The Hyperledger Project, a collaborative software initiative building a distributed ledger and smart contract platform, is a real test for FOSS. Many contributors are new to public collaboration, much of this space is still being defined, and some companies have made huge bets on particular outcomes. Arnaud Le Hors explains how the project balances these challenges and ships production code.

Robert “r0ml” Lefkowitz is the chief architect for software at Warby Parker. Prior to Warby Parker, Robert was a software architect in the insurance, telecommunications, and finance industries. He is also a distinguished engineer of the ACM.

Presentations

Beyond open source: The democratization of software Session

The Schumpeterian sensibility of our age is that incumbents get disrupted. So when one asserts that open source has won, the logical follow-up questions are: What will disrupt the incumbent? What comes next? Robert Lefkowitz explains why the answer is the democratization of software.

Idit Levine is the CTO for the cloud management division at EMC and a member of its Global CTO office, where she focuses on management and orchestration (M&O) over the entire stack, microservices, cloud-native apps, and platforms as a service. Idit became fascinated with the cloud when she joined DynamicOps (vCAC, now part of VMware) as one of its first employees. She subsequently took part in developing Verizon Terremark’s next-generation public cloud and served as acting CTO at Intigua, a startup focused on container and management technology.

Presentations

Unik: A platform for automating unikernel compilation and deployment Session

Unikernels are rapidly gaining momentum in the market: Docker acquired Unikernel Systems, and Google trends show it's a leading topic. Idit Levine explores Unik, a open source orchestration system for unikernels that is a useful tool in the cloud-native application space, and explains how to integrate Unik as a backend to Docker, Kubernetes, and Cloud Foundry runtime.

Joseph Lynch is a software engineer for Yelp who focuses on building data store and service infrastructure. Joey is a core contributor to Yelp’s data store platform, which has allowed Yelp to go from a primarily MySQL data tier to a polyglot data tier including Elasticsearch, Cassandra, and Zookeeper. He loves pushing the edge of how Yelp uses DevOps tools to automate infrastructure and never met a problem he didn’t want to automate away. When not wrangling clusters of data stores, Joey enjoys building service discovery, reliable communication, fast deployment, and monitoring into Yelp’s SOA.

Presentations

Building a powerful data tier from open source datastores Session

In the past few years, there has been a proliferation of production-ready open source databases, giving developers and operators more choices than ever. Joseph Lynch explores how Yelp has combined complimentary data stores to provide a powerful data tier for our developers. Along the way, Joseph shares lessons learned about deployment, configuration, and monitoring from a production environment.

Eloise Macdonald-Meyer, aka Ducky, is a computing student and an enthusiastic Tasmanian. She works part time as a web developer at Takeflight, a local Tasmanian web agency. Her main technical interests are in games technology, human-computer interaction, geographic information systems, and the ways she can combine them. Eloise is an active member in communities such as Girl Geek Coffees and the Tasmanian Game Development Society. In her free time, she enjoys snowboarding, sailing, playing and making games, and teaching kids how to code.

Presentations

I just want to talk about Wagtail and how great it is Session

Eloise Macdonald-Meyer offers an introduction to Wagtail, an open source content management system built on Django. Eloise discusses the pros and cons of the system, its unique features and nature as an open source project, and the future of the project and explains how to get started with Wagtail.

Jon Manning is the cofounder of Secret Lab and has worked on apps of all sorts, ranging from iPad games for children to instant messaging clients. He frequently finds himself gesticulating wildly in front of classes full of eager-to-learn developers. Jon has written a whole bunch of books for O’Reilly (and previously Wiley) about iOS development and game development. He recently completed his PhD, where his research studied how people manipulate the ranking systems of social media sites; this means that he literally has a doctorate about jerks on the internet. He wrote Yarn Spinner, an interactive dialogue system, which was used in the 2017 indie game Night in the Woods. Jon can be found as @desplesda on Twitter.

Presentations

Building containerized microservices with Swift Session

Microservices. Containerization. Swift. Three words that bespeak greatness in this modern technology world. Paris Buttfield-Addison, Jonathon Manning, and Tim Nugent explain how to combine them. This is actually useful—come and learn why.

Engaging with open data through video games Session

Open data is cool, especially when it comes from the government. What’s even cooler than open data? Games. Games are cool. So why not combine them? Tim Nugent, Paris Buttfield-Addison, and Jonathon Manning explore the potential for spreading the word about open data—and providing deeper engagement with data—through game development.

Liam Maxwell is the national technology advisor in the UK government, where his role is to create the conditions to make the UK the best place for business to invest in technology and ensure the civil service can make the best use of emerging technologies to deliver effective digital government. Previously, Liam was chief technology officer for HM government. His teams at the Government Digital Service established the Common Technology Services function, which delivered a range of projects from the Crown Hosting Service to the Public Services Network, the Digital Marketplace, and the spend control and delivery assurance function. The changes to technology that his team introduced across the government helped to save £3.5B in the last four years of the 2010 parliament.

Presentations

Using open to drive change Keynote

In 2011, the UK government started to change the way that it delivers public services. The fundamental driver for technology change was the use of open—open standards, open source, open data, and open markets. Liam Maxwell explains how this approach helped, where it fell short, and lessons learned about how to transform government.

Patrick McFadin is one of the leading experts in Apache Cassandra and data-modeling techniques. As a consultant and the chief evangelist for Apache Cassandra at DataStax, Patrick has helped build some of the largest and most exciting deployments in production. Prior to DataStax, he was chief architect at Hobsons, an education services company. There, Patrick spoke often on web application design and performance.

Presentations

Open source or proprietary: Choose wisely Session

Will our project be OSS or proprietary? It's an easy question that can lead to some uncomfortable moments in an organization. Sorting through the reasons for and against OSS can be tedious at best and life changing at worst. Don’t let this moment become something you regret. Patrick McFadin outlines the process and gives you some tools to make it through. Hopefully we’ll save a few friendships.

Ashley McNamara is the director of technical communities at ObjectRocket by Rackspace, where she acts as a bridge between third-party developers and Rackspace, driving platform adoption through the developer community and driving change into products based on real-world customer/developer feedback. Ashley was a 2014 Hackbright engineering fellow. In her spare time, she’s a mentor at WeWork, General Assembly, AngelHack, and CapitalFactory and is on the board of multiple engineering groups including Redis Austin, Big Data Analytics Club, and Austin All Girl Hack Night. Ashley is passionate about helping more underrepresented individuals join and feel comfortable in tech and is often a resource for new developers trying to find their way.

Presentations

Building amazing cross-platform command-line apps in Go Tutorial

Ashley McNamara and Steve Francia demonstrate how to create user-friendly command-line interfaces and command suites before walking you through building your own app. By the end of the workshop, you’ll have a working knowledge of Go and your very own functioning CLI app.

Luca Mezzalira is a solutions architect at DAZN. In his 14-year career, Luca has worked on cutting-edge projects for mobile (iOS, Android, and Blackberry), desktop, web, TVs, set-top boxes, and embedded devices. Luca believes the best way to learn any programming language is by mastering its models, so he’s spent a lot of time studying topics like object-oriented programming, functional programming, and reactive programming. As a result, he’s able to swap easily between different programming languages, apply best practices, and drive any team to success. Luca is a Google Developer Expert on web technologies and manager of the London JavaScript community.

Presentations

MVI: An architecture for reactive programming Session

MVI (Model-View-Intent) is a new architecture made for reactive programming leveraging the power and flexibility of observables. Luca Mezzalira explores why reactive programming will remain a hot topic over the next decade and explains how you can structure an application in pure reactive programming using Cycle.js, React, and hyperscript.

H. Wade Minter is the product manager for team sports products at NBC SportsEngine. Wade is also the public address announcer for the National Hockey League’s Carolina Hurricanes and the ring announcer for GOUGE Professional Wrestling. He leads a weird life.

Presentations

Building a pipeline: The case for hiring junior developers Session

Any hiring manager in a technology company knows that the hardest problem to solve is hiring. There never seem to be enough experienced developers available at any given point in time. But many of those same hiring managers will say, "We don't hire junior developers." Tech team-builder Wade Minter makes the case for why your company should hire and train junior developers.

Lorna Mitchell is a Leeds-based developer advocate with IBM Cloud Data Services. She brings her technical expertise on a range of topics to audiences all over the world with her writing and speaking engagements, always delivered with a very practical slant. Lorna is the author of PHP Web Services (O’Reilly), PHP Master (Sitepoint), and Git Workbook (Leanpub) and is regularly published at a number of outlets, including net magazine and her blog, Lornajane.net.

Presentations

The wonderful world of webhooks Session

Webhooks allow our applications to exchange data as soon as it happens rather than polling using APIs. Lorna Mitchell covers creating, consuming, and deploying webhooks in a modern, microservices world.

Arpan Nanavati is a developer and technical leader on the Customer Experience team at @WalmartLabs, where he leads teams contributing to the open source communities for Electrode, Node.js, React, and the JavaScript ecosystem. Prior to @WalmartLabs, Arpan helped lead the team in reinventing and delivering Paypal Checkout on Node.js and AngularJS. In his free time, he loves snowboarding and being stupid on his motorcycle.

Presentations

Digital transformation: The why, what, and how of @WalmartLabs's migration to the Electrode platform in less than a year Session

Arpan Nanavati tells the story of how @WalmartLabs successfully migrated to the Electrode platform (built on React and Node.js) with efficiency and speed.

Deb Nicholson is the community outreach director for the Open Invention Network—the defensive patent pool built to protect Linux projects. She is also the community manager for GNU MediaGoblin, a brand-new federated media hosting program. Deb works at the intersection of technology and social justice. She has over 15 years of nonprofit management experience and got involved in the free software movement about five years ago when she started working for the Free Software Foundation. In her spare time, Deb serves on the board of OpenHatch, a small nonprofit dedicated to identifying and mentoring new free software contributors, with a particular interest in building a more diverse free software movement.

Presentations

Handle conflict like a boss Session

The FOSS community is full of passionate people with many, many differing ideas on how to achieve our shared goals. Disagreements seem inevitable, but what if they could be handled rationally, in a way that left everyone feeling at least OK about the outcome? Deb Nicholson covers strategies for handling conflict and offers tips on how to scale your conflict resolution skills like a boss.

Tim Nugent pretends to be a mobile app developer, game designer, and PhD student, and now he’s even pretending to be an author. (He cowrote the latest update to Learning Cocoa with Objective-C for O’Reilly.) When he isn’t busy avoiding being found out as a fraud, Tim spends most of his time designing and creating little apps and games he won’t let anyone see. He also spent a disproportionately long time writing this tiny little bio, most of which was taken up trying to stick a witty sci-fi reference in. . .before he simply gave up. Tim can be found as @The_McJones on Twitter.

Presentations

Building containerized microservices with Swift Session

Microservices. Containerization. Swift. Three words that bespeak greatness in this modern technology world. Paris Buttfield-Addison, Jonathon Manning, and Tim Nugent explain how to combine them. This is actually useful—come and learn why.

Engaging with open data through video games Session

Open data is cool, especially when it comes from the government. What’s even cooler than open data? Games. Games are cool. So why not combine them? Tim Nugent, Paris Buttfield-Addison, and Jonathon Manning explore the potential for spreading the word about open data—and providing deeper engagement with data—through game development.

Nick O’Leary is an emerging technology specialist at IBM, where he gets to do interesting things with interesting technologies and also play with toys. Nick focuses on IoT technology areas and has worked on projects ranging from smart meter energy monitoring to retrofitting sensors to industrial manufacturing lines with Raspberry Pis and Arduinos. With a background in pervasive messaging, he is a contributor to the Eclipse Paho project and sits on the OASIS MQTT technical committee. Nick is the creator of Node-RED, an open source tool for wiring the Internet of Things.

Presentations

Node-RED: Wiring the IoT with open source tools Session

An open Internet of Things (IoT) industry is critical. Nick O'Leary introduces Node-RED, an open source tool for wiring together hardware devices, APIs, and online services using a visual flow-based programming model that allows users to quickly create apps using an easy drag-and-drop interface.

Ryan Oglesby is an application developer at ThoughtWorks, where he has worked on products ranging from native mobile applications to an enterprise banking platform built on domain-driven design, CQRS, and event sourcing. Ryan is currently a senior consultant and technical lead who builds high-quality, valuable software as well as strong technical community among teams through communication, empathy, and inclusivity.

Presentations

Transitioning to microservices Tutorial

Having an architecture based on services offers many advantages (like scalability and technical flexibility), but it comes with upfront costs and complexity that few companies are in a position to pay. Cassandra Shum and Ryan Oglesby explore the prerequisites for moving into a microservices architecture and provide tips on how to achieve them via engaging exercises.

Edafe Onerhime supports governments, businesses, civil societies, and the third sector with technical advice on open data through Open Data Services, a digital cooperative that incubates open data standards and helps people publish and use open data. Open Data Services supports, among others, 360Giving and Open Contracting; two standards adopted by the UK government at the May 2016 anti-corruption summit and in the UK National Action Plan. Edafe first encountered open data while preparing her dissertation on the quality of UK health open data; she now hosts data clinics to provide free advice on making sense of data, mentors people interested in improving their data skills, and trains a diverse audience in open data and data literacy. She is also a regular speaker at events, with a focus on bringing tech to the people and demystifying data. Edafe holds a master’s degree in business intelligence. She champions digital literacy, diversity and inclusiveness, particularly for the third sector, women in technology and minorities.

Presentations

Open funding data: 360Giving's journey so far Session

At present, it's not possible to find a complete dataset on all charitable grants in the UK. Alice Casey and Edafe Onerhime offer an overview of 360Giving, which supports funding organizations in publishing their grants data in an open, standardized way and helps people to understand and use that data to support decision making and learning across the charitable giving sector.

Chi Onwurah is a British member of Parliament representing Newcastle upon Tyne Central and is also shadow minister for industrial strategy, science, and innovation. From September 2015 to October 2016, Chi was shadow minister for the digital economy and was previously shadow cabinet office minister leading on cybersecurity, social entrepreneurship, civil contingency, open government, and transparency, shadow minister for innovation, science, and digital infrastructure, where she worked closely with the science and business community, with industry on broadband issues, and on the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill.

Prior to Chi’s election to Parliament in May 2010, she worked as head of Telecom’s technology at the UK regulator Ofcom, focusing on the implications for competition and regulation of the services and technologies associated with next-generation networks. Prior to Ofcom, Chi was a partner in Hammatan Ventures, a US technology consultancy, developing the GSM markets in Nigeria and South Africa, director of market development with Teligent, a global wireless local loop operator, and director of product strategy at GTS. She has also worked for Cable & Wireless and Nortel as an engineer, project, and product manager in the UK and France. Chi continues to encourage women in STEM. She is a chartered engineer with a BEng in electrical engineering from Imperial College London and an MBA from Manchester Business School. Chi was born in Wallsend and attended Kenton Comprehensive School in Newcastle, where she was elected the school’s “MP” in mock elections at age 17.

Presentations

Open source and the fourth industrial age Session

The fourth industrial age is driven by technology, particularly software and algorithms. Chi Onwurah explores how open source is helping to deliver the industrial landscape we want.

Tracy Osborn is a designer, developer, and entrepre-nerd living in California’s Bay Area. She’s a part of the developer relations team at DreamFactory, the author of Hello Web App, and creator of WeddingLovely. She’s also an avid outdoorswoman and would love to go on a hike with you.

Presentations

Marketing for developers Session

"If you build it, they will come," they say. Not so! Marketing is crucial for anything you build that you want people to find and use. How should you market your app, your open source project, your mobile app, or anything else you build—especially as a time-strapped developer? Tracy Osborn offers marketing tips and recommendations to make sure that what you build is seen and used.

Katrina Owen is as an advocate on the Open Source team at GitHub. She accidentally became a developer while pursuing a degree in molecular biology. When programming, her focus is on automation, workflow optimization, and refactoring. Katrina works primarily in Go and Ruby, contributes to several open source projects, and is the creator of Exercism.io.

Presentations

The bait and switch of open source Session

Open source sells itself as being about technical problems—delightfully thorny technical problems at that. However, successful projects are filled with people, which introduces a whole different set of problems. Katrina Owen illustrates the many ways in which things went wrong for Exercism because she didn’t treat people problems as first-class citizens.

Jo Pearce is a nonbinary, language agnostic developer and science womble who loves to learn about a wide range of sciences and make good use of the things that they find. Jo has spent the last 20 years working in IT companies, on projects ranging from OO databases, financial modeling, and decision support systems to marketing websites. In every role, the one consistent requirement has been to understand people and their needs. Jo enjoys making useful things, but they also enjoy helping people be more useful and productive.

Presentations

Hacking your head: Managing information overload Session

There are limits to our ability to learn and process information. Overload impacts productivity by causing psychological and physiological stress. Jo Pearce relates findings from cognitive psychology that help us understand how, as developers, we might be overloading both ourselves and those we work with—and what to do about it.

Simon Phipps has engaged at a strategic level in the world’s leading technology companies, starting in roles such as field engineer, programmer, systems analyst and more recently taking on executive leadership roles around open source. Simon worked with X-series standards in the ‘80s, on collaborative conferencing software in the ’90s, helped introduce both Java and XML at IBM, and was instrumental in open sourcing the whole software portfolio at Sun Microsystems. He is now managing director of Meshed Insights Ltd and founder of Public Software CIC. As a director of the Document Foundation and of the UK’s Open Rights Group, he takes an active interest in digital rights issues and is a widely read commentator on InfoWorld and his own Webmink blog. Simon holds a BSc in electronic engineering and is a fellow of the British Computer Society and the Open Forum Academy.

Presentations

Project umbrellas for Europe Session

Do you need to start an open source foundation? Many open source projects choose to become legal entities to support their collaboration. In the US, there are several general purpose bodies for hosting open source projects, but up to now there have been none in Europe—so Simon Phipps and Moritz Bartl started one. They explain what they are doing to address the need and how you can benefit.

Richard Pope makes things for the Internet. Over his career, Richard has worked on GOV.UK, ScraperWiki, MOO.com, mySociety, Rewired State, Consumer Focus Labs, and electionleaflets.org

Presentations

Power, design, and possibilities: Designing digital services that are accountable, understood, and trusted Session

Politics is about the distribution of power in society. In the early 21st century, digital products are exerting influence on how power is distributed among us. Richard Pope explains why software is now politics and what your responsibilities are in this new world.

Steve Pousty is a dad, son, partner, and PaaS-dust spreader (aka developer evangelist) with OpenShift. He goes around and shows off all the great work the OpenShift engineers do. He can teach you about PaaS with Java, Python, PostgreSQL, and MongoDB, as well as some JavaScript. He has deep subject-area expertise in GIS spatial data, statistics, and ecology. He has spoken and led over 50 workshops at over 75 conferences, including Monktoberfest, MongoNY, JavaOne, FOSS4G, CTIA, Fluent, GeoWeb, Where2.0, and OSCON. Before OpenShift, Steve was a developer evangelist for LinkedIn, deCarta, and ESRI. Steve has a PhD in ecology from the University of Connecticut. He likes building interesting applications and helping developers create great solutions.

Presentations

Packaging and maintaining Docker-based solutions with OpenShift Session

Steve Pousty outlines the processes, tools, and techniques that Red Hat is adopting in order to help improve security for building, running, and maintaining container images. Steve covers topics such as OpenShift templates and source-to-image builds and includes a workflow demonstration showing how operations teams can distribute security patches throughout a Kubernetes cluster.

Ilan Rabinovitch is director of technical community and evangelism at Datadog. Previously, Ilan spent a number of years leading infrastructure and reliability engineering teams at organizations such as Ooyala and Edmunds.com. He’s active in the open source and DevOps communities, where he is a co-organizer of events such as SCALE, Texas Linux Fest, DevOpsDay LA, and DevOpsDays Silicon Valley.

Presentations

Monitoring 101: Finding signal in the noise Session

It only takes monitoring a few machines and applications for it to become very complicated to identify and fix issues in your environment. Knowing which metrics to watch and how to use them to troubleshoot will help you solve problems more quickly. Ilan Rabinovitch covers the three types of monitoring data, what to collect, what should trigger an alert, and how to avoid pager fatigue.

Rachel Reese is a longtime software engineer and math geek who can often be found talking to random strangers about the joys of functional programming and F#. Rachel currently works for Jet.com in New York City. She has helped run the Nashville F# User group, @NashFSharp, and the Burlington, Vermont, functional programming user group, @VTFun. She’s also an ASPInsider, an F# MVP, a Xamarin MVP, a community enthusiast, one of the founding @lambdaladies, and a Rachii. You can find her on her blog, Rachelree.se.

Presentations

Patterns and practices for real-world, functional, event-driven microservices Session

Jet.com, an ecommerce startup competing with Amazon, is a heavy user of F# and has based its architecture around Azure-based event-driven functional microservices. Over the last several months, Jet has schooled itself on what works and what doesn't for F# and microservices. Rachel Reese walks you through the lessons Jet has learned on its way to developing the platform.

Rachel Roumeliotis is a strategic content director at O’Reilly Media, where she leads an editorial team that covers a wide variety of programming topics ranging from full stack to open source in the enterprise to emerging programming languages. Rachel is a programming chair of OSCON and O’Reilly’s Software Architecture Conference. She has been working in technical publishing for 10 years, acquiring content in many areas including mobile programming, UX, computer security, and AI.

Presentations

Monday opening welcome Keynote

Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis, Simon Wardley, and Francine Bennett open the first day of keynotes.

Tuesday opening welcome Keynote

Program chairs Simon Wardley, Francine Bennett, and Rachel Roumeliotis open the second day of keynotes.

Karen M. Sandler is the executive director of the Software Freedom Conservancy. Karen is known for her advocacy for free software, particularly in relation to the software on medical devices. Previously, she was executive director of the GNOME Foundation, where she has since been elected to the board of directors, and general counsel of the Software Freedom Law Center. Karen co-organizes Outreachy, the award-winning outreach program for women, and is an advisor to the Ada Initiative. She is also pro bono counsel to the FSF and GNOME and pro bono general counsel to QuestionCopyright.Org. Karen is a recipient of the O’Reilly Open Source Award and cohost of the oggcast Free as in Freedom.

Presentations

A look at enforcement worldwide Session

There has been a recent increase in global enforcement initiatives around the GPL, the majority of which are coordinated and consistently undertaken. Karen Sandler breaks down what's happening and what you need to know about them. Karen outlines the principles of community-oriented GPL enforcement and explains how they impact enforcement discussions and promote overall compliance.

Is software freedom a social justice issue? Keynote

With so many important issues on a global scale, just how important is software freedom? Karen Sandler shares the evolution of her own thoughts about free and open source software on a bigger political and social scale and examines the ways we should frame discourse around the issue.

Erin Schnabel is a senior software engineer at IBM who specializes in composable runtimes and microservice architectures, including the application of OSGi, object-oriented and service-oriented technologies, and design patterns to decompose existing software systems. Erin has over 15 years of experience in the WebSphere Application Server development organization, with 7 years spent as development lead and architect for WebSphere Liberty.

Presentations

Learning microservices in the open with GameOn! Session

There are plenty of talks out there about how to get started with microservices, but in reality you learn by doing. Erin Schnabel and Katherine Stanley explore lessons learned while creating GameOn!, an interactive text-based adventure game that allows you to get hands-on with a microservice architecture to find out what works and what doesn't, and how we as a community can learn from each other.

Cassandra Shum is a lead consultant with ThoughtWorks, where she primarily leads and works on a variety of mobile projects and technologies, including domain-driven design and microservices. Over the last six years, she has worked on many different web and mobile applications. Cassandra is one of the leaders in the initiative to organize the women’s group in ThoughtWorks and is involved in promoting more female speakers in technology.

Presentations

Transitioning to microservices Tutorial

Having an architecture based on services offers many advantages (like scalability and technical flexibility), but it comes with upfront costs and complexity that few companies are in a position to pay. Cassandra Shum and Ryan Oglesby explore the prerequisites for moving into a microservices architecture and provide tips on how to achieve them via engaging exercises.

Mark Shuttleworth is the founder of both Ubuntu and Canonical. Mark leads product strategy and design at Canonical, defining the operations and user experience of Ubuntu for desktop, cloud, and IoT deployments at scale.

Presentations

Brilliant pebbles Keynote

Small is beautiful. Mark Shuttleworth explains why your next million is more likely to come from an afternoon tinkering on your laptop and a tiny PC than beating your neighbor to web scale on the cloud. From smart switches to smart drones, from the home to the office to the farm to the space station, the next wave is all about delivering your best bits to brilliant pebbles.

A software engineer, technologist, and activist, James Smith has been working with open source ideas for his entire career and is particularly interested in how they create a better future for everyone through open collaboration. James is currently head of labs at the Open Data Institute and formed a startup political party, Something New.

Presentations

Something New: Building an open source political party Session

Openness is a political idea, and our democracy is changing for the network age. Something New is a startup political party in the UK built for the network age and founded on open source principles. The party created an open source manifesto, ran it in the 2015 general election, and is now building momentum for the future. Join James Smith to learn what an open source democratic future looks like.

Katherine Stanley is a software engineer in the WebSphere Application Server development organization at IBM, where she specializes in microservices architectures built using WebSphere Liberty. Katherine has produced articles and samples about building microservices and spoken at events about developing and testing a microservice architecture. She holds a master of mathematics degree from Durham University and participated in the IBM Extreme Blue internship program.

Presentations

Learning microservices in the open with GameOn! Session

There are plenty of talks out there about how to get started with microservices, but in reality you learn by doing. Erin Schnabel and Katherine Stanley explore lessons learned while creating GameOn!, an interactive text-based adventure game that allows you to get hands-on with a microservice architecture to find out what works and what doesn't, and how we as a community can learn from each other.

Yodit Stanton is the founder and CEO of opensensors.io, a company founded to lower the barrier to entry in publishing city-scale sensor data.

Presentations

Scaling the Internet of Things with open data Session

Yodit Stanton shines a light on the real IoT revolution quietly happening away from the spotlight and marketing dollars. Yodit explains how makers are using open data to solve real needs in multiple contexts, looking at examples from all over the world where communities and businesses are deploying sensors around problems from air and water quality to mobility and parking.

Kelly Stirman is the VP of Strategy at MongoDB. Kelly works closely with customers, partners, and the open source community to articulate how MongoDB is quickly becoming the world’s most popular database. For over 15 years he has worked at the forefront of database technologies. Prior to MongoDB, Kelly served in executive and leadership roles at Hadapt, MarkLogic, PeopleSoft, GE, and PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Presentations

Inside the open source sausage factory: Lessons learned from decades selling open source Session

From the outside, open source companies try to appear to be Fine Upstanding Open Source Citizens™. However, inside the sausage factory, hard decisions and trade-offs are constantly being made. Matt Asay and Kelly Stirman explain how to build a 21st-century open source business without selling your soul. . .or your software.

Jeni Tennison is the technical director of the Open Data Institute. As a developer, Jeni specializes in open data publishing and consumption, including XML, JSON, and linked data APIs. She trained as a knowledge engineer and holds a PhD in collaborative ontology development. Jeni was the technical architect and lead developer for legislation.gov.uk and worked on the linked data aspects of data.gov.uk. Jeni is author of several technical books and was appointed to the W3C’s Technical Architecture group in 2011. She is also a member of the Open Data user group and the UK Government Linked Data group.

Presentations

Moving open data from tech to culture Session

Open data is traveling the same road as open source. It started as a tech-driven desire for more information but is turning into a cultural change—one that changes business models, focuses policy interventions, and drives community engagement. Jeni Tennison explores how open data both requires and catalyzes systemic changes.

Amy Unruh is a developer programs engineer at Google for the Google Cloud Platform, where she works with TensorFlow as well as many other Cloud Platform technologies. Amy has a PhD in CS/AI, has worked in academia, at several startups, and in industrial R&D, and has published a book on App Engine.

Presentations

Diving into machine learning through TensorFlow Tutorial

Amy Unruh and Eli Bixby offer practical, hands-on experience with TensorFlow, an open source library for deep learning. Amy and Eli introduce the basics of TensorFlow, show how to build neural net models with TensorFlow and train them both locally and in the cloud, and explain how to use trained models for prediction. In the process, they'll have some fun with visualization.

Dvir Volk is a veteran engineer, entrepreneur, open source advocate, and former newspaper editor. Dvir began his tech career developing his own massively scalable web search engine, which is now integrated into many of Israel’s top websites. He later went on to cofound the social networking startup ILCU and served as director of engineering at Giraffic, a P2P video distribution provider. In his last role as chief architect at mobile startup EverythingMe, Dvir designed the company’s entire infrastructure around Redis, becoming one of the earliest members and active evangelists of the Redis community.

Presentations

The new Redis module system Session

The new Redis module system gives you the ability to extend Redis by loading dynamic libraries into it, creating new commands that operate on different data types or perform functions that Redis wasn't designed for. Dvir Volk explains how the Redis module system was designed and how developers can take advantage of the power of Redis to create new commands and different data types.

Simon Wardley is a researcher for the Leading Edge Forum focused on the intersection of IT strategy and new technologies. Simon is a seasoned executive who has spent the last 15 years defining future IT strategies for companies in the FMCG, retail, and IT industries—from Canon’s early leadership in the cloud-computing space in 2005 to Ubuntu’s recent dominance as the top cloud operating system. As a geneticist with a love of mathematics and a fascination for economics, Simon has always found himself dealing with complex systems, whether in behavioral patterns, the environmental risks of chemical pollution, developing novel computer systems, or managing companies. He is a passionate advocate and researcher in the fields of open source, commoditization, innovation, organizational structure, and cybernetics.

Simon’s most recent published research, “Clash of the Titans: Can China Dethrone Silicon Valley?,” assesses the high-tech challenge from China and what this means to the future of global technology industry competition. His previous research covers topics including the nature of technological and business change over the next 20 years, value chain mapping, strategies for an increasingly open economy, Web 2.0, and a lifecycle approach to cloud computing. Simon is a regular presenter at conferences worldwide and has been voted one of the UK’s top 50 most influential people in IT in Computer Weekly’s 2011 and 2012 polls.

Presentations

Crossing the river by feeling the stones Session

We live in a competitive world. That competition forces change. It has always forced change. Change is normal. The question is not whether our organisations will change, that’s a given, but can we see this change before it hits us, do we know where we’re heading or are we simply floating aimlessly being carried by a river? It certainly feels that way sometimes.

Monday opening welcome Keynote

Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis, Simon Wardley, and Francine Bennett open the first day of keynotes.

Playing chess with companies Event

Simon Wardley uses mapping to demonstrate how open source can be effectively used as a competitive weapon, how ecosystems can be built and exploited, how organizations evolve, and how changes such as big data, the cloud, and 3D printing were all highly predictable.

Tuesday opening welcome Keynote

Program chairs Simon Wardley, Francine Bennett, and Rachel Roumeliotis open the second day of keynotes.

Working in Internet infrastructure, web app security, and design taught Casey West to be a paranoid, UX-oriented, problem-solving Internet plumber. His earliest contributions to Perl live on to this day on your Mac. Casey’s speaking and writing topics range from open source communities and culture to technical architecture and automation tips and tricks. Casey wears the mantle of principal technologist focused on Pivotal’s Cloud Foundry platform and lives in Pittsburgh, where he’s raising three sarcastic children.

Presentations

Said no CEO ever: Things that don't matter in the cloud Session

Cloud adoption has made some aspects of our jobs irrelevant, but this is a good thing. Casey West explores many of the technical skills no longer required in an operationally mature, cloud-based organization; Casey explains why each skill is no longer worth doing manually and offers a collection of open source software solutions that require minimal human effort.

Cedric Williams is an InnerSource advocate for PayPal helping to grow the InnerSource Commons community. A technologist, pilot, coach, and advocate for individual freedoms, Cedric aspires to use narrative and technology to make communities powerful.

Presentations

A quick intro to Innersource Session

Danese Cooper, Silona Bonewald and Cedric Williams provide a quick introduction to innersource.

Transitioning to InnerSource: Increase delivery velocity, enable smooth collaboration, and produce quality software Tutorial

InnerSource applies the best lessons from open source to proprietary engineering and transforms the cultures that use it. Danese Cooper, Cedric Williams, and Silona Bonewald explain how PayPal and other companies started redesigning their engineering approaches and ended up changing how they work and outline techniques any team can use to build an InnerSource practice in their organization.