July 20–24, 2015
Portland, OR

Python conference sessions

5:00pm–5:40pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Matthew Taylor (Numenta)
Slides:   external link
What if you had software that tracked location history so well it could remember all the walks you take, all your commutes, and even the quests you take in your favorite video games? With this level of detail captured and a bit of algorithmic brilliance, NuPIC allows for instant anomaly detection, and in the process, opens up a whole new world of intelligent applications for pattern recognition.
4:10pm–4:50pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
pat barton (O'Reilly School of Technology)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This talk addresses improving the ability of hierarchal temporal memory (HTM) to predict electricity demand, helping the algorithm by providing some of the complementarity data streams currently applied to demand analysis, and including some goodness-of-fit metrics that address known characteristics of electric load.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Nicole White (Neo4j)
Slides:   external link,   external link
Flask, a popular Python web framework, has many tutorials available online which use an SQL database to store information about the website’s users and their activities. In this tutorial, we will replace SQL with Neo4j, an open source graph database, in order to build a simple microblog application with social features that are otherwise too complex to model and express in SQL.
4:10pm–4:50pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Alan Robertson (Assimilation Systems Limited)
Slides:   1-PDF 
The cybersecurity community has difficulty working together around breaches, out of legal and public relations concerns, but can share best practices. The open source Assimilation Project compares system configurations against best practices in near-real-time. This talk outlines our efforts to include more security experts in our community, and translate the results into open source code.
1:40pm–2:20pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Amy Boyle (New Relic)
Slides:   external link
Learn how digital signal processing can help you look at data, and even the world around you, with a new critical eye. Gain an understanding of the methods behind speech recognition, image manipulation, data compression, and more.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Matt Harrison (MetaSnake)
Got the basics of Python down but want to dig in a little more? Have you wondered about functional programming, closures, decorators, context managers, generators, or list comprehensions, and when you should use them and how to test them? This hands-on tutorial will cover these intermediate subjects in detail, by applying them to programming a drone.
1:40pm–2:20pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Slides:   1-PDF 
Many classic design patterns and traditional Python idioms remain relevant today. However, the language has grown, the problem spaces we address keep shifting, and best practices for software development have matured. Thus, the set of best-of-breed patterns and idioms has changed, some classics fading, new stars emerging. This talk explores today's realities in Python patterns and idioms.
5:00pm–5:40pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
In this talk, I'll show you how to write a straightforward specification that is easy to implement in any programming language. I'll do this by sharing the story of JMESPath, a query language for JSON that currently has implementations in seven languages, and the lessons learned in creating the JMESPath specification. You'll leave ready to write easy-to-implement specifications.
10:00am–10:40am Friday, 07/24/2015
Jonathan Whitmore (Silicon Valley Data Science)
Slides:   external link
The IPython Notebook is perfect for many data science tasks, including rapid iteration for data munging and cleaning; exploration and visualization; creating a transparent data processing pipeline workflow; and beautiful presentation of results. This talk will explore overall best practices, with special attention to these use cases and how to get the most out of IPython Notebook for each one.
10:40am–11:20am Thursday, 07/23/2015
Paco Nathan (O'Reilly Media)
Slides:   external link
Herein, an open source developer community considers itself _algorithmically_. This project shows how to surface data insights from the developer email forums for just about any Apache open source project. It leverages machine learning and advanced analytics in Apache Spark, but also makes use of Docker containers for standalone NLP services.
4:10pm–4:50pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
Slides:   1-PDF    2-PDF 
Pingo is a uniform Python API for devices that have programmable I/O for physical computing: Raspberry Pi, Arduino TRE, Intel Edison, BeagleBone Black etc. The design of the Arduino board and IDE made device programming accessible, and the design of the Pingo API aims to do the same with the Internet of Things, bringing interactive discovery and high-level services to embedded systems development.
11:30am–12:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Developments like the `concurrent.futures` classes, coroutine delegation with `yield from` and the `asyncio` module together represent a major new chapter in the evolution of Python, and are the best reasons to upgrade to Python 3. This talk will show how these tools bring concurrent programming within reach of even casual programmers, with dramatic boosts in throughput.
5:00pm–5:40pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
James McCaffrey (Microsoft)
Swarm intelligence (SI) algorithms mimic the behaviors of groups such as flocks of birds and schools of fish. This session describes in detail four major SI algorithms: amoeba method optimization, particle swam optimization, simulated bee colony optimization, and firefly algorithm optimization. Attendees will receive Python source code for each algorithm.
9:00am–12:30pm Tuesday, 07/21/2015
Jarret Raim (Rackspace), Andrew Hartnett (Rackspace)
Attendees will learn general best practices for cryptography and key management, be able to generate, store, and verify passwords, protect data at rest with encryption, protect data from modification with signing and verification techniques, and generate, store, and use keys securely.
10:00am–10:40am Friday, 07/24/2015
Bradley Kuhn (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Slides:   external link
Kallithea is a self-hosted source code management system that exists thanks to a GPL violation and subsequent compliance action by the Software Freedom Conservancy. We'll show how a copyleft license violation and careful license vetting helped a software development community begin anew, and why licensing wonks and release engineers can make a huge impact on the health of a project's community.