17–19 October 2016: Conference & Tutorials
19–20 October 2016: Training
London, UK
 
Sandringham
Add Distributed consensus: Making impossible possible to your personal schedule
10:50 Distributed consensus: Making impossible possible Heidi Howard (University of Cambridge)
Add Learning microservices in the open with GameOn! to your personal schedule
11:40 Learning microservices in the open with GameOn! Erin Schnabel (IBM), Katherine Stanley (IBM)
Add MVI: An architecture for reactive programming to your personal schedule
13:35 MVI: An architecture for reactive programming Luca Mezzalira (DAZN)
Add The wonderful world of webhooks to your personal schedule
16:55 The wonderful world of webhooks Lorna Mitchell (IBM)
Balmoral
Add Useful Rust to your personal schedule
10:50 Useful Rust Florian Gilcher (asquera GmbH)
Add Docker from development to production to your personal schedule
13:35 Docker from development to production Patrick Chanezon (Docker)
Add Visualizing concurrency in Go to your personal schedule
14:25 Visualizing concurrency in Go Ivan Daniluk (Typeform)
Add The top 10 things you need to know about Perl 6 to your personal schedule
16:05 The top 10 things you need to know about Perl 6 Jeffrey Goff (Evozon Systems)
Buckingham Room
Add Open source or proprietary: Choose wisely to your personal schedule
10:50 Open source or proprietary: Choose wisely Patrick McFadin (DataStax)
Add Marketing for developers to your personal schedule
11:40 Marketing for developers Tracy Osborn (DreamFactory)
Add A look at enforcement worldwide to your personal schedule
13:35 A look at enforcement worldwide Karen Sandler (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Add The business of community to your personal schedule
14:25 The business of community VM Brasseur (@vmbrasseur)
Add Open source for closed source companies to your personal schedule
16:55 Open source for closed source companies Amanda Folson (GitLab)
Blenheim Room
Add Open source and the fourth industrial age to your personal schedule
10:50 Open source and the fourth industrial age Chi Onwurah (Parliament)
Add The seven (more) deadly sins of microservices to your personal schedule
13:35 The seven (more) deadly sins of microservices Daniel Bryant (SpectoLabs)
Add Open innovation for the NHS: Navigating complexity to your personal schedule
14:25 Open innovation for the NHS: Navigating complexity Laura James (Doteveryone)
Add Building a pipeline: The case for hiring junior developers to your personal schedule
16:05 Building a pipeline: The case for hiring junior developers Wade Minter (NBC SportsEngine)
Add Using the ESP8266 to build the Internet of Things to your personal schedule
16:55 Using the ESP8266 to build the Internet of Things Alasdair Allan (Babilim Light Industries)
Windsor Suite
Add Moving open data from tech to culture to your personal schedule
10:50 Moving open data from tech to culture Jeni Tennison (Open Data Institute)
Add Engaging with open data through video games to your personal schedule
11:40 Engaging with open data through video games Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee), Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.)
Add Scaling the Internet of Things with open data to your personal schedule
13:35 Scaling the Internet of Things with open data yodit stanton (opensensors.io)
Add Open sourcing learning to rank in Solr to your personal schedule
14:25 Open sourcing learning to rank in Solr Diego Ceccarelli (Bloomberg LP)
Add Open funding data: 360Giving's journey so far to your personal schedule
16:05 Open funding data: 360Giving's journey so far Alice Casey (360Giving), Edafe Onerhime (Open Data Services)
Add Forking successfully to your personal schedule
16:55 Forking successfully Colin Charles (Percona)
Park Suite (Sponsored)
Add A quick intro to Innersource to your personal schedule
11:40 A quick intro to Innersource Danese Cooper (PayPal), Cedric Williams (PayPal), Silona Bonewald (PayPal)
Add  The bait and switch of open source to your personal schedule
14:25 The bait and switch of open source Katrina Owen (GitHub)
Add Monday opening welcome to your personal schedule
King's Suite
9:00 Monday opening welcome Rachel Roumeliotis (O'Reilly Media), Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum), Francine Bennett (Mastodon C)
Add Using open to drive change to your personal schedule
9:05 Using open to drive change Liam Maxwell (HM Government)
Add How InnerSource is like FLOSSing to your personal schedule
9:45 How InnerSource is like FLOSSing Danese Cooper (PayPal)
Add Evolving the JavaScript ecosystem to your personal schedule
9:50 Evolving the JavaScript ecosystem Kris Borchers (Linux Foundation)
Add Brilliant pebbles to your personal schedule
9:55 Brilliant pebbles Mark Shuttleworth (Ubuntu & Canonical)
7:30 Morning Coffee | Room: King's Suite Foyer
18:35 TBC
10:15 Morning Break | Room: Sponsor Pavilion (Monarch Suite)
Add Monday lunch and Topic Tables to your personal schedule
12:20 Event Monday lunch and Topic Tables | Room: Sponsor Pavilion (Monarch Suite)
15:05 Afternoon Break | Room: Sponsor Pavilion (Monarch Suite)
Add Opening Reception to your personal schedule
17:35 Opening Reception | Room: Sponsor Pavilion (Monarch Suite)
Add Monday evening Birds of a Feather sessions to your personal schedule
19:00 Event Monday evening Birds of a Feather sessions | Room: Palace and Windsor Suites
10:50-11:30 (40m) Architecture DevOps, Networking
Distributed consensus: Making impossible possible
Heidi Howard (University of Cambridge)
Heidi Howard explains how to construct resilient distributed systems on top of unreliable components. Starting almost two decades ago, with Leslie Lamport’s Paxos protocol, Heidi leads a journey to today’s data centers, covering interesting impossibility results and demonstrating how to construct new fault-tolerance systems that you can depend upon everyday.
11:40-12:20 (40m) Architecture Java, Techniques, Tools
Learning microservices in the open with GameOn!
Erin Schnabel (IBM), Katherine Stanley (IBM)
There are plenty of talks out there about how to get started with microservices, but in reality you learn by doing. Erin Schnabel and Katherine Stanley explore lessons learned while creating GameOn!, an interactive text-based adventure game that allows you to get hands-on with a microservice architecture to find out what works and what doesn't, and how we as a community can learn from each other.
13:35-14:15 (40m) Architecture Emerging languages, HTML/CSS, JavaScript
MVI: An architecture for reactive programming
Luca Mezzalira (DAZN)
MVI (Model-View-Intent) is a new architecture made for reactive programming leveraging the power and flexibility of observables. Luca Mezzalira explores why reactive programming will remain a hot topic over the next decade and explains how you can structure an application in pure reactive programming using Cycle.js, React, and hyperscript.
14:25-15:05 (40m) Architecture C#/F#/.NET, Functional languages
Patterns and practices for real-world, functional, event-driven microservices
Rachel Reese (Jet.com)
Jet.com, an ecommerce startup competing with Amazon, is a heavy user of F# and has based its architecture around Azure-based event-driven functional microservices. Over the last several months, Jet has schooled itself on what works and what doesn't for F# and microservices. Rachel Reese walks you through the lessons Jet has learned on its way to developing the platform.
16:05-16:45 (40m) Architecture DevOps, Linux, Networking
Said no CEO ever: Things that don't matter in the cloud
Casey West (Pivotal)
Cloud adoption has made some aspects of our jobs irrelevant, but this is a good thing. Casey West explores many of the technical skills no longer required in an operationally mature, cloud-based organization; Casey explains why each skill is no longer worth doing manually and offers a collection of open source software solutions that require minimal human effort.
16:55-17:35 (40m) Architecture Core programming concepts, Techniques
The wonderful world of webhooks
Lorna Mitchell (IBM)
Webhooks allow our applications to exchange data as soon as it happens rather than polling using APIs. Lorna Mitchell covers creating, consuming, and deploying webhooks in a modern, microservices world.
10:50-11:30 (40m) The new stuff Emerging languages, Rust
Useful Rust
Florian Gilcher (asquera GmbH)
The Rust type system is often discussed, especially in its relation to memory management; it allows for memory safety as a static guarantee at compile time. But if that were its only specialty, Rust would be a one-trick pony. Florian Gilcher uses Rust to present elegant, compiler-supported solutions for common problems of everyday applications as well as the infrastructure around them.
11:40-12:20 (40m) The new stuff DevOps, Techniques, Tools
ChatOps: How to enhance your DevOps workflow
Brent Beer (GitHub)
Your company is moving to a DevOps development culture. . .but you have no idea what that really means. Brent Beer offers an overview of ChatOps, a way of moving your DevOps culture through your company's chat client to your developers' fingertips, outlining clear steps to ship code faster and safer today.
13:35-14:15 (40m) The new stuff Java, Linux, Tools
Docker from development to production
Patrick Chanezon (Docker)
Containers as a service (CaaS) provide developers the agility and portability they need to build microservice applications and ops the control required to deploy and maintain these apps in production. Patrick Chanezon offers a detailed overview of the latest evolutions in the Docker ecosystem enabling CaaS, from in-container development on a Mac to CI/CD in the cloud to deployment in production.
14:25-15:05 (40m) The new stuff Go
Visualizing concurrency in Go
Ivan Daniluk (Typeform)
Ivan Daniluk explains concurrency in Go using the power of 3D modeling and animations. Ivan offers a demo of his tool that can visually represent concurrent Go programs using WebGL in a browser. You'll explore common concurrency patterns through real-time 3D animations and learn how parallelism differs from concurrency.
16:05-16:45 (40m) The new stuff Emerging languages, Functional languages, Perl
The top 10 things you need to know about Perl 6
Jeffrey Goff (Evozon Systems)
Join Jeffrey Goff to learn about the top 10 features that Perl 6 brings to the table, including Unicode support, functional programming, reactive and concurrent programming, built-in expression grammars, built-in vector operators, and a full metaprogramming system with support for roles. Jeffrey discusses where Perl 6 started, where it is today, and where the language is going in the future.
16:55-17:35 (40m) The new stuff
Node-RED: Wiring the IoT with open source tools
Nick O'Leary (IBM)
An open Internet of Things (IoT) industry is critical. Nick O'Leary introduces Node-RED, an open source tool for wiring together hardware devices, APIs, and online services using a visual flow-based programming model that allows users to quickly create apps using an easy drag-and-drop interface.
10:50-11:30 (40m) The business of open source: From project to product Business , Legal
Open source or proprietary: Choose wisely
Patrick McFadin (DataStax)
Will our project be OSS or proprietary? It's an easy question that can lead to some uncomfortable moments in an organization. Sorting through the reasons for and against OSS can be tedious at best and life changing at worst. Don’t let this moment become something you regret. Patrick McFadin outlines the process and gives you some tools to make it through. Hopefully we’ll save a few friendships.
11:40-12:20 (40m) The business of open source: From project to product Business , Techniques, Venture Capital
Marketing for developers
Tracy Osborn (DreamFactory)
"If you build it, they will come," they say. Not so! Marketing is crucial for anything you build that you want people to find and use. How should you market your app, your open source project, your mobile app, or anything else you build—especially as a time-strapped developer? Tracy Osborn offers marketing tips and recommendations to make sure that what you build is seen and used.
13:35-14:15 (40m) The business of open source: From project to product Business , Legal, Linux
A look at enforcement worldwide
Karen Sandler (Software Freedom Conservancy)
There has been a recent increase in global enforcement initiatives around the GPL, the majority of which are coordinated and consistently undertaken. Karen Sandler breaks down what's happening and what you need to know about them. Karen outlines the principles of community-oriented GPL enforcement and explains how they impact enforcement discussions and promote overall compliance.
14:25-15:05 (40m) The business of open source: From project to product Business , Geek lifestyle
The business of community
VM Brasseur (@vmbrasseur)
VM Brasseur looks at community from a business perspective and explores the effect community can have on an organization's bottom line. Although there are communities everywhere, Vicky approaches the topic—communities, their members, and their contributors—from a free and open source perspective.
16:05-16:45 (40m) The business of open source: From project to product
Inside the open source sausage factory: Lessons learned from decades selling open source
Matt Asay (Adobe), kelly stirman (MongoDB)
From the outside, open source companies try to appear to be Fine Upstanding Open Source Citizens™. However, inside the sausage factory, hard decisions and trade-offs are constantly being made. Matt Asay and Kelly Stirman explain how to build a 21st-century open source business without selling your soul. . .or your software.
16:55-17:35 (40m) The business of open source: From project to product Business , Legal, Techniques
Open source for closed source companies
Amanda Folson (GitLab)
Just because you’re selling SaaS doesn’t mean you can’t adopt open source principles in your organization. Amanda Folson explores how individuals and companies can open source their documentation, libraries, and ideas for the greater good of the community in a way that doesn’t mean giving it all away for free.
10:50-11:30 (40m) In real life (IRL), Open government
Open source and the fourth industrial age
Chi Onwurah (Parliament)
The fourth industrial age is driven by technology, particularly software and algorithms. Chi Onwurah explores how open source is helping to deliver the industrial landscape we want.
11:40-12:20 (40m) In real life (IRL) Business , Geek lifestyle, Techniques
Dealing with cultural diversity and internal advocacy within a distributed team
Laura Czajkowski (Couchbase)
Scaling company culture can be difficult even when the majority of your company is in the same office. Nowadays, this is rarely the case; most of the time you’re split over multiple continents. Laura Czajkowski breaks down the cultural challenges faced when working in a distributed team and looks at some solutions that can be brought in to help.
13:35-14:15 (40m) In real life (IRL) Techniques
The seven (more) deadly sins of microservices
Daniel Bryant (SpectoLabs)
All is not completely rosy in microservice-land. It's often a sign of an architectural approach’s maturity that anti-patterns begin to be identified and classified alongside well-established principles and practices. Daniel Bryant introduces seven deadly sins from real projects, which left unchecked could easily ruin your next microservices project.
14:25-15:05 (40m) In real life (IRL) Techniques, UX/UI
Open innovation for the NHS: Navigating complexity
Laura James (Doteveryone)
Doteveryone’s work with the NHS aims to improve care for older people in the final phases of life by demonstrating what's possible with new technologies, targeting the furthest first—the most socially and digitally excluded. Laura James shares experiences and lessons learned navigating complicated organizations and IT systems, people and ethics, and standards and prototyping.
16:05-16:45 (40m) In real life (IRL) Business , Geek lifestyle, Techniques
Building a pipeline: The case for hiring junior developers
Wade Minter (NBC SportsEngine)
Any hiring manager in a technology company knows that the hardest problem to solve is hiring. There never seem to be enough experienced developers available at any given point in time. But many of those same hiring managers will say, "We don't hire junior developers." Tech team-builder Wade Minter makes the case for why your company should hire and train junior developers.
16:55-17:35 (40m) In real life (IRL) Networking, Techniques, Tools
Using the ESP8266 to build the Internet of Things
Alasdair Allan (Babilim Light Industries)
The ESP8266 is a microcontroller with WiFi and GPIO that is sold for as little as two dollars. After 50 years of Moore's Law, we're getting to a place where computing is not just cheap—it’s essentially free. The Internet of Things, which puts both general-purpose computing and sensors everywhere, will be built from blocks like these. Alasdair Allan shows you how.
10:50-11:30 (40m) Open data & data science
Moving open data from tech to culture
Jeni Tennison (Open Data Institute)
Open data is traveling the same road as open source. It started as a tech-driven desire for more information but is turning into a cultural change—one that changes business models, focuses policy interventions, and drives community engagement. Jeni Tennison explores how open data both requires and catalyzes systemic changes.
11:40-12:20 (40m) Open data & data science Geek lifestyle
Engaging with open data through video games
Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee), Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.)
Open data is cool, especially when it comes from the government. What’s even cooler than open data? Games. Games are cool. So why not combine them? Tim Nugent, Paris Buttfield-Addison, and Jonathon Manning explore the potential for spreading the word about open data—and providing deeper engagement with data—through game development.
13:35-14:15 (40m) Open data & data science
Scaling the Internet of Things with open data
yodit stanton (opensensors.io)
Yodit Stanton shines a light on the real IoT revolution quietly happening away from the spotlight and marketing dollars. Yodit explains how makers are using open data to solve real needs in multiple contexts, looking at examples from all over the world where communities and businesses are deploying sensors around problems from air and water quality to mobility and parking.
14:25-15:05 (40m) Open data & data science Java, Techniques
Open sourcing learning to rank in Solr
Diego Ceccarelli (Bloomberg LP)
Learning to rank is a technique used by all the big search engines (Google, Bing, Yandex, etc.) to improve the quality of search. At the moment, there is not an open source solution available, but Bloomberg is working on an open source plugin for Solr (an open source search engine). Diego Ceccarelli presents learning-to-rank key concepts and explains how the Solr plugin works.
16:05-16:45 (40m) Open data & data science
Open funding data: 360Giving's journey so far
Alice Casey (360Giving), Edafe Onerhime (Open Data Services)
At present, it's not possible to find a complete dataset on all charitable grants in the UK. Alice Casey and Edafe Onerhime offer an overview of 360Giving, which supports funding organizations in publishing their grants data in an open, standardized way and helps people to understand and use that data to support decision making and learning across the charitable giving sector.
16:55-17:35 (40m) Open data & data science Legal, Techniques
Forking successfully
Colin Charles (Percona)
Forking in the open source world means going with different goals and design directions. How do you pick a winner? Colin Charles offers practical examples from the MariaDB world (MySQL fork), as well as lessons from other projects like LibreOffice, LibreSSL, SuiteCRM, and Jenkins. If you have to fork and want to do it well, this journey through the MariaDB server world is for you.
10:50-11:30 (40m) Sponsored
Digital transformation: The why, what, and how of @WalmartLabs's migration to the Electrode platform in less than a year
Arpan Nanavati (@WalmartLabs)
Arpan Nanavati tells the story of how @WalmartLabs successfully migrated to the Electrode platform (built on React and Node.js) with efficiency and speed.
11:40-12:20 (40m)
A quick intro to Innersource
Danese Cooper (PayPal), Cedric Williams (PayPal), Silona Bonewald (PayPal)
Danese Cooper, Silona Bonewald and Cedric Williams provide a quick introduction to innersource.
14:25-15:05 (40m) Sponsored
The bait and switch of open source
Katrina Owen (GitHub)
Open source sells itself as being about technical problems—delightfully thorny technical problems at that. However, successful projects are filled with people, which introduces a whole different set of problems. Katrina Owen illustrates the many ways in which things went wrong for Exercism because she didn’t treat people problems as first-class citizens.
9:00-9:05 (5m)
Monday opening welcome
Rachel Roumeliotis (O'Reilly Media), Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum), Francine Bennett (Mastodon C)
Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis, Simon Wardley, and Francine Bennett open the first day of keynotes.
9:05-9:20 (15m)
Using open to drive change
Liam Maxwell (HM Government)
In 2011, the UK government started to change the way that it delivers public services. The fundamental driver for technology change was the use of open—open standards, open source, open data, and open markets. Liam Maxwell explains how this approach helped, where it fell short, and lessons learned about how to transform government.
9:20-9:30 (10m) Sponsored
Introducing Electrode, an open source release from @WalmartLabs
Laurent Desegur (@WalmartLabs)
@WalmartLabs has successfully transitioned its application platform to React and Node.js. That platform is now open sourced for the world to use. Laurent Desegur discusses the problems @WalmartLabs aims to solve and the benefits of Electrode.
9:30-9:45 (15m)
The blockchain and open source: The new world order
Kate Craig-Wood (Memset)
IT moves in cycles. The cloud is just the latest of several rounds of centralization of IT resources. Now, blockchain technology has the potential to drive the next redistribution. Kate Craig-Wood explores how and why the blockchain will change IT as we know it.
9:45-9:50 (5m)
How InnerSource is like FLOSSing
Danese Cooper (PayPal)
Danese Cooper explains how InnerSource is like FLOSSing.
9:50-9:55 (5m)
Evolving the JavaScript ecosystem
Kris Borchers (Linux Foundation)
Join Kris Borchers for a talk on evolving the JavaScript ecosystem.
9:55-10:10 (15m)
Brilliant pebbles
Mark Shuttleworth (Ubuntu & Canonical)
Small is beautiful. Mark Shuttleworth explains why your next million is more likely to come from an afternoon tinkering on your laptop and a tiny PC than beating your neighbor to web scale on the cloud. From smart switches to smart drones, from the home to the office to the farm to the space station, the next wave is all about delivering your best bits to brilliant pebbles.
10:10-10:15 (5m)
Closing remarks
Program chairs Rachel Roumeliotis, Simon Wardley, and Francine Bennett close the first day of keynotes.
7:30-9:00 (1h 30m)
Break: Morning Coffee
18:35-19:00 (25m)
Plenary
To be confirmed
10:15-10:50 (35m)
Break: Morning Break
12:20-13:35 (1h 15m)
Monday lunch and Topic Tables
Join us for Topic Tables at lunch each day of the conference. Find and connect with other like-minded people while you eat lunch at tables designated for certain languages, technologies, and interests. Look for the signs on the tables near the buffet lines each day. No advance signup is necessary.
15:05-16:05 (1h)
Break: Afternoon Break
17:35-18:35 (1h)
Opening Reception
Grab a drink and kick off OSCON by meeting and mingling with exhibitors and fellow attendees.
19:00-21:00 (2h)
Monday evening Birds of a Feather sessions
Monday and Tuesday evenings, you'll have the chance to participate in a Birds of a Feather session with like-minded people.