July 20–24, 2015
Portland, OR

Geek life lifestyle conference sessions

11:30am–12:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Wade Minter (NBC SportsEngine)
Slides:   1-ZIP 
Modern software development places a high value on doing things The Right Way(tm). But what if you're just someone with an idea, some coding knowledge, and a nontrivial amount of intimidation? In this session, a sysadmin-turned-developer will take you through a battle with the demons of self-doubt, and help you discover the ONE CRAZY TRICK YOUR BRAIN DOESN'T WANT YOU TO KNOW!
10:00am–10:40am Friday, 07/24/2015
Bryan Smith (Fossetcon)
Botnets can take down virtually any site or service on the internet, including an entire country's internet backbone. Oftentimes your hear about a botnet's path of destruction, but you never hear about how they work. This talk will introduce you to the concepts behind botnets, and also show a live demonstration of a botnet on a sandboxed network.
11:10am–11:50am Friday, 07/24/2015
Matthew Garrett (CoreOS)
Slides:   1-ODP 
As we become more and more reliant on our computers, attackers become more and more sophisticated. How can we build a computer that's resilient to some of the more subtle attacks such as firmware modification?
4:10pm–4:50pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Caskey Dickson (Microsoft)
Slides:   1-PDF    external link
Did you know that some development practices actively encourage flow while others prevent you from ever getting there in the first place? This talk will lay out the conditions of flow, what established programming techniques encourage it, and strategies for finding ways to create flow sessions in your daily development life, regardless of what your established software-development lifecycle is.
11:10am–11:50am Friday, 07/24/2015
Donna Benjamin (Creative Contingencies), Gina Likins (Red Hat)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Conflict can be constructive. Testing ideas by challenging them with alternatives is a useful process. But it can be uncomfortable and confronting for many people. Let's discuss how we can build a culture of respect to embrace the positive aspects of conflict and work together better.
1:40pm–2:20pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Leslie Hawthorn (Red Hat), Amye Scavarda (Red Hat )
Slides:   1-PDF 
While it’s easy to pay lip service to the idea of innovating by failing fast, humans are both neurally geared and financially incentivized to avoid failure. How can we create an environment that makes failing fast safe for the participants and their organizations?
5:00pm–5:40pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
John Feminella (Pivotal)
There's a war on open standards and software brewing, and it's happening in a surprising location: under the hood of your car. In this talk, we discuss the storied history of OBD, a suite of related diagnostic protocols that's used by virtually every car sold in the US, EU, and China -- and how your ability to own and examine your vehicle's data might be threatened if some people have their way.
10:40am–11:20am Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Kevin Burke (burke.services)
Slides:   external link
You might be good at designing coasters in "Roller Coaster Tycoon," but you could make even cooler coasters if you let Go build them for you. We'll look a little at RCT's code (written in x86) and how to reverse-engineer it. You'll learn how to design good genetic algorithms. Finally, we'll discuss the advantages of using Go's standard library for a project like this.
10:00am–10:40am Friday, 07/24/2015
Patrick McFadin (Datastax)
You love using open source software. It's done right by you and now you want to contribute back. You get your patch all ready and... the boss says No! Don't feel alone. Enterprises everywhere are trying to figure this out. I'll walk you through the risks to business that actually exist and how you can help manage them. Maybe armed with this information your boss will say... Yes!
1:40pm–2:20pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
Slides:   external link
In this session, you’ll learn about game design: the art and science of constructing enjoyable, engaging games. We aren't doing any coding, and we’re not talking game engine development - instead, we’ll be taking a deep dive into game design theory, using it to understand how people interact with rules, and how to use it to improve your community, your company, your project, and your software.
10:00am–10:40am Friday, 07/24/2015
Simon Phipps (Public Software CIC), Deborah Bryant (Red Hat)
The Open Source Initiative has changed from a licensing-focussed organisation to a force uniting open source projects, developers, and advocates worldwide. Hear how it happened, what's happening next, and why this is important to your career and business.
1:40pm–2:20pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Jay Goel (Rent the Runway)
We often say that interviews should be a two-way street, but it doesn’t always feel that way. Here we talk about specific techniques for humanely interviewing engineers, and why this is good for business. We'll also talk about tips for candidates that help move things along.
11:10am–11:50am Friday, 07/24/2015
VM Brasseur (@vmbrasseur), Alexis Rossi (Internet Archive)
Slides:   external link
Internet Archive has released a number of open APIs and tools to allow people to upload and download items, as well as data mine the metadata for its entire 12+ Petabyte collection.
1:30pm–5:00pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Kara Sowles (Puppet Labs), Francesca Krihely (MongoDB )
Slides:   external link
The open source world has a vibrant, never-ending calendar of community events. This session will cover best practices and pitfalls to avoid in planning and executing events for your technical community.
10:40am–11:20am Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Brian Proffitt (Red Hat)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Everything we do in technology - operating systems, applications, systems administration - is based on nothing solid and real, but rather conceptualizations and ideas that we make accessible through metaphors. In fact, far from being "non-creative," nerd-types may be among the most creative storytellers in history.
2:30pm–3:10pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Ben Balter (GitHub)
Open source isn't open source without a license. GitHub is the de facto hub for creating and sharing open source software, but how much of it is truly open? How has license usage changed over time? How does licensing effect contribution, reuse, and project evolution? Join Ben Balter and Tal Niv, two of GitHub's legals for a quantitative analysis of license usage across all of GitHub's 19M repos.
5:00pm–5:40pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Randi Harper (Literally Blue, LLC)
This talk aims to discuss the current state of online harassment, and the way that the open source community can create new tools to mitigate abuse until policy and law enforcement catch up.
9:00am–12:30pm Monday, 07/20/2015
Damian Conway (Thoughtstream)
Over the past decade Damian Conway's popular "Presentation Aikido" class has explained and demonstrated the fundamentals of giving great presentations. In this, the long-awaited followup class, Damian delves even deeper into the art and science of presentation, revealing the subtle and unexpected techniques that can lift your presentations from great to extraordinary.
5:00pm–5:40pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Ruth Suehle (Red Hat), Tom "spot" Callaway (Red Hat)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Ruth Suehle and Tom Callaway, authors of _Raspberry Pi Hacks_ (O’Reilly, December 2013) offer technical tips for makers, hackers, and tinkerers who want to take advantage of the Raspberry Pi. You'll learn universally useful things, like how to add a power switch, followed by a show-and-tell of fun things that Ruth and Tom as well as many others have built.
1:40pm–2:20pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
Eli White (php[architect])
Slides:   external link
I've worked as a 100% remote employee for six different companies. Through this, I've learned the good, the bad, and the ugly about remote work (as well as time shifted asynchronous work). In this session we will discuss the benefits and drawbacks of remote work, for both the employee and the company. Learn the tricks needed, both procedural and technological, to make this possible!
5:00pm–5:40pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
Slides:   external link
Board games are hard at the best of times – you have to find friends who have the free time to play, find a game everyone is happy to play, and more! When friends move elsewhere, things get even harder! This sessions explores the challenges of telepresence board gaming. Learn why and how you should care, how the problems are being addressed, and how it’s relevant to remote collaboration.
11:30am–12:10pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
Deb Nicholson (Open Invention Network)
Slides:   external link
There's always plenty to do in the world of free and open source software, but saying yes to it all eventually leads to burnout. Not every job, module or meeting is going to lead to more of the kinds of opportunities you want. When should you reinvent the wheel and when should you settle for something that's good enough?
10:40am–11:20am Thursday, 07/23/2015
Van Lindberg (Rackspace)
Developers know that participating in the open source community can be a win-win for both employers and employees. But how do you convince the legal department and executives? In this presentation we will share Rackspace's internal policy documents that allow all employees to participate in open source projects, and explain the details that convinced everyone to let us put it in place.
4:10pm–4:50pm Wednesday, 07/22/2015
John Sullivan (Free Software Foundation)
The FSF turns 30 this October. Don your freedom goggles and trip with its beardless executive director through 30 years of entertaining memorabilia and historical happenings (including "Who's this 'open source' kid and why's he on my lawn?"), then emerge, blinking, in the present. What are the challenges for user freedom in the next 30 years and how do we build a united movement to tackle them?
11:10am–11:50am Friday, 07/24/2015
Alasdair Allan (Babilim Light Industries), Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
Slides:   external link
Join the authors of "The Kerbal Book" on a panel where they regale you with tales of their adventures in the Kerbal Space Program, the increasingly popular and disturbingly realistic space programme simulator game enjoyed by geeks around the world. Learn how and why you should go to space, and what you can learn from it! Science will be involved.
2:30pm–3:10pm Thursday, 07/23/2015
In true open source fashion, a community's failures are often as visible as their successes. Failing can provide a learning experience, but many mistakes are still made which can easily be avoided, even by experienced open source communities. Learn about these points of fail that open source projects have experienced, and see how badly your favorite FOSS project fails.