July 20–24, 2015
Portland, OR

Cultivate conference sessions

The companies defining our new network age are fast, flat, and flexible. Successful organizations embrace continual change, leverage copious data, and adapt to a marketplace in which customers’ needs and desires truly come first. Successful leadership starts with corporate culture: working effectively with people, understanding shared assumptions, and managing communications patterns. Leadership isn’t about telling people what to do; it’s about providing a context in which they can be effective.

At Cultivate, a two-day event taking place July 20-21, experts from leading companies who have been through this before will tell you how they do it, and how you can, too.

Cultivate explores the business practices managers, people in product development groups who want to become managers, and project team leads need to thrive in the new world: enabling design thinking, collaboration, and agility. The focus is on the way corporate cultures have to change to adapt to current trends like rapid release cycles, the use of data to inform discussion, and building environments where everyone, including women and other underrepresented groups, can contribute freely.

Changing culture isn’t about making superficial organizational tweaks; these are significant changes, and they have to be made from the bottom up, as well as from the top down. The companies that can make those changes will prosper; the ones that can’t, won’t.

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9:00am–5:00pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Portland 256
We’re at the cusp of a new network age. The companies defining it are fast, flat, and flexible. They devour data and focus obsessively on their customers. “Analyze and adapt” is their Standing Operating Procedure. At Cultivate, they’ll tell you how they do it—and how you can, too. Read more.
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9:40am–10:30am Monday, 07/20/2015
Portland 256
Mary Yoko Brannen (CLIA Consulting)
In her keynote address, Mary Yoko Brannen, will propose “ethnographic thinking” as a new way of diagnosing culture that can open up new avenues for innovation and ongoing strategic renewal. Read more.
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11:10am–12:10pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Portland 256
People who build things often over-focus on the technology and ignore the critical human factor of collaboration -- and yet collaboration is an art that will make or break your team. Read more.
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1:30pm–2:30pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Portland 256
Michael Lopp (Rands)
A series of simple numbers can represent a useful and memorable corpus of hard-earned leadership experience. This talk will succinctly explain essential leadership lessons that you can either heed or simply wait to experience. Read more.
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2:45pm–3:45pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Portland 256
Liza Daly (Safari)
Companies in all industries looking to remain relevant can learn greater transparency, agility, and new ways to collaborate by careful study of case studies in institutional innovation. Managers and executives looking to bring the best of engineering culture to their institution will benefit from this presentation, which follows several companies through their detailed technical transformation. Read more.
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3:45pm–4:15pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Portland 256
Afternoon break Read more.
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4:15pm–5:15pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Portland 256
Molly Graham (Quip)
There are very few companies that get the chance to grow from the initial team to thousands of employees. Whether you're running a team that is doubling every six months or less, or growing your start up from 30 to 100 employees, it's scary and overwhelming. In this session, we're going to talk about the phases of scaling, what to expect, and how you can help your team. Read more.
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9:00am–5:00pm Tuesday, 07/21/2015
Portland 256
We’re at the cusp of a new network age. The companies defining it are fast, flat, and flexible. They devour data and focus obsessively on their customers. “Analyze and adapt” is their Standing Operating Procedure. At Cultivate, they’ll tell you how they do it—and how you can, too. Read more.
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9:30am–9:40am Tuesday, 07/21/2015
Portland 256
Mike Loukides (O'Reilly Media), Bjorn Freeman-Benson (New Relic Inc)
Program Chair Mike Loukides and Co-Host Bjorn Freeman-Benson welcome you to Cultivate. Read more.
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9:40am–10:40am Tuesday, 07/21/2015
Portland 256
Eric McNulty (Richer Earth)
There are three big shifts in leadership development: from linear thinking to complex systems thinking where relationships are paramount; from focus as a noun to a verb -- continually recalibrating to ensure clarity of purpose, values, and performance; and from "they" to "you" -- the onus on leadership development now falls on each individual so take charge of your leadership future. Read more.
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1:30pm–2:30pm Tuesday, 07/21/2015
Portland 256
Jez Humble (DevOps Research and Assessment LLC)
We know that culture can make or break a company, but it's hard to measure and even harder to change. In this talk I'll discuss how we measured culture in an enormous international survey of over 9,000 people, what makes a high performance organization, and how companies have moved from low performance to high performance. Read more.
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2:45pm–3:45pm Tuesday, 07/21/2015
Portland 256
Karla Monterroso (CODE2040)
Blindspots, risk, and will: Tools for navigating difference will help you examine the role that culture plays in our listening, interactions with colleagues, and design of operations. Read more.
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3:45pm–4:15pm Tuesday, 07/21/2015
Portland 256
Afternoon break 3:45pm Read more.
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4:15pm–5:15pm Tuesday, 07/21/2015
Portland 256
Bjorn Freeman-Benson (New Relic Inc), Kate Heddleston (Kate Heddleston LLC), Molly Graham (Quip), Belinda Runkle (New Relic), Will Maier (Simple)
This panel will discuss the uncomfortable questions that can’t be asked in public—and that frequently aren’t asked at all. Read more.