July 20–24, 2015
Portland, OR

OSCON 2015 Schedule

Use the calendar icon [calendar icon] next to each listing you want to attend. Then use the personal schedule button below to generate your schedule.

Thursday, July 23

Portland 251
Add Building Release Pipelines on the Open Web to your personal schedule
10:40am Building Release Pipelines on the Open Web Ryan Jarvinen (CoreOS)
Add Refactoring systems with confidence to your personal schedule
11:30am Refactoring systems with confidence Jesse Toth (GitHub), Nathan Witmer (GitHub)
Add Stop writing Javascript frameworks to your personal schedule
1:40pm Stop writing Javascript frameworks Joseph Gregorio (Google)
Add Reactive front end to your personal schedule
2:30pm Reactive front end Martin Gontovnikas (Auth0)
Add Mesos: The operating system for your datacenter to your personal schedule
5:00pm Mesos: The operating system for your datacenter David Greenberg (Two Sigma)
Portland 252
Add Don't change languages. Change your language. to your personal schedule
10:40am Don't change languages. Change your language. Damian Conway (Thoughtstream)
Add Docker in production: Reality, not hype to your personal schedule
11:30am Docker in production: Reality, not hype Bridget Kromhout (Pivotal)
Add Handle your design conundrums with modern Python design patterns to your personal schedule
1:40pm Handle your design conundrums with modern Python design patterns Anna Martelli Ravenscroft (Self), Alex Martelli (Google)
Add Scalable graph analysis with Apache Giraph and Spark GraphX to your personal schedule
2:30pm Scalable graph analysis with Apache Giraph and Spark GraphX Roman Shaposhnik (Pivotal Inc.)
Add A rebasing workflow for Git to your personal schedule
5:00pm A rebasing workflow for Git Emma Jane Hogbin Westby (UN-OCHA)
Portland 255
Add Modern accessibility for modern web apps to your personal schedule
10:40am Modern accessibility for modern web apps Patrick Fox (Razorfish)
Add Grow an organization by planting volunteers to your personal schedule
11:30am Grow an organization by planting volunteers Stormy Peters (Cloud Foundry Foundation), Avni Khatri (Kids on Computers)
Add Advanced analytics for the Internet of Things to your personal schedule
1:40pm Advanced analytics for the Internet of Things Rosaria Silipo (KNIME.com AG)
Add Creating an open source office: Lessons from Twitter to your personal schedule
2:30pm Creating an open source office: Lessons from Twitter Chris Aniszczyk (Cloud Native Computing Foundation)
Add Test-driven repair to your personal schedule
4:10pm Test-driven repair Christopher Neugebauer (@chrisjrn)
Add Choose boring technology to your personal schedule
5:00pm Choose boring technology Dan McKinley (Stripe)
Portland 256
Add Microservices, containers, and machine learning to your personal schedule
10:40am Microservices, containers, and machine learning Paco Nathan (O'Reilly Media)
Add Measuring big data - understanding data by usage to your personal schedule
1:40pm Measuring big data - understanding data by usage Charles Smith (Netflix)
Add Walmart labs: finding our success by transitioning to open source to your personal schedule
2:30pm Walmart labs: finding our success by transitioning to open source Jeremy King (Walmart Global E-Commerce)
Add Raspberry Pi hacks to your personal schedule
5:00pm Raspberry Pi hacks Ruth Suehle (Red Hat), Tom "spot" Callaway (Red Hat)
D135/136
Add Vulnerability management for open software development to your personal schedule
10:40am Vulnerability management for open software development Jeremy Stanley (OpenStack Foundation)
Add Remote working / asynchronous working to your personal schedule
1:40pm Remote working / asynchronous working Eli White (php[architect])
D137/138
Add Open source at scale: Building Pinterest’s iOS app to your personal schedule
10:40am Open source at scale: Building Pinterest’s iOS app Garrett Moon (Pinterest)
Add Plate spinning: Modern concurrency in Python to your personal schedule
11:30am Plate spinning: Modern concurrency in Python Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
Add Cassandra 3.0: improved productivity with JSON to your personal schedule
4:10pm Cassandra 3.0: improved productivity with JSON Jonathan Ellis (DataStax, Inc)
Add Designing calm technology to your personal schedule
5:00pm Designing calm technology Amber Case (Esri)
D139/140
Add Steal this open source policy! to your personal schedule
10:40am Steal this open source policy! Van Lindberg (Rackspace)
Add How Do I Game Design? Design games, understand people! to your personal schedule
1:40pm How Do I Game Design? Design games, understand people! Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Jonathon Manning (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.), Tim Nugent (lonely.coffee)
Add Manufacturing open source hardware to your personal schedule
2:30pm Manufacturing open source hardware Kipp Bradford (The Kippworks)
Add Creating a community around cybersecurity best practices to your personal schedule
4:10pm Creating a community around cybersecurity best practices Alan Robertson (Assimilation Systems Limited)
Add Anomaly detection with NuPIC to your personal schedule
5:00pm Anomaly detection with NuPIC Matthew Taylor (Numenta)
E145
Add Speeding up the web with PHP 7 to your personal schedule
10:40am Speeding up the web with PHP 7 Rasmus Lerdorf (Etsy)
Add Hello, my name is __________. to your personal schedule
11:30am Hello, my name is __________. Nova Patch (Shutterstock)
Add For the greater good? Open sourcing weaponisable code to your personal schedule
1:40pm For the greater good? Open sourcing weaponisable code Laura Bell (SafeStack Limited)
Add Full stack robotics using Go to your personal schedule
2:30pm Full stack robotics using Go Ron Evans (The Hybrid Group), Adrian Zankich (The Hybrid Group)
Add Open source working to your personal schedule
4:10pm Open source working Kyle Simpson (Getify)
Add Telling your story: Speaking for non-speakers to your personal schedule
5:00pm Telling your story: Speaking for non-speakers Kirsten Hunter (Akamai)
E146
Add Open source design: A love story to your personal schedule
10:40am Open source design: A love story Una Kravets (IBM Design)
Add Asp.net vNext: Hey, Asp.net isn't just for enterprise to your personal schedule
11:30am Asp.net vNext: Hey, Asp.net isn't just for enterprise Maria Naggaga (Microsoft )
Add Nobody should know more about you than you do to your personal schedule
2:30pm Nobody should know more about you than you do Alistair Croll (Solve For Interesting)
E147/148
Add Network analysis: People and open source communities to your personal schedule
10:40am Network analysis: People and open source communities Dawn Foster (The New Stack)
Add Open sourcing anti-harassment tools to your personal schedule
5:00pm Open sourcing anti-harassment tools Randi Harper (Literally Blue, LLC)
E141
Add The architecture of continuous innovation to your personal schedule
10:40am The architecture of continuous innovation Chip Childers (Cloud Foundry Foundation)
Add Open source at HP: A fresh perspective to your personal schedule
11:30am Open source at HP: A fresh perspective Bdale Garbee (HP)
Add Capital One opens up to open source to your personal schedule
1:40pm Capital One opens up to open source Dan Makoski (Capital One)
Add Introduction to IoT.JS to your personal schedule
2:30pm Introduction to IoT.JS Kyeongwoon Lee (Samsung Electronics)
Add Let's talk about browser hardening... to your personal schedule
4:10pm Let's talk about browser hardening... Rohit Harchandani (PayPal), Aashish Sheshadri (PayPal)
E142
Add Accelerating the core of the cloud to your personal schedule
11:30am Accelerating the core of the cloud Greg Bentley (Intel)
Add JMAP & Cyrus: Better email – fully open source to your personal schedule
2:30pm JMAP & Cyrus: Better email – fully open source Neil Jenkins (FastMail)
E 143/144
Add Getting the most out of code review to your personal schedule
2:30pm Getting the most out of code review Stephanie Wagner (Namely)
Add Intro to Apache Spark, plus Astro: Data Sources API integration for HBase to your personal schedule
4:10pm Intro to Apache Spark, plus Astro: Data Sources API integration for HBase Paco Nathan (O'Reilly Media), Jacky Li (Huawei technology)
Add Thursday opening welcome to your personal schedule
9:00am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Thursday opening welcome Rachel Roumeliotis (O'Reilly Media), Matthew McCullough (GitHub), Sarah Novotny (NGINX)
Add Making architecture matter to your personal schedule
9:05am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Making architecture matter Martin Fowler (ThoughtWorks)
Add Getting started with InnerSource to your personal schedule
9:20am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
Getting started with InnerSource Danese Cooper (PayPal), Arnold Goldberg (PayPal), Manish Jain (PayPal)
Add The making of a cloud native application platform to your personal schedule
9:30am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
The making of a cloud native application platform Sam Ramji (Cloud Foundry Foundation)
Add On change-making at the largest public interest startup to your personal schedule
9:45am Plenary
Room: Portland Ballroom
On change-making at the largest public interest startup Mikey Dickerson (Federal Government | United States Digital Services Team)
10:05am Closing remarks
Room: Portland Ballroom
Add Morning Break Sponsored by New Relic / Ask Me Anything About chat to your personal schedule
10:10am Plenary
Room: Expo Hall
Morning Break Sponsored by New Relic / Ask Me Anything About chat Tim O'Reilly (O'Reilly Media)
Add Thursday Lunch / Ask Me Anything About chats to your personal schedule
12:10pm Plenary
Room: Expo Hall
Thursday Lunch / Ask Me Anything About chats
Add Afternoon Break Sponsored by Google to your personal schedule
3:10pm Plenary
Room: Expo Hall
Afternoon Break Sponsored by Google
8:15am Morning coffee service
Room: Portland Ballroom Foyer
7:30am Morning Yoga
Room: BOTTOM OF THE STAIRS BY THE E ROOMS
Add @Walmart Labs Tech Mixer to your personal schedule
6:00pm Event
Room: Spirit of 77 Bar and Lounge
@Walmart Labs Tech Mixer
Add Thursday BoFs to your personal schedule
8:00pm Plenary
Room: D135/136, D137/138, D139/140, E145, E146, E147/E148
Thursday BoFs
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Architecture
Building Release Pipelines on the Open Web
Ryan Jarvinen (CoreOS)
Learn how to build workflows that can help automate each part of your project's release lifecycle (build, test, review, merge, deployment, reporting, etc). We'll take a look at common language-based build tools, and learn how to set up Jenkins and/or Travis for build work and continuous integration (CI). Then, we'll compare various cloud deployment targets and learn about continuous delivery (CD).
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Architecture
Refactoring systems with confidence
Jesse Toth (GitHub) et al
This talk will tell the story of a large-scale refactoring of our permissions model at GitHub. We’ll explain the problem, our solution, and then go over the tools we built, the techniques we used, and the lessons we learned while replacing this critical piece of our application live, side-by-side, and in production.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Architecture
Stop writing Javascript frameworks
Joseph Gregorio (Google)
JavaScript frameworks seem like death and taxes; inevitable and unavoidable. But that's not the way it needs to be, and actually, it must stop. A talk based on the zer framework manifesto: http://bitworking.org/news/2014/05/zero_framework_manifesto
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Architecture
Reactive front end
Martin Gontovnikas (Auth0)
There's been a lot of talk about reactive programming lately, but nobody really knows exactly what it is. I'll first talk a little bit about what reactive programming is, and then we'll dive into practical examples on how to use it with any front-end technology and particularly with AngularJS. We'll see how beautiful and clean our code can be when we use reactive code in the front end.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Scale
Connecting and deploying microservices at scale with nginx
Nick Shadrin (NGINX, Inc.)
The new standard for web application development is microservices. In this talk we will review a modern web architecture, ways to fit different systems together, and how to scale and manage demand from initial startup deployments to millions of users. We will talk about the importance of unification of the web delivery approach across multiple systems, and demo some new features of nginx.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Scale
Mesos: The operating system for your datacenter
David Greenberg (Two Sigma)
In this talk, we'll learn all about Mesos - what it is, how you can leverage it to simplify your infrastructure and reduce AWS/cloud computing costs, and why you should develop your next application on top of it. This talk will give you the tools you need to understand whether Mesos is the right fit for your infrastructure, and several starting points for learning more about Mesos.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Foundations
Don't change languages. Change your language.
Damian Conway (Thoughtstream)
Your favorite development language may be great, but it inevitably has a few misfeatures that make every programming task unnecessarily harder. That doesn't mean you need to find a new language; you can fix your existing one. And, happily, you already have exactly the right tool to do that: your existing language.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Scale
Docker in production: Reality, not hype
Bridget Kromhout (Pivotal)
DramaFever, the largest streaming video site for international content, uses AWS to power its streaming video platform, and has been running Docker in production since about October 2013 (well before it even went 1.0). This talk goes into detail about we use Docker to make development more consistent and deployment more repeatable.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Foundations
Handle your design conundrums with modern Python design patterns
Anna Martelli Ravenscroft (Self) et al
Many classic design patterns and traditional Python idioms remain relevant today. However, the language has grown, the problem spaces we address keep shifting, and best practices for software development have matured. Thus, the set of best-of-breed patterns and idioms has changed, some classics fading, new stars emerging. This talk explores today's realities in Python patterns and idioms.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Data
Scalable graph analysis with Apache Giraph and Spark GraphX
Roman Shaposhnik (Pivotal Inc.)
Graph relationships are everywhere. In fact, more often than not, analyzing relationships between points in your datasets lets you extract more business value from your data. This presentation will provide an introduction into two of the most used Hadoop ecosystem projects in the area of scalable graph processing: Apache Giraph and Spark GraphX.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Collaboration
Building a successful organization by mastering failure
John Goulah (Primary)
The Etsy organization has grown by a significant amount over the last five years. As a company grows, more thought must be put into the techniques that it uses to communicate and deal with failures. This talk will cover several techniques that have helped foster a Just Culture, one in which an effort is made to balance both safety and accountability.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Foundations
A rebasing workflow for Git
Emma Jane Hogbin Westby (UN-OCHA)
You've decided to level up your Git skills and have heard that rebasing is where it's at. In this session we'll talk about: WHY rebasing can make it easier to untangle your project's history; WHEN you should use rebase; WHAT rebasing actually does to your repository; and HOW it actually looks when things go right (and how to recover when things go wrong).
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Design
Modern accessibility for modern web apps
Patrick Fox (Razorfish)
Building modern, accessible web apps can be daunting. This talk goes beyond the foundational aspects of accessibility to discuss higher-level concepts and challenges for making modern web UI accessible, demonstrating specific solutions and best practices for: -Common UI components(modals, form validation) -Single-page architecture -Summarizing complex content -Providing accessible help text
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Collaboration
Grow an organization by planting volunteers
Stormy Peters (Cloud Foundry Foundation) et al
Most nonprofit organizations depend on volunteers. And most volunteer organizations are asked how in the world they recruit and keep volunteers. While not every organization is the same, there are definitely some best practices that many open source software projects have discovered and evolved.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Mobility
Advanced analytics for the Internet of Things
Rosaria Silipo (KNIME.com AG)
This project deals with data from the Internet of Things, and particularly with data from a bike sharing service. The goal is to visualize and analyze the most popular routes, as well as to implement an intelligent alarm system to restock the bike stations in a timely manner. Time series prediction, geo-localization, and predictive analytics techniques have been used in this project.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Collaboration
Creating an open source office: Lessons from Twitter
Chris Aniszczyk (Cloud Native Computing Foundation)
When companies start adopting open source, they face common challenges, like how do you contribute back or what do you even open source. Companies like Google, Intel, Facebook, and Twitter have chosen to establish open source offices to facilitate working with open source communities. In this session, learn lessons from Twitter on how to start your own open source office.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Architecture
Test-driven repair
Christopher Neugebauer (@chrisjrn)
Test-driven development's great, but what happens when you find yourself working on code where automated testing took a back seat to being shipped? This talk looks at techniques for automated testing of late-stage or even production code, and how to use this to fix bugs in your code. Testing late in life isn't a lost cause any more!
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Architecture
Choose boring technology
Dan McKinley (Stripe)
How do you choose the technology to run your business? You should use the best tools for the job, of course. But the precise definitions of the words "best" and "job" are tricky. This talk gives these terms shape, and introduces a framework for thinking about new technology rigorously, holistically, and systematically.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Data
Microservices, containers, and machine learning
Paco Nathan (O'Reilly Media)
Herein, an open source developer community considers itself _algorithmically_. This project shows how to surface data insights from the developer email forums for just about any Apache open source project. It leverages machine learning and advanced analytics in Apache Spark, but also makes use of Docker containers for standalone NLP services.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Scale
Practical performance tips and tricks to make your HTML/JavaScript faster
Doris Chen (Microsoft)
How do you tackle real-world web platform performance problems in modern websites and apps? This session starts with a basic understanding of the web platform, and then explores a set of problem/solution pairs built with industry-standard performance guidance. In the talk, we will demonstrate performance tips and tricks that will help you improve the performance of your apps and sites today.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Data
Measuring big data - understanding data by usage
Charles Smith (Netflix)
We are collecting increasing amounts of data to analyze, so we can understand how to better serve our customers. But how do you know that the data collected is useful or even being used? Using Netflix’s experience building data platforms, we will talk about how gaining insight into the use of your data can improve your own platform.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Scale
Walmart labs: finding our success by transitioning to open source
Jeremy King (Walmart Global E-Commerce)
In order to scale its operations to serve more than 245 million customers around the world each week, Walmart eCommercecompletely re-engineered its entire technology stack -- including making huge investments in OpenStack, Node.JS and other technologies to create a global platform that would rival those of the best technology companies.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Foundations
Using Docker to simplify distributed systems development
John Hugg (VoltDB)
One challenge in building distributed systems is actually running and testing distributed systems. This session will show how developers at VoltDB simplify development and testing using Docker and other container technologies.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Mobility
Raspberry Pi hacks
Ruth Suehle (Red Hat) et al
Ruth Suehle and Tom Callaway, authors of _Raspberry Pi Hacks_ (O’Reilly, December 2013) offer technical tips for makers, hackers, and tinkerers who want to take advantage of the Raspberry Pi. You'll learn universally useful things, like how to add a power switch, followed by a show-and-tell of fun things that Ruth and Tom as well as many others have built.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Protect
Vulnerability management for open software development
Jeremy Stanley (OpenStack Foundation)
The vulnerability management team for the OpenStack project handles hundreds of incoming reports of potential security vulnerabilities, and publishes dozens of advisories every year. Find out how we reconcile vulnerability reporting with our public design and open community development ideals, and learn about the free tooling and published processes we employ to make it easier.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Craft
"You code like a sysadmin" - Impostor Syndrome for the modern developer
Wade Minter (NBC SportsEngine)
Modern software development places a high value on doing things The Right Way(tm). But what if you're just someone with an idea, some coding knowledge, and a nontrivial amount of intimidation? In this session, a sysadmin-turned-developer will take you through a battle with the demons of self-doubt, and help you discover the ONE CRAZY TRICK YOUR BRAIN DOESN'T WANT YOU TO KNOW!
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Craft
Remote working / asynchronous working
Eli White (php[architect])
I've worked as a 100% remote employee for six different companies. Through this, I've learned the good, the bad, and the ugly about remote work (as well as time shifted asynchronous work). In this session we will discuss the benefits and drawbacks of remote work, for both the employee and the company. Learn the tricks needed, both procedural and technological, to make this possible!
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Foundations
This is why you fail: The avoidable mistakes open source projects STILL make
Tom "spot" Callaway (Red Hat)
In true open source fashion, a community's failures are often as visible as their successes. Failing can provide a learning experience, but many mistakes are still made which can easily be avoided, even by experienced open source communities. Learn about these points of fail that open source projects have experienced, and see how badly your favorite FOSS project fails.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Design
UX for open source: Getting the most from an engaged community
Joe Wagner (Puppet Labs)
At Puppet Labs, we’ve adopted and developed techniques for getting our ideas in front of our community in a manner that leads to reliable feedback. Join us to learn about what we’ve found to be effective, and how that has affected the way we plan, design, and build.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Foundations
How to write a specification: Implementing a library in seven programming languages
James Saryerwinnie (AWS)
In this talk, I'll show you how to write a straightforward specification that is easy to implement in any programming language. I'll do this by sharing the story of JMESPath, a query language for JSON that currently has implementations in seven languages, and the lessons learned in creating the JMESPath specification. You'll leave ready to write easy-to-implement specifications.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Mobility
Open source at scale: Building Pinterest’s iOS app
Garrett Moon (Pinterest)
Pinterest’s iOS team uses over 30 open source libraries to build their app. Pinterest engineer Garrett Moon will explain how Pinterest moves quickly and maintains world-class stability, while shipping a new version of the app every three weeks. Hear harrowing tales of tracking down deadlocks, rewriting popular caching libraries, and implementing a homegrown image downloading and caching library.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Scale
Plate spinning: Modern concurrency in Python
Luciano Ramalho (ThoughtWorks)
Developments like the `concurrent.futures` classes, coroutine delegation with `yield from` and the `asyncio` module together represent a major new chapter in the evolution of Python, and are the best reasons to upgrade to Python 3. This talk will show how these tools bring concurrent programming within reach of even casual programmers, with dramatic boosts in throughput.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Scale
When Performance Counts: C++ in the 21st Century
Jon Kalb (A9.com)
C++ is hot again. Find out why. This talk will cover why engineers looking for performance choose C++, and where C++ fits in a world in which solutions are increasingly created using different languages for different components. You will get a historical perspective of C++, focusing on what's going on in the C++ community right now and where the language and its user base is heading.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Solve
Unconventional programming with chemical computing
Carin Meier (Cognitect)
Take a step back from your normal programming approach and discover a new way of looking at problems. All living organisms' information systems are based on chemical processes. What can we learn by using this metaphor of chemistry in our programming?
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Data
Cassandra 3.0: improved productivity with JSON
Jonathan Ellis (DataStax, Inc)
This session will cover the new features in Cassandra 3.0, including JSON support, user-defined types, and global indexes. These allow engineers to deliver even better performance and productivity in their application development.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Design
Designing calm technology
Amber Case (Esri)
Technology shouldn't require all of our attention, just some of it, and only when necessary. This talk will cover how to use principles of calm technology to design the next generation of connected devices. We'll look at notification styles, compressing information into other senses, and designing for the least amount of cognitive overhead.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Collaboration
Steal this open source policy!
Van Lindberg (Rackspace)
Developers know that participating in the open source community can be a win-win for both employers and employees. But how do you convince the legal department and executives? In this presentation we will share Rackspace's internal policy documents that allow all employees to participate in open source projects, and explain the details that convinced everyone to let us put it in place.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Collaboration
Introducing an open source answer for modern collaboration
David Kelnar (Vector)
If you believe in a world where we should have the right to run our own communications and own our data, then learn how “Vector” fills the void!
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Design
How Do I Game Design? Design games, understand people!
Paris Buttfield-Addison (Secret Lab Pty. Ltd.) et al
In this session, you’ll learn about game design: the art and science of constructing enjoyable, engaging games. We aren't doing any coding, and we’re not talking game engine development - instead, we’ll be taking a deep dive into game design theory, using it to understand how people interact with rules, and how to use it to improve your community, your company, your project, and your software.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Design
Manufacturing open source hardware
Kipp Bradford (The Kippworks)
So you want to turn your cool hardware device into a new product—what could possibly go wrong? If you’ve ever helped crowdfund a hardware product, then you’ve probably gotten some insight into many of the things that do go wrong. This talk will explore some common mistakes and why, despite the challenges, an open-source approach to hardware manufacturing makes sense.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Protect
Creating a community around cybersecurity best practices
Alan Robertson (Assimilation Systems Limited)
The cybersecurity community has difficulty working together around breaches, out of legal and public relations concerns, but can share best practices. The open source Assimilation Project compares system configurations against best practices in near-real-time. This talk outlines our efforts to include more security experts in our community, and translate the results into open source code.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Solve
Anomaly detection with NuPIC
Matthew Taylor (Numenta)
What if you had software that tracked location history so well it could remember all the walks you take, all your commutes, and even the quests you take in your favorite video games? With this level of detail captured and a bit of algorithmic brilliance, NuPIC allows for instant anomaly detection, and in the process, opens up a whole new world of intelligent applications for pattern recognition.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Scale
Speeding up the web with PHP 7
Rasmus Lerdorf (Etsy)
2015 is an exciting year for PHP. With PHP 7 soon to be released, and HHVM getting complete enough to run most existing PHP apps well, you have two amazingly fast options for running your PHP code. In this session I will cover the performance and new features of PHP 7.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Protect
Hello, my name is __________.
Nova Patch (Shutterstock)
Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the worldwide diversity of our most basic personal information like names and genders. This session will demonstrate ways to build applications that respect users’ identities instead of limiting them.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Protect
For the greater good? Open sourcing weaponisable code
Laura Bell (SafeStack Limited)
Are we responsible for what code is used for once released? Security tools are a fascinating grey area. In order to protect our organisations, systems, and people, we must attack them in controlled ways and measure the results. The line between beneficial defensive tools and weapon of choice is unclear. So how do you safely open source a security tool like this? Let me share my story.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Mobility
Full stack robotics using Go
Ron Evans (The Hybrid Group) et al
The Internet of Things has begun to emerge, and the Age of Robots has come upon us. What are the technologies that will make it real? The new and powerful programming language Go is ideally suited for the task. In this talk, we will share our vision of "full stack robotics" based on open source software such as Gobot, with live demonstrations of actual robotic devices.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Craft
Open source working
Kyle Simpson (Getify)
Open source your job search and career. Open source finding and hiring candidates. Open source the talent pool.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Craft
Telling your story: Speaking for non-speakers
Kirsten Hunter (Akamai)
Many conference attendees come year after year without giving presentations. The sense that there's a high bar for perfection is pervasive, and people are afraid of being "wrong." Everyone has a story to tell about a problem they've solved or issues they've tackled. Learn how to share your experiences without fear, and join the speaker community!
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Craft
Open source design: A love story
Una Kravets (IBM Design)
When designers and developers work together from the start, it produces better outcomes, more usable products, and increased adoption. But how can we get designers involved and wanting to participate in the open source community? In order to figure out how to fix it, we need to take a look at the barriers for designers and how we can work together to influence change.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Foundations
Asp.net vNext: Hey, Asp.net isn't just for enterprise
Maria Naggaga (Microsoft )
ASP.Net vNext, the open source version of the .Net series, has opened up its framework to an entirely new web developer community. The cool thing about this lean framework is you can get ASP.NET from Mac to PC using either Visual Studio Community or Sublime. In this demo, I will be going through the tools and frameworks you need to get ASP.NET vNext running on OS X Yosemite.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Collaboration
Leaping the chasm from proprietary to open: A survivor's guide
Bryan Cantrill (Joyent)
While leading several high-profile open source projects, Joyent has also historically had significant proprietary systems. In November of last year, we open sourced these proprietary systems -- including our SmartDataCenter cloud orchestration system and our Manta scale-out storage system -- becoming an all open source company.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Craft
Nobody should know more about you than you do
Alistair Croll (Solve For Interesting)
In the next decade, data-driven feeds will become the primary tool with which we manage our lives. Access to that data—much of which lives behind walled gardens, or profitable arbitrage—is fast becoming a moral issue. In this session, Alistair Croll looks at the promises and perils of big data as it finds its way into our lives, and makes far too many unreasonable predictions along the way.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Mobility
Closed devices powered by open source software? The IoT Paradox.
Peter Hoddie (Marvell)
The Internet of Things is built on open source software, and yet the devices are far from open. This isn’t the future that free and open source contributors have been working toward. It's a disappointment for the Open Source Community, but we can lead the way to freedom, transparency, and collaboration in IoT. And we must—to avert impending frustration for increasingly savvy consumers.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Collaboration
Build a community of practice, one PR at a time: Using GitHub to teach the values of open source
Peter Bell (Wheelhouse.io)
The pull request is both a feature and a philosophy--it takes a stand on openness, collaboration and culture. While most PR use cases are straightforward, other novel uses offer deeper learning opportunities. We’ll walk through different ways to deploy pull requests to model the values of open source, share understanding, learn from mistakes, and build a community of practice.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Solve
Network analysis: People and open source communities
Dawn Foster (The New Stack)
The real magic in any community comes from the people. I will show you tools and techniques for performing network analysis, to look at the people in your community along with the relationships between them. Why settle for boring numbers and line charts to describe your community when you can do cool visualizations that show how people connect within your open source community?
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Solve
A brief history of rendering math (and its future online)
Garen Torikian (GitHub)
The way math equations are written and represented have a long history that's woven into computer science. However, rendering math for the web has been a challenge. This talk explores the pursuit of rendering math beautifully for the web, culminating in the creation of a library that integrates with markup formats like Markdown and AsciiDoc.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Solve
Data transformation superpowers with digital signal processing
Amy Boyle (New Relic)
Learn how digital signal processing can help you look at data, and even the world around you, with a new critical eye. Gain an understanding of the methods behind speech recognition, image manipulation, data compression, and more.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Protect
Getting your ducks in a row - an introduction to managing components in your software supply chain
Manfred Moser (simpligility technologies inc.)
Results of a five-year study on open source development and security practices form the basis for introducing supply chain management to your development practice. We rely on the usage of third-party components, and take on the responsibility for them and their licensing terms or security vulnerabilities. New tools for managing these components in your software development efforts are demoed.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Solve
Applications of hierarchal temporal memory algorithm tools to energy demand analysis
pat barton (O'Reilly School of Technology)
This talk addresses improving the ability of hierarchal temporal memory (HTM) to predict electricity demand, helping the algorithm by providing some of the complementarity data streams currently applied to demand analysis, and including some goodness-of-fit metrics that address known characteristics of electric load.
5:00pm-5:40pm (40m) Protect
Open sourcing anti-harassment tools
Randi Harper (Literally Blue, LLC)
This talk aims to discuss the current state of online harassment, and the way that the open source community can create new tools to mitigate abuse until policy and law enforcement catch up.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored
The architecture of continuous innovation
Chip Childers (Cloud Foundry Foundation)
This talk takes the audience inside the architectural foundation of a modern cloud native platform.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored
Open source at HP: A fresh perspective
Bdale Garbee (HP)
This session will provide a rare opportunity to hear perceptions of the current state of the IT universe and a fresh perspective on corporate engagement with open source, from someone applying more than 35 years of continuous involvement in free software, decades of community leadership, and unique experience guiding open source activities at major corporations.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored
Capital One opens up to open source
Dan Makoski (Capital One)
Dan Makoski, VP design, will share how the nation’s largest direct bank is using open source concepts to reinvent products and services, redesign digital experiences, and reimagine commercials – connecting people and money in more meaningful ways. Join Dan for a lively discussion about how Capital One views the intersection of code, creativity, customers, and currency.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored
Introduction to IoT.JS
Kyeongwoon Lee (Samsung Electronics)
IoT.JS is for JavaScript developers who want to write IoT services on small devices. It provides programmable IoT spaces with full JavaScript functionality.
4:10pm-4:50pm (40m) Sponsored
Let's talk about browser hardening...
Rohit Harchandani (PayPal) et al
Doug Crockford has long been a leader in the JavaScript world. His work for the past couple of years at PayPal has yielded a company-wide shift to Node.js, amongst other changes. Currently his team is working on implementing the latest research into hardening browsers. Team members Aashish Sheshadri and Rohit Harchandani will discuss their early implementation work on this exciting project.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored
Everything I wish I knew when I started using GitHub
Brent Beer (GitHub)
GitHub is a large and fantastic place with everything you could ever want and more for software development, but are you using everything it has to offer? Whether you've used GitHub for a while now, or are just starting out, come learn the best ways to use the platform to its fullest potential.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored
Accelerating the core of the cloud
Greg Bentley (Intel)
In this presentation, we’ll talk about the work Intel is doing to improve server dynamic languages and some of the successes we’ve achieved, as well as future challenges and how we can help.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored
Enabling cloud-native application development with microservices
Ben Schumacher (Cisco)
As teams transition to the world of Fast IT, they need their development lifecycles to keep up. Typical tools require teams dedicate resources for SCM and platform services. Is there an easier way to enable teams to build nextgen applications? Enter the world of Hybrid DevOps, and reach the goal of enabling teams to easily deploy and run their products across hybrid clouds and the Intercloud.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Sponsored
JMAP & Cyrus: Better email – fully open source
Neil Jenkins (FastMail)
Should Email & Calendaring developers have to choose closed/proprietary protocols in order to get the performance and functionality they need? We don’t think so and we want to tell you why this is no longer a problem! In our session we'll explore how JMAP and Cyrus are coming together to produce a truly modern, robust & scalable solution that is both fun to deploy and simple to manage.
10:40am-11:20am (40m) Sponsored
Filtering in OpenStack Nova for fun, efficiency, and profit: The anatomy of an OpenStack filter
Harold Hannon (SoftLayer)
Part of the challenge of running a production OpenStack deployment can be scheduling instances. There are many deployment options; how do you get the guest VM to the correct pool? How do you efficiently assign guests to hosts? What if you have pools for specialized deployments? We'll look at filters, dissect how they work, and how you can leverage them to solve real-world issues.
11:30am-12:10pm (40m) Sponsored
Case studies in success: Exploiting the open source Linux ecosystem to drive rapid innovation and higher value
Jim Wasko (IBM) et al
In this session, we will share case studies and use cases of developers who have successfully exploited open source technology using IBM z Systems and Power. We will focus on the application development, databases, cloud infrastructure, and big data/analytics categories along with ISV partnerships that can help you get the most out of your open source projects.
1:40pm-2:20pm (40m) Sponsored
High scale relational storage at Salesforce built with Apache HBase and Apache Phoenix
Andrew Purtell (Salesforce)
This session will cover how the Data Platform and Services group at Salesforce.com built a multitenant storage platform, that supports structured relational data access using the open source nonrelational scale-out datastore Apache HBase and its open source "SQL skin" Apache Phoenix.
2:30pm-3:10pm (40m) Collaboration
Getting the most out of code review
Stephanie Wagner (Namely)
Code reviews are one of the best ways to improve code quality - however, they can be even more complex than writing the code itself. This talk will help you understand how to conduct effective code reviews and benefit from a strong peer review culture.
4:10pm-5:40pm (1h 30m) Sponsored
Intro to Apache Spark, plus Astro: Data Sources API integration for HBase
Paco Nathan (O'Reilly Media) et al
This session provides an introduction to Apache Spark, with a brief overview of how/why it evolved, then covering the Spark core API, with examples in Python and Scala, how to build a pipeline with SQL + DataFrames, plus look through the broader Spark ecosystem: Tungsten, Streaming, MLlib, GraphX, Packages, etc. Plus many links out case studies of production use cases at scale for Spark.
9:00am-9:05am (5m)
Thursday opening welcome
Rachel Roumeliotis (O'Reilly Media) et al
Program dhairs Rachel Roumeliotis, Sarah Novotny, and Matthew McCullough open the second day of keynotes.
9:05am-9:20am (15m)
Making architecture matter
Martin Fowler (ThoughtWorks)
Software architecture is important, but shouldn't lead to bureaucratic burdens.
9:20am-9:30am (10m) Sponsored
Getting started with InnerSource
Danese Cooper (PayPal) et al
InnerSource is what we call using open source tools and methodologies inside a company to improve engineering practices, and it's gained a foothold at PayPal. We've found it useful for helping to break down engineering silos, increasing emphasis on code craftsmanship and, more generally, for increasing employee collaboration and satisfaction.
9:30am-9:45am (15m)
The making of a cloud native application platform
Sam Ramji (Cloud Foundry Foundation)
It wasn’t too long ago that artisans, bathed in the glow of molten metal, forged parts that would go on to make up bigger, more powerful machines. Today, we call those artisans developers. Instead of metal, they use bits and bytes in the cloud to forge a modern application architecture.
9:45am-10:05am (20m)
On change-making at the largest public interest startup
Mikey Dickerson (Federal Government | United States Digital Services Team)
The Federal Government’s approach to technology is outdated and maddening. But this dysfunction didn’t come out of thin air—it’s rooted in deep, structural realities. Less than a year old, the U.S. Digital Service is hacking bureaucracy and improving services millions rely on every day. Mikey will talk about how that work is going and how the group is spurring change in the open.
10:05am-10:10am (5m)
Break: Closing remarks
10:10am-10:40am (30m) Events
Morning Break Sponsored by New Relic / Ask Me Anything About chat
Tim O'Reilly (O'Reilly Media)
Join O'Reilly speakers for informal question and answer sessions.
12:10pm-1:40pm (1h 30m) Events
Thursday Lunch / Ask Me Anything About chats
Join O'Reilly speakers for informal question and answer sessions.
3:10pm-4:10pm (1h) Events
Afternoon Break Sponsored by Google
Afternoon Break Sponsored by Google
8:15am-9:00am (45m)
Break: Morning coffee service
7:30am-8:15am (45m)
Break: Morning Yoga
6:00pm-8:00pm (2h) Events
@Walmart Labs Tech Mixer
Come join our Walmart eCommerce CTO and Engineering members for an evening full of free bites + brews, mingling and networking on Thursday, July 23rd, 6pm-8pm at Spirit of 77 Bar (across from the convention center)
8:00pm-10:00pm (2h) Events
Thursday BoFs
Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions provide face to face exposure to those interested in the same projects and concepts. BoFs can be organized for individual projects or broader topics (best practices, open data, standards). BoFs are entirely up to you. We post your topic and provide the space and time. You provide the engaging topic.