July 20–24, 2015
Portland, OR

Tools and techniques conference sessions

11:30am–12:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Wade Minter (NBC SportsEngine)
Slides:   1-ZIP 
Modern software development places a high value on doing things The Right Way(tm). But what if you're just someone with an idea, some coding knowledge, and a nontrivial amount of intimidation? In this session, a sysadmin-turned-developer will take you through a battle with the demons of self-doubt, and help you discover the ONE CRAZY TRICK YOUR BRAIN DOESN'T WANT YOU TO KNOW!
10:40am–11:20am Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Brandon Keepers (GitHub)
Sometimes, learning what not to do is the best path to success. This absurd, humorous, and completely serious talk will teach you everything you need to know to ensure that a healthy open source project meets its demise. Whether you are a user testing the open source waters, an experienced maintainer, or open source ate your hard drive, discover techniques to ruin your corner of the world.
11:30am–12:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Garen Torikian (GitHub)
The way math equations are written and represented have a long history that's woven into computer science. However, rendering math for the web has been a challenge. This talk explores the pursuit of rendering math beautifully for the web, culminating in the creation of a library that integrates with markup formats like Markdown and AsciiDoc.
2:30pm–3:10pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Slides:   external link
You've decided to level up your Git skills and have heard that rebasing is where it's at. In this session we'll talk about: WHY rebasing can make it easier to untangle your project's history; WHEN you should use rebase; WHAT rebasing actually does to your repository; and HOW it actually looks when things go right (and how to recover when things go wrong).
11:10am–11:50am Friday, 07/24/2015
Robert Aboukhalil (Fluidigm)
Slides:   external link
In 2008, Nate Silver wowed the public by correctly predicting the outcome of the U.S. elections in 49 out of 50 states. As it turns out, you don't have to be a statistician to perform such analyses. In this talk, I introduce the Bash scripting language and how it can be used to perform advanced number crunching.
4:10pm–4:50pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
pat barton (O'Reilly School of Technology)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This talk addresses improving the ability of hierarchal temporal memory (HTM) to predict electricity demand, helping the algorithm by providing some of the complementarity data streams currently applied to demand analysis, and including some goodness-of-fit metrics that address known characteristics of electric load.
11:30am–12:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Maria Naggaga (Microsoft )
Slides:   1-PDF 
ASP.Net vNext, the open source version of the .Net series, has opened up its framework to an entirely new web developer community. The cool thing about this lean framework is you can get ASP.NET from Mac to PC using either Visual Studio Community or Sublime. In this demo, I will be going through the tools and frameworks you need to get ASP.NET vNext running on OS X Yosemite.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 07/21/2015
Julie Steele (Silicon Valley Data Science), Susie Lu (Silicon Valley Data Science)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This tool-agnostic tutorial is for those with the software chops and interest to create data visualizations, who want to elevate the look and feel of their work. Attendees will workshop an in-progress data visualization. They will learn design best practices and how to navigate the critique process, and then develop their own work on-site with guidance from two experts.
10:00am–10:40am Friday, 07/24/2015
Bryan Smith (Fossetcon)
Botnets can take down virtually any site or service on the internet, including an entire country's internet backbone. Oftentimes your hear about a botnet's path of destruction, but you never hear about how they work. This talk will introduce you to the concepts behind botnets, and also show a live demonstration of a botnet on a sandboxed network.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Josh Owens (Meteor Club)
Join Meteor expert Josh Owens as he walks through live coding a Meteor.js app from scratch and gets it working with the built-in Cordova support. Learn how easy it is to build a new mobile app with Meteor.js.
11:30am–12:10pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Jonathan LeBlanc (PayPal / Braintree)
What if instead of a broad location, you could have pinpoint location awareness of someone in a physical space. How could this change everything about how we interact with the physical world? In this session we'll explore open beacon technology, and how we can use these systems to change everything from shopping to accessibility for the disabled, all built on top of a mobile device.
4:10pm–4:50pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
John Goulah (Primary)
The Etsy organization has grown by a significant amount over the last five years. As a company grows, more thought must be put into the techniques that it uses to communicate and deal with failures. This talk will cover several techniques that have helped foster a Just Culture, one in which an effort is made to balance both safety and accountability.
11:10am–11:50am Friday, 07/24/2015
Matthew Garrett (CoreOS)
Slides:   1-ODP 
As we become more and more reliant on our computers, attackers become more and more sophisticated. How can we build a computer that's resilient to some of the more subtle attacks such as firmware modification?
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Jonathan Stark (Jonathan Stark Consulting)
Slides:   external link
It’s a fact: if you have a working knowledge of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, you already have the tools you need to develop your own web or hybrid apps for mobile. In this session, you’ll learn how to use these open source web technologies to design and build apps for the iPhone, iPad, Android, etc. on the development platform of your choice—without using Objective-C, Swift, or Java.
10:40am–11:20am Thursday, 07/23/2015
Ryan Jarvinen (CoreOS)
Learn how to build workflows that can help automate each part of your project's release lifecycle (build, test, review, merge, deployment, reporting, etc). We'll take a look at common language-based build tools, and learn how to set up Jenkins and/or Travis for build work and continuous integration (CI). Then, we'll compare various cloud deployment targets and learn about continuous delivery (CD).
2:30pm–3:10pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Mark Ferree (Chapter Three)
It is not in your best interest to leave most of your work hidden away at your employer. GitHub has created a showcase for your work, and hiring managers will spend time looking through your work before you are invited to come in for an interview. I will cover strategies for increasing both the quality and quantity of your open source contributions to improve your open resume.
4:10pm–4:50pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Caskey Dickson (Microsoft)
Slides:   1-PDF    external link
Did you know that some development practices actively encourage flow while others prevent you from ever getting there in the first place? This talk will lay out the conditions of flow, what established programming techniques encourage it, and strategies for finding ways to create flow sessions in your daily development life, regardless of what your established software-development lifecycle is.
4:10pm–4:50pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Nick Shadrin (NGINX, Inc.)
The new standard for web application development is microservices. In this talk we will review a modern web architecture, ways to fit different systems together, and how to scale and manage demand from initial startup deployments to millions of users. We will talk about the importance of unification of the web delivery approach across multiple systems, and demo some new features of nginx.
11:10am–11:50am Friday, 07/24/2015
Donna Benjamin (Creative Contingencies), Gina Likins (Red Hat)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Conflict can be constructive. Testing ideas by challenging them with alternatives is a useful process. But it can be uncomfortable and confronting for many people. Let's discuss how we can build a culture of respect to embrace the positive aspects of conflict and work together better.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 07/21/2015
Steve Francia (Google)
This is not a typo: we are going to demonstrate and compare different orchestration systems, for scales both big and small. Within the span of this tutorial, we will build clusters together using open source software like Swarm, Mesos, and others.
5:00pm–5:40pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Kevin Scaldeferri (New Relic)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Continuous delivery of a monolith is easy - just automate, automate, automate! But what challenges will you run into applying the same ideas to 300 microservices? Come and find out!
2:30pm–3:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Chris Aniszczyk (Cloud Native Computing Foundation)
When companies start adopting open source, they face common challenges, like how do you contribute back or what do you even open source. Companies like Google, Intel, Facebook, and Twitter have chosen to establish open source offices to facilitate working with open source communities. In this session, learn lessons from Twitter on how to start your own open source office.
5:00pm–5:40pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Alasdair Allan (Babilim Light Industries)
Bluetooth LE is very different from classic Bluetooth, in fact pretty much the only thing that is the same is the name. Using Bluetooth LE radios properly involves creating custom services and characteristics. However, until recently, this was actually really hard to do without making use of expensive proprietary software tools.
5:00pm–5:40pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Mike Biglan (Analytic Spot), Elijah Hamovitz (Analytic Spot)
Slides:   1-BIN    2-PDF 
CQL3 has a relational-database-centric abstraction that hides many key details of the underlying storage. Though CQL can be an efficient and convenient tool to use when querying, knowing how CQL actually maps to Cassandra's storage structure is key to being able to create scalable and flexible data models.
2:30pm–3:10pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Julie Cameron (Articulate)
Slides:   external link
This talk will look at how taking a modular, object-oriented approach to CSS can turn frontend woes into frontend wins. We’ll examine modern CSS approaches like OOCSS, SMACSS, and BEM and demonstrate how they will help to not only decouple your CSS styles and reduce specificity conflicts, but how they will also help to decouple your CSS and HTML from your JavaScript and feature specs.
5:00pm–5:40pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Amber Case (Esri)
Technology shouldn't require all of our attention, just some of it, and only when necessary. This talk will cover how to use principles of calm technology to design the next generation of connected devices. We'll look at notification styles, compressing information into other senses, and designing for the least amount of cognitive overhead.
2:30pm–3:10pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Matt Ranney (Uber)
Slides:   external link
As Uber moves into new markets with new services, designing for high availability and scalability presents some interesting challenges. Even brief outages in the service are very costly, with real-world impact on people's lives. This talk will cover the Uber architecture and how it handles every failure we can think of.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Andrew Baker (Twilio)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Docker was one of last year’s most talked about open source projects - but what is it? And what does it mean for deploying applications? This tutorial will explain what Docker is and where it fits in with other deployment and configuration management techniques. Students will then learn the basics of working with Docker containers, how to “dockerize” an app, and some emerging best practices.
10:40am–11:20am Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Bridget Kromhout (Pivotal)
Slides:   1-PDF 
DramaFever, the largest streaming video site for international content, uses AWS to power its streaming video platform, and has been running Docker in production since about October 2013 (well before it even went 1.0). This talk goes into detail about we use Docker to make development more consistent and deployment more repeatable.
1:40pm–2:20pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Matthew Hodgson (Matrix.org)
An open, interoperable communication ecosystem for VoIP, IM, and IoT services currently feels farther away than ever. Users are forced into closed silos like WhatsApp and Facebook by their contacts, rather than choosing their preferred app/service. This talk discusses ways to fix the problem and introduces Matrix: an open standard for decentralised communication, which may provide a new hope.
5:00pm–5:40pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
John Feminella (Pivotal)
There's a war on open standards and software brewing, and it's happening in a surprising location: under the hood of your car. In this talk, we discuss the storied history of OBD, a suite of related diagnostic protocols that's used by virtually every car sold in the US, EU, and China -- and how your ability to own and examine your vehicle's data might be threatened if some people have their way.
2:30pm–3:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Manfred Moser (simpligility technologies inc.)
Slides:   external link
Results of a five-year study on open source development and security practices form the basis for introducing supply chain management to your development practice. We rely on the usage of third-party components, and take on the responsibility for them and their licensing terms or security vulnerabilities. New tools for managing these components in your software development efforts are demoed.
1:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, 07/21/2015
Slides:   external link
You've dabbled a little in version control using Git. You can follow along with the various tutorials you've found online. But now you've been asked to implement a work flow strategy and you're not really sure how (or where) to start. You have a lot of choices, we'll help you pick the right one for your project.
11:30am–12:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Stormy Peters (Cloud Foundry Foundation), Avni Khatri (Kids on Computers)
Most nonprofit organizations depend on volunteers. And most volunteer organizations are asked how in the world they recruit and keep volunteers. While not every organization is the same, there are definitely some best practices that many open source software projects have discovered and evolved.
10:40am–11:20am Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Kevin Burke (burke.services)
Slides:   external link
You might be good at designing coasters in "Roller Coaster Tycoon," but you could make even cooler coasters if you let Go build them for you. We'll look a little at RCT's code (written in x86) and how to reverse-engineer it. You'll learn how to design good genetic algorithms. Finally, we'll discuss the advantages of using Go's standard library for a project like this.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Robert Gallup (XOBXOB)
Slides:   1-ZIP    external link
Prototypes allow us to see, touch, feel, and refine ideas and designs. Starting from zero, this hands-on workshop explores smart hardware prototyping using a micro-controller and basic electronic components. You'll connect LEDs, buttons, and knobs, then program a micro-controller to define behavior. Through this you’ll better understand the tools and process of designing smart, connected products.
1:40pm–2:20pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Slides:   1-PDF 
Many classic design patterns and traditional Python idioms remain relevant today. However, the language has grown, the problem spaces we address keep shifting, and best practices for software development have matured. Thus, the set of best-of-breed patterns and idioms has changed, some classics fading, new stars emerging. This talk explores today's realities in Python patterns and idioms.
11:30am–12:10pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Federico Lucifredi (Red Hat)
This is a live demonstration of hacking into the processor embedded in an SD card, effectively turning the device into a covert Raspberry Pi-class computer under your complete control -- running Linux. There will be a discussion of similar attacks against ARM processors embedded in current HDD drive controllers.
11:30am–12:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Nova Patch (Shutterstock)
Slides:   external link
Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the worldwide diversity of our most basic personal information like names and genders. This session will demonstrate ways to build applications that respect users’ identities instead of limiting them.
2:30pm–3:10pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Josh Deprez (Google Australia)
Slides:   external link
What can be learned about a person's internet habits if every packet in and out was logged by a transparent man-in-the-middle? Here's what I discovered from a few months of self-experimentation.
2:30pm–3:10pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
David Cheney (Canonical)
Slides:   1-PDF 
The Go programming language lets you write high performance network servers without resorting to event loops and callback spaghetti.
1:40pm–2:20pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
Slides:   external link
In this session, you’ll learn about game design: the art and science of constructing enjoyable, engaging games. We aren't doing any coding, and we’re not talking game engine development - instead, we’ll be taking a deep dive into game design theory, using it to understand how people interact with rules, and how to use it to improve your community, your company, your project, and your software.
1:40pm–2:20pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Daisuke Maki (HDE Inc)
Slides:   1-BIN 
Go is quickly becoming one of the many must-have items in our toolboxes. In this talk I will describe the common pitfalls and misunderstandings for people who have an extensive background in interpreted languages like myself. I will tell you all about my failures so you don't have to repeat them!
5:00pm–5:40pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
In this talk, I'll show you how to write a straightforward specification that is easy to implement in any programming language. I'll do this by sharing the story of JMESPath, a query language for JSON that currently has implementations in seven languages, and the lessons learned in creating the JMESPath specification. You'll leave ready to write easy-to-implement specifications.
1:40pm–2:20pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Jay Goel (Rent the Runway)
We often say that interviews should be a two-way street, but it doesn’t always feel that way. Here we talk about specific techniques for humanely interviewing engineers, and why this is good for business. We'll also talk about tips for candidates that help move things along.
4:10pm–4:50pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Beth Tucker Long (Treeline Design)
Slides:   external link
Investigate a hacked WordPress website, and learn what the hacker has left behind, which tools will help find the vulnerability and point of entrance, how to seal up the most common problem areas, and how to set up notifications to help you spot a hack more quickly in the future. Even though we will be going through a WordPress website, most of the tools discussed are applicable to any website.
11:30am–12:10pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Cedric Williams (PayPal)
Maturing engineering organizations tend to coalesce into silos around products, technologies, and business units. InnerSource uses proven open source approaches for development inside the firewall, bypassing the constraints of silo architecture while increasing velocity and quality. This session will examine how InnerSource is growing at PayPal and what has been learned so far.
11:10am–11:50am Friday, 07/24/2015
VM Brasseur (@vmbrasseur), Alexis Rossi (Internet Archive)
Slides:   external link
Internet Archive has released a number of open APIs and tools to allow people to upload and download items, as well as data mine the metadata for its entire 12+ Petabyte collection.
1:30pm–5:00pm Tuesday, 07/21/2015
Jen Kramer (Harvard University Extension School)
Slides:   1-ZIP    external link
Sass, the CSS preprocessor, is increasingly an important tool for creating websites. In this tutorial, you'll learn the basics of structuring your Sass files, creating variables, writing if/else statements, working with mixins, and more.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Kara Sowles (Puppet Labs), Francesca Krihely (MongoDB )
Slides:   external link
The open source world has a vibrant, never-ending calendar of community events. This session will cover best practices and pitfalls to avoid in planning and executing events for your technical community.
10:00am–10:40am Friday, 07/24/2015
Jonathan Whitmore (Silicon Valley Data Science)
Slides:   external link
The IPython Notebook is perfect for many data science tasks, including rapid iteration for data munging and cleaning; exploration and visualization; creating a transparent data processing pipeline workflow; and beautiful presentation of results. This talk will explore overall best practices, with special attention to these use cases and how to get the most out of IPython Notebook for each one.
10:40am–11:20am Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Brian Proffitt (Red Hat)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Everything we do in technology - operating systems, applications, systems administration - is based on nothing solid and real, but rather conceptualizations and ideas that we make accessible through metaphors. In fact, far from being "non-creative," nerd-types may be among the most creative storytellers in history.
4:10pm–4:50pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Ray Tsang (Google)
Slides:   external link
Join this session to learn how to create a Java-based microservice using Spring Boot, containerize it using Maven plugins, and subsequently deploy a fleet of microservices and dependent components such as Redis using Kubernetes. Toward the end of the session, let's take a look at how we can apply the same patterns to other runtimes, such as Vert.x and Grails.
1:40pm–2:20pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Bryan Cantrill (Joyent)
While leading several high-profile open source projects, Joyent has also historically had significant proprietary systems. In November of last year, we open sourced these proprietary systems -- including our SmartDataCenter cloud orchestration system and our Manta scale-out storage system -- becoming an all open source company.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Tammy Butow (Dropbox), Georgi Knox (GitHub), Jessica Frazelle (Microsoft)
Slides:   external link
This will be a hands-on workshop aimed at those who are casually familiar with the Linux operating system. Perhaps you use it on a server or in a virtualbox, but want to gain deeper understanding about the kernel and how Linux actually works.
10:00am–10:40am Friday, 07/24/2015
Nicolas Steenhout (Part of a Whole)
Without firsthand experience, it is difficult to understand the barriers that exist for screenreader users on the web. Many developers have told me they were curious to "see" a screenreader in action. This is your chance! Using a combination of real-world examples and code snippets, we will use a screenreader to go through common barriers and discuss them.
1:40pm–2:20pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Charles Smith (Netflix)
We are collecting increasing amounts of data to analyze, so we can understand how to better serve our customers. But how do you know that the data collected is useful or even being used? Using Netflix’s experience building data platforms, we will talk about how gaining insight into the use of your data can improve your own platform.
5:00pm–5:40pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
David Greenberg (Two Sigma)
In this talk, we'll learn all about Mesos - what it is, how you can leverage it to simplify your infrastructure and reduce AWS/cloud computing costs, and why you should develop your next application on top of it. This talk will give you the tools you need to understand whether Mesos is the right fit for your infrastructure, and several starting points for learning more about Mesos.
11:30am–12:10pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Slides:   1-PDF    2-PDF 
Thanks to Docker and containers, microservices architectures are no longer reserved to large organizations like Netflix or Amazon. Let's review the benefits of those architectures, for Devs and Ops, in projects big and small, and how to realize them with the open source container technology available today.
10:40am–11:20am Thursday, 07/23/2015
Patrick Fox (Razorfish)
Building modern, accessible web apps can be daunting. This talk goes beyond the foundational aspects of accessibility to discuss higher-level concepts and challenges for making modern web UI accessible, demonstrating specific solutions and best practices for: -Common UI components(modals, form validation) -Single-page architecture -Summarizing complex content -Providing accessible help text
10:40am–11:20am Thursday, 07/23/2015
Dawn Foster (The New Stack)
Slides:   1-PDF 
The real magic in any community comes from the people. I will show you tools and techniques for performing network analysis, to look at the people in your community along with the relationships between them. Why settle for boring numbers and line charts to describe your community when you can do cool visualizations that show how people connect within your open source community?
2:30pm–3:10pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Kenny Bastani (Digital Insight)
Slides:   1-BIN 
Fast and scalable analysis of big data has become a critical competitive advantage for companies. There are open source tools like Apache Hadoop and Apache Spark that are providing opportunities for companies to solve these big data problems in a scalable way. Platforms like these have become the foundation of the big data analysis movement.
10:40am–11:20am Wednesday, 07/22/2015
The design of an open source project will greatly effect a user's experience, and open source typically lacks solid design. In this session we'll talk about the current state of design and how we can raise the bar in an open source community.
5:00pm–5:40pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Randi Harper (Literally Blue, LLC)
This talk aims to discuss the current state of online harassment, and the way that the open source community can create new tools to mitigate abuse until policy and law enforcement catch up.
4:10pm–4:50pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
Slides:   1-PDF    2-PDF 
Pingo is a uniform Python API for devices that have programmable I/O for physical computing: Raspberry Pi, Arduino TRE, Intel Edison, BeagleBone Black etc. The design of the Arduino board and IDE made device programming accessible, and the design of the Pingo API aims to do the same with the Internet of Things, bringing interactive discovery and high-level services to embedded systems development.
11:30am–12:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Developments like the `concurrent.futures` classes, coroutine delegation with `yield from` and the `asyncio` module together represent a major new chapter in the evolution of Python, and are the best reasons to upgrade to Python 3. This talk will show how these tools bring concurrent programming within reach of even casual programmers, with dramatic boosts in throughput.
11:30am–12:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Doris Chen (Microsoft)
How do you tackle real-world web platform performance problems in modern websites and apps? This session starts with a basic understanding of the web platform, and then explores a set of problem/solution pairs built with industry-standard performance guidance. In the talk, we will demonstrate performance tips and tricks that will help you improve the performance of your apps and sites today.
1:40pm–2:20pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Jonathan LeBlanc (PayPal / Braintree)
We are now in an age where more people have phones than toilets, and there are more active cell phones than people on the planet. How do we protect all of these devices as they’re roaming around unsecured locations, especially when we want to pay for something.
11:30am–12:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Jesse Toth (GitHub), Nathan Witmer (GitHub)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This talk will tell the story of a large-scale refactoring of our permissions model at GitHub. We’ll explain the problem, our solution, and then go over the tools we built, the techniques we used, and the lessons we learned while replacing this critical piece of our application live, side-by-side, and in production.
1:40pm–2:20pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Eli White (php[architect])
Slides:   external link
I've worked as a 100% remote employee for six different companies. Through this, I've learned the good, the bad, and the ugly about remote work (as well as time shifted asynchronous work). In this session we will discuss the benefits and drawbacks of remote work, for both the employee and the company. Learn the tricks needed, both procedural and technological, to make this possible!
5:00pm–5:40pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
Slides:   external link
Board games are hard at the best of times – you have to find friends who have the free time to play, find a game everyone is happy to play, and more! When friends move elsewhere, things get even harder! This sessions explores the challenges of telepresence board gaming. Learn why and how you should care, how the problems are being addressed, and how it’s relevant to remote collaboration.
4:10pm–4:50pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Lucy Wyman (Puppet Labs)
Slides:   external link,   2-HTM 
This talk will start off with the basics of what Syntactically Awesome StyleSheets are, what features and functionality they have to offer, and why they're a great tool to have in your arsenal. We'll then delve into how to use Sass in developing your own sites and which tools you'll want to use alongside it, complete with a live demo and some in-production examples.
1:40pm–2:20pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Travis Brown (Twitter, Inc.)
Scala plays a central role in many parts of Twitter's infrastructure, and Twitter's open source projects are widely used in the Scala community. While Scala has brought many benefits to Twitter, its nature as a relatively young hybrid OOP / FP language has also posed some challenges. This talk will provide an overview of how Twitter maintains one of the largest Scala codebases on the planet.
2:30pm–3:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Roman Shaposhnik (Pivotal Inc.)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Graph relationships are everywhere. In fact, more often than not, analyzing relationships between points in your datasets lets you extract more business value from your data. This presentation will provide an introduction into two of the most used Hadoop ecosystem projects in the area of scalable graph processing: Apache Giraph and Spark GraphX.
5:00pm–5:40pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
James McCaffrey (Microsoft)
Swarm intelligence (SI) algorithms mimic the behaviors of groups such as flocks of birds and schools of fish. This session describes in detail four major SI algorithms: amoeba method optimization, particle swam optimization, simulated bee colony optimization, and firefly algorithm optimization. Attendees will receive Python source code for each algorithm.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 07/21/2015
Jarret Raim (Rackspace), Andrew Hartnett (Rackspace)
Attendees will learn general best practices for cryptography and key management, be able to generate, store, and verify passwords, protect data at rest with encryption, protect data from modification with signing and verification techniques, and generate, store, and use keys securely.
1:40pm–2:20pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Joseph Gregorio (Google)
Slides:   external link
JavaScript frameworks seem like death and taxes; inevitable and unavoidable. But that's not the way it needs to be, and actually, it must stop. A talk based on the zer framework manifesto: http://bitworking.org/news/2014/05/zero_framework_manifesto
5:00pm–5:40pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Kirsten Hunter (Akamai)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
Many conference attendees come year after year without giving presentations. The sense that there's a high bar for perfection is pervasive, and people are afraid of being "wrong." Everyone has a story to tell about a problem they've solved or issues they've tackled. Learn how to share your experiences without fear, and join the speaker community!
4:10pm–4:50pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Slides:   1-PDF 
Test-driven development's great, but what happens when you find yourself working on code where automated testing took a back seat to being shipped? This talk looks at techniques for automated testing of late-stage or even production code, and how to use this to fix bugs in your code. Testing late in life isn't a lost cause any more!
11:10am–11:50am Friday, 07/24/2015
Jason Maxham (The Art Of Troubleshooting)
It's something we all do, but how it's done can be haphazard. I'm talking about troubleshooting, an often underappreciated skill. This talk will get you thinking about this critical discipline in a more formal way. We'll cover: Strategies: recipes to quickly get you from "broken" to "fixed"; Virtues: the mindset and behavior of a good troubleshooter; Cleaning up: learning from failures.
5:00pm–5:40pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Eva Tse (Netflix, Inc)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
At Netflix, the big data platform is the foundation for analytics that drives all product decisions. As for scale, it is one of the top three largest services running at Netflix. In this talk, you will learn about our open source-powered big data architecture in the AWS cloud, and how we build out the technology stack that comprises the big data platform at Netflix today.
2:30pm–3:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Carin Meier (Cognitect)
Take a step back from your normal programming approach and discover a new way of looking at problems. All living organisms' information systems are based on chemical processes. What can we learn by using this metaphor of chemistry in our programming?
4:10pm–4:50pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Nova Patch (Shutterstock)
Slides:   external link
Unicode is much more than just characters. The Unicode Consortium defines open standards for collating, parsing, and formatting data in much of the world’s languages. The Common Locale Data Repository (CLDR) is the largest standard repository of locale data along with specifications for its use, and is a powerful resource for software localization.
4:10pm–4:50pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
John Hugg (VoltDB)
One challenge in building distributed systems is actually running and testing distributed systems. This session will show how developers at VoltDB simplify development and testing using Docker and other container technologies.
4:10pm–4:50pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Joe Wagner (Puppet Labs)
At Puppet Labs, we’ve adopted and developed techniques for getting our ideas in front of our community in a manner that leads to reliable feedback. Join us to learn about what we’ve found to be effective, and how that has affected the way we plan, design, and build.
10:40am–11:20am Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Jan Paul Posma (Brigade)
We don’t see how code executes. We take peeks, using console.logs and breakpoints, but they don’t tell the whole story. This talk shows future toolmakers and (non-) visual thinkers how to take off our blindfolds.
10:40am–11:20am Thursday, 07/23/2015
Jeremy Stanley (OpenStack Foundation)
The vulnerability management team for the OpenStack project handles hundreds of incoming reports of potential security vulnerabilities, and publishes dozens of advisories every year. Find out how we reconcile vulnerability reporting with our public design and open community development ideals, and learn about the free tooling and published processes we employ to make it easier.
2:30pm–3:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Jeremy King (Walmart Global E-Commerce)
In order to scale its operations to serve more than 245 million customers around the world each week, Walmart eCommercecompletely re-engineered its entire technology stack -- including making huge investments in OpenStack, Node.JS and other technologies to create a global platform that would rival those of the best technology companies.
1:40pm–2:20pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Grant Ingersoll (Lucidworks)
Ever wonder how Watson beat all comers in Jeopardy or how Siri or Google Now work? Thinking about deploying question answering (QA) technology in your application? QA and NLP technology have finally hit the mainstream, and are making information access more powerful every day. The best part? Open source technologies make it easier than ever to build and deploy question answering technology!