July 20–24, 2015
Portland, OR

Speaker Slides & Video

Presentation slides will be made available after the session has concluded and the speaker has given us the files. Check back if you don't see the file you're looking for—it might be available later! (However, please note some speakers choose not to share their presentations.)

ChunEon Park (Samsung Electronics)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Recently, Samsung has released various products powered by Tizen, including the NX Camera Series, Z1 Smartphone, Samsung Gear, and SUHD TVs. Tizen is a brand new platform, so developers can easily enter and have a strong presence in the Tizen applications market.
Wade Minter (NBC SportsEngine)
Slides:   1-ZIP 
Modern software development places a high value on doing things The Right Way(tm). But what if you're just someone with an idea, some coding knowledge, and a nontrivial amount of intimidation? In this session, a sysadmin-turned-developer will take you through a battle with the demons of self-doubt, and help you discover the ONE CRAZY TRICK YOUR BRAIN DOESN'T WANT YOU TO KNOW!
Molly Graham (Quip)
Slides:   1-PDF 
There are very few companies that get the chance to grow from the initial team to thousands of employees. Whether you're running a team that is doubling every six months or less, or growing your start up from 30 to 100 employees, it's scary and overwhelming. In this session, we're going to talk about the phases of scaling, what to expect, and how you can help your team.
Vishnu Vettrivel (Atigeo)
Slides:   1-PPT 
Cloud architects and managers looking for a simpler introduction to the world of cloud security will benefit greatly from this talk. Using the 12 steps as a guide, attendees will be able to understand various security domains outlined, and to implement a cloud security framework of their own using open source solutions alone.
Kris Kowal (Uber)
Slides:   1-PDF    external link,   external link
Promises, streams, observables, and behaviors are some of the building blocks of event driven programming. What makes each of these tick and when would you choose one over another?
Slides:   external link
You've decided to level up your Git skills and have heard that rebasing is where it's at. In this session we'll talk about: WHY rebasing can make it easier to untangle your project's history; WHEN you should use rebase; WHAT rebasing actually does to your repository; and HOW it actually looks when things go right (and how to recover when things go wrong).
Slides:   external link
You've decided to level up your Git skills and have heard that rebasing is where it's at. In this session we'll talk about: WHY rebasing can make it easier to untangle your project's history; WHEN you should use rebase; WHAT rebasing actually does to your repository; and HOW it actually looks when things go right (and how to recover when things go wrong).
Greg Bentley (Intel)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
In this presentation, we’ll talk about the work Intel is doing to improve server dynamic languages and some of the successes we’ve achieved, as well as future challenges and how we can help.
Rosaria Silipo (KNIME.com AG)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This project deals with data from the Internet of Things, and particularly with data from a bike sharing service. The goal is to visualize and analyze the most popular routes, as well as to implement an intelligent alarm system to restock the bike stations in a timely manner. Time series prediction, geo-localization, and predictive analytics techniques have been used in this project.
Jim Zemlin (The Linux Foundation)
Jim will provide an update on the latest news from the open source community regarding containers technologies. The Open Container Initiative, formerly known as the Open Container Project, was announced just last month and Zemlin will share the latest information on these efforts and what comes next.
Robert Aboukhalil (Fluidigm)
Slides:   external link
In 2008, Nate Silver wowed the public by correctly predicting the outcome of the U.S. elections in 49 out of 50 states. As it turns out, you don't have to be a statistician to perform such analyses. In this talk, I introduce the Bash scripting language and how it can be used to perform advanced number crunching.
Scott Murray (University of San Francisco)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Get started with d3.js, the most powerful JavaScript tool for creating data visualizations on the web. We'll start from scratch, and build an interactive scatterplot by the end of the session.
Sam Helman (Flatiron Health)
Slides:   external link
AngularJS is relatively new, meteorically popular, and functionally powerful. However, a lot of AngularJS’s workings are very opaque and confusing. In this tutorial, an updated version of the same tutorial from last year, my goal is to walk you through building a basic app, and introduce you to concepts and patterns that will allow you to comfortably dive further into using AngularJS.
Matthew Taylor (Numenta)
Slides:   external link
What if you had software that tracked location history so well it could remember all the walks you take, all your commutes, and even the quests you take in your favorite video games? With this level of detail captured and a bit of algorithmic brilliance, NuPIC allows for instant anomaly detection, and in the process, opens up a whole new world of intelligent applications for pattern recognition.
Paco Nathan (O'Reilly Media), Haichuan Wang (Huawei), Jacky Li (Huawei technology), Vimal Das Kammath V (Huawei)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This tutorial provides a hands-on introduction to Apache Spark, with coding exercises for Spark apps showing Python, Scala, R, and SQL. We will review the Spark core API, how to build a pipeline with SQL + DataFrames, plus look through the broader Spark ecosystem: Tungsten, Streaming, MLlib, and GraphX.
pat barton (O'Reilly School of Technology)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This talk addresses improving the ability of hierarchal temporal memory (HTM) to predict electricity demand, helping the algorithm by providing some of the complementarity data streams currently applied to demand analysis, and including some goodness-of-fit metrics that address known characteristics of electric load.
Tom Greever (Bitovi)
Slides:   external link
Every designer has had to justify designs to non-designers, yet most lack the ability to explain their choices in a compelling way. Effectively articulating design decisions is critical to a project’s success because the most articulate person wins. This session offers practical advice for talking to managers, developers, and other stakeholders to win them over and create the best user experience.
Maria Naggaga (Microsoft )
Slides:   1-PDF 
ASP.Net vNext, the open source version of the .Net series, has opened up its framework to an entirely new web developer community. The cool thing about this lean framework is you can get ASP.NET from Mac to PC using either Visual Studio Community or Sublime. In this demo, I will be going through the tools and frameworks you need to get ASP.NET vNext running on OS X Yosemite.
Dani Traphagen (GridGain), Jon Haddad (DataStax)
Slides:   external link
In this three-hour Cassandra tutorial, we’ll explore all the basics you’ll need to become best buds with this radically scalable, always-on, and increasingly popular database solution.
Joe Witt (Onyara Inc.)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Dataflow is an often underestimated challenge in realizing the value of big data. Messaging-based approaches are fast and well understood, and solid open source options exist. However, this talk makes the case that transport-oriented messaging is not the right abstraction for large distributed enterprise data flow, and describes how Apache NiFi is designed to solve these problems.
Julie Steele (Silicon Valley Data Science), Susie Lu (Silicon Valley Data Science)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This tool-agnostic tutorial is for those with the software chops and interest to create data visualizations, who want to elevate the look and feel of their work. Attendees will workshop an in-progress data visualization. They will learn design best practices and how to navigate the critique process, and then develop their own work on-site with guidance from two experts.
Karla Monterroso (CODE2040)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
Blindspots, risk, and will: Tools for navigating difference will help you examine the role that culture plays in our listening, interactions with colleagues, and design of operations.
Max De Marzi (NeoTechnology)
Slides:   1-BIN    external link
Do you need to build a recommendation engine like yesterday and have no idea where to start? How to get over the cold start problem? How to get some initial data? How do you know if its even working? Learn how to get past all that and get up and recommending quickly.
Fred Melo (Pivotal), William Markito Oliveira (General Motors)
Slides:   external link,   2-PDF    external link
In less than half a day, this hands-on workshop will show you how to leverage open source software like Apache Geode, Spring XD, Docker, and Cloud Foundry/Lattice to quickly build a complete IoT solution. The Internet of Things requires new applications to consume data that streams in from connected devices, and apply advanced real-time analytics.
Scott Cranfill (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau), Mollie Bates (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau)
Slides:   external link
Keeping code and design in sync across large teams and multiple projects can be a big challenge. At the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a new federal agency, the in-house design and development team has created its own modular front-end framework and style guide. Team members will talk about how this has fostered cross-team collaboration and improved the consistency of their products.
Nicole White (Neo4j)
Slides:   external link,   external link
Flask, a popular Python web framework, has many tutorials available online which use an SQL database to store information about the website’s users and their activities. In this tutorial, we will replace SQL with Neo4j, an open source graph database, in order to build a simple microblog application with social features that are otherwise too complex to model and express in SQL.
Matthew Garrett (CoreOS)
Slides:   1-ODP 
As we become more and more reliant on our computers, attackers become more and more sophisticated. How can we build a computer that's resilient to some of the more subtle attacks such as firmware modification?
Liza Daly (Safari)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Companies in all industries looking to remain relevant can learn greater transparency, agility, and new ways to collaborate by careful study of case studies in institutional innovation. Managers and executives looking to bring the best of engineering culture to their institution will benefit from this presentation, which follows several companies through their detailed technical transformation.
Jonathan Stark (Jonathan Stark Consulting)
Slides:   external link
It’s a fact: if you have a working knowledge of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, you already have the tools you need to develop your own web or hybrid apps for mobile. In this session, you’ll learn how to use these open source web technologies to design and build apps for the iPhone, iPad, Android, etc. on the development platform of your choice—without using Objective-C, Swift, or Java.
Jim Wasko (IBM), Troy Peterson (IBM Systems Group)
Slides:   1-ZIP 
In this session, we will share case studies and use cases of developers who have successfully exploited open source technology using IBM z Systems and Power. We will focus on the application development, databases, cloud infrastructure, and big data/analytics categories along with ISV partnerships that can help you get the most out of your open source projects.
Dan McKinley (Stripe)
Slides:   external link
How do you choose the technology to run your business? You should use the best tools for the job, of course. But the precise definitions of the words "best" and "job" are tricky. This talk gives these terms shape, and introduces a framework for thinking about new technology rigorously, holistically, and systematically.
Peter Hoddie (Marvell)
Slides:   1-PDF 
The Internet of Things is built on open source software, and yet the devices are far from open. This isn’t the future that free and open source contributors have been working toward. It's a disappointment for the Open Source Community, but we can lead the way to freedom, transparency, and collaboration in IoT. And we must—to avert impending frustration for increasingly savvy consumers.
Jeff Ruby (Intel)
Slides:   1-PDF 
OpenStack has gained a lot of attention for its ability to deliver an open software-defined infrastructure in an on-demand, self-service manner. This session will highlight key learnings from deploying Cloud Foundry on OpenStack into production from Intel IT; future direction; and efforts to improve the deployment of OpenStack and Cloud Foundry within the enterprise.
Caskey Dickson (Microsoft)
Slides:   1-PDF    external link
Did you know that some development practices actively encourage flow while others prevent you from ever getting there in the first place? This talk will lay out the conditions of flow, what established programming techniques encourage it, and strategies for finding ways to create flow sessions in your daily development life, regardless of what your established software-development lifecycle is.
Donna Benjamin (Creative Contingencies), Gina Likins (Red Hat)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Conflict can be constructive. Testing ideas by challenging them with alternatives is a useful process. But it can be uncomfortable and confronting for many people. Let's discuss how we can build a culture of respect to embrace the positive aspects of conflict and work together better.
Kevin Scaldeferri (New Relic)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Continuous delivery of a monolith is easy - just automate, automate, automate! But what challenges will you run into applying the same ideas to 300 microservices? Come and find out!
Slides:   1-PDF 
There are tons of metrics that can be measured out there. Facebook likes, Twitter followers, website hits, database queries, number of VMs, cheapest lunch in the neighborhood, and many more. What if you could collect those metrics and choose the ones you'd like to present into a nice dashboard? And perhaps add easy analytics to it? Learn how to use Dashing together with platforms like Keen.io.
Alan Robertson (Assimilation Systems Limited)
Slides:   1-PDF 
The cybersecurity community has difficulty working together around breaches, out of legal and public relations concerns, but can share best practices. The open source Assimilation Project compares system configurations against best practices in near-real-time. This talk outlines our efforts to include more security experts in our community, and translate the results into open source code.
Bruce Eckel (Mindview, LLC)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Based on six years of research and organization visits, I present the "Trust Organization Manifesto," a radically different and yet surprisingly well-tested set of guidelines for self-organizing a company where "work is joy."
Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Christopher Neugebauer (@chrisjrn)
Slides:   external link
It’s a big world for small devices, and you need to be able to design not just for Android and iPhone, but the mobile world beyond as well. Over the course of this tutorial, you’ll learn critical skills in thinking about problems in a mobile context, how to apply these skills to address app design problems on any mobile platform, and how to design for future improvement.
Mike Biglan (Analytic Spot), Elijah Hamovitz (Analytic Spot)
Slides:   1-BIN    2-PDF 
CQL3 has a relational-database-centric abstraction that hides many key details of the underlying storage. Though CQL can be an efficient and convenient tool to use when querying, knowing how CQL actually maps to Cassandra's storage structure is key to being able to create scalable and flexible data models.
Amy Boyle (New Relic)
Slides:   external link
Learn how digital signal processing can help you look at data, and even the world around you, with a new critical eye. Gain an understanding of the methods behind speech recognition, image manipulation, data compression, and more.
Julie Cameron (Articulate)
Slides:   external link
This talk will look at how taking a modular, object-oriented approach to CSS can turn frontend woes into frontend wins. We’ll examine modern CSS approaches like OOCSS, SMACSS, and BEM and demonstrate how they will help to not only decouple your CSS styles and reduce specificity conflicts, but how they will also help to decouple your CSS and HTML from your JavaScript and feature specs.
C Todd Lombardo (Fresh Tilled Soil)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Design sprints are a time-boxed, disciplined way to get validation on a concept so you write code that gets used and not trashed. This workshop will take you through a mini-design sprint so you can get first-hand experience of what it's like to participate in one. You’ll walk away with ideas and the knowledge of how to implement these frameworks in your organization.
Matt Ranney (Uber)
Slides:   external link
As Uber moves into new markets with new services, designing for high availability and scalability presents some interesting challenges. Even brief outages in the service are very costly, with real-world impact on people's lives. This talk will cover the Uber architecture and how it handles every failure we can think of.
Thomas Lockney (Nike and PNWScala)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This session will show attendees how to build reactive services using Akka and Scala. Reactive services are scalable, reliable, and efficient, and we'll demonstrate the basic model, a simple development workflow, and the tools and libraries that make it all work.
Andrew Baker (Twilio)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Docker was one of last year’s most talked about open source projects - but what is it? And what does it mean for deploying applications? This tutorial will explain what Docker is and where it fits in with other deployment and configuration management techniques. Students will then learn the basics of working with Docker containers, how to “dockerize” an app, and some emerging best practices.
Bridget Kromhout (Pivotal)
Slides:   1-PDF 
DramaFever, the largest streaming video site for international content, uses AWS to power its streaming video platform, and has been running Docker in production since about October 2013 (well before it even went 1.0). This talk goes into detail about we use Docker to make development more consistent and deployment more repeatable.
Leslie Hawthorn (Red Hat), Amye Scavarda (Red Hat )
Slides:   1-PDF 
While it’s easy to pay lip service to the idea of innovating by failing fast, humans are both neurally geared and financially incentivized to avoid failure. How can we create an environment that makes failing fast safe for the participants and their organizations?
Slides:   external link
Does your project need more contributors? Have you ever considered helping a project, but not followed through because you're scared you don't know enough? Through years of coaching novice open source contributors, I've optimized a powerful line of logic for getting past those initial hurdles of impostor syndrome, and now I'd like to share it with you.
George Dyson (Independent)
Nature uses digital coding for replication, storage, and error correction, but relies on analog coding for control. Technology will follow. We are starting to treat streams of bits the way vacuum tubes treat streams of electrons, implementing analog processing upon a digital substrate, the same way digital processing was implemented using analog components, the first time around.
Jason Swartz (Mesosphere)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Scala powers some of the biggest companies and fastest applications in the world. Find out why so many programmers are enamored of this language. We'll start with the basics of Scala, try out the features in the REPL, and then build an application. If you already know Javascript, Ruby, Python, or Java then you'll do great in this class.
Danese Cooper (PayPal), Arnold Goldberg (PayPal), Manish Jain (PayPal)
InnerSource is what we call using open source tools and methodologies inside a company to improve engineering practices, and it's gained a foothold at PayPal. We've found it useful for helping to break down engineering silos, increasing emphasis on code craftsmanship and, more generally, for increasing employee collaboration and satisfaction.
Stephanie Wagner (Namely)
Slides:   external link
Code reviews are one of the best ways to improve code quality - however, they can be even more complex than writing the code itself. This talk will help you understand how to conduct effective code reviews and benefit from a strong peer review culture.
Manfred Moser (simpligility technologies inc.)
Slides:   external link
Results of a five-year study on open source development and security practices form the basis for introducing supply chain management to your development practice. We rely on the usage of third-party components, and take on the responsibility for them and their licensing terms or security vulnerabilities. New tools for managing these components in your software development efforts are demoed.
Slides:   external link
You've dabbled a little in version control using Git. You can follow along with the various tutorials you've found online. But now you've been asked to implement a work flow strategy and you're not really sure how (or where) to start. You have a lot of choices, we'll help you pick the right one for your project.
Slides:   1-ZIP    2-PDF 
This tutorial will enable you to understand and improve the performance of your Go programs. We will do a deep dive into Go's powerful profiling and benchmarking tools, and discuss basic and advanced optimization techniques.
Kevin Burke (burke.services)
Slides:   external link
You might be good at designing coasters in "Roller Coaster Tycoon," but you could make even cooler coasters if you let Go build them for you. We'll look a little at RCT's code (written in x86) and how to reverse-engineer it. You'll learn how to design good genetic algorithms. Finally, we'll discuss the advantages of using Go's standard library for a project like this.
Raffi Krikorian (Uber Advanced Technologies Center)
Re-architecting a system is wrought with problems. However, what we can sometimes forget is the most important aspect of any project: the team! Your team, who miraculously survives these projects, has to continue to change with your business and your technology! But, don't fret, we can architect our way towards this way of thinking!
Robert Gallup (XOBXOB)
Slides:   1-ZIP    external link
Prototypes allow us to see, touch, feel, and refine ideas and designs. Starting from zero, this hands-on workshop explores smart hardware prototyping using a micro-controller and basic electronic components. You'll connect LEDs, buttons, and knobs, then program a micro-controller to define behavior. Through this you’ll better understand the tools and process of designing smart, connected products.
Slides:   1-PDF 
Many classic design patterns and traditional Python idioms remain relevant today. However, the language has grown, the problem spaces we address keep shifting, and best practices for software development have matured. Thus, the set of best-of-breed patterns and idioms has changed, some classics fading, new stars emerging. This talk explores today's realities in Python patterns and idioms.
Nova Patch (Shutterstock)
Slides:   external link
Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the worldwide diversity of our most basic personal information like names and genders. This session will demonstrate ways to build applications that respect users’ identities instead of limiting them.
Josh Deprez (Google Australia)
Slides:   external link
What can be learned about a person's internet habits if every packet in and out was logged by a transparent man-in-the-middle? Here's what I discovered from a few months of self-experimentation.
David Cheney (Canonical)
Slides:   1-PDF 
The Go programming language lets you write high performance network servers without resorting to event loops and callback spaghetti.
Andrew Purtell (Salesforce)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This session will cover how the Data Platform and Services group at Salesforce.com built a multitenant storage platform, that supports structured relational data access using the open source nonrelational scale-out datastore Apache HBase and its open source "SQL skin" Apache Phoenix.
Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
Slides:   external link
In this session, you’ll learn about game design: the art and science of constructing enjoyable, engaging games. We aren't doing any coding, and we’re not talking game engine development - instead, we’ll be taking a deep dive into game design theory, using it to understand how people interact with rules, and how to use it to improve your community, your company, your project, and your software.
James Pearce (Facebook)
Ship a lot, or ship fast? These goals may seem to be at odds, but it's actually possible to have large, diverse portfolios of open source projects and maintain a fast-moving, iterative approach. In this talk, Facebook's open source lead James Pearce will discuss how Facebook is able to ship open source products twice a week and maintain quality, size, and speed.
Daisuke Maki (HDE Inc)
Slides:   1-BIN 
Go is quickly becoming one of the many must-have items in our toolboxes. In this talk I will describe the common pitfalls and misunderstandings for people who have an extensive background in interpreted languages like myself. I will tell you all about my failures so you don't have to repeat them!
Beth Tucker Long (Treeline Design)
Slides:   external link
Investigate a hacked WordPress website, and learn what the hacker has left behind, which tools will help find the vulnerability and point of entrance, how to seal up the most common problem areas, and how to set up notifications to help you spot a hack more quickly in the future. Even though we will be going through a WordPress website, most of the tools discussed are applicable to any website.
VM Brasseur (Hewlett Packard Enterprise), Alexis Rossi (Internet Archive)
Slides:   external link
Internet Archive has released a number of open APIs and tools to allow people to upload and download items, as well as data mine the metadata for its entire 12+ Petabyte collection.
Paco Nathan (O'Reilly Media), Jacky Li (Huawei technology)
Slides:   1-PDF 
This session provides an introduction to Apache Spark, with a brief overview of how/why it evolved, then covering the Spark core API, with examples in Python and Scala, how to build a pipeline with SQL + DataFrames, plus look through the broader Spark ecosystem: Tungsten, Streaming, MLlib, GraphX, Packages, etc. Plus many links out case studies of production use cases at scale for Spark.
Jen Kramer (Harvard University Extension School)
Slides:   1-ZIP    external link
Sass, the CSS preprocessor, is increasingly an important tool for creating websites. In this tutorial, you'll learn the basics of structuring your Sass files, creating variables, writing if/else statements, working with mixins, and more.
Nick Gudman (Hewlett Packard)
Slides:   1-ODP 
Learning to develop device drivers can be intimidating, but Linux makes it simpler than ever to write your own device driver. Using a simple driver for a monochromatic character display as a guide, we will briefly explore important topics for developing embedded Linux device drivers.
Kara Sowles (Puppet Labs), Francesca Krihely (MongoDB )
Slides:   external link
The open source world has a vibrant, never-ending calendar of community events. This session will cover best practices and pitfalls to avoid in planning and executing events for your technical community.
Jonathan Whitmore (Silicon Valley Data Science)
Slides:   external link
The IPython Notebook is perfect for many data science tasks, including rapid iteration for data munging and cleaning; exploration and visualization; creating a transparent data processing pipeline workflow; and beautiful presentation of results. This talk will explore overall best practices, with special attention to these use cases and how to get the most out of IPython Notebook for each one.
Slides:   1-PDF 
Ironic is a modern tool for hardware provisioning. Combining a RESTful API, scalable control plane, and pluggable hardware drivers, Ironic installs operating systems efficiently and repeatably on diverse hardware. We will demonstrate Ironic with Ansible, install, build, and deploy a machine image, and discuss the project's architecture, history, and goals. Deep knowledge is not required.
Brian Proffitt (Red Hat)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Everything we do in technology - operating systems, applications, systems administration - is based on nothing solid and real, but rather conceptualizations and ideas that we make accessible through metaphors. In fact, far from being "non-creative," nerd-types may be among the most creative storytellers in history.
Ray Tsang (Google)
Slides:   external link
Join this session to learn how to create a Java-based microservice using Spring Boot, containerize it using Maven plugins, and subsequently deploy a fleet of microservices and dependent components such as Redis using Kubernetes. Toward the end of the session, let's take a look at how we can apply the same patterns to other runtimes, such as Vert.x and Grails.
Neil Jenkins (FastMail)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Should Email & Calendaring developers have to choose closed/proprietary protocols in order to get the performance and functionality they need? We don’t think so and we want to tell you why this is no longer a problem! In our session we'll explore how JMAP and Cyrus are coming together to produce a truly modern, robust & scalable solution that is both fun to deploy and simple to manage.
Tom Marrs (LivingSocial)
Slides:   1-FILE 
Most modern web APIs prefer JSON because of its interoperability. All modern languages have excellent JSON support, but large-scale environments often require more than simple serialization/de-serialization. This tutorial shows how to leverage JSON Schema, Search, and Transform along with simple tooling to enhance a developer’s workflow to build elegant, powerful, and efficient applications.
Michael Lopp (Rands)
Slides:   1-PDF 
A series of simple numbers can represent a useful and memorable corpus of hard-earned leadership experience. This talk will succinctly explain essential leadership lessons that you can either heed or simply wait to experience.
Tammy Butow (Dropbox), Georgi Knox (GitHub), Jessica Frazelle (Docker)
Slides:   external link
This will be a hands-on workshop aimed at those who are casually familiar with the Linux operating system. Perhaps you use it on a server or in a virtualbox, but want to gain deeper understanding about the kernel and how Linux actually works.
Martin Fowler (ThoughtWorks)
Software architecture is important, but shouldn't lead to bureaucratic burdens.
Hadley Beeman (U.K. Government | W3C)
Openness is good for Government on many levels — open data, open standards, open source, open markets. Where we set the way we work in Government, it’s important to let industry determine the technical standards we work with.
Slides:   1-PPT 
Why would anyone intentionally hire a rock star developer? Rock stars are known for being high maintenance, unreliable, over-paid, and difficult to work with. Instead of rock star developers, open source needs a lot more Willie Nelsons.
Spencer Gibb (Pivotal)
Slides:   external link
Building an application using microservices and don't know where to start? How do services find each other? How do I configure many instances of each service? How do I see what's going on with my services? If you've asked these questions, this session will give you some answers using Spring Cloud and Netflix OSS to create microservices that are robust, discoverable, scalable & configurable.
Adrian Cockcroft (Battery Ventures)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Adrian will run a two-day training class at OSCON. The class will go into more depth on the business need for speed that leads to microservices, and the characteristics of existing microservice architectures. In addition there will be a hands-on exercise to model your existing architecture, a future state, and the step by step migration to get there.
Adrian Cockcroft (Battery Ventures)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Adrian will run a two day training class at OSCON. The class will go into more depth on the business need for speed that leads to microservices, and the characteristics of existing microservice architectures. In addition there will be a hands-on exercise to model your existing architecture, a future state, and the step by step migration to get there.
Paco Nathan (O'Reilly Media)
Slides:   external link
Herein, an open source developer community considers itself _algorithmically_. This project shows how to surface data insights from the developer email forums for just about any Apache open source project. It leverages machine learning and advanced analytics in Apache Spark, but also makes use of Docker containers for standalone NLP services.
Slides:   1-PDF    2-PDF 
Thanks to Docker and containers, microservices architectures are no longer reserved to large organizations like Netflix or Amazon. Let's review the benefits of those architectures, for Devs and Ops, in projects big and small, and how to realize them with the open source container technology available today.
Slides:   1-PDF 
Mocha.jl is an efficient and flexible deep learning framework for Julia. It supports multiple computation backends, leading to 20~30 times faster training on a modern GPU device. We will use an example to illustrate the user interfaces of Mocha.jl and also introduce the design and architecture behind the library implementations.
Dawn Foster (The New Stack)
Slides:   1-PDF 
The real magic in any community comes from the people. I will show you tools and techniques for performing network analysis, to look at the people in your community along with the relationships between them. Why settle for boring numbers and line charts to describe your community when you can do cool visualizations that show how people connect within your open source community?
Janina Bläsius (SAP SE), Michael Graf (SAP SE)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Nowadays, there’s a wide variety of devices, platforms, and screen sizes on which web apps can be run. What if your web app was responsive, adaptive, and able to run on all devices without you having to take care of all the details? We will demonstrate how to build well-designed web apps based on the example of an app we created for one of the most loved sports in Germany: soccer.
Alistair Croll (Solve For Interesting)
Slides:   1-PDF 
In the next decade, data-driven feeds will become the primary tool with which we manage our lives. Access to that data—much of which lives behind walled gardens, or profitable arbitrage—is fast becoming a moral issue. In this session, Alistair Croll looks at the promises and perils of big data as it finds its way into our lives, and makes far too many unreasonable predictions along the way.
The 11th Annual O’Reilly Open Source Award winners will be announced.
Bradley Holt (IBM Watson Data Platform)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Mobile web apps shouldn't stop working when there's no network connection. Based on Apache CouchDB, PouchDB is an open source syncing JavaScript database that runs within a web browser. Learn how to use HTML5, PouchDB, IBM Cloudant, and IBM Bluemix to build and deploy offline-first mobile web apps that provide a better, faster user experience both offline and online.
Mikey Dickerson (Federal Government | United States Digital Services Team)
The Federal Government’s approach to technology is outdated and maddening. But this dysfunction didn’t come out of thin air—it’s rooted in deep, structural realities. Less than a year old, the U.S. Digital Service is hacking bureaucracy and improving services millions rely on every day. Mikey will talk about how that work is going and how the group is spurring change in the open.
Yujie Du (Huawei Technologies)
Slides:   1-PPT 
Why do we need an open source way when an emerging technology hits the world's largest market, China? Huawei would help the China community link up with the global community.
Kenny Bastani (Digital Insight)
Slides:   1-BIN 
Fast and scalable analysis of big data has become a critical competitive advantage for companies. There are open source tools like Apache Hadoop and Apache Spark that are providing opportunities for companies to solve these big data problems in a scalable way. Platforms like these have become the foundation of the big data analysis movement.
Pierre Chamberland (Netmail), Laurent Denel (OpenIO), Matt Technical Advisor (Spamhaus)
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Learn and contribute to modernizing open source messaging. Meet technologists from FastMail, Cyrus IMAP, Atmail, MXTools, OpenIO, and Spamhaus, who are re-booting email with smarter clients, hyper-scale storage grids, secured transport, and high performance virtualization. Discover exciting tools that can be used to develop cool new apps that can interoperate with existing systems and devices.
Angel Diaz (IBM)
Slides:   external link
Dr. Angel Diaz, IBM VP Cloud Architecture & Technology, provides a retrospective on the evolution of open source from the “old ways” in the early years to today’s new model of “code, community and culture” which brings together users and developers to accelerate innovation.
Kyle Simpson (Getify)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Open source your job search and career. Open source finding and hiring candidates. Open source the talent pool.
Mike Loukides (O'Reilly Media), Bjorn Freeman-Benson (New Relic Inc)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
Program Chair Mike Loukides and Co-Host Bjorn Freeman-Benson welcome you to Cultivate.
Christopher Cannon (Hewlett-Packard)
Slides:   1-ZIP 
This is an interactive, informative session for those getting started or wishing to learn more about OpenStack. Join Chris Cannon from the HP Cloud Team for an overview of OpenStack, and a hands-on introduction to HP Helion OpenStack.
Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
Slides:   1-PDF    2-PDF 
Pingo is a uniform Python API for devices that have programmable I/O for physical computing: Raspberry Pi, Arduino TRE, Intel Edison, BeagleBone Black etc. The design of the Arduino board and IDE made device programming accessible, and the design of the Pingo API aims to do the same with the Internet of Things, bringing interactive discovery and high-level services to embedded systems development.
Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Developments like the `concurrent.futures` classes, coroutine delegation with `yield from` and the `asyncio` module together represent a major new chapter in the evolution of Python, and are the best reasons to upgrade to Python 3. This talk will show how these tools bring concurrent programming within reach of even casual programmers, with dramatic boosts in throughput.
Slides:   1-ZIP 
card.io scans credit cards using your phone's camera. It was recently open-sourced. This talk will explain how card.io works its magic. No computer vision or machine learning background required.
Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.)
Slides:   external link
If you're involved in writing anything to do with iPhones, iPads, or Macs, you need to get familiar with Swift. This training will bring you from zero Swift knowledge all the way up to a deep understanding of the subject.
Ruth Suehle (Red Hat), Tom "spot" Callaway (Red Hat)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Ruth Suehle and Tom Callaway, authors of _Raspberry Pi Hacks_ (O’Reilly, December 2013) offer technical tips for makers, hackers, and tinkerers who want to take advantage of the Raspberry Pi. You'll learn universally useful things, like how to add a power switch, followed by a show-and-tell of fun things that Ruth and Tom as well as many others have built.
Henrik Engstrom (Lightbend)
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Reactive Applications are the next major evolution of the Internet. They allow for applications to be responsive, scalable and resilient by building on a fully event-driven foundation. Typesafe’s Reactive Platform, consisting of the Play Framework, the Akka middleware and the Scala programming language embraces this new programming paradigm.
Jesse Toth (GitHub), Nathan Witmer (GitHub)
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This talk will tell the story of a large-scale refactoring of our permissions model at GitHub. We’ll explain the problem, our solution, and then go over the tools we built, the techniques we used, and the lessons we learned while replacing this critical piece of our application live, side-by-side, and in production.
Eli White (php[architect])
Slides:   external link
I've worked as a 100% remote employee for six different companies. Through this, I've learned the good, the bad, and the ugly about remote work (as well as time shifted asynchronous work). In this session we will discuss the benefits and drawbacks of remote work, for both the employee and the company. Learn the tricks needed, both procedural and technological, to make this possible!
Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
Slides:   external link
Board games are hard at the best of times – you have to find friends who have the free time to play, find a game everyone is happy to play, and more! When friends move elsewhere, things get even harder! This sessions explores the challenges of telepresence board gaming. Learn why and how you should care, how the problems are being addressed, and how it’s relevant to remote collaboration.
Lucy Wyman (OSU Open Source Lab)
Slides:   external link,   2-HTM 
This talk will start off with the basics of what Syntactically Awesome StyleSheets are, what features and functionality they have to offer, and why they're a great tool to have in your arsenal. We'll then delve into how to use Sass in developing your own sites and which tools you'll want to use alongside it, complete with a live demo and some in-production examples.
Deb Nicholson (Open Invention Network)
Slides:   external link
There's always plenty to do in the world of free and open source software, but saying yes to it all eventually leads to burnout. Not every job, module or meeting is going to lead to more of the kinds of opportunities you want. When should you reinvent the wheel and when should you settle for something that's good enough?
Roman Shaposhnik (Pivotal Inc.)
Slides:   1-PDF 
Graph relationships are everywhere. In fact, more often than not, analyzing relationships between points in your datasets lets you extract more business value from your data. This presentation will provide an introduction into two of the most used Hadoop ecosystem projects in the area of scalable graph processing: Apache Giraph and Spark GraphX.
Henrik Ingo (MongoDB)
Slides:   external link
As open source has become mainstream and a business, many companies face a knowledge gap and may not even realize it: most executives and sales managers have no particular experience in the dynamics of open source. Unfortunately, most open source folks have no experience in sales either! This session will help each group to understand, and apply, both the open source and sales parts together.
Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum)
From Portlandia’s capa chuchu chuchu tea to Texas where “Everything is so BIG” that they only have data, OSCON is moving. In this farewell talk to Portland, we will cover the history of navigation from stories to maps, the unexplored lands of open source’s future and the territories open source has already conquered.
Eddie Canales (CrossChx)
Slides:   external link
Faster pages...profit! Right? Despite what common sense and every case study might tell you, we found out that isn't always true. When you get 20 million visitors a month and make a lot of your money from advertising (the enemy of speed), you have tons of opportunity/obligation to understand which kinds of speed matter. This is a story about hope, disappointment, discovery, and triumph.
Joseph Gregorio (Google)
Slides:   external link
JavaScript frameworks seem like death and taxes; inevitable and unavoidable. But that's not the way it needs to be, and actually, it must stop. A talk based on the zer framework manifesto: http://bitworking.org/news/2014/05/zero_framework_manifesto
Linda Powell (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
Everyone at OSCON knows that good data coupled with modern open source technology can revolutionize business. But does senior management know? This presentation is about how to convince very powerful people with limited tech literacy that investing in good data and good data technology helps promote the organization’s mission.
Kirsten Hunter (Akamai)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
Many conference attendees come year after year without giving presentations. The sense that there's a high bar for perfection is pervasive, and people are afraid of being "wrong." Everyone has a story to tell about a problem they've solved or issues they've tackled. Learn how to share your experiences without fear, and join the speaker community!
Slides:   1-PPTX 
One barrier to the adaption of Open Source products is the lack of documentation. Many projects can benefit from a good README. Unfortunately, many READMEs suggest that you read their source code for documentation, and that frustrates many potential users. A developer can write better READMEs by following the basic structure that I’ll lay out in my talk.
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Test-driven development's great, but what happens when you find yourself working on code where automated testing took a back seat to being shipped? This talk looks at techniques for automated testing of late-stage or even production code, and how to use this to fix bugs in your code. Testing late in life isn't a lost cause any more!
The talk will present a quantitative analysis of the major free / open source software projects producing cloud infrastructure and platform systems (IaaS, PaaS): OpenStack, Apache CloudStack, OpenNebula, Eucalyptus, CloudFoundry, and OpenShift. The analysis will focus on the communities behind those projects, their main development parameters, and the trends that can be observed.
Jez Humble (DevOps Research and Assessment LLC)
Slides:   1-PDF 
We know that culture can make or break a company, but it's hard to measure and even harder to change. In this talk I'll discuss how we measured culture in an enormous international survey of over 9,000 people, what makes a high performance organization, and how companies have moved from low performance to high performance.
Eva Tse (Netflix, Inc)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
At Netflix, the big data platform is the foundation for analytics that drives all product decisions. As for scale, it is one of the top three largest services running at Netflix. In this talk, you will learn about our open source-powered big data architecture in the AWS cloud, and how we build out the technology stack that comprises the big data platform at Netflix today.
Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia)
The 21st century is a time with an unprecendented expansion of ideas, culture, technology, information, and global justice. Compared to any ther point in history, humans are *flourishing*. Yet the way in which we think about the world—and our shared future in it—has not accelerated at the same pace. Join us to find out why the future is awesome, and what you can do about it.
Sam Ramji (Cloud Foundry Foundation)
It wasn’t too long ago that artisans, bathed in the glow of molten metal, forged parts that would go on to make up bigger, more powerful machines. Today, we call those artisans developers. Instead of metal, they use bits and bytes in the cloud to forge a modern application architecture.
Alasdair Allan (Babilim Light Industries), Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
Slides:   external link
Join the authors of "The Kerbal Book" on a panel where they regale you with tales of their adventures in the Kerbal Space Program, the increasingly popular and disturbingly realistic space programme simulator game enjoyed by geeks around the world. Learn how and why you should go to space, and what you can learn from it! Science will be involved.
Allison Randal (Hewlett Packard Enterprise and Open Source Initiative)
The early days of the open source movement were all about creating an approachable on-ramp to software freedom. We focused strongly on practical benefits of free software and refined the message, hoping to help the professional software sector better understand. We succeeded but success in our first goal doesn't mean we're done, it means we're due to clearly define the next phase of open source.
Keila Banks (Student)
Keila Banks is a 13-year-old African-American girl in the inner city - her talk will be about her story and how people around the world can do coding and computer stuff at any age, with just a little motivation.
Nova Patch (Shutterstock)
Slides:   external link
Unicode is much more than just characters. The Unicode Consortium defines open standards for collating, parsing, and formatting data in much of the world’s languages. The Common Locale Data Repository (CLDR) is the largest standard repository of locale data along with specifications for its use, and is a powerful resource for software localization.
Derek Thurston (Booz Allen Hamilton)
Slides:   1-PPT 
Is your cloud secure? Is your cloud of containers secure? Security should be built-in from Day Zero, and not layered in as an afterthought. What open source tools are out there now to help you in your quest to not be on the front page of the news? How are all of the latest hacks happening, and how can we put tools in place to prevent these from happening again?
Aurelia Moser (Mozilla Science)
Slides:   external link
The historical versioning of maps defines some of the most fascinating social, political, and environmental flux of precedent. Everything from the eruption of post-World Cup tweets, to the migration patterns of mammals, can be mapped with OSS. This talk will cover time travel as it can be viewed in visualizations: the ways we partner time-series data with interactive maps @CartoDB.
Eli White (php[architect])
Slides:   external link,   external link
This session will expose you to a broad range of web security vulnerabilities and their solutions. We'll cover the basics such as XSS, CSRF, SQL Injection, and clickjacking. We will also go into depth on issues of session management, password security, two-factor authentication, and much much more!
Joe Darcy (Oracle)
Slides:   external link
Learn about how floating-point arithmetic approximates real arithmetic, and lessons for more effective (and less surprising) numerical programming.
Bradley Kuhn (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Slides:   external link
Kallithea is a self-hosted source code management system that exists thanks to a GPL violation and subsequent compliance action by the Software Freedom Conservancy. We'll show how a copyleft license violation and careful license vetting helped a software development community begin anew, and why licensing wonks and release engineers can make a huge impact on the health of a project's community.
Eric McNulty (Richer Earth)
Slides:   1-PPTX 
There are three big shifts in leadership development: from linear thinking to complex systems thinking where relationships are paramount; from focus as a noun to a verb -- continually recalibrating to ensure clarity of purpose, values, and performance; and from "they" to "you" -- the onus on leadership development now falls on each individual so take charge of your leadership future.
Mary Yoko Brannen (CLIA Consulting)
Slides:   1-PDF 
In her keynote address, Mary Yoko Brannen, will propose “ethnographic thinking” as a new way of diagnosing culture that can open up new avenues for innovation and ongoing strategic renewal.