26–28 October 2015
Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Schedule

G 102/103
Add Software architecture as code to your personal schedule
11:00 Software architecture as code Simon Brown (Independent Consultant)
Add Chaos patterns - architecting for failure in distributed systems to your personal schedule
11:50 Chaos patterns - architecting for failure in distributed systems Jos Boumans (Krux Digital), Bruce Wong (Twilio)
Add Building microservices with Go  to your personal schedule
13:45 Building microservices with Go Baron Schwartz (VividCortex)
Add 5 secrets to rock solid Rails APIs to your personal schedule
16:15 5 secrets to rock solid Rails APIs Carlos Souza (Code School)
G001 + G002
Add Articulating design decisions to your personal schedule
11:00 Articulating design decisions Tom Greever (Bitovi)
Add Decoupling the front end through modular CSS to your personal schedule
11:50 Decoupling the front end through modular CSS Julie Cameron (Articulate)
Add Modern accessibility for modern web apps to your personal schedule
13:45 Modern accessibility for modern web apps Patrick Fox (Razorfish)
Add Don't disconnect me! The challenges of building offline-enabled web apps to your personal schedule
14:35 Don't disconnect me! The challenges of building offline-enabled web apps Christiane Kurz (SAP SE), Matthias Oßwald (SAP)
Add Building a mobile location aware system with beacons to your personal schedule
16:15 Building a mobile location aware system with beacons Tim Messerschmidt (PayPal + Braintree)
Add Working in the Open as an Open Source Community to your personal schedule
17:05 Working in the Open as an Open Source Community Job van der Voort (GitLab)
G 104/105
Add What to expect from PHP 7 to your personal schedule
11:00 What to expect from PHP 7 Lorna Mitchell (IBM)
Add Nim: An overview to your personal schedule
11:50 Nim: An overview Andreas Rumpf (3DICC)
Add ES6 metaprogramming unleashed to your personal schedule
14:35 ES6 metaprogramming unleashed Javier Arias Losada (Telefonica I+D)
Add Perl 6 for mere mortals to your personal schedule
16:15 Perl 6 for mere mortals Curtis Poe (All Around the World)
Add Plate spinning: Modern concurrency in Python to your personal schedule
17:05 Plate spinning: Modern concurrency in Python Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
G 106/107
Add A Git rebasing workflow to your personal schedule
11:50 A Git rebasing workflow Emma Jane Hogbin Westby (UN-OCHA)
Add Pull requests: Not just for code anymore to your personal schedule
13:45 Pull requests: Not just for code anymore Tim Krajcar (New Relic)
Add GET /better to your personal schedule
14:35 GET /better Mark Bates (Meta42 Labs, LLC)
Add Help! Which software license should I pick? to your personal schedule
16:15 Help! Which software license should I pick? Bradley Kuhn (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Add The new world of open source SQL analytics to your personal schedule
17:05 The new world of open source SQL analytics Tugdual Grall (MapR)
G109
11:00 TBC
Add The Seif Project Deeper Dive to your personal schedule
13:45 The Seif Project Deeper Dive Douglas Crockford (PayPal)
Add OpenShift 3 and The Next Generation of PaaS to your personal schedule
14:35 OpenShift 3 and The Next Generation of PaaS Marek Jelen (Red Hat)
7:00 Break
Room: Auditorium Lounge
10:30 Morning Break
Room: Diamond Lounge & Europe Foyer
Add Monday Lunch-Birds of a Feather (BoF) Tables and Office Hours to your personal schedule
12:30 Lunch
Room: Diamond Lounge & Europe Foyer
Monday Lunch-Birds of a Feather (BoF) Tables and Office Hours
15:15 Afternoon Break Sponsored by Google
Room: Diamond Lounge & Europe Foyer
Add Sponsor Pavilion Opening Reception (Sponsored by GitLab) to your personal schedule
17:45 Plenary
Room: Diamond Lounge & Europe Foyer
Sponsor Pavilion Opening Reception (Sponsored by GitLab)
Add Monday keynote welcome to your personal schedule
9:00 Plenary
Room: Auditorium
Monday keynote welcome Rachel Roumeliotis (O'Reilly Media), Peter Cooper (Cooper Press)
Add The evolution of evolutionary architecture to your personal schedule
9:05 Plenary
Room: Auditorium
The evolution of evolutionary architecture Rebecca Parsons (ThoughtWorks)
Add The Seif Project to your personal schedule
9:20 Plenary
Room: Auditorium
The Seif Project Douglas Crockford (PayPal)
Add Docker security to your personal schedule
9:35 Plenary
Room: Auditorium
Docker security Nils Magnus (LinuxTag Association and Open Telekom Cloud)
Add Enough Foundations Already! to your personal schedule
9:50 Plenary
Room: Auditorium
Enough Foundations Already! Simon Phipps (Public Software CIC)
Add Programming as performance - live coding with Sonic Pi to your personal schedule
10:05 Plenary
Room: Auditorium
Programming as performance - live coding with Sonic Pi Sam Aaron (University of Cambridge)
Add Closing remarks to your personal schedule
10:20 Plenary
Room: Auditorium
Closing remarks
11:00-11:40 (40m) Architecture
Software architecture as code
Simon Brown (Independent Consultant)
It’s 2015 and we’re still manually drawing software architecture diagrams in tools like Microsoft Visio that often don’t reflect the implementation in code. This session will look at why this happens, and how to resolve the conflict between software architecture and code through the use of architecturally-evident coding styles and the representation of software architecture models as code..
11:50-12:30 (40m) Architecture
Chaos patterns - architecting for failure in distributed systems
Jos Boumans (Krux Digital), Bruce Wong (Twilio)
As we architect our systems for greater demands, scale, uptime, and performance, the hardest thing to control becomes the environment in which we deploy and the subtle but crucial interactions between complicated systems. Chaos patterns help us establish and implement a virtuous cycle that lets us both prove and improve our system along each of these dimensions before the inevitable happens.
13:45-14:25 (40m) Architecture
Building microservices with Go
Baron Schwartz (VividCortex)
Go is great for building HTTP and RPC services. VividCortex's infrastructure is Go-based, and there are a lot of lessons to learn from the experience building it. This talk will cover topics from the language to build and deployment, production monitoring, and architectural decisions.
14:35-15:15 (40m) Architecture
Who are you and what did you do with my containers?
Mandy Waite (Google)
After discovering Docker, the next step on the path to Container Nirvana is to use them to build the kind of deployments and microservices architectures you've always aspired to. This talk will show you how to do just that through live demos and visualizations that highlight the strengths and weaknesses of Kubernetes, the open source cluster management and container orchestration platform.
16:15-16:55 (40m) Architecture
5 secrets to rock solid Rails APIs
Carlos Souza (Code School)
With recent advances in client-side technology, a lot of Rails projects are pushing template rendering to the browser. Some projects might also need to cater to native mobile clients and other gadgets. In summary, there is no shortage of need for back end APIs. This talk will teach how to get the best out of Ruby on Rails and the HTTP protocol in order to build a rock solid web API.
17:05-17:45 (40m) Architecture
Writing code that lasts… or writing code you won’t hate tomorrow
Rafael Dohms (AmsterdamPHP)
As developers we write code every day, only to frown at it a week later. Writing code that survives the test of time and self-judgment is a matter of clarity and simplicity. Let's talk about growing, learning, and improving our code with calisthenics, readability, and good design.
11:00-11:40 (40m) Design
Articulating design decisions
Tom Greever (Bitovi)
Every designer has had to justify designs to non-designers, yet most lack the ability to explain their choices in a compelling way. Effectively articulating design decisions is critical to a project’s success because the most articulate person wins. This session offers practical advice for talking to managers, developers, and other stakeholders to win them over and create the best user experience.
11:50-12:30 (40m) Design
Decoupling the front end through modular CSS
Julie Cameron (Articulate)
This talk will look at how taking a modular, object-oriented approach to CSS can turn front-end woes into front-end wins. We’ll examine modern CSS approaches like OOCSS, SMACSS, and BEM, and demonstrate how they will help to not only decouple your CSS styles and reduce specificity conflicts, but will also help decouple your CSS and HTML from your JavaScript and feature specs.
13:45-14:25 (40m) Design
Modern accessibility for modern web apps
Patrick Fox (Razorfish)
Modern web technology is ever-evolving and increasingly complex to implement. Creating modern, accessible web applications is especially challenging: dynamic UI components and single-page, Ajax-driven architectures are inherently inaccessible. With the right process, mindset, and techniques, creating modern, accessible web applications is possible.
14:35-15:15 (40m) Devices
Don't disconnect me! The challenges of building offline-enabled web apps
Christiane Kurz (SAP SE), Matthias Oßwald (SAP)
Nowadays, despite a near-ubiquitous solid network infrastructure, there is still the chance of losing your connection. This may prevent you from using an app on the web. What if web apps could just switch between online and offline mode without interrupting user interaction? Get an overview of what to keep in mind to be able to provide a smooth user experience independent of connection quality.
16:15-16:55 (40m) Devices
Building a mobile location aware system with beacons
Tim Messerschmidt (PayPal + Braintree)
What if instead of a broad location, you could have pinpoint location awareness of someone in a physical space? How could this change everything about how we interact with the physical world? In this session we'll explore open beacon technology and how we can use these systems to change everything from shopping to accessibility for the disabled, all built on top of a mobile device.
17:05-17:45 (40m) Collaboration and Craft
Working in the Open as an Open Source Community
Job van der Voort (GitLab)
How to build a successful open-source company that is open to the public from everything like product releases to company HR policies.
11:00-11:40 (40m) Foundations
What to expect from PHP 7
Lorna Mitchell (IBM)
A new major release of PHP is set for the end of 2015. It's the platform that runs everywhere and is used (at least a tiny bit) by every organisation, so what's new and what's changed?
11:50-12:30 (40m) Foundations
Nim: An overview
Andreas Rumpf (3DICC)
Nim is a new upcoming systems programming language that tries to give the programmer ultimate power without compromises on runtime efficiency. This means it focuses on compile-time mechanisms in all their various forms. Beneath a nice infix/indentation based syntax with a powerful (AST based, hygienic) macro system, lies a semantic model that supports a soft real-time GC on thread local heaps.
13:45-14:25 (40m) Foundations
5* non-cryptographic hash functions enter. One hash function leaves.
Adam Harvey (Æcerbot)
Quick! You need a hash function as a first check for whether you've already seen a string! What do you reach for? You could reach for SHA-2. Or SHA-1. Or MD5. But there's a world of non-cryptographic hash functions out there that are faster and more memory-efficient. Let's use them!
14:35-15:15 (40m) Foundations
ES6 metaprogramming unleashed
Javier Arias Losada (Telefonica I+D)
ES6 delivers some exciting metaprogramming capabilities with its new proxies feature. Metaprogramming is powerful, but remember: "With great power comes great responsibility." In the talk we will revisit Javascript metaprogramming and explain ES6 proxies with code examples.
16:15-16:55 (40m) Foundations
Perl 6 for mere mortals
Curtis Poe (All Around the World)
With Larry Wall's announcement that Perl 6 will be production-ready this year, more developers are looking at it. However, it looks kind of big and scary. It's not. Instead, we're going to show why Perl 6 is not only probably of more interest to developers than they realized, but is also easier to read and write than they realized. And your data will be safer than ever.
17:05-17:45 (40m) Foundations
Plate spinning: Modern concurrency in Python
Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
Python's recent developments, like the concurrent.futures classes, coroutine delegation with "yield from," and the asyncio module, together represent a major new chapter in its evolution, and are the best reasons to upgrade to Python 3. This talk will show how these tools bring concurrent programming within reach of even casual programmers, with dramatic boosts in throughput.
11:00-11:40 (40m) Collaboration and Craft
Fear of failing fast: How to avoid sabotaging your success
Leslie Hawthorn (Red Hat)
While it’s easy to pay lip service to the idea of innovating by failing fast, humans are both neurally geared and financially incentivized to avoid failure. In this talk, we’ll cover key strategies for creating an environment that fosters rapid innovation in your organization.
11:50-12:30 (40m) Collaboration and Craft
A Git rebasing workflow
Emma Jane Hogbin Westby (UN-OCHA)
You've decided to level up your Git skills and have heard that rebasing is where it's at. In this session we'll talk about: WHY rebasing can make it easier to untangle your project's history; WHEN you should use rebase; WHAT rebasing actually does to your repository; and HOW it actually looks when things go right (and how to recover when things go wrong).
13:45-14:25 (40m) Collaboration and Craft
Pull requests: Not just for code anymore
Tim Krajcar (New Relic)
Many companies have copied the fork-and-pull-request model from open source because it works so well, even for closed-source projects. So why are company processes and policies written in isolation with no collaboration? I'll present New Relic's implementation of an open-source-inspired workflow that drives all of our internal company processes.
14:35-15:15 (40m) Collaboration and Craft
GET /better
Mark Bates (Meta42 Labs, LLC)
Becoming a well sought-after and "better" developer is easier than you think. There are no tonics or elixirs you can take that will instantly make a desirable engineer, but there are easily defined steps to that goal.
16:15-16:55 (40m) Collaboration and Craft
Help! Which software license should I pick?
Bradley Kuhn (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Open source and free software is here to stay, but software is still "born proprietary" until the author affirmatively liberates that software via a copyright license. Licensing choices are a confusing array of options. This talk explains the basic information an author should consider during the complex and highly politicized decision of FLOSS license selection.
17:05-17:45 (40m) Data
The new world of open source SQL analytics
Tugdual Grall (MapR)
The traditionally closed source world of MPP databases and data warehouses is being challenged by a new breed of open source, distributed query engines such as Apache Hive and Apache Drill. In this session we'll describe the most popular open source projects and outline their strengths and weaknesses. We'll also provide a recipe that will help you get started with open source SQL analytics.
11:00-11:40 (40m)
Session
To be confirmed
11:50-12:30 (40m) Performance/Scale
Is OpenStack the best path forward towards successful Clouds?
Cor van der Struijf (IBM)
OpenStack is a fast growing open source community, providing a set of software tools for building and managing cloud computing platforms for public and private clouds.
13:45-14:25 (40m) Sponsored
The Seif Project Deeper Dive
Douglas Crockford (PayPal)
This talk introduces Seif, an open source project that was started at PayPal, which has the goal of transitioning the web into an application delivery system that will be safer, easier to use, and easier to develop for. This session is a deeper dive into the Seif project and its' deliverables, including a Q&A about the keynote announcement, and a vision for the entire project.
14:35-15:15 (40m) Sponsored
OpenShift 3 and The Next Generation of PaaS
Marek Jelen (Red Hat)
Let's talk about deploying containers on scale and in a secure way.
7:00-9:00 (2h)
Break
10:30-11:00 (30m)
Break: Morning Break
12:30-13:45 (1h 15m) Event
Monday Lunch-Birds of a Feather (BoF) Tables and Office Hours
Connect with other like-minded people during lunch at tables designated for certain languages, technologies, and interests. Look for the signs on the tables near the buffet lines each day at lunch.
15:15-16:15 (1h)
Break: Afternoon Break Sponsored by Google
17:45-19:00 (1h 15m) Event
Sponsor Pavilion Opening Reception (Sponsored by GitLab)
Grab a drink and kick off OSCON by meeting and mingling with exhibitors and fellow attendees.
9:00-9:05 (5m)
Monday keynote welcome
Rachel Roumeliotis (O'Reilly Media), Peter Cooper (Cooper Press)
OSCON in Amsterdam Program Chairs Rachel Roumeliotis and Peter Cooper welcome you to the first day of keynotes.
9:05-9:20 (15m)
The evolution of evolutionary architecture
Rebecca Parsons (ThoughtWorks)
Evolutionary architecture—also known as just-in-time architecture—is not as horrifying to mainstream developers and software architects as it once was. The techniques have evolved, as has our ability to maintain various capabilities using an evolutionary approach. If you've shunned evolutionary architecture in the past, it could be worth another look.
9:20-9:35 (15m) Sponsored
The Seif Project
Douglas Crockford (PayPal)
This talk introduces Seif, an open source project that was started at PayPal, which has the goal of transitioning the web into an application delivery system that will be safer, easier to use, and easier to develop for.
9:35-9:50 (15m)
Docker security
Nils Magnus (LinuxTag Association and Open Telekom Cloud)
This talk examines the security features of Docker, introduces the technology behind it, and thus allows participants to assess whether Docker corresponds to their individual requirements.
9:50-10:05 (15m)
Enough Foundations Already!
Simon Phipps (Public Software CIC)
In the explosion of new open source software "foundations" there's a crucial element we're overlooking; the core principle that got everything started and which is the basis for every developers' success in a modern business. Before we start another Foundation, let's agree that what we need protected is software freedom and not corporate politics.
10:05-10:20 (15m)
Programming as performance - live coding with Sonic Pi
Sam Aaron (University of Cambridge)
In this keynote Sam will introduce and perform with Sonic Pi, a live coding synth available for free to use on all major platorms including the Raspberry Pi. He will discuss how it has created a huge impact with educators in addition to artists and programmers interested in exploring the creative potential of code.
10:20-10:25 (5m)
Closing remarks
OSCON EU Program Chairs, Rachel Roumeliotis and Peter Cooper, present their closing remarks.