26–28 October 2015
Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Foundations conference sessions

Monday, October 26

11:00–11:40 Monday, 26/10/2015
Location: G 104/105
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 2 ratings)
A new major release of PHP is set for the end of 2015. It's the platform that runs everywhere and is used (at least a tiny bit) by every organisation, so what's new and what's changed? Read more.
11:50–12:30 Monday, 26/10/2015
Location: G 104/105
Andreas Rumpf (3DICC)
Average rating: *****
(5.00, 1 rating)
Nim is a new upcoming systems programming language that tries to give the programmer ultimate power without compromises on runtime efficiency. This means it focuses on compile-time mechanisms in all their various forms. Beneath a nice infix/indentation based syntax with a powerful (AST based, hygienic) macro system, lies a semantic model that supports a soft real-time GC on thread local heaps. Read more.
13:45–14:25 Monday, 26/10/2015
Location: G 104/105
Adam Harvey (New Relic)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 3 ratings)
Quick! You need a hash function as a first check for whether you've already seen a string! What do you reach for? You could reach for SHA-2. Or SHA-1. Or MD5. But there's a world of non-cryptographic hash functions out there that are faster and more memory-efficient. Let's use them! Read more.
14:35–15:15 Monday, 26/10/2015
Location: G 104/105
Javier Arias Losada (Telefonica I+D)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 1 rating)
ES6 delivers some exciting metaprogramming capabilities with its new proxies feature. Metaprogramming is powerful, but remember: "With great power comes great responsibility." In the talk we will revisit Javascript metaprogramming and explain ES6 proxies with code examples. Read more.
16:15–16:55 Monday, 26/10/2015
Location: G 104/105
Curtis Poe (All Around the World)
Average rating: ****.
(4.50, 4 ratings)
With Larry Wall's announcement that Perl 6 will be production-ready this year, more developers are looking at it. However, it looks kind of big and scary. It's not. Instead, we're going to show why Perl 6 is not only probably of more interest to developers than they realized, but is also easier to read and write than they realized. And your data will be safer than ever. Read more.
17:05–17:45 Monday, 26/10/2015
Location: G 104/105
Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 2 ratings)
Python's recent developments, like the concurrent.futures classes, coroutine delegation with "yield from," and the asyncio module, together represent a major new chapter in its evolution, and are the best reasons to upgrade to Python 3. This talk will show how these tools bring concurrent programming within reach of even casual programmers, with dramatic boosts in throughput. Read more.

Tuesday, October 27

14:35–15:15 Tuesday, 27/10/2015
Location: G 104/105
Scott Jenson (Google)
Average rating: ****.
(4.33, 9 ratings)
The number of smart devices is going to explode, and the assumption that each new device will require its own application just isn't realistic. People should be able to walk up to any smart device and not have to download an app first. Everything should be just a tap away. The Physical Web is an open approach to unleash the core superpower of the web: interaction on demand. Read more.
16:15–16:55 Tuesday, 27/10/2015
Location: G 104/105
Tim Berglund (Confluent)
Average rating: ****.
(4.10, 10 ratings)
An overview of key distributed systems concepts through the lens of events at a local coffee shop. Read more.
17:05–17:45 Tuesday, 27/10/2015
Location: G001 + G002
Jim Blandy (Mozilla Corporation)
Average rating: ****.
(4.00, 2 ratings)
The Rust programming language makes writing multi-threaded code painless. Rust is a systems programming language, with performance comparable to that of C and C++. However, Rust prevents data races at compile time, eliminating many of the opportunities for bugs that make concurrent programming risky in other languages. Read more.
17:05–17:45 Tuesday, 27/10/2015
Location: G 104/105
Average rating: ****.
(4.56, 9 ratings)
You know clone, commit, push, and pull. Now you're ready for the fun stuff. This talk will give you the advanced knowledge you need to take control of your Git repository: rebase, cherry-pick, bisect, blame, squashing, and the reflog. You'll also get a better conceptual understanding of how Git works, allowing you to chain these tools together to accomplish whatever task you need. Read more.

Wednesday, October 28

9:00–12:30 Wednesday, 28/10/2015
Location: G106
Brent Beer (GitHub), Lorna Mitchell (IBM)
Average rating: ****.
(4.67, 3 ratings)
Wish you could level-up your Git skills and collaborate effectively with any developers in the world? Get a tune-up on both your Git and GitHub abilities by learning the fundamentals of Git on the command line, while taking full advantage of collaboration techniques on GitHub. Read more.
9:00–12:30 Wednesday, 28/10/2015
Location: G001 + G002
John Graham-Cumming (CloudFlare)
Average rating: **...
(2.91, 11 ratings)
Go from no Go to Go pro in this three-hour tutorial by the guy behind O'Reilly's successful "Introduction to Go Programming" video tutorial. Read more.
13:30–17:00 Wednesday, 28/10/2015
Location: G105
Chris Laffra (Google)
Average rating: **...
(2.83, 6 ratings)
Want to sharpen your coding skills, practice for an upcoming job interview, or create cool algorithm visualizations? Then this tutorial is perfect for you. It describes 35 popular, easy to understand algorithms, and explains each algorithm using insightful visualizations. Learn how to code in O(1), how to divide and conquer, and how to get that awesome job you always wanted. Read more.