July 20–24, 2015
Portland, OR

OSCON 2015 Schedule

Use the calendar icon [calendar icon] next to each listing you want to attend. Then use the personal schedule button below to generate your schedule.

Friday, July 24

Portland 251
Add Build a botnet? to your personal schedule
10:00am Build a botnet? Bryan Smith (Fossetcon)
Add Programming single-page applications to your personal schedule
11:10am Programming single-page applications Brian Capouch (Saint Joseph's College), Nathan Samano (Saint Joseph's College (Indiana)), Craig Austgen (Saint Joseph's College)
Portland 252
Add Adventures in data science with Bash to your personal schedule
11:10am Adventures in data science with Bash Robert Aboukhalil (Fluidigm)
Portland 255
Add Speed kills: When faster pages mean less revenue to your personal schedule
10:00am Speed kills: When faster pages mean less revenue Eddie Canales (CrossChx)
Portland 256
Add IPython Notebook best practices for data science to your personal schedule
10:00am IPython Notebook best practices for data science Jonathan Whitmore (Silicon Valley Data Science)
Add Building a modern UI for programmers to your personal schedule
11:10am Building a modern UI for programmers Caleb Madrigal (FireEye)
D135/136
Add How to use OSI's resources to change the open source world to your personal schedule
10:00am How to use OSI's resources to change the open source world Simon Phipps (Public Software CIC), Deborah Bryant (Red Hat)
Add The art of troubleshooting to your personal schedule
11:10am The art of troubleshooting Jason Maxham (The Art Of Troubleshooting)
D137/138
Add Designing reactive systems with Akka to your personal schedule
11:10am Designing reactive systems with Akka Thomas Lockney (Nike and PNWScala)
D139/140
Add Building a trustworthy computer to your personal schedule
11:10am Building a trustworthy computer Matthew Garrett (CoreOS)
E145
Add Constructive conflict resolution to your personal schedule
11:10am Constructive conflict resolution Donna Benjamin (Creative Contingencies), Gina Likins (Red Hat)
E146
Add Mocha.jl - Deep learning for Julia to your personal schedule
10:00am Mocha.jl - Deep learning for Julia Chiyuan Zhang (MIT)
Add The Mün and back - a Kerbal tale to your personal schedule
11:10am The Mün and back - a Kerbal tale Alasdair Allan (Babilim Light Industries), Paul Fenwick (Perl Training Australia), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
E147/148
Add When copyleft business models go bad ... and how Kallithea's community recovered to your personal schedule
10:00am When copyleft business models go bad ... and how Kallithea's community recovered Bradley Kuhn (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Add Internet archive: Universal access. Open APIs to your personal schedule
11:10am Internet archive: Universal access. Open APIs VM Brasseur (@vmbrasseur), Alexis Rossi (Internet Archive)
Add Friday opening welcome to your personal schedule
9:00am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Friday opening welcome Matthew McCullough (GitHub), Sarah Novotny (NGINX), Rachel Roumeliotis (O'Reilly Media)
Add Hacking Conway's Law to your personal schedule
9:05am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Hacking Conway's Law Raffi Krikorian (Uber Advanced Technologies Center)
Add From analog to digital and back to your personal schedule
9:20am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
From analog to digital and back George Dyson (Independent)
Add Undefinable me: The story of a 13-year-old girl from the inner city who codes to your personal schedule
9:30am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Undefinable me: The story of a 13-year-old girl from the inner city who codes Keila Banks (Student)
9:45am Closing remarks
Room: Portland Ballroom
Add O'Reilly Open Source Awards to your personal schedule
12:00pm Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
O'Reilly Open Source Awards
Add Situation normal, everything must change to your personal schedule
12:05pm Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Situation normal, everything must change Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum)
12:25pm Closing Remarks
Room: Portland Ballroom
8:00am Morning Coffee Service
Room: Portland Ballroom Foyer
10:40am Morning Break Sponsored by SAP
Room: Portland Ballroom Foyer
12:30pm Closing Get Together
Room: Portland Ballroom Foyer
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Protect
Build a botnet?
Bryan Smith (Fossetcon)
Botnets can take down virtually any site or service on the internet, including an entire country's internet backbone. Oftentimes your hear about a botnet's path of destruction, but you never hear about how they work. This talk will introduce you to the concepts behind botnets, and also show a live demonstration of a botnet on a sandboxed network.
11:10am-11:50am (40m) Architecture
Programming single-page applications
Brian Capouch (Saint Joseph's College) et al
Single-page web applications offer users a rich, responsive experience, utilizing the browser as an application platform. We provide a framework-agnostic introduction to programming single-page applications, considered generically. Server- and client-side routing, module API surfacing, bookmarking, and SEO strategies must be carefully managed in an SPA environment.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Data
Beyond messaging: Enterprise dataflow with Apache NiFi
Joe Witt (Onyara Inc.)
Dataflow is an often underestimated challenge in realizing the value of big data. Messaging-based approaches are fast and well understood, and solid open source options exist. However, this talk makes the case that transport-oriented messaging is not the right abstraction for large distributed enterprise data flow, and describes how Apache NiFi is designed to solve these problems.
11:10am-11:50am (40m) Data
Adventures in data science with Bash
Robert Aboukhalil (Fluidigm)
In 2008, Nate Silver wowed the public by correctly predicting the outcome of the U.S. elections in 49 out of 50 states. As it turns out, you don't have to be a statistician to perform such analyses. In this talk, I introduce the Bash scripting language and how it can be used to perform advanced number crunching.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Scale
Speed kills: When faster pages mean less revenue
Eddie Canales (CrossChx)
Faster pages...profit! Right? Despite what common sense and every case study might tell you, we found out that isn't always true. When you get 20 million visitors a month and make a lot of your money from advertising (the enemy of speed), you have tons of opportunity/obligation to understand which kinds of speed matter. This is a story about hope, disappointment, discovery, and triumph.
11:10am-11:50am (40m) Collaboration
Freedom and responsibility @Netflix: Centralized team in a decentralized world
Mike McGarr (Netflix)
Engineering teams at Netflix can follow the latest industry trends and sometimes they even create them. No one single team is responsible for innovation: does this generate opportunity or waste or both? The Engineering Tools team helps to direct other teams’ experimentation toward new products, while preserving their own ability to innovate.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Foundations
IPython Notebook best practices for data science
Jonathan Whitmore (Silicon Valley Data Science)
The IPython Notebook is perfect for many data science tasks, including rapid iteration for data munging and cleaning; exploration and visualization; creating a transparent data processing pipeline workflow; and beautiful presentation of results. This talk will explore overall best practices, with special attention to these use cases and how to get the most out of IPython Notebook for each one.
11:10am-11:50am (40m) Design
Building a modern UI for programmers
Caleb Madrigal (FireEye)
You’ve got mad computer hacking skills, and an app idea to take over the world! But there's one problem: you’re not a designer and need your app to look stunning. This talk will show you how to quickly build a beautiful, modern user interface without having to hire a designer.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Collaboration
How to use OSI's resources to change the open source world
Simon Phipps (Public Software CIC) et al
The Open Source Initiative has changed from a licensing-focussed organisation to a force uniting open source projects, developers, and advocates worldwide. Hear how it happened, what's happening next, and why this is important to your career and business.
11:10am-11:50am (40m) Foundations
The art of troubleshooting
Jason Maxham (The Art Of Troubleshooting)
It's something we all do, but how it's done can be haphazard. I'm talking about troubleshooting, an often underappreciated skill. This talk will get you thinking about this critical discipline in a more formal way. We'll cover: Strategies: recipes to quickly get you from "broken" to "fixed"; Virtues: the mindset and behavior of a good troubleshooter; Cleaning up: learning from failures.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Craft
Help! I want to contribute to an open source project but my boss says no
Patrick McFadin (Datastax)
You love using open source software. It's done right by you and now you want to contribute back. You get your patch all ready and... the boss says No! Don't feel alone. Enterprises everywhere are trying to figure this out. I'll walk you through the risks to business that actually exist and how you can help manage them. Maybe armed with this information your boss will say... Yes!
11:10am-11:50am (40m) Scale
Designing reactive systems with Akka
Thomas Lockney (Nike and PNWScala)
This session will show attendees how to build reactive services using Akka and Scala. Reactive services are scalable, reliable, and efficient, and we'll demonstrate the basic model, a simple development workflow, and the tools and libraries that make it all work.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Architecture
Migrating PHP runtimes to HHVM: Taking the plunge
Joe Marrama (Box)
Changing the engine that runs a large PHP application is fraught with hidden dangers but comes with large rewards. In this talk, I'll detail the process Box went through to safely make the transition to running our production site on top of HHVM.
11:10am-11:50am (40m) Protect
Building a trustworthy computer
Matthew Garrett (CoreOS)
As we become more and more reliant on our computers, attackers become more and more sophisticated. How can we build a computer that's resilient to some of the more subtle attacks such as firmware modification?
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Design
Listen to the difference: Using a screenreader to compare before/after code of 5 top accessibility barriers
Nicolas Steenhout (Simply Accessible)
Without firsthand experience, it is difficult to understand the barriers that exist for screenreader users on the web. Many developers have told me they were curious to "see" a screenreader in action. This is your chance! Using a combination of real-world examples and code snippets, we will use a screenreader to go through common barriers and discuss them.
11:10am-11:50am (40m) Craft
Constructive conflict resolution
Donna Benjamin (Creative Contingencies) et al
Conflict can be constructive. Testing ideas by challenging them with alternatives is a useful process. But it can be uncomfortable and confronting for many people. Let's discuss how we can build a culture of respect to embrace the positive aspects of conflict and work together better.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Solve
Mocha.jl - Deep learning for Julia
Chiyuan Zhang (MIT)
Mocha.jl is an efficient and flexible deep learning framework for Julia. It supports multiple computation backends, leading to 20~30 times faster training on a modern GPU device. We will use an example to illustrate the user interfaces of Mocha.jl and also introduce the design and architecture behind the library implementations.
11:10am-11:50am (40m) Solve
The Mün and back - a Kerbal tale
Alasdair Allan (Babilim Light Industries) et al
Join the authors of "The Kerbal Book" on a panel where they regale you with tales of their adventures in the Kerbal Space Program, the increasingly popular and disturbingly realistic space programme simulator game enjoyed by geeks around the world. Learn how and why you should go to space, and what you can learn from it! Science will be involved.
10:00am-10:40am (40m) Collaboration
When copyleft business models go bad ... and how Kallithea's community recovered
Bradley Kuhn (Software Freedom Conservancy)
Kallithea is a self-hosted source code management system that exists thanks to a GPL violation and subsequent compliance action by the Software Freedom Conservancy. We'll show how a copyleft license violation and careful license vetting helped a software development community begin anew, and why licensing wonks and release engineers can make a huge impact on the health of a project's community.
11:10am-11:50am (40m) Scale
Internet archive: Universal access. Open APIs
VM Brasseur (@vmbrasseur) et al
Internet Archive has released a number of open APIs and tools to allow people to upload and download items, as well as data mine the metadata for its entire 12+ Petabyte collection.
9:00am-9:05am (5m)
Friday opening welcome
Matthew McCullough (GitHub) et al
Program chairs Matthew McCullough, Sarah Novotny, and Rachel Roumeliotis open the third day of keynotes.
9:05am-9:20am (15m)
Hacking Conway's Law
Raffi Krikorian (Uber Advanced Technologies Center)
Re-architecting a system is wrought with problems. However, what we can sometimes forget is the most important aspect of any project: the team! Your team, who miraculously survives these projects, has to continue to change with your business and your technology! But, don't fret, we can architect our way towards this way of thinking!
9:20am-9:30am (10m)
From analog to digital and back
George Dyson (Independent)
Nature uses digital coding for replication, storage, and error correction, but relies on analog coding for control. Technology will follow. We are starting to treat streams of bits the way vacuum tubes treat streams of electrons, implementing analog processing upon a digital substrate, the same way digital processing was implemented using analog components, the first time around.
9:30am-9:45am (15m)
Undefinable me: The story of a 13-year-old girl from the inner city who codes
Keila Banks (Student)
Keila Banks is a 13-year-old African-American girl in the inner city - her talk will be about her story and how people around the world can do coding and computer stuff at any age, with just a little motivation.
9:45am-9:50am (5m)
Break: Closing remarks
12:00pm-12:05pm (5m)
O'Reilly Open Source Awards
The 11th Annual O’Reilly Open Source Award winners will be announced.
12:05pm-12:25pm (20m)
Situation normal, everything must change
Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum)
From Portlandia’s capa chuchu chuchu tea to Texas where “Everything is so BIG” that they only have data, OSCON is moving. In this farewell talk to Portland, we will cover the history of navigation from stories to maps, the unexplored lands of open source’s future and the territories open source has already conquered.
12:25pm-12:30pm (5m)
Break: Closing Remarks
8:00am-9:00am (1h)
Break: Morning Coffee Service
10:40am-11:10am (30m)
Break: Morning Break Sponsored by SAP
12:30pm-1:30pm (1h)
Break: Closing Get Together